Update your CarmenConnect Add-in

Please check your ability to open and use a meeting room well before your next CarmenConnect meeting!  If Connect isn’t working for you, follow the instructions below.

If you are a Windows user, you can download and install the latest add-in from https://helpx.adobe.com/adobe-connect/connect-downloads-updates.html. The new add-in will install over your current version–no need to uninstall the old add-in.  You may need to restart your browser or your computer.

If you are a Mac user, you’ll need to do the following:

1) Uninstall the previous add-in.  Follow these instructions carefully, and be sure to empty your trash bin before you install the new add-in: https://helpx.adobe.com/adobe-connect/kb/uninstall-connect-92-add-in.html

2) Install the add-in available here: https://helpx.adobe.com/adobe-connect/connect-downloads-updates.html

3) Restart your computer.

The instructions above are for your reference when working on your personal devices. If you experience any problems with your personal system, please contact OSU 8HELP at 614-688-4357 or 8help@osu.edu

Taking Notes in Nearpod

Nearpod is a interactive classroom presentation tool that can help students become more engaged in the classroom. Not only is this tool great for professors who want their students to experience more active learning through presentations containing polls and quizzes, but it also contains features to make the classroom setting less stressful for students.

One of these features is the note-taking component. With this component, students will be able to save all of the slides in a lecture, along with extra notes they can add to each slide, to either their email or Google Docs. This will enable students to pay more attention to what their professor is saying in lecture instead of scrambling to re-type each slide in their notes. This way, the student will have all the necessary information from the lecture slides, and have the time to type out extra notes that the professor may express verbally.

How to Capture Your Notes in Nearpod

When in a Nearpod presentation, click the arrow in the upper right hand corner.

 

Click the option that says “Notes.”

 

You will now be able to type extra notes in the grayed-out bar at the bottom of the screen.

This is an example of notes being typed out under the slide.

 

When the lecture is over, make sure to click the “Share” tab in the lower right hand corner in order to save your notes.

Now, you can either send the notes to your email or to your Google Drive.

 

If you send the notes to your email, it will download as a Word document. This is how your saved notes will look. They will contain all the slides, and any additional notes you added to a slide will appear under the slide.

Do you have questions about how to take notes in Nearpod? Email CON-S-help@osu.edu.

Embedding VoiceThread Videos into a Page/Post

This post will walk you through the steps to embed a video on a webpage.  The images here show how to embed a VoiceThread video into a u.osu.edu webpage, but the same basic instructions can be used to embed videos into your Carmen classroom pages as well.

After you have created a video in VoiceThread, click on the “menu” button to the top left and click “Share”

In the “Share” menu, click on “Embed”

Click to copy the embed code, and be sure to check the boxes if you want others to be able to view and/or comment on your video:

Now, after logging into u.osu.edu and going to the site you want to embed your video into, click on the title of the page or post where you want the video to go (or, create a new page or post)

In the “edit” screen, click “Add Media”

When the menu opens, click on “Insert Embed Code”

Now press “ctrl + v” or right click and click “paste” to paste the embed code into the box, and click “Insert Into Post”:

Now your video is embedded in the page. Be sure to “Update” or “Publish” your page to save your changes!

 

If you want to embed a video in a Carmen page, click on the “HTML editor” button and then paste the embed code into the page:

Office 365 for Personal Computers

The Office of the Chief Information Officer (OCIO) is rolling out Office 365 for faculty and staff on July 25, 2017. The following products will be available as part of the phase one release:

  • Office 365 ProPlus – Mac/PC Licenses for full Office installs; enables Mobile Office
  • Office Online – Work in the cloud using Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote, and PDF documents in your web browser
  • OneDrive for Business – One (1) terabyte of cloud storage; needed for Office Online
  • Sway – Easily create engaging, interactive, web-based reports and presentations
  • Forms – Quizzing function available through Office 365
  • Planner – Create new plans, build a team, assign tasks, and update status in a few easy steps
  • Delve – Discover current information likely to be most interesting to you across Office 365

To get started with Office 365 for faculty and staff, refer to the Office 365 Employees article as well as the FAQ for employees on Office 365. For information on the data that can and cannot be placed in OneDrive for Business, consult the Ohio State Institutional Data Policy.To access Office 365, use the office365.osu.edu webpage.

To log in, click the ‘Faculty/Staff’ button and use your lastname.#@osu.edu and password. If you are a student as well as a university employee, you will have two Office 365 accounts: for one, you will use your lastname.#@osu.edu to log in, and you will use your lastname.#@buckeyemail.osu.edu to log in to the other. It is important to note that if an employee is also a student, they will have two separate and unique accounts, one for employee work and one for student work. They must log into each separately.

To install Office 365, refer to the Installation of Office for Windows/Mac for Employees Knowledge Base article. Note: Office 365 should NOT be installed on any Ohio State-managed equipment. Employees must contact their local IT before attempting an installation on university managed computers.

Add Recent Announcements to your Carmen (Canvas) Homepage

If you’ve ever thought that your students might not be getting all of your course communications by email or through Carmen (Canvas) announcements, try this clever idea (and best practice) from Hollie Moots.  Consistent class communication will improve, and questions directed to your email inbox will decrease.  Take 2.5 minutes to learn more from Hollie in her demonstration video (below).

Panopto – Which link is which?

If you are an instructor and you receive any Panopto “ready to view” emails, you might be wondering which link is which.

Long story short, choose the “View” link. We suggest you actually click on it, make sure it plays fine, and then copy the link from the web browser instead of your email.

Otherwise, here is a breakdown of an example “ready to view” message.

Panopto Ready to View Example

View: This is the link you want to share with students! We suggest you click on it to make sure it works properly. Then copy this link from your web browser and paste it into Canvas (or an email or however you want to share it with others).

Edit: If you know how to make some basic edits to your lecture, this link will take you to the Panopto website. You’ll need to log in if you aren’t already.

Share: Please do not confuse this with the View link! This allows you to check the sharing settings on your lecture.

Additional output formats: You will likely not use this, but if you do, you get different options on the ways your lecture can be viewed. These options are mainly for video and audio podcast versions.

Cybersecurity Part 3: Educate Yourself About Web Addresses

In our first two posts about Cybersecurity, we defined different threats and discussed what the College of Nursing IT department does, as well as what you can do, to protect our data at the College of Nursing.  This post will go over some additional information about reading website addresses that will help you to be safer when browsing the web.

Below in black/blue/red/green you can see the full web address of the RN to BSN program introduction on the CON website.  You will notice four distinct parts of the address. Below, we will go over those parts of the web address.

Http(s): The letters “http” ahead of a website signify the Hypertext Transfer Protocol, and the “S” added here indicates that the connection is encrypted (or, coded to keep unauthorized viewers from seeing the information being transferred).

Domain: The domain name is the name of the website that you are accessing. In the case above, nursing.osu.edu is the domain name of the College of Nursing.  All of the subsequent pages that you can reach from the College of Nursing’s website are “nested” into this domain.  In this particular case, nursing.osu.edu is connected to the overall osu.edu domain which you can reach by clicking the link at the very top of the page.  In much the same way that books have chapters with sub sections, the larger “osu.edu” domain connects to the smaller “nursing.osu.edu” domain which has many pages attached to it.

Extension: The extension tells us what kind of website we are accessing.  In this case, the “.edu” extension indicates that this is a higher educational institution.  Other common domain names are listed on this Wikipedia page.  It’s good to be familiar with the most used extensions, because in recent years, fake websites have popped up that may lead you to think they are legitimate. For example, the real website for the ABC News television station is abcnews.go.com.  Recently, a fake site popped up with the web address abcnews.go.co* (notice this site ends with “.co” instead of the usual “.com”) that mimicked the real website quite convincingly.

Path: The series of words with forward slashes that follow the website extension tell your computer where to look in the domain of the website– this is basically a nested series of pages. So, in the example above, the RN to BSN program introduction connects to the undergraduate program overview page which can be found on the academic program page.

Now that you know the basic elements of a web address, try paying attention to the addresses that common links take you to.  Whenever you see a domain name that seems off (like “gooogle.com” for instance), an extension you don’t recognize such as “.co”, or you don’t trust the provider of the link, DON’T CLICK!  You can find some helpful hints from these pages as well:

How to Spot a Fake Website

Reading Web Addresses

 

*For those of you who are now terrified of clicking on a bad link, we’re glad you’re paying attention! The link above to the fake ABC website will just take you to a Wikipedia page describing the site, so feel free to check it out this time.

 

 

Accessing older CarmenCanvas courses

If you are on the Carmen landing page and are trying to access older courses, here’s a simple trick to make them show up.

Click on the “Load More Courses” button on the right side under Filter.

Load More Courses

Now you’ll see more courses. In this example, the list now includes SU16 and AU16. The search feature will also find your older courses from those semesters.

Hide Added Courses
To go back to viewing more recent courses, click on the same button (which now says “Hide Added Courses”).