OSU Extension Announces Two-Day Tax Schools for Tax Practitioners & Agricultural & Natural Resources Income Tax Issues Webinar

OSU Income Tax Schools 2020

OSU Extension Announces Two-Day Tax Schools for Tax Practitioners &

Agricultural & Natural Resources Income Tax Issues Webinar

Barry Ward & Julie Strawser, OSU Income Tax Schools

Dealing with the tax provisions of the COVID-related legislation for both individuals and businesses are among the topics to be discussed during the upcoming Tax School workshop series offered throughout Ohio in November and December.

“The annual series is designed to help tax preparers learn about federal tax law changes and updates for this year as well as learn more about issues they may encounter when filing individual and small business 2020 tax returns,” said Barry Ward, Director of the Ohio State University Income Tax School Program.

“The tax schools are intermediate-level courses that focus on interpreting tax regulations and changes in tax laws to help tax preparers, accountants, financial planners and attorneys advise their clients,” he said. The schools offer continuing education credit for certified public accountants, enrolled agents, attorneys, annual filing season preparers and certified financial planners.

“This is another important year for tax education as the new COVID-related legislation creates some challenges for tax practitioners to prepare tax returns. We have an excellent set of instructors with a great deal of experience and training along with a top reference workbook to prepare tax practitioners to best serve their clients during this ongoing process of incorporating recent tax law changes in completing tax returns,” Ward said.

The workbook alone is an extremely valuable reference as it offers over 700 pages of material including helpful tables and examples that will be valuable to practitioners. Sample chapters of the reference workbook can be found at: https://go.osu.edu/WorkbookChapters.

This year, OSU Income Tax Schools will offer both in-person schools and online virtual schools.

In-person schools:

  1. Lima – November 2-3

Old Barn Restaurant and Grill

3175 W Elm Street, Lima, OH 45805

  1. Fremont – November 4-5

Ole Zim’s Wagon Shed

1375 State Route 590, Gibsonburg, OH 43431

  1. Ashland – November 11-12 SOLD OUT

Ashland University

John C. Meyers Convocation Center

820 Clermont Ave., Ashland, OH  44805

 

  1. Dayton – November 17-18

Presidential Banquet Center

4548 Presidential Way, Kettering, OH  45429

  1. Columbus – December 10-11 SOLD OUT

Nationwide & Ohio Farm Bureau 4-H Center

2201 Fred Taylor Dr., Columbus, OH 43221

 

Virtual On-Line Schools:

  1. Webinar (Zoom)

November 9, 13, 16 and 19

Each Day 12:30 – 5pm

Zoom Webinar

  1. Livestream (Zoom)

December 10-11

Livestream of Columbus Tax School Location via Zoom

In addition to the tax schools, the program offers a separate, two-hour ethics webinar that will broadcast Dec. 4 at 10 a.m. The webinar is $25 for school attendees and $50 for non-attendees and is approved by the IRS and the Ohio Accountancy Board for continuing education credit

Register two weeks prior to the school date and receive the two-day tax school early-bird registration fee of $375.  This includes all materials, lunches and refreshments. The deadline to enroll is 10 business days prior to the date of each school. After the school deadline, the fee increases to $425.

Additionally, the 2020 RIA Federal Tax Handbook is available to purchase by participants for a discounted fee of $45 each. Registration information and the online registration portal can be found online at:

http://go.osu.edu/2020tax

A webinar on Ag Tax Issues will be held Dec. 18 from 8:45 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

If you are a tax practitioner that represents farmers or rural landowners or are a farmer or farmland owner that prepares your own taxes, this five-hour webinar is for you. It will focus on key topics and new legislation related specifically to those income tax returns.

Registration, which includes the Ag Tax Issues workbook, is $150. Register by mail or on-line at https://go.osu.edu/agissues2020.

Participants may contact Ward at 614-688-3959, ward.8@osu.edu or Julie Strawser 614-292-2433, strawser.35@osu.edu for more information.

Farmer and Farmland Owner Income Tax Webinar

Are you getting the most from your tax return? Farmers and farmland owners who wish to increase their tax knowledge should consider attending this webinar that will address tax issues specific to this industry. Content focuses on important tax issues and will offer insight into new COVID related legislation.

Mark your calendars for December 3rd, 2020 to participate in this live webinar from 6:30 to 8:30 pm. The event is a joint offering from OSU Income Tax Schools which are a part of OSU Extension and the College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and Purdue University Income Tax Schools.  If you are not able to attend the live webinar, all registered participants will receive a link to view the recorded webinar at a time of their convenience. This link will be available through the tax filing season.

The two-hour program is targeted towards owners who file their own farm taxes or simply wish to arm themselves with more tax information that will help them to better plan for tax filing.

Topics to be discussed during the webinar include:

  • Tax Issues related to COVID-related legislations including tax credits, PPP loans, EIDL loans etc.
  • New 1099-Misc and 1099-NEC
  • Tax planning in an unusual year: prevented planting crop insurance indemnity payments, Revenue Crop Insurance Payments, CFAP payments, etc.
  • Like Kind Exchanges (farm machinery and equipment no longer are eligible for this provision – this is a significant change), how this change may affect state income tax and how this change may affect your Social Security credits and eventual payments
  • Qualified Business Income Deduction, sales to cooperatives, lease income
  • Other topics

The cost for the webinar is $35. To register, go to https://go.osu.edu/farmertax2020.  For more information, contact Julie Strawser at strawser.35@osu.edu or call the OSU Extension Farm Office at 614-292-2433.

Barry Ward, Director, OSU Income Tax Schools

College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, OSU Extension

Help us out Farmers…Take the OSU Extension Health Survey

Take the OSU Extension Health Survey

  • Give us 15 minutes to tell us about your health behaviors for sun safety and 7 other areas: sleep, stress, nutrition, physical activity & a few more
  • We will not ask your name, or any other personal identifiers – your information will be aggregated with other farmer responses in Ohio
  • This information will develop future Extension programs and resources for healthy living.
  • There is a $10 gift card incentive for all completed surveys – for 100 Ohio farmers.
  • Go to our survey link directly:  www.go.osu.edu/HealthSurvey2020

 

For questions, contact:

Pat Brinkman, Extension Educator Family & Consumer Sciences, brinkman.93@osu.edu

Dee Jepsen, Ag Safety and Health, jepsen.4@osu.edu

 

C.O.R.N -CROP OBSERVATION AND RECOMMENDATION NETWORK

C.O.R.N. Newsletter is a summary of crop observations, related information, and appropriate recommendations for Ohio crop producers and industry. C.O.R.N. Newsletter is produced by the Ohio State University Extension Agronomy Team, state specialists at The Ohio State University and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC). C.O.R.N. Newsletter questions are directed to Extension and OARDC state specialists and associates at Ohio State.

  1. Author(s)Mark LouxHerbicide options for burndown of existing weeds prior to planting of no-till wheat include glyphosate, Gramoxone, Sharpen, and dicamba.  Among these, the combination of glyphosate and

  2. Cressleaf Groundsel
    Author(s)Mark LouxSome hay producers have been unpleasantly surprised in the past when cressleaf groundsel infestations became evident in their hay fields in May prior to first cutting.

  3. Author(s)Greg LaBarge, CPAg/CCA“What are the right decisions for phosphorus management in crop production that reduce water quality impacts?” is a common question I have from farmers looking to

 

 

 

 

 

Beef News

Five new articles have been posted in this week’s issue number 1208 of the Ohio BEEF Cattle letter: http://u.osu.edu/beef/

If you grew up on a farm in the 50’s and 60’s, social distancing was simply a way of life. This week we take a brief look at some other things we probably already knew, but maybe haven’t really thought too much about.

Articles this week include:

  • Lessons Learned by a Cattleman in 2020
  • Pasture Management Basics: Grazing Successfully
  • Grazing Management Minute: Warm Season Annuals
  • Transportation Shrink in Beef Cattle
  • Weekly Livestock Comments for September 4, 2020

Sheep in the News

Do Cover Crops Need Fertilizer?

Christine Gelley, OSU Extension Educator ANR, Noble County At A Glance: The benefits of utilizing cover crops in both grazing and agronomic crop production are Read more…

by Braden Campbell on September 8, 2020

National Sheep Improvement Program – The Value of Data

by Braden Campbell on September 8, 2020

Increase Lamb Crop by Testing for Pregnancy

Geri Parsons and Cleon Kimberling, Optimal Livestock Services Reviewed by: Jay Parsons, University of Nebraska-Lincoln and Bill DeMoss, Mountain Vet supply (Previously published online with Read more…

by Braden Campbell on September 8, 2020

Noxious weeds on your property: what is your responsibility?

It might be September, the weather is changing, pumpkins are ripening and mums are blooming but now is the time to take care of your weeds as they are gathering nutrients to replenish their root system. Control the seed heads with herbicide or by mowing. Herbicide control will be taken into the root system therefore killing the entire plant.  Mowing will cut down on seed dispersal but will only deter the plant growth. Private property and public property both need to control weeds. See the article below from OSU Extension Agriculture Resource Law.

Written by Ellen Essman

Despite the fact that “pumpkin spice” everything is back in stores, it is still summer, and if you’re anything like me, you’re still dealing with weeds. In fact, we have been receiving many questions about noxious weeds lately.  This blog post is meant to be a refresher about what you should do if noxious weeds sprout up on your property.

What are noxious weeds?

The Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) is in charge of designating “prohibited noxious weeds.”  The list may change from time to time, but currently, noxious weeds include:

  • Shatter cane (Sorghum bicolor)
  •  Russian thistle (Salsola Kali var. tenuifolia).
  • Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense ).
  •  Wild parsnip (Pastinaca sativa).
  • Grapevines (Vitis spp.), when growing in groups of one hundred or more and not pruned, sprayed, cultivated, or otherwise maintained for two consecutive years.
  • Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense ).
  • Poison hemlock (Conium maculatum).
  •  Cressleaf groundsel (Senecio glabellus).
  • Musk thistle (Carduus nutans).
  • Purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria).
  • Mile-A-Minute Weed (Polygonum perfoliatum).
  • Giant Hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum).
  • Apple of Peru (Nicandra physalodes).
  • Marestail (Conyza canadensis)
  • Kochia (Bassia scoparia).
  • Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri).
  • Kudzu (Pueraria montana var. lobata).
  • Japanese knotweed (Polygonum cuspidatum).
  • Yellow Groove Bamboo (Phyllostachys aureasculata), when the plant has spread from its original premise of planting and is not being maintained.
  • Field bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis).
  • Heart-podded hoary cress (Lepidium draba sub. draba).
  • Hairy whitetop or ballcress Lepidium appelianum).
  • Perennial sowthistle (Sonchus arvensis).
  • Russian knapweed (Acroptilon repens).
  • Leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula).
  • Hedge bindweed (Calystegia sepium).
  • Serrated tussock (Nassella trichotoma).
  • Columbus grass (Sorghum x almum).
  • Musk thistle (Carduus nutans).
  • Forage Kochia (Bassia prostrata).
  • Water Hemp (Amaranthus tuberculatus).

The list of noxious weeds can be found in the Ohio Administrative Code section 901:5-37-01. In addition to this list, Ohio State has a guidebook that will help you identify noxious weeds in Ohio, which is available here.  It may be helpful to familiarize yourself with the weeds in the book, so you can be on the lookout for noxious weeds on your property.

When am I responsible for noxious weeds?

The Ohio Revised Code addresses noxious weeds in different parts of the code. When it comes to noxious weeds on the property of private individuals, there are two scenarios that may apply: noxious weeds on private property, and noxious weeds in line fence rows.

 Noxious weeds on your property

If your property is located outside of a municipality, a neighbor or another member of the public can inform the township trustees in writing that there are noxious weeds on your property. If this happens, the township trustees must then turn around and notify you about the existence of noxious weeds. After receiving a letter from the trustees, you must either destroy the weeds or show the township trustees why there is no need for doing so. If you do not take one of these actions within five days of the trustees’ notice, the township trustees must cause the weeds to be cut or destroyed, and the county auditor will assess the costs for destroying the weeds against your real property taxes.  If your land is in a municipality, similar laws apply, but you would be dealing with the legislative authority, like the city council, instead of township trustees.

What if you rent out your land out to be farmed or otherwise?  Are you responsible for noxious weeds on your property in that situation?  The answer is probably.  The law states that the board of township trustees “shall notify the owner, lessee, agent, or tenant having charge of the land” that they have received information about noxious weeds on the property (emphasis added).  Furthermore, the law says that the “person notified” shall cut or destroy the weeds (or have them cut or destroyed).  In all likelihood, if you own the land, you are going to be the person who is notified by the trustees about the presence of weeds.  If you rent out your property to be farmed or otherwise, you may want to include who is responsible for noxious weeds in the language of the lease.

Noxious weeds in the fence row

The “line fence law” or “partition fence law” in Ohio requires landowners in unincorporated areas to cut all noxious weeds, brush, briers and thistles within four feet and in the corners of a line fence. A line fence (or partition fence) is a fence that is on the boundary line between two properties. If you fail to keep your side of the fence row clear of noxious weeds and other vegetation, Ohio law provides a route for adjacent landowners concerned about the weeds. First, an adjacent landowner must request that you clear the fence row of weeds and must allow you ten days to do so. If the weeds still remain after ten days, the complaining landowner may notify the township trustees of the situation. Then, the township trustees must view the property and determine whether there is sufficient reason to remove weeds and vegetation from the fence row. If they determine that the weeds should be removed, the township trustees may hire someone to clear the fence row.  Once again, if this occurs, the county auditor will assess the costs of destruction on your property taxes.

Being aware of noxious weeds is key. 

As a landowner, it is really important for you to keep an eye out for noxious weeds on your property.  If you keep on top of the weeds, cutting them or otherwise destroying them as they grow, it will certainly make your life a lot easier. You will avoid awkward conversations with neighbors, letters from your township trustees, and extra charges on your property taxes. Additionally, you will help to prevent the harm that noxious weeds may cause to crops, livestock, and ecosystems in general.

To learn more about Ohio’s noxious weed laws, you can access our law bulletin on the subject here.  While the bulletin addresses the responsibilities of landowners, it also goes beyond the scope of this blog post, addressing weeds on roadways, railroads, and public lands, as well as how to respond if your neighbor has noxious weeds on their property.  Additionally, the bulletin has a helpful section of “frequently asked questions” regarding noxious weeds.

New Master Gardener Volunteer Training

Brown, Clermont, & Highland County New Master Gardener Volunteer Training

The Master Gardener Program provides intensive training in horticulture to interested gardeners who then volunteer their time assisting with educational programs and activities for Ohio residents through their local Ohio State University Extension county office.

What is the Master Gardener Program?       

Working with county Extension personnel, Master Gardeners provide such educational services to their communities as: answering gardening questions from the public; conducting plant clinics; gardening activities with children, senior citizens or disabled persons; beautifying the community; developing community or demonstration gardens; and other horticulture activities.

How do I know if I’d make a good Master Gardener?

You could qualify to become a Master Gardener, if:

  • You want to learn more about plants and gardening.
  • You are eager to participate in a practical and intensive training program.
  • You enjoy sharing your knowledge with others.
  • You have the time to attend training and serve your community as a volunteer educator.

How do I become a Master Gardener?

To become a Master Gardener, you must:

  • Be accepted into the Master Gardener program by completing the volunteer application. Please note that the class size is limited. Trainees will be selected based upon their application and their availability and willingness to complete their training and volunteer requirements. Applications can also be found at https://go.osu.edu/2020app or picked up at your local extension office. Please email, mail, or drop off your completed application to OSU Extension Brown County no later than September 18, 2020.  More information will be emailed directly to you upon completion of online registration.
  • Complete the formal training provided by The Ohio State University Extension. The training is approximately 50 hours and participants must pass all quizzes and examinations with a cumulative average of 70% or better.
  • Complete 50 hours of volunteer time on projects pre-approved by the Master Gardener coordinator. This volunteer time must be finished within one calendar year after their formal training.

Is there a cost for the training?

The 2020 class costs $150 plus the cost of a required background check. If paying by check, make checks out to Ohio State University Extension.) Background checks can be done upon acceptance into MGV class.

When is the next training? 

Training will be offered virtually by the Brown, Clermont, and Highland County Extension Offices.

Preference to these counties first then outside counties may be added to fill virtual seats.

Dates: Every Tuesday and Thursday beginning September 22 and ending November 19. Classes will be held from 9AM-12PM. Full list of dates: September 22, 24,29. October 1, 6, 8, 13, 15, 20, 22, 27, 29. November 3, 5, 10, 12, 17, 19.

Register no later than 09/07/2020. Register here: https://go.osu.edu/registermgv

I already received my Master Gardener Volunteer training.  Can I join a different county association?

Yes, if you are a member in good standing with another state or county association, you can switch your membership to a different county’s association.

There are additional criteria for transferring from out of state. Contact your local extension office for those details.

How do I continue as an active Master Gardener?

To stay active, you must do the following every year:

  • Pay your local association dues.
  • Complete 20 hours of volunteer time on pre-approved Master Gardener projects.
  • Complete 10 hours of pre-approved training in horticulture. Training opportunities will be provided locally but are also available at state and national conferences.

Contact Information

  • James Morris, Brown County: Morris.1677@osu.edu  937-378-6716
    • 325 West State Street, Building B, Georgetown, OH 45121