Explore Nation: Brownfield Redevelopment Client Work

The Roseway Railyard

Currently, the site contains three large, predominately brick buildings along with two smaller buildings. The landscape is overgrown and trash litters the area. Bricks in disrepair cover some areas of the ground, while others are mostly dirt. In addition, in the middle of the site there is an irregular ditch and densely growing plants. The buildings themselves are in poor condition. Rotting wood, broken windows, and collapsed sections of roof are all part of the site. The brick on the eastern and western-most buildings is in relatively good condition along with the stone at the base of the western most building. However the surrounding area is mostly residential with a small park, a family center and a corner store to the south, and the Franklin Park Conservatory to the north.

The eastern most building in its current condition.

The eastern most building in its current condition.

Relationship to human-size

Relationship to human-size.

Brick pavement already on site.

Brick pavement already on site.

Development plan:

Historic sites, such as the Rose Avenue Car Barn, should be reused and redeveloped because it helps to create a local neighborhood feeling, a place that is unlike any other. It’s important to maintain facilities as much as possible, and incorporate design elements from these areas into new construction or thought processes.

Overall, we wanted to create a family/tourist friendly area by re-purposing the old buildings and creating a new market space. Our first idea is to transform the old trolley barn (western-most building) into a streetcar museum, complete with a small café and gift shop located in actual street cars that designate the main entrance to the museum on the north façade.

The current condition of the museum space. Notice the skylights filtering natural light in to the space.

The current condition of the museum space. Notice the skylights filtering natural light in to the space.

The space inside of the museum would utilize its natural skylights and the large garage door facing Kelton would be sealed, but maintained as much as possible, and a new entrance would be on the northern side of the building, facing the parking lot. This concept gives the building a new purpose, while maintaining its past, drawing in families, tourists, and education based groups to learn about the history of streetcars in Columbus.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shows which direction the loop would run, the new open-space event/market area, and the handicapped parking. Also shows the pond and the positioning of all buildings to be maintained as per the plan.

Shows which direction the loop would run, the new open-space event/market area, and the handicapped parking. Also shows the pond and the positioning of all buildings to be maintained as per the plan.

In the middle of the lot, we have planned a newly constructed, open, indoor marketplace with restaurants, groceries from farmer’s markets and event space. Local families can shop, dine, and attend events without having to leave their neighborhood. It is built in a style that reflects the lower density of the area and brings modernity to contrast the very traditional, old buildings on site, bringing the area into the 21st century, whilst recessed from the street view to help maintain the neighborhood aesthetic. The back wall, on the northernmost side of the loop, would be covered in murals from people who utilize the site.

The new, open event/market space with capacity for a restaurant.

The new, open event/market space with capacity for a restaurant.

 

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Roses and trees, ivy on the walls, and proposed ideas for the westernmost building, complete with the streetcars on the northern face of the building.

The plan for the easternmost building is to convert the northernmost section into a community art gallery and the southern most section into a bar or cocktail lounge with a relaxed setting. South of the market and lounge we have a rainwater pond that can be used as an ice rink in the winter, and a picnic area that can be used by the site’s visitors and community members. The southern façade of the lounge that borders the picnic area will also serve as a community mural where locals can write words of inspiration on a chalk-painted wall. Other aspects of our plan help to bring a sense of history and cohesiveness to the site. Our first aspect is landscape. Kelton Ave used to be named Rose Ave, so we thought that it was important to bring roses into the landscape along with trees and other vegetation that borders and runs throughout the site.

Gateway archways reflecting the arches that used to power streetcars in Columbus.

Gateway archways reflecting the arches that used to power streetcars in Columbus.

We also will use arches that form a gateway over the entrance and exits in order to continue the streetcar concept and give the site identity. The pedestrian paths will be made out of repurposed brick from the torn down buildings in order to maintain history and the aesthetic of the site. One way vehicular circulation throughout the site also incorporates the streetcar concept, as the one-way loop resembles the route of a streetcar. There will also be handicap spaces available on the loop between the market area and the gallery.

The eastern most building, with the middle section that has a collapsed roof re-purposed as a garden between the gallery and lounge.

The eastern most building, with the middle section that has a collapsed roof re-purposed as a garden between the gallery and lounge.

Overview of eastern most building

Overview of eastern most building

Garden view, looking at gallery

Garden view, looking at gallery

Neighbors:

The residents surrounding the site may have issues with the increased traffic, and increased activity in the space that could disrupt their daily lives. However, they would most likely be more inclined to embrace the redevelopment of the site. It will bring in new economic opportunities for the residents, create a community oriented space, and will retain its historic value through the redevelopment of the eastern and western-most buildings.

 

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