DLS Helps to DIY

Parents, March is a month of change.  We have been inside a lot recently and the dreary days may have caused us to become self-focused and feel run down.  But then comes March, when there is more sunlight, longer days, and the cold weather finally breaks.  These outward changes inspire us inwardly as well: we are inspired to go outside and get some fresh air, which creates more opportunities to interact with those around us.  Increased physical activity and vitamin D from the sun are two positive benefits from the great outdoors which can strongly improve both mood and energy levels.  Considering that, lets plan a time to do exactly what this month commands: March! …

Plan a Kindness March in March!  What is a kindness march, you ask?  It is a march, or mission, to do a random act of kindness for someone, and physically marching while you do it.  The point is to combine your physical and emotional body into doing something kind for someone around you, which will result in a healthier you, as well as a healthier community.  By actually marching, you may draw attention to your mission, which will spread the word about kindness.  And kindness is contagious!

You can start small and simply march over to greet a lonely neighbor with a smile, or kindly march to get the mail or the garbage cans for a neighbor.  You can encourage the younger children to get their energy out in a constructive way by acting like a soldier who is on a mission is to be kind!  Perhaps they can march to feed the first robin of spring, or march while walking someone’s dog.  The children can march to find a leaf to create a leaf-rubbing picture with crayons and later march it over to a friend.

You can schedule a family march or a neighborhood march on the weekend to help someone in need or to build a sense of community.  No matter what you decide to do, just march!  Get those knees up and enjoy the sun on your face and the warmth in your heart that comes from kindness expressed to others.

For more ideas about creating positive family interactions see:   https://child.unl.edu/strongfamilies

Nina Solomon, Development of Living Skills Instructor, Ohio State University Extension, Butler County