November PSL Question

Is there a way to change Congressional apportionment in the House to make it “fair”?  If yes, how?  If no, why not? 

Representation is a significant issue in the United States of America. Each state elects a certain number of representatives to the House of Representatives depending on the size of the state’s population, but there are several problems associated with this. For example, both Wyoming and Montana are each represented by a single representative, but Montana has a population of 1,050,493 while Wyoming only has a population of 579,315. Furthermore, the District of Columbia is appointed no representatives, and neither are any of the citizens of American territories like Puerto Rico and Guam.  

Since 1910, the House has been capped at a total of 435 representatives. However, before this, the size of the House continued to expand relative to the growing population of the country. Since 1910, our nation’s population has grown exponentially and has almost tripled. The fixed number of seats is therefore causing significant disparities among state representation.  

There are definitely feasible ways to adjust Congressional appointment in the House to make it more fair than it is now. First and foremost, there should be representatives for the District of Columbia as well as representatives for each of the American territories. Even though these areas aren’t necessarily considered states, they are comprised of American citizens and the actions of the United States government directly affect these territories. Therefore, they should have fair representation within our central government, just like a state would have.  

There have been a few suggestions to fix the disparity of representation between the 50 states as well. One of them is called the “Wyoming Rule,” which would take the population of the 50 states and divide it by the population of the smallest state, which would then be the number of districts to be appointed. This rule would result in fairness of representation because the population of the smallest state would then also be the average population of congressional districts.  

Another suggestion is the “Cube Root Rule,” which states that the number of seats in the House would always be the cube root of the United States population (minus 100 for the Senate). This rule would be very efficient and responsive to population changes within the country.  

There would obviously have to be other factors taken into account, like preventing the House from becoming too large and tracking population changes, but either of these methods, or even a combination of these methods, would make voting more fair in the United States.

 

Source: https://www.fairvote.org/how_we_can_change_the_size_of_the_house_of_representatives

Year in Review

[ “Year in Review”  is where you should reflect on the past year and show how you have evolved as a person and as a student.  You may want to focus on your growth in a particular area (as a leader, scholar, researcher, etc.) or you may want to talk about your overall experience over the past year.  For more guidance on using your ePortfolio, including questions and prompts that will help you get started, please visit the Honors & Scholars ePortfolio course in Carmen. To get answers to specific questions, please email eportfolio@osu.edu. Delete these instructions and add your own post.]

G.O.A.L.S.

[ “G.O.A.L.S.” is a place where students write about how their planned, current, and future activities may fit into the Honors & Scholars G.O.A.L.S.: Global Awareness, Original Inquiry, Academic Enrichment, Leadership Development, and Service Engagement. For more guidance on using your ePortfolio, including questions and prompts that will help you get started, please visit the Honors & Scholars ePortfolio course in Carmen. To get answers to specific questions, please email eportfolio@osu.edu. Delete these instructions and add your own post.

  • Global Awareness: Students cultivate and develop their appreciation for diversity and each individual’s unique differences. For example, consider course work, study abroad, involvement in cultural organizations or activities, etc.
  • Original Inquiry: Honors & Scholars students understand the research process by engaging in experiences ranging from in-class scholarly endeavors to creative inquiry projects to independent experiences with top researchers across campus and in the global community. For example, consider research, creative productions or performances, advanced course work, etc.
  • Academic Enrichment: Honors & Scholars students pursue academic excellence through rigorous curricular experiences beyond the university norm both in and out of the classroom.
  • Leadership Development: Honors & Scholars students develop leadership skills that can be demonstrated in the classroom, in the community, in their co-curricular activities, and in their future roles in society.
  • Service Engagement: Honors & Scholars students commit to service to the community.]

Career

[“Career” is where you can collect information about your experiences and skills that will apply to your future career.  Like your resume, this is information that will evolve over time and should be continually updated.  For more guidance on using your ePortfolio, including questions and prompts that will help you get started, please visit the Honors & Scholars ePortfolio course in Carmen. To get answers to specific questions, please email eportfolio@osu.edu. Delete these instructions and add your own post.]

Artifacts

Part of being a 1st year in the PSL Scholars program involves being put into a small mentor group. Both of my mentors have been great resources, especially in the first couple of months in college. I was given the opportunity to talk with one of my mentors, Anya Chew, a little more in depth about her experiences in Scholars. Anya is double majoring in Political Science and Security and Intelligence. She chose to major in these subject areas because she has always been interested in government as well as cyber security and defense systems. She wants to eventually have a career in the Department of Defense or practice law. Like myself, she is also on the Pre-Law track and is considering attending law school after finishing her undergraduate career at The Ohio State University. She is currently applying for internships in the legal sector and is hoping to work for an attorney.

Anya is extremely involved in activities outside of the classroom. This was encouraging to hear as someone who is hoping to get more involved on campus as the year goes on. She is on the Collegiate Council on World Affairs and she is in Model UN. She volunteers with Habitat for Humanity and Buckeye Food Alliance. Anya is also in Kappa Kappa Gamma. I am rushing at the beginning of next semester, so this was good to hear!

Anya joined PSL Scholars because she thought it would be cool to meet others who are interested in politics and law. Her favorite part of PSL last year was the annual Washington D.C. trip. When I asked Anya how being in a Scholars program makes a difference in the college experience, she shared that it changes the experience by allowing you to connect with others who are motivated by academics and it connects you with people who share a specific interest. She said that it is important to keep in mind that college can be fun, but it is first and foremost about learning.

About Me

Hannah Dailey is a first-year undergraduate student in The Ohio State University’s Fisher College of Business. She is majoring in International Business on the Pre-Law track with a minor in Spanish for Business. She hopes to use her areas of study in her future career as a corporate lawyer. She is also in the Politics, Society, and Law Scholars Program. She grew up in Toledo, Ohio, but she is excited to call Columbus her new home. Hannah plans on taking advantage of the many opportunities offered at Ohio State by studying abroad, joining student organizations, and securing an internship as early as possible. When not in class, you can find Hannah pursuing her passions for dance and yoga or volunteering with several non-profit organizations. If you have any questions about Ohio State, Scholars, Fisher College of Business, or just life in general, feel free to contact Hannah!