AIAA Aviation Forum 2022 Presentation

Renske Nijveldt, a MS student and researcher in CSEL, presented on June 28th for the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) Aviation Forum virtually. Renske’s paper, co-authored by Dr. Martijn IJtsma, is titled is titled “Cognitive Task Analysis of Contingency Management in Future Unmanned Aircraft Systems Traffic Management (UTM)”.  It provides an overview on the results of a Cognitive Task Analysis (CTA) to explore challenges and identify needs for supporting coordination across various roles during contingency management in future UTM operations. 

You can view the paper [Here] and the presentation slides [Here].

BW4T Experiment

The Cognitive Systems Engineering Lab (CSEL) is looking for participants for an experiment on coordination under time pressure, with the goal of better supporting coordination in high-stakes operations such as air traffic control and manned spaceflight operations. Please see the flyer below.

What? You will work with another participant to perform simulated search and retrieve tasks missions in an virtual environment. Participants will each receive a $20 gift card and another $10 based on the team’s performance.

Where? The study takes place in Baker Systems Engineering.

How long? The experiment will take a maximum of 2.5 hours. 

How? Participation in this study is voluntary. If you are interested in participating, please fill out this google form (https://forms.gle/WYtr5dp88Sf24E9R8).

You can view the flyer [Here].

 

Researchers: 

Renske Nijveldt

Abhinay Paladugu

Dr. Martijn IJtsma

  

2022 Ohio Air Mobility Symposium

Renske Nijveldt, a MS student and researcher in CSEL, and Abhinay Paladugu, a PhD student and graduate researcher in CSEL, presented a poster on April 7th for the Ohio Air Mobility Symposium at The Ohio State University. The poster is titled “Design and Evaluation of Coordination for Advanced Air Mobility (AAM)”.  It provides an overview on support for coordination during anomalies in the system.

A more detailed version of the poster can be found [Here].

 

 

From “bench” to bedside: science-based alarm management with high IMPActS

In my upcoming presentation at the Human Factors in Healthcare Symposium (March 21-23, 2022 in New Orleans, LA), Dr. Michael Rayo will walk through the contributions of our alarm research and design work made possible through our P30 grant awarded from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Dr. Rayo will step through the relevant science that was applied, the research and design process that was used, the relevant findings, and our current and future directions. Dr. Rayo will also discuss the successes and failures of each of our related interventions through the lens of the IMPActS framework, which can also be used as a design and implementation planning tool to anticipate potential barriers and facilitators (Fitzgerald, 2019).

[Here] is a synopsis of this talk.

References:

Block, F. E. (2008). “For if the trumpet give an uncertain sound, who shall prepare himself to the battle?”(I Corinthians 14: 8, KJV). Anesthesia & Analgesia, 106(2), 357. Retrieved from http://www.anesthesia-analgesia.org/content/106/2/357.short

Fitzgerald, M. (2019). The IMPActS Framework:  the necessary requirements for making science-based organizational impact.

Hansen, C. J., Rayo, M. F., Patterson, E. S., Yamokoski, T., Abdel-Rasoul, M., Allen, T. T., … Moffatt-Bruce, S. D. (2021). Perceptually Discriminating the Highest Priority Alarms Reduces Response Time: A Retrospective Pre-Post Study at Four Hospitals. Human Factors: The Journal of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, 001872082110328. doi: 10.1177/00187208211032870

Horwood, C. R., Moffatt-Bruce, S. D., Fitzgerald, M., & Rayo, M. F. (2018). A qualitative analysis of clinical decompensation in the surgical patient: Perceptions of nurses and physicians. Surgery, 164(6), 1311–1315. doi: 10.1016/j.surg.2018.06.006

Horwood, C. R., Moffatt-Bruce, S. D., & Rayo, M. F. (2019). Continuous Cardiac Monitoring Policy Implementation: Three-year Sustained Decrease of Hospital Resource Utilization. In Structural Approaches to Address Issues in Patient Safety: Vol. 18 (pp. 159–171). Emerald Publishing Limited. doi: 10.1108/s1474-823120190000018007

Horwood, C. R., Rayo, M. F., Fitzgerald, M., Balkin, E. A., & Moffatt-Bruce, S. D. (2018, June 15). Gaps Between Alarm Capabilities and Decision-making Needs: An Observational Study of Detecting Patient Decompensation. 7.

Patterson, E. S., Rayo, M. F., Edworthy, J. R., & Moffatt-Bruce, S. D. (2021). Applying Human Factors Engineering to Address the Telemetry Alarm Problem in a Large Medical Center. Human Factors: The Journal of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, 001872082110188. doi: 10.1177/00187208211018883

Rayo, M. F. (2022). Implementation Systems That Support Resilient Performance:  Improving Anticipatory Recognition to Mitigate Risk of Patient Decompensation. In F. Rapport, R. Clay-Williams, & J. Braithwaite (Eds.), Key concepts in implementation science: Translation and Improvement in Medicine and Healthcare. UK: Routledge.

Rayo, M. F., Mansfield, J., Eiferman, D., Mignery, T., White, S., & Moffatt-Bruce, S. D. (2015). Implementing an institution-wide quality improvement policy to ensure appropriate use of continuous cardiac monitoring: a mixed-methods retrospective data analysis and direct observation study. BMJ Quality & Safety, bmjqs-2015-004137. doi: 10.1136/bmjqs-2015-004137

Rayo, M. F., & Moffatt-Bruce, S. D. (2015). Alarm system management: evidence-based guidance encouraging direct measurement of informativeness to improve alarm response. BMJ Quality & Safety, 24(4), 282–286. doi: 10.1136/bmjqs-2014-003373

Rayo, M. F., Patterson, E. S., Abdel-Rasoul, M., & Moffatt-Bruce, S. D. (2019). Using timbre to improve performance of larger auditory alarm sets. Ergonomics, 1–33. doi: 10.1080/00140139.2019.1676473

AIAA SciTech

Stephanie Duros, a MS student and graduate researcher in CSEL, presented a lecture on January 3 for The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) SciTech Forum in San Diego, CA. Stephanie’s paper, co-authored by Dr. Martijn IJtsma, is titled “Development of a Dynamic Model of Adaptation in Distributed Work Systems”. It provides an overview on distributed work systems such as disaster response operations.

You can view the paper [Here] and the presentation slides [Here].

TDAI Fall Forum

Renske Nijveldt, a MS student and researcher in CSEL, and Abhinay Paladugu, a PhD student and graduate researcher in CSEL, presented a poster on November 2nd for the Translational Data Analytics Institute (TDAI) Fall Forum at The Ohio State University. The poster is titled “Modeling the Work of Coordination for Supporting Advanced Air Mobility (AAM)”.  It provides an overview on challenges such as automation surprises & coordination and work load sharing for anomaly responses related to the introduction of new technologies in AAM.

HFES Presentation – “Requirements for Computational Approaches To Analyzing Resilience in Human-Machine Teams”

Jacob Keller, a MS student and graduate researcher in CSEL, presented a lecture on October 6th for the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 65th International Annual Meeting in Baltimore, MD. Jacob’s paper, co-authored by Dr. Martijn IJtsma, is titled “Requirements for Computational Approaches To Analyzing Resilience in Human-Machine Teams”. It provides an overview of computational models, exploring novel approaches to identifying human-machine team resilience computationally.

You can view the slides for the presentation [Here], and the paper’s abstract below.

Abstract: Human-machine teams (HMTs) in complex work domains need to be able to adapt to variable and uncertain work demands. Computational modeling and simulation can provide novel approaches to the evaluation of HMTs performing complex joint activities, affording large-scale, quantitative analysis of team characteristics (such as system architecture and governance protocols) and their effects on resilience. Drawing from literature in resilience engineering, human-automation interaction, and cognitive systems engineering, this paper provides a theoretical exploration of the use of computational modeling and simulation to analyze resilience in HMTs. Findings from literature are summarized in a set of requirements that highlight key aspects of resilience in HMTs that need to be accounted for in future modeling and evaluation efforts. These requirements include a need to model HMTs as joint cognitive systems, the need to account for the interdependent nature of activity, the temporal dynamics of work, and the need to support formative exploration and inquiry. We provide a brief overview of existing modeling and simulation approaches to evaluating HMTs and discuss further steps for operationalizing the identified requirements.

The HFES 65th International Annual Meeting was held in Baltimore, MD, October 4-7, 2021. The 66th International Annual Meeting will be held in Atlanta, Georgia, October 2022.

Recommended Citation:

Keller, J., & IJtsma, M. (2021). Requirements For Computational Approaches To Analyzing Resilience In Human-Machine Teams. Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. Presented 10/6/2021 in Baltimore, Maryland, at the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 65th Annual Meeting

Joint Activity Testing: Towards a Multi-Dimensional, High-Resolution Evaluation for Human-Machine Teaming

Dane Morey, a Ph.D. student, and Dante Della Vella, an MS student, both graduate research associates in CSEL, presented a poster on October 6, 2021, for the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (HFES) International Conference. The poster is titled “Joint Activity Testing: Towards a Multi-Dimensional, High-Resolution Evaluation for Human-Machine Teaming”. It provides an overview of how CSEL has operationalized its Joint Activity Testing (JAT) methodology in four domains to evaluate how the performance of human-machine teams changes as challenges to the system increases.

HFES Presentation – “Modeling the Effects of Machine Rigidities on Joint Work Strategies”

Katie Albert, a CSEL MS student, presented a lecture on October 5th at the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 65th International Annual Meeting in Baltimore, MD. Katie’s paper is titled “Modeling the Effects of Machine Rigidities on Joint Work Strategies” and is co-authored by Dr. Martijn IJtsma. This presentation proposed representing the work domain as a network to identify interdependencies that support opportunistic adaptation.

You can view the presentation slides [Here], and the paper’s abstract below.

Abstract: One of the challenges in designing resilient human-machine systems is that machine capabilities are inherently rigid. A resilient joint cognitive system can anticipate and adapt to changing work demands effectively, but limitations of machines can make this adaptation constrained and less fluid. By identifying and accommodating for these rigidities in the design of human-machine system architectures, developers can build human-machine systems that support multiple contexts. This paper proposes a work-modeling approach for analyzing joint human-machine work strategies, focusing on identifying interdependencies that would support opportunistic adaptation and reduce the risk of machine rigidity leading to brittle failures of a human-machine system. The approach is applied to a case study in space operations to demonstrate how interdependencies can be identified and evaluated. The results of this analysis provide early insight into how team adaptation and machine limitations can be systematically accounted for in system architecture design.

The HFES 65th International Annual Meeting was held in Baltimore, MD, October 4-7, 2021. The 66th International Annual Meeting will be held in Atlanta, Georgia, October 2022.

Recommended Citation:

Albert, K., & IJtsma, M. (2021). Modeling the Effects of Machine Rigidities on Joint Work Strategies. Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. Presented 10/6/2021 in Baltimore,

Maryland, at the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 65th Annual Meeting