Brief activity vs relaxation breaks for energy

There are times when students might need to study for long periods. In that situation, some students might struggle to maintain their energy levels.
Research has shown benefits of exercise for anxiety (1)
A recent study looked at effectiveness of breaks during a 4 hour learning session (2).

Who was studied?
Blasche and colleagues studied 66 students, mean age 22.5 years, enrolled in two different university classes of 4‐hr duration (2).

What was measured?
Fatigue and vigor were assessed immediately before, immediately after, and 20 minutes after the break (2).

How long were the breaks? (2)

  • The breaks were 6 minutes long.
  • These breaks were after 45 minutes of a lecture.

What type of breaks did the participants get?

  • Exercise break 6 minutes: 3 min of aerobic exercise including running on the spot and a variety of jumping exercises that were alternated every 30 s followed by 3 min of a variety of stretching exercises (2).
  • Relaxation break consisted of a 6‐min guided body scan exercise. Individuals were instructed to focus their attention on various body parts and functions such as feet, legs, arms, and breathing and to observe the sensations arising in those regions (2).
  • Unstructured rest break, individuals could do what they wanted as long as they remained seated at their desks (2).

What were the results?

  • The main findings were that a brief, 6–7‐min relaxation technique or physical activity, decreased fatigue beyond the level of a normal rest break.
  • These breaks also increased in vigor, which could improve work engagement and productivity (2).

What are some caveats?

  • This is a small study and further study is needed.
  • Brief exercise may not be suitable for everyone (check with your healthcare provider).
  • Not everyone might benefit from this approach.
  • Some students might notice immediate stress relief benefits of yoga.
  • Other strategies to improve academic performance can be found here.

By R. Ryan S Patel DO, FAPA OSU-CCS Psychiatrist
If you would like to be notified about future monthly posts, enter your email and click the subscribe button above.

Disclaimer: This article is intended to be informative only. It is advised that you check with your own physician/mental health provider before implementing any changes. With this article, the author is not rendering medical advice, nor diagnosing, prescribing, or treating any condition, or injury; and therefore claims no responsibility to any person or entity for any liability, loss, or injury caused directly or indirectly as a result of the use, application, or interpretation of the material presented. Permission to use/cite this article: contact patel.2350@osu.edu

References:
1. Stonerock, Gregory L. et al. “Exercise as Treatment for Anxiety: Systematic Review and Analysis.” Annals of behavioral medicine : a publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine 49.4 (2015): 542–556. PMC. Web. 9 May 2018.
2. Blasche, G., Szabo, B., Wagner-Menghin, M., Ekmekcioglu, C., & Gollner, E. (2018). Comparison of rest-break interventions during a mentally demanding task. Stress and health : journal of the International Society for the Investigation of Stress, 34(5), 629–638. https://doi.org/10.1002/smi.2830

Being outdoors for mental health

With the weather improving, it may be easier to spend more time outside.

While there are many options for mental health treatment, a recent study looked at whether being outside can benefit for mental health (1).

What was the study? (1)

  • Ibes and Forestell (1) studied 234 undergraduate students.
  • Participants engaged in 20 minutes of mindfulness meditation or a control task, either in a campus park-like setting or in a quiet room indoors.
  • Before and after the activity, total mood disturbance (TMD) was assessed with the Profile of Mood States Questionnaire.

What were the results? (1)

  • In this study, they found (1) that when participants sat for 20 minutes in a greenspace located in a central campus location, they experienced a significant reduction in mood disturbance relative to those who sat inside.
  • Participants were near car traffic, foot traffic, and campus activities.
  • During the study, temperature ranged (i.e., from the mid-40s to upper 80 s, in degrees Fahrenheit) for outdoor participants.
  • A significant reduction in mood disturbance was noted regardless of whether they engaged in meditation or the control activity (sitting).

Other thoughts:

By R. Ryan S Patel DO, FAPA OSU-CCS Psychiatrist

Permission to use/cite this article: contact patel.2350@osu.edu

 Disclaimer: This article is intended to be informative only. It is advised that you check with your own physician/mental health provider before implementing any changes. With this article, the author is not rendering medical advice, nor diagnosing, prescribing, or treating any condition, or injury; and therefore claims no responsibility to any person or entity for any liability, loss, or injury caused directly or indirectly as a result of the use, application, or interpretation of the material presented.

References:

  1. Dorothy C. Ibes & Catherine A. Forestell (2022) The role of campus greenspace and meditation on college students’ mood disturbance, Journal of American College Health, 70:1, 99-106, DOI: 10.1080/07448481.2020.1726926

Does yoga help quickly with stress?

72.8 % of respondents indicated moderate to severe psychological distress according to a fall 2021 survey from the American College Health Association, of a reference group of 33,204 college students across the country (1).

Previous posts discuss a variety of strategies to help with stress.

A recent study looked at the immediate and lasting benefit of yoga for stress (2).

What was the study (2)?

Tong and colleagues (2) studied healthy undergraduate students from four yoga and four fitness classes in Study 1 (n = 191) and Study 2 (n = 143), respectively.

How much yoga was done? (2)

Study 1 evaluated the immediate effect (a 60-minute practice) while Study 2 evaluated the durable effect (a 12-week intervention) (2).

What type of yoga was done in this study (2) ?

Both studies involved Hatha yoga which comprised of meditation (5 min), breathing (5 min), posture-holding exercise  (including 12 postures after warm-up such as waist rotating, downward facing dog, cat stretch, warrior, 40 min), and 10 minutes of relaxation practice (2).

What were the results (2)?

Study 1 Showed that immediate stress reduction and mindfulness was greater in the yoga group than in the fitness group (2).

Study 2 showed that effect of yoga on stress reduction through mindfulness was a lasting one (2).

Both yoga and exercise showed benefits in reducing stress (2).

What are some caveats?

  • Further study is needed.
  • There are many forms of yoga. Students may find some forms of yoga more helpful than others.
  • Check with your healthcare provider to make sure that doing yoga is safe and appropriate for you.
  • Additional resources:
  • Yoga classes through OSU Wellness
  • Group fitness classes through OSU RPAC
  • Online resources for yoga
  • Yoga classes in the community

 

By R. Ryan S Patel DO, FAPA OSU-CCS Psychiatrist

If you would like to be notified about future monthly posts, enter your email and click the subscribe button above.

 Disclaimer: This article is intended to be informative only. It is advised that you check with your own physician/mental health provider before implementing any changes. With this article, the author is not rendering medical advice, nor diagnosing, prescribing, or treating any condition, or injury; and therefore claims no responsibility to any person or entity for any liability, loss, or injury caused directly or indirectly as a result of the use, application, or interpretation of the material presented.  Permission to use/cite this article: contact patel.2350@osu.edu

References:

  1. American College Health Association. American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment III: Reference Group Executive Summary Fall 2021. Silver Spring, MD: American College Health Association; 2022.
  2. Jiajin Tong, Xin Qi, Zhonghui He, Senlin Chen, Scott J. Pedersen, P. Dean Cooley, Julie Spencer-Rodgers, Shuchang He & Xiangyi Zhu (2021) The immediate and durable effects of yoga and physical fitness exercises on stress, Journal of American College Health, 69:6, 675-683, DOI: 10.1080/07448481.2019.1705840