Dwight D. Eisenhower and the Korean War

For my non-IA/campus event, I went to the “Reassessing Ike: Dwight D. Eisenhower and the Korean War” event at the Mershon Center on December 3rd. This event was a presentation focused on Eisenhower’s views on nuclear war and how that affected the use of nuclear weaponry during the 1950’s. In high school, I wrote a speech analysis essay on Eisenhower’s speech, “Atoms for Peace.” I went to this presentation because I thought I would understand it easier, as I have already written about it, and that it would add more information to what I wrote about. To my surprise, however, the presentation was focused on Eisenhower’s desire to use atomic weapons in the Korean War, and how he used threats of atomic bombing against the USSR, which was the complete opposite of his speech that I analyzed. The main point of the presentation was that Eisenhower’s experiences while serving in the Philippines affected how he handled the involvement of the United States in the Korean War.

 

While there, I networked with a political science professor named Jeff. We discussed my interest in international affairs and why we were both at the event, and he gave me some pretty helpful insight. He said that business and international studies is a good combination, and that I should try learning a foreign language. I told him that I knew Spanish, and that I plan on learning a third language, most likely Russian. He said that fluency is not the most important aspect of foreign language, what matters is being able to listen to and understand foreign media, such as a news broadcast. This made sense, as the media is an important part of culture in all countries. I appreciated the opportunity to network during this event, as I have only had one other opportunity when I participated in Buckeyes First. The networking skills that I learned from Buckeyes First came in handy when talking to Jeff. While I will probably never take a political science class, it is nice to know more faces on campus.

 

After the presentation, many people asked questions to the presenter, and it was clear that they paid attention and were curious on the subject. For example, one person asked what happened to the relationship between Eisenhower and Joseph McCarthy, as they were friends before they served in the Philippines. It turns out that their relationship diminished after serving, as they had very different viewpoints and opinions. Eisenhower even went as far as to call McCarthy a “clerk,” which was an insult towards his position in the government. The presenter was very prepared during the entire presentation and had answers for most of the questions afterwards.

 

I am glad I went to this event, as it gave me more insight on a moment of history that I did not know much about. It was interesting to learn about Eisenhower and the Korean War, and this whole opposite viewpoint than what I wrote about in high school. It was weird to learn that Eisenhower’s opinions on atomic weaponry changed so drastically, as what I knew was that he wanted peace between the United Nations and its enemies.

Breaking Stereotypes

For my academic requirement, I went to the Current Events Conversation with Sam Stelnicki on Stereotypes and Current Events of Africa. This event took place on October 26, 2018 at 4 pm. This event started off with a game of Kahoot based on African stereotypes. We then watched a video parody of organizations that raise money for children in Africa. To finish, Sam then went through a PowerPoint of facts about Africa and we discussed what we thought.

 

During the Kahoot game, I answered most of the questions incorrectly, which showed that I believed the stereotypes that I have heard about Africa. For example, one of the questions asked about what the highest cause of death is, and I answered Malaria. The correct answer, however, was upper respiratory infection, which really surprised me. Towards the end of the game, I started to think against the stereotypes and answer the questions correctly. Many people believe that the continent of Africa is really poor, so it would be believable that only a small percentage of Africans have cell phones. The truth is, however, that around 85% of Africans own a cell phone. This was one of the few questions that I answered correctly by ignoring the stereotypes surrounding the poverty of Africa. The Kahoot game made me realize that we, as people in a first-world country, only recognize the problems faced by our country. Just because there are countries that are economically behind does not mean that the people who live there cannot afford the same luxuries as us.

 

The video that we watched seemed like a legit commercial fighting against the poverty in Africa until the star of the video, who is an African child, started making fun of the script. When he was given a Danish pastry by the woman doing the charity appeal, he took a bite and then spat it out, exclaiming that it tasted poorly. The woman stated that we can “save Africa,” but it is shown that the kids are fine and do not need saving. It is clear to see that most charities She also asked the viewers to “please reach into [their] hearts and dig into [their] pockets.” It is sad that most charities just want people to donate money; that there is no reason behind their cause.

 

Going through the PowerPoint, we learned some interesting facts about Africa that I did not know before. In fact, I never realized that before coming to this event, my knowledge on Africa was very limited. One of the facts that I learned during the PowerPoint is that a majority of Kenya’s power supply is geothermal. After learning this, I asked Sam if when compared to countries such as the United Kingdom or the United States, Kenya’s power supply is more earth-friendly because they do not use as much. Sam said that was a good point to consider, but many people believe that cities in Africa are not as developed as cities in other countries, when really Africa has cities very similar to Columbus.

 

I was worried about coming to this event due to my lack of knowledge on Africa, but I am glad that I went. I definitely know more than I did, and I feel like I broke the stereotypes I had in my mind, but there is definitely more for me to learn about Africa.

Tree of Hope Project

For my service requirement, I went to the Tree of Hope Project with CRIS in room 163 of Smith-Steeb Hall. This event took place on September 25, 2018 at 7 pm. In this project, members of the International Affairs scholars program wrote cards to incoming refugee children going to school in Columbus. Learning about the situation that some of these refugee children were in gave me more of an understanding of the importance of the project. Everyone should feel included, and it is very difficult for refugee children to automatically come into school feeling like they belong. I believe that I gained a feeling of hope for the children from writing the cards.

This event relates to International Affairs because as a scholars program, we care about what is happening in other countries across the world, just as we are with what is happening in our country. Our interest in this project is welcoming the refugees to our country as they would welcome us to theirs. We (IA) heard about CRIS, the founder of the project, during our second community meeting. CRIS is a program that matches people, known as mentors, up with refugees, known as mentees, who are coming into Columbus and do not really have any connections. While the program is meant for everyone, the cards from the Tree of Hope project go to just refugee children in school.

While writing the cards, I noticed that everyone’s cards were different. Most of the cards had effort put into them, but in different ways. While some cards were more artistic, others were more plain, but had messages with them. This showed me that no one necessarily had to be artistic or have any art skills to participate in the project, the true meaning of the project was the thought put behind it.

In my first card, I wrote “Welcome!” on the front, and then “You matter. You are loved. We are so glad to have you here.” on the inside. For my second card, I wanted a Spanish-speaker to receive it, so I used what I have learned during my four years of Spanish in high school and in my Spanish 2202 class. I wrote “Ten un buen día. Te amamos.” which translates to “Have a good day. We love you.” Since the first two cards focused more on the message, I tried to make the third card showier. I am not artistic in any sense, but I put some effort into using multiple colors and making a border around the card.

I hope that when the refugee children receive these cards, they really take the time to look at them. I know many people in IA, including myself, really want these children to feel welcome, and that is why we participated in the project. I know that some kids will not feel left out or secluded, and they might not need the cards as much, but for some other kids, words of encouragement are exactly what they need. My biggest hope is that the cards that I wrote will brighten a refugee child’s day, because that was my intent while writing them.

Year in Review

[ “Year in Review”  is where you should reflect on the past year and show how you have evolved as a person and as a student.  You may want to focus on your growth in a particular area (as a leader, scholar, researcher, etc.) or you may want to talk about your overall experience over the past year.  For more guidance on using your ePortfolio, including questions and prompts that will help you get started, please visit the Honors & Scholars ePortfolio course in Carmen. To get answers to specific questions, please email eportfolio@osu.edu. Delete these instructions and add your own post.]

G.O.A.L.S.

[ “G.O.A.L.S.” is a place where students write about how their planned, current, and future activities may fit into the Honors & Scholars G.O.A.L.S.: Global Awareness, Original Inquiry, Academic Enrichment, Leadership Development, and Service Engagement. For more guidance on using your ePortfolio, including questions and prompts that will help you get started, please visit the Honors & Scholars ePortfolio course in Carmen. To get answers to specific questions, please email eportfolio@osu.edu. Delete these instructions and add your own post.

  • Global Awareness: Students cultivate and develop their appreciation for diversity and each individual’s unique differences. For example, consider course work, study abroad, involvement in cultural organizations or activities, etc.
  • Original Inquiry: Honors & Scholars students understand the research process by engaging in experiences ranging from in-class scholarly endeavors to creative inquiry projects to independent experiences with top researchers across campus and in the global community. For example, consider research, creative productions or performances, advanced course work, etc.
  • Academic Enrichment: Honors & Scholars students pursue academic excellence through rigorous curricular experiences beyond the university norm both in and out of the classroom.
  • Leadership Development: Honors & Scholars students develop leadership skills that can be demonstrated in the classroom, in the community, in their co-curricular activities, and in their future roles in society.
  • Service Engagement: Honors & Scholars students commit to service to the community.]

Career

[“Career” is where you can collect information about your experiences and skills that will apply to your future career.  Like your resume, this is information that will evolve over time and should be continually updated.  For more guidance on using your ePortfolio, including questions and prompts that will help you get started, please visit the Honors & Scholars ePortfolio course in Carmen. To get answers to specific questions, please email eportfolio@osu.edu. Delete these instructions and add your own post.]

Artifacts

[Artifacts are the items you consider to be representative of your academic interests and achievements. For each entry, include both an artifact and a detailed annotation.  An annotation includes both a description of the artifact and a reflection on why it is important to you, what you learned, and what it means for your next steps.  For more guidance on using your ePortfolio, including questions and prompts that will help you get started, please visit the Honors & Scholars ePortfolio course in Carmen. To get answers to specific questions, please email eportfolio@osu.edu. Delete these instructions and add your own post.]

About Me

[Your “About Me” is a brief biographical statement that might include your intended major, your academic interests, your goals, as well as the things that make you unique.  Definitely include a picture! Also, remember that you can always update this post at any point. For more guidance on using your ePortfolio, including questions and prompts that will help you get started, please visit the Honors & Scholars ePortfolio course in Carmen. To get answers to specific questions, please email eportfolio@osu.edu. Delete these instructions and add your own post.]