Omega 3 and stress

A previous post discussed Omega 3s and anxiety.

While the role of omega 3’s and inflammation has been studied(1), omega 3’s and stress is not as well studied.

This post discusses a study looking at Omega 3’s and stress reduction.

Who was in the study? (2)

138 sedentary, overweight, middle-aged participants (n = 93 women, n = 45 men) received either 2.5 g/d of omega-3, 1.25 g/d of omega-3, or a placebo for 4 months (2).

What was studied? (2)

  • Before and after the trial, participants underwent the Trier Social Stress Test.
  • Saliva and blood samples were collected once before and repeatedly after the stressor to measure salivary cortisol, telomerase in peripheral blood lymphocytes, and serum anti-inflammatory (interleukin-10; IL-10) and pro-inflammatory (interleukin-6; IL-6, interleukin-12, tumor necrosis factor-alpha) cytokines.

What were the results? (2)

  • Adjusting for pre-supplementation reactivity, age, sagittal abdominal diameter, and sex, omega-3 supplementation altered telomerase (p = 0.05) and IL-10 (p = 0.05) stress reactivity; both supplementation groups were protected from the placebo group’s 24% and 26% post-stress declines in the geometric means of telomerase and IL-10, respectively.
  • Omega-3 reduced overall cortisol (p = 0.03) and IL-6 (p = 0.03) throughout the stressor;
  • The group that received 2.5gram per day of Omega 3’s had had 19% and 33% lower overall cortisol levels (lower stress) and IL-6 geometric mean levels (lowering inflammation), respectively, compared to the placebo group.

The authors (2) conclude that, by lowering overall inflammation and cortisol levels during stress and boosting repair mechanisms during recovery, omega-3 may slow accelerated aging and reduce depression risk.

What are some caveats?

  • This is a small study and further study is needed.
  • The population studied was middle aged, which makes it difficult to generalize to specific populations like college students.
  • Omega 3s may interact with prescription medications and supplements.
  • Omega 3’s have other health benefits (3) as well.
  • Talk to your doctor or prescriber before considering omega 3’s.

What are some sources of omega 3s?
According to the National Institute of Health(3), sources of omega 3’s include:
• Fish and other seafood (especially cold-water fatty fish, such as salmon, mackerel, tuna, herring, and sardines)
• Nuts and seeds (such as flaxseed, chia seeds, and walnuts)
• Plant oils (such as flaxseed oil, soybean oil, and canola oil)
• Fortified foods (such as certain brands of eggs, yogurt, juices, milk, soy beverages, and infant formulas)
• Omega-3 dietary supplements include fish oil, krill oil, cod liver oil, and algal oil (a vegetarian source that comes from algae). They come in a wide range of doses and forms.

How much omega 3s do I need per day?
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommends consuming no more than 3 g/day of EPA and DHA combined, including up to 2 g/day from dietary supplements (3).

Where can I learn more about omega 3s?

https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Omega3FattyAcids-Consumer/

What are some resources to improve nutrition?
• Nutrition coaching with The OSU Student Wellness Center
• Nutritionist at The OSU Wilce Wilce Student Health center
• Nutritionist at The OSU Wexner medical center
• Nutrition books
• Take a nutrition class
• Take a look at the Dietary Guidelines for Americans.
• Harvard’s page on nutritional psychiatry.

What are some resources to improve stress?

To learn more about stress management go here: https://u.osu.edu/emotionalfitness/2017/09/01/dealing-with-too-much-stress/

 

By R. Ryan S Patel DO, FAPA OSU-CCS Psychiatrist

Disclaimer: This article is intended to be informative only. It is advised that you check with your own physician/mental health provider before implementing any changes. With this article, the author is not rendering medical advice, nor diagnosing, prescribing, or treating any condition, or injury; and therefore claims no responsibility to any person or entity for any liability, loss, or injury caused directly or indirectly as a result of the use, application, or interpretation of the material presented.

References:

  1. Wall R, Ross RP, Fitzgerald GF, Stanton C. Fatty acids from fish: the anti-inflammatory potential of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids. Nutr Rev. 2010 May;68(5):280-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1753-4887.2010.00287.x. PMID: 20500789.
  2. Madison, A.A., Belury, M.A., Andridge, R. et al.Omega-3 supplementation and stress reactivity of cellular aging biomarkers: an ancillary substudy of a randomized, controlled trial in midlife adults. Mol Psychiatry (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41380-021-01077-2
  3. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Omega3FattyAcids-Consumer/

Silvercloud for mental health

Nationwide, universities report a 30% increase in demand for mental health services despite only 6% increases in student enrollment (1).

To meet the increasing demand and variety of mental health concerns experienced by college students, OSU CCS offers a variety of solutions.  You can learn more about this variety on our mental health options page.

This blog post discusses an innovative service for OSU students called Silvercloud.

What is Silvercloud?

  • Silvercloud is an online, self-paced, computerized Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) based program to help you learn ways to feel better by addressing, thoughts, feelings, and behaviors.
  • Additional features and benefits include:
  • Self-paced so you can do it on your own at any time.
  • Modules and programs based on your needs.
  • It can be done on a variety of electronic devices.
  • It can be done on its own or in addition to other mental health services.
  • Here is a video: https://vimeo.com/502522528

What types of concerns can Silvercloud address?

  • Silvercloud has programs to help you improve Anxiety, Depression, Covid, Sleep, Resiliency, and Stress.

Does Silvercloud work?

  • There are over 40 research papers on this subject.
  • Some highlights include:
  •  60% of users showed significant reduction in depression scores, 56% showed a significant reduction in anxiety scores, and symptom reduction was maintained 3 months post follow up (2).
  • A subsequent study in  the journal Nature digital health showed improvements lasting  12 months after program completion (3).
  • 85% of users see improvement in depression and anxiety scores (3).
  • It is offered by hundreds of universities, public and private organizations, health insurance plans, even the National Health Service in the United Kingdom offers this service to their users.
  • 94% of users said they found the program helpful (3).

What are some caveats?

  • Silvercloud is not for mental health crisis, or emergencies.
  • Silvercloud does NOT replace professional mental health treatment.
  • Some students may prefer or be more appropriate for teletherapy, telepsychiatry, or in person mental health treatment, with or without Silvercloud.
  • Silvercloud is mostly based on Cognitive behavioral therapy and some students may benefit from other therapy modalities for mental health support.

How can I access Silvercloud?

To get started,

  1. Create a SilverCloud Account: https://osu.silvercloudhealth.com/signup/
  2. Log in to your SilverCloud Account:  https://osu.silvercloudhealth.com/
  3. Download the SilverCloud app on Apple App Store or Google Play

 

By R. Ryan S Patel DO, FAPA OSU-CCS Psychiatrist

Disclaimer: This article is intended to be informative only. It is advised that you check with your own physician/mental health provider before implementing any changes. With this article, the author is not rendering medical advice, nor diagnosing, prescribing, or treating any condition, or injury; and therefore claims no responsibility to any person or entity for any liability, loss, or injury caused directly or indirectly as a result of the use, application, or interpretation of the material presented.

References:

  1. https://sites.psu.edu/ccmh/fi les/2018/02/2017_CCMH_Report-1r4m88x.pdf
  2. Palacios JE, Richards D, Palmer R, Coudray C, Hofmann SG, Palmieri PA, Frazier P, Supported Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Programs for Depression, Anxiety, and Stress in University Students: Open, Non-Randomised Trial of Acceptability, Effectiveness, and Satisfaction, JMIR Ment Health 2018;5(4):e11467
  3. Mental Health Research  |  SilverCloud Health

Using Systems + Goals to increase success

“You do not rise to the level of your goals. You fall to the level of your systems.  Your goal is your desired outcome. Your system is the collection of daily habits that will get you there.” James Clear (6)

Many people start the new year by setting goals but less than 10 % of people keep their New Year’s resolutions each year (1, 2).

Is there a better way?

First, to set effective goals, consider the following:

  • For goal setting, consider S.M.A.R.T. goals (Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, Time bound) (4).
  • A goal card (5) may also be helpful.

After effective goal setting, focus on the system:

In his book Atomic Habits, author James Clear suggests the following strategies to think of systems (6):

  • Goals are good for setting a direction, but systems are best for making sustained progress (6).
  • For example, you might ahave a goal to clean up a messy room (6). But if you maintain the same sloppy, pack-rat habits (system) that led to a messy room in the first place, soon you’ll be looking at a new pile of clutter and hoping for another burst of motivation (6).
  • If you’re a student, instead of getting an A, a better goal could be to become a better student (a system).  This would shift your focus to the daily process:
    • How often and how much you study
    • Improve your study skills
    • With whom and where you study
    • How you address difficult topics
    • Your eating, sleeping, and exercise habits.
    • Your method for tracking progress before grades/exam. This could be in terms of quizzing or testing yourself, etc.

By R. Ryan S Patel DO, FAPA OSU-CCS Psychiatrist

Disclaimer: This article is intended to be informative only. It is advised that you check with your own physician/mental health provider before implementing any changes. With this article, the author is not rendering medical advice, nor diagnosing, prescribing, or treating any condition, or injury; and therefore claims no responsibility to any person or entity for any liability, loss, or injury caused directly or indirectly as a result of the use, application, or interpretation of the material presented.

 

References:

  1. https://www.iflscience.com/brain/psychology-new-year-s-resolutions/
  2. Norcross, John & Mrykalo, Marci & Blagys, Matthew. (2002). Auld Lang Syne: Success Predictors, Change Processes, and Self-Reported Outcomes of New Year’s Resolvers and Nonresolvers. Journal of clinical psychology. 58. 397-405. 10.1002/jclp.1151.
  3. https://www.healthdirect.gov.au/goal-setting#:~:text=Setting%20goals%20is%20an%20effective,the%20recovery%20from%20mental%20illness.
  4. https://www.cdc.gov/dhdsp/evaluation_resources/guides/writing-smart-objectives.htm
  5. Goal card: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5954583/figure/fig1-2055102918774674/
  6. Atomic Habits: Tiny Changes, Remarkable Results by James Clear