“Your Password is ______.

Brace yourself for the latest in email scams: “Your password is ____”
Scammers are getting exceptionally clever lately and have started sending out very scary and convincing emails. These emails usually put a user’s actual password in the subject line to make it more credible, claim that they’ve hacked the recipient’s computer, and threaten to release very personal information to friends and family via social media if the scammer isn’t paid a large amount of money. While this is a very convincing trick, it’s still only a trick.

Here’s how they do it:

When websites get hacked, attackers often make off with a database of usernames, email addresses, and “hashed” (encrypted) passwords. While the passwords aren’t immediately useful, the hashes are usually posted to the internet where they can be reverse engineered and decrypted. If you were one of the affected users, anyone in the world can get a copy of your email and the password you used for that site.

Here’s a couple tips you can use to protect yourself:

  • Check https://haveibeenpwned.com. Enter your email address(es) into the field to see if any of your addresses have ever been affected by a breach. If so, you should assume that the password you used for that site is compromised and you should change it on any and all sites that share that password.
  • Use unique passwords for each website. If you use a password manager likechttps://www.lastpass.com/ or https://1password.com/, you can generate unique, secure passwords for every service you use and never have to remember them. If a site you use ever gets breached, attackers will only have your password for that site, instead of every site you use.
  • Change your passwords often, especially if you are informed that a service you use has been breached.

 

 

 

 

More phishing: Avoid taking the bait!

Please be especially vigilant for phishing emails. We’ve noticed an increased number of suspicious messages coming to faculty and students that are particularly clever.

Features of the current campaign have included:

  • Messages sent as a “reply to” a message already in the infected user’s inbox, which makes it harder to detect.
  • The body of the message does not contain a greeting, a signature or an explanation for why the user would be sending you a link rather than including the information in the message.  Messages may appear similar to this screenshot below.
  • Messages include a link that directs you to an unrecognized, possibly malicious site (usually addresses that end in something other than “osu.edu,” as depicted in the screenshot below).

The Office of the Chief Information Officer is working on this issue. In the meantime, please do click any links in suspicious emails and forward all suspicious emails to report-phish@osu.edu.

8-31-18 Proctorio Flash Friday Presentation

Proctorio has been available in Carmen for a few months now. This tool allows for online proctoring of exams with settings that can be adjusted for a variety of scenarios (for example, an open book exam or a group exam). John Pryba and Alice Teall gave a Flash Friday presentation about the tool, including how to enable it in a course, set up a quiz to use it, and how to view reports.

Watch the recording of the presentation and learn more about Proctorio on the ODEE website.

 

Link Validator in Carmen, and other tools to double-check your course

At the beginning of each semester, instructors often wonder if the pages and links they copied from their previous semester’s course transferred in good working order to the new, current-semester copy of their course.  There are many reasons a link that worked perfectly last semester might not work this semester, so it is best practice to check your Carmen course links at least once per term. Carmen has a handy link validator that will do this (mostly) automatically for you.  In your Carmen course, go to Settings > Validate Links in Content. The link validator will cause a process to run that identifies links in your course that may be problematic, and it will even tell you the reason for the problem.

If you have questions about using this tool, please let us know in the CON-IT department.  Also, check out the additional ways you can double-check your course for errors and usability according to the Canvas community.

Course Link Validator

Course Link Validator

Assessing the Quality of Multiple Choice Questions

I am often asked about how one knows whether a multiple choice question is “good” or not. Expertise in the field always makes the final decision, but there are guidelines and statistics that can provide very helpful support in writing and refining multiple choice questions.

Nikole Hicks, PhD, RN, CNE, wrote a Fairness of Items tool (FIT) to guide writing and assessment of multiple choice questions. Read more about her development of this tool. I have her permission to share it with OSU College of Nursing faculty, so email me (Joni) to obtain a copy.

If you are somewhat familiar with statistics and need a quick guide to quiz item analysis, refer to this PDF from Anne Schoening, PhD, RN CNE.

A more detailed explanation of item analysis of quiz questions is presented in this article McGahee and Ball (2009). You can access the full text of the article through the OSU Health Sciences Library.

As always, please consult with the your instructional design experts on the CON-IT team if you need additional assistance with question writing and evaluation.

Adobe Spark for Presentations

We have an exciting new presentation tool available for you and your students to use at OSU:  Adobe Spark!  As of July 1, you can log in to Adobe Spark Premium with your OSU credentials to create beautiful presentations with video, images, and buttons that take you to web sites. Find out how to get started (it’s easy!) and learn more about using Spark at Adobe.com, or email us at con-it@osu.edu (students please email con-s-help@osu.edu) and we’ll be happy to assist.

How can I use it?

Adobe Spark presentations can be used for student assignments, conference presentations, and everything in between! Check out the presentation below to see what a Spark Presentation can be:
Exploring GBD
View additional example presentations from education in the Adobe Spark gallery.

Microsoft Exchange Online is Coming to the College of Nursing

By the end of this fiscal year, Ohio State Office of the Chief Information Officer (OCIO) will migrate our email accounts from local servers to Exchange Online from Microsoft (MS).  This will increase email storage, simplify integration with other MS Office services and improve stewardship of university resources by leveraging the high-quality cloud services that are now available.

Your email, calendar items, contacts, tasks and notes will be migrated to the cloud after university business hours on July 16, 2018. Please close your Outlook and Skype for Business/Lync clients at the end of your work day on July 16, 2018.  After migration, OCIO will send a follow-up email to confirm your account was migrated to Exchange Online successfully. Because email accounts will be migrated in nightly batches, if you access other calendars and email accounts (in addition to your primary lastname.# account), you may notice a temporary disruption in permissions.  Any interruption will be temporary and will only occur if some accounts that you access have been migrated online, and others have yet to be migrated. To help you prepare, an Exchange migration checklist and additional Skype tips are available online. Your Outlook client or device should automatically reconfigure after your migration. If it did not reconfigure, be sure that you are using a supported client and/or mobile application.

You can check Microsoft’s online system requirements for Office. These requirements also apply to Exchange Online. If you have additional questions, please contact the IT Service Desk via online Self Service, or by phone at 614-688-4357 (HELP).  If you run into any issues after the date of your migration, please also feel free to contact the CON IT team at con-it@osu.edu.

 

Choose the Best Answer:  (a) Multiple Choice Quizzes or (b) Specification Grading

If you’ve ever felt the tension between multiple-choice tests and more complex assessments of learning, you are not alone.  Read this EdSurge article on specification grading and its potential advantages over multiple choice exams for student assessment.

The grading tools in CarmenCanvas might make specification grading an efficient approach to engaging your students and finding out more about the course content they have learned and can apply to problems.  The article also makes a case for the right time and way to use multiple choice tests.  If you would like to explore CarmenCanvas tools (rubrics, SpeedGrader, etc.) for specification grading, please contact the mailto:con-it@osu.edu for more information.