Qualitative Methods in Nursing Education

If you are evaluating your teaching practice or student interactions from the student perspective, you may have asked questions that factual data and numbers cannot answer.  You may need to explore qualitative research methods to find answers to questions about how students experience nursing education.  Dr. Judy Tate presented a workshop on the basics of qualitative research methods in nursing education on July 16, 2019, to share with faculty how a qualitative approach might facilitate exploration and development of innovative strategies in teaching and learning.  Judy covered the following topics:

  • General description of qualitative research designs
  • Knowing when qualitative designs are a good fit
  • Discussion of types of qualitative data
  • Steps in data collection and analysis in educational settings
  • Application of a basic qualitative approach to examples from healthcare education

View the recording of Judy’s session, and access her presentation and other materials.

Using Data Visualization for Learning, Research, and Quality Improvement

Tableau, one type of visualization software, can be used as a tool for teaching informatics and how to convey meaning behind data. It can also be used to share research and quality improvement project results. Dr. Lyn Hardy presented an overview of data visualization use in research presentations and funding proposals at the CON on June 18, 2019. She also described how Tableau is being used to educate OSU doctoral students in data use for patient care and leadership. Lyn concluded the session with a brief overview of Tableau and how it is used within the context of a pain data set. View a recording of Lyn’s workshop, and contact her if you would like to know more about data visualization with Tableau.  Her workshop slides are also available.

Manuscript Revision Tips

You have written your paper, submitted it, and now it comes back with numerous comments and suggestions and a four-week turnaround! What next? In this May 8 session for the Academy for Teaching Innovation, Excellence, and Scholarship, Dr. Rita Pickler described a general approach to responding to reviewer comments and offered some suggestions for addressing some of the “stickier” issues that reviewers raise. If you anticipate needing to grapple with the challenging task of responding to peer-reviewer feedback on your manuscripts, this session is for you. 
A recording of the session is available to people with an OSU username and password.

Three Tips for Carmen Course Setup

We have only a few days between spring and summer semesters to set up summer Carmen courses, so it’s important to be as efficient as possible during course setup.  These tips might help.

  1.  Page History:  Your Carmen course pages might have beautiful pictures and text formatting that can be ruined with just a single swipe of a misplaced cursor.  If you save changes on a Carmen page that you later regret, there is a solution!  Access Page History at the three-vertical-dots menu on the right side of the page (see 1 in the image below).  You can go back to a previous version of the page where you last saved changes you actually want.  For more detailed instructions, see the Canvas documentation.
  2.  Auto-open File Viewer:  Sometimes, you want a file that is attached to a page in Carmen to open automatically for students so they view it in the Carmen page rather than needing to download it and open it as an attachment.  Enable the “Auto-Open for Inline Preview” option to make this happen.  See the Canvas documentation on this feature.
  3.  I often hear requests for image sources where instructors can find “free” pictures to use in their courses.  Keeping in mind that many pictures on the internet can be copied at no cost, images should always be cited just like written resources are.  If you aren’t sure whether you should use an image or not, please contact your CON-IT team or your copyright librarian for more information.  You can find images that are designated for reuse by others at the following sites:

OSU Photography – scroll to the bottom of the page and click “Browse signature photo gallery”; mainly OSU-themed and higher-education-themed pictures
OSU Digital Storytelling – suggests sites that enable searches for content labeled for reuse
Unsplash – beautiful images on general topics (very few medical pictures)
Pixabay – another site with general image topics
HSL image resources – specific medical images for teaching related purposes; these have very specific terms of use listed here

Many thanks to Sarah Rusnak in the School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences for sharing these resources and collaborating on these important Carmen tips!

Apple TV coming to all College of Nursing classrooms

The CON IT team is equipping all Newton Hall classrooms to be compatible with Apple devices (iPads, iPhones, Macbooks) so you can wirelessly project from your devices to the projector and screens in the classrooms. Currently, rooms 264 and 172 are ready to go with this new capability. Our plan is to equip all of our classrooms with Apple AirPlay this summer. For a step-by-step guide on how to connect your Apple device to the CON classroom equipment, follow the instructions on the wall near the classroom podium or refer to our one-page guide, Using the Apple TV.

Erik Yarberry installs Apple TV in Newton 172

Erik Yarberry installs Apple TV in Newton 172

John Pryba tests the Apple TV in Newton 172

John Pryba tests the Apple TV in Newton 172

How People Learn II: Learners, Contexts and Cultures

An important update to a National Academies Press resource on teaching and learning is now available online as a downloadable PDF book. The book incorporates research from the past two decades to expand on the original report from 2000. How People Learn II includes chapters that summarize theories related to learning and knowledge, theories related to motivation to learn, and use of digital technology for learning. These summaries can be very helpful when we are designing learning interventions and collecting evidence of their effectiveness in the process of educating nurses. The new (and free) edition of this book can make underpinning your learning design with theory and evaluating the outcomes a little easier.

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2018). How people learn II: Learners, contexts, and cultures. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/24783

Teaching Online Pedagogical Repository (TOPR)

The University of Central Florida offers an open, online resource–the Teaching Online Pedagogical Repository (TOPR)–that provides specific strategies and innovative ideas for faculty and instructional designers who teach online. Each entry describes a strategy used by online and blended teaching faculty, depicts this strategy with examples from actual courses, and is aligned with findings from research or professional practice literature. The TOPR editorial board is currently seeking submissions related to using online discussions to engage students. Have you ever used any of the following strategies in your online or blended discussions?
  • Engaging your students in Socratic questioning
  • Playing devil’s advocate to promote critical thinking
  • Managing online discussions in large classes
  • Scaffolding to promote critical thinking
  • Creating effective online discussion objectives
  • Supporting collaborative work
If you use any of the strategies listed above, or if you think you have a particularly unique or innovative online interaction strategy you would like to share, consider creating a submission to TOPR. Read more about how to contribute to this resource.

Kaizen: A Gaming Platform for Academic and Patient Education

Carolynn Thomas Jones and her colleagues presented a webinar on Kaizen, a gamification platform for teaching and learning. Kaizen has been used in academic programs in public health and nursing, including our own MACPR courses, to teach students about clinical research quality management and Good Clinical Practices (GCPs). Presenters for this session shared their experience with Kaizen and their development process for a game-manager user manual (their “field guide” to Kaizen). If you’ve been considering integration of an element of gamification in your course, this platform might be the tool you need!

View the webinar recording to find out more.

Skype for Business Basics

If you’ve ever had trouble creating or joining a Skype for Business meeting, or if your meeting attendees have ever had trouble joining, this 20-minute walk-through by Rourick David of the CON IT department is a must-view Flash Friday recording.  Learn how to create a Skype for Business meeting in Outlook and send invitations to your participants, no matter whether you are using Mac or Windows, or the Outlook  application on your computer or browser-based Outlook web app.  View the process of joining a meeting to better understand the meeting participant’s experience, especially the “lobby” people sometimes find themselves stuck in.  Find out how you can decide whether Skype for Business or Zoom is the better option for your meeting.

View the Flash Friday recording.

Kaizen: A Gamification Platform for Academic and Patient Education

When: Tuesday, November 13, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.
Where: OSU CCTS, 240 Prior Hall
Join CON faculty member Carolynn Thomas Jones and her colleagues from University of Alabama at Birmingham to learn about Kaizen, a gamification platform for teaching and learning.  Kaizen has been used in academic programs in public health and nursing, including our own MACPR courses where students learn about clinical research quality management.  If you’ve been considering integrating an element of gamification in your course, find out if this platform might be just what you need.

UAB KAIZEN

A Gamification Platform for Academic Education, Training & Patient Education 

November 13, 2018; OSU CCTS, 240 Prior Hall

AGENDA

10:00      Welcome, Introductions (Carolynn Jones, Becky Jackson)

10:15      James H. Willig, MD, MSPH, Associate Professor,

UAB Division of Infectious Diseases

  • What is KAIZEN? The Story, The Applications, Future Plans

11:00      David Redden, PhD, Professor and Vice Chair of Biostatistics

UAB School of Public Health

  • R2T Kaizen; Academic applications (Biostatistics)

11:45      Penny Jester, MPH, RN, Instructor OSU CON/MACPR; Clinical Research Educator/Consultant

Carolynn Jones, DNP, MSPH, RN, Associate Professor, OSU College of Nursing/MACPR

  • Kaizen at UAB College of Nursing- Academic Courses and Patient Education
  • Kaizen at OSU: Quality Kaizen – MACPR Quality Course: NUR7482
  • In the Works: GCP Kaizen

12:15      Q&A Discussions, Demonstrations

1:00       Adjourn

Additional information on Kaizen

An invitation from MACPR faculty member, Carolynn Thomas Jones:

On Tuesday, November 13 (10-1pm ET), members of the CCTS at the University of Alabama at Birmingham are going to join faculty from the CON MACPR program to present the use of gamification for academic learning, training, and patient education. The game platform was developed by James Willig, MD at UAB for the purpose of educating interns and residents in the UAB internal medicine program via a gamification platform he has named Kaizen. It was a huge success with intensive engagement and a marked increase in board scores. Since that time, this gamification platform has been used for multiple academic programs in public health and nursing academic education, to train rigor, responsibility and transparency to translational scientists. It has also been used in nursing for patient education. Carolynn Jones and Penny Jester have used it in one of the MACPR Courses addressing clinical research quality management and are currently working on a Kaizen game for GCP training under a UAB CCTS supplement award. If you are interested in learning about this platform and toying with the idea of gamification in your courses or nursing applications, please RSVP by email to Terri Ryan at theresa.ryan@osumc.edu. We will be meeting at the OSU CCTS- Room 240 Prior.