Using the BCC Field to Avoid a Mass-Email Faux Pas

Use of the BCC field to avoid a mass-email faux pas.

Did you know you can use the BCC field to avoid the awkwardness of mass replies to your emails?

In Outlook for Mac:

Outlook for Windows:

Outlook Web App (in a web browser):

You will first need to click the BCC button in the right upper corner.

A commonly asked question is, “If I put the recipient’s email address in the BCC field, what do I put in the ‘To’ field?” You do not need to put any address in the “To” field as long as you have an address in the BCC field. You can also address the email to yourself for archiving purposes.

If you are not seeing the BCC field, it may be hidden from your view in Options. Support documentation for Microsoft Office describes how you can show the BCC field.

Friendly reminder about remote access to CON drives:

You can access CON drives when you are not in Newton Hall by using our remote desktop server:

http://remote.con.ohio-state.edu/

Apple TV coming to all College of Nursing classrooms

The CON IT team is equipping all Newton Hall classrooms to be compatible with Apple devices (iPads, iPhones, Macbooks) so you can wirelessly project from your devices to the projector and screens in the classrooms. Currently, rooms 264 and 172 are ready to go with this new capability. Our plan is to equip all of our classrooms with Apple AirPlay this summer. For a step-by-step guide on how to connect your Apple device to the CON classroom equipment, follow the instructions on the wall near the classroom podium or refer to our one-page guide, Using the Apple TV.

Erik Yarberry installs Apple TV in Newton 172

Erik Yarberry installs Apple TV in Newton 172

John Pryba tests the Apple TV in Newton 172

John Pryba tests the Apple TV in Newton 172

Check out NLN TEQ Blog

The National League for Nursing (NLN) TEQ Blog is a resource for nurse educators and faculty who want to stay up to date with innovations in simulation, e-learning, telehealth, and informatics.  It is managed by the NLN Center for Innovation in Simulation and Technology.  Their latest post, Ace.P Unfolding Case – Thomas Sykes, presents a pediatric case study focused on a community approach and provides free resources for download. Another post discusses findings from a national survey on tech growth in nursing education.  Check out the wealth of resources for nurse faculty on this site at nlnteq.org.

Upcoming Qualtrics Changes

If you use Qualtrics for research or administrative purposes, you may be affected by upcoming changes to the system.  You can learn more about the changes and take further steps based on the information below:

 

Microsoft Exchange Online is Coming to the College of Nursing

By the end of this fiscal year, Ohio State Office of the Chief Information Officer (OCIO) will migrate our email accounts from local servers to Exchange Online from Microsoft (MS).  This will increase email storage, simplify integration with other MS Office services and improve stewardship of university resources by leveraging the high-quality cloud services that are now available.

Your email, calendar items, contacts, tasks and notes will be migrated to the cloud after university business hours on July 16, 2018. Please close your Outlook and Skype for Business/Lync clients at the end of your work day on July 16, 2018.  After migration, OCIO will send a follow-up email to confirm your account was migrated to Exchange Online successfully. Because email accounts will be migrated in nightly batches, if you access other calendars and email accounts (in addition to your primary lastname.# account), you may notice a temporary disruption in permissions.  Any interruption will be temporary and will only occur if some accounts that you access have been migrated online, and others have yet to be migrated. To help you prepare, an Exchange migration checklist and additional Skype tips are available online. Your Outlook client or device should automatically reconfigure after your migration. If it did not reconfigure, be sure that you are using a supported client and/or mobile application.

You can check Microsoft’s online system requirements for Office. These requirements also apply to Exchange Online. If you have additional questions, please contact the IT Service Desk via online Self Service, or by phone at 614-688-4357 (HELP).  If you run into any issues after the date of your migration, please also feel free to contact the CON IT team at con-it@osu.edu.

 

Flash Friday recap: Remote Access and Network Drives in the CON

In the College of Nursing’s latest Flash Friday, Erik Yarberry from the CON IT department explained in easy-to-understand language how he keeps us securely connected with each other and with our data.  He answered the following questions:
~ How do VPN and the Remote Desktop really work?
~ What are the differences between our CON network drives? Which ones can I access and when?
~ Why can’t I keep things on my own desktop on Remote Desktop? Why shouldn’t I keep a bunch of files and folders on my own computer desktop?
~ How does Duo work?

If you missed his half-hour webinar, you can view the recording online.

He displayed a pair of great side-by-side diagrams illustrating the difference between our Remote Desktop and VPN.  Here they are!

Remote Desktop Server Overview

VPN Overview

Creating Flashcards on H5P

The previous blog entry showed how to make a basic accordion style review tool on H5P. This entry will teach you how to use H5P to create online flashcards. The online flashcard tool is a great way to present a large amount of study material, as long as the material requires only a brief explanation or rationale. The process is a bit more complex than the accordion style list, but the outcome is much more customizable. Below is an example flashcard set to study commonly used medical abbreviations. Most of these cards are simply text on both sides. Cards 3 and 4 give examples of how to use audio and image clues on a flashcard set.

To create a flashcard set, start at the H5P content screen (you will need to create a free account) and select “dialog cards” from the drop down menu.

These first dialogue boxes will set the title for your project, the title that appears at the top of the card pile, and the general instructions for the card pile.

The first dialogue box for your card will determine what shows on the front of the card. The second dialogue box shows what will appear on the back of your card. Initially, you will only have one blank card. To add more cards, you must click the blue “add dialog” button on the left menu.

Card 3 is unique in that I added an audio clue to the card. To do this, scroll down until you see the section for “audio files” then click on the grey rectangle to upload your audio file. You can upload audio files with a URL or from uploading a saved MP3 from your computer. It’s also possible to record your own audio files to upload. It’s important to be aware of any copyrights your file may have, and to cite them properly. Citations will appear in the “Rights of Use” button on your flashcard set.

Card 4 is unique because it has a visual clue that appears on the card (images will appear on the front and back of the card). Images are uploaded just like audio files, except you will upload images under the “image” section. Just like audio files, be aware of the copyrights your image may have and cite them properly.

At the bottom of the page you will have the option to further edit actions and behaviors of the card deck. For this tutorial I left those options as default, but I encourage you to play with them and contact CON IT for any additional assistance you may need. You will also have the option of editing what buttons will appear on the final flash card deck. Once you are satisfied with your flashcard deck, click the pink “save” button. If you followed the directions posted here, you should end up with a deck identical to the one at the top of this blog post. For help configuring your deck, or assistance in implementing flashcards in your classes or study groups, please contact CON IT for additional assistance.

 

 

An Introduction to Using H5P

In this post, I will show you how to create an accordion list, one of the many tools on H5P. Below is an example I created of an accordion to review physiology. In this example, the student is presented with a question  to consider, and then the student can double check their answer by clicking on the accordion to reveal more information. One of the benefits of an accordion list is that it can organize and present broad answers with a lot of information. Accordion lists can be embedded into Carmen to condense large chunks of information and can be given to students as an assignment to complete or as a study guide. Accordion lists are especially useful in organizing long blocks of text into digestible pieces of information, as in complicated assignment instructions or longer discussion postings. Please try out the interactive accordion below:

The creation of an accordion list is quite simple. Follow this link  to get to H5P’s content creation page (you will also need to create a free account). Once there, click on the bar in the center of the page labeled “select content type,” and “accordion” will be the first choice. After selecting “accordion” and clicking the blue “use” button, you will be presented with a blank template. In the image below I have given the list the title “Physiology Review.” The current template has one blank form. To create a second blank form, you will need to hit the blue “add panel” button (circled in red).

The following images shows how I filled out the forms to create the interactive example at the top of the page (click on the image for a larger view):

Following these steps will create an accordion list identical to the one you see at the top of this blog post. All that’s left is to finalize the list at the bottom of the page:

 

If you want to add more content, you can continue to add more panels by clicking the blue “add panel” button. If you want to edit the display buttons on your accordion list, you can do so with the check boxes. If you are finished and want to see the completed list, click the pink “save” button.

Saving will take you to a finalized version of your accordion list. If you want to make edits to your list, you can do so by clicking the “edit” button. If you want to download a copy of your list or get the embed code, you can do so by clicking the respective buttons. If you don’t want the option to have download or embed buttons, you can remove them by deselecting the check boxes on the previous screen. For assistance using the H5P accordion list in your classroom, please contact the CON IT Department for support.

Citing media from digital resources

This post will provide a walk-through for citing digital media using the American Psychological Association (APA) format. This is the most common citation style for scientific papers. Proper citation is important in that it gives credit to the original authors and owners of referenced works, and it gives readers of your paper a way to research and verify the sources that you used.

  • Citing a Video Link:

Example:

Citation:

In-Text Citations:

The video should be referenced in the text, like this:

“The OSU marching band put on an amazing halftime show (the Lantern, 2012).”

or

“The Lantern (2012) highlights the skill of the OSU marching band.”

  • Citing an Image/Graph/Chart:

The image should have a caption that includes:

  1. The word Figure (with a capital letter and in italics)
  2. A number (starting with 1, increasing in numerical order with each new figure)
  3. A title for the figure or brief description of the work
  4. The owner and publication date in parenthesis

Example:

Figure 1. Ohio State Buckeyes Logo (Buckeyes1186, 2013)

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Citation:

In text citation:

The figure should be referenced in the text, like this:

“As Figure 1 shows, OSU has the best school logo.”

  • Citing a Table

The table should have the following information:

Above the table:

Include the word Table with its number next to it (starting at 1) and a title which describes the contents of the table. Title should be in italics and capitalized in sentence case.

Below the table:

A table should be able to be understood on its own, even outside of the context of the rest of the paper. A note under the table can be used to provide extra information and context.

Example:

Citation:

In-text citation:

The table should be referenced in the text, like this:

“As shown in Table 1, I assume you will have a perfect understanding of APA formatting after reading this post.”

  • Additional Tips:

Some web resources may choose to include their reference list without the usual APA-style hanging indent because hanging indents will not display correctly on certain blogs and web platforms (See an example).  The reference entries you see above are image files intended to demonstrate how hanging indent should display in APA style.

It is important to be aware of the ownership rights of media you choose to replicate. Some sources of free use images are:

When in Doubt, Don’t Click! Avoid Email Phishing Attempts

You have probably been told in the past not to click links in emails from unknown sources, and you probably follow that rule to the letter.  Phishing attempts become more legitimate-looking every day.

When thinking about whether to click on a link, please remember these basic rules (explained in more detail in this Wired.com article):

  1. Always think twice before clicking a link in an email
  2. Consider the source (first, look at who sent the email, then hover over the link– but don’t click!– and see if the link leads to a website you recognize and trust)
  3. Report phishing attempts, or suspected attempts, to report-phish@osu.edu

Some recent items we have noticed in phishing attempts include the following:

  • Email addresses that look like OSU emails, but if you search the names at osu.edu/findpeople, no results will come up
  • Use of OSU logos, legitimate-looking email layouts, and legitimate email addresses/websites listed under the signature or in the header
  • Simple-looking emails that ask you to click a link to “validate” or “secure” your email, storage, or other information
  • Emails that look like they are written by a friend/colleague but with unknown email addresses or referring to a conversation you never had

Below are some recent examples that faculty and staff at the College of Nursing have reported.  Click on the image to view it full-size.

Examples of Recent Phishing Emails

This email has been flagged by the administrator as a possible phishing attempt (red flag #1), and if you hover over the link without clicking, you’ll see it does not go to a osu.edu webpage. Also please note the convincing-looking signature line, and the very suspicious line above this assuring you that it is legitimate.

See that the link above does not lead to my.osu.edu, and note the grammatical errors in the email.

The above email contains a link that does not lead to a osu.edu page.  It also contains questionable grammar such as “All staffs and students” and “portal to access the below”.

The link in the above email does not seem legitimate, and the “From” line of the email seems odd too, as it does not have an email address but only a name. I looked up the sender below for more information.

It turns out, the “sender” is a real OSU employee, but if you notice in the original email, the “From” box has a comma between last name and first and in the center of the email the comma is missing. If you do not know the sender or you are not expecting an email from them, assume this is a phishing attempt.

Sometimes it helps to do a Google Search or a “Find People” search on the sender of an email. Above is what I found out about “Wilhem Veen,” a name which appeared numerous times above.

 

Thanks for reading! Please remember to always consider the source and hover over links before clicking them. When in doubt, don’t click! Forward any suspicious emails to report-phish@osu.edu

 

 

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