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Supporting our Cloverbud Youth during Challenging Times

In today’s world there are many tragic events, from gun violence to natural disasters, to which children are exposed on a regular basis. It is important as we get into the busy summer season that we serve as caring adult role models for Cloverbud participants. In doing so, we provide a safe, supportive environment for them.

The main purpose of this Cloverbud Connections article is to share about how to support healthy interaction with Cloverbuds. Talking with Cloverbud members can be difficult with not knowing what to say or how to be supportive. There is helpful guidance from the National Council on Family Relations (Myers-Wall, 2022) and KidsHealth (Walls, 2022).

Suggestions for supporting Cloverbuds include:

  • Help the children feel and know they are safe. Reassure them that you are here to support and care for them.
  • Make time to talk and to share about what they are feeling. Let their questions, if they have any, guide the interactions.
  • Use various expressive outlets and Cloverbud activities for them to express themselves such as music, art, movement, puppets, and play.
  • Cloverbud children may express a desire to help those hurting or experiencing pain. Support them with writing letters of care, gathering donations, or ideas they may have.
  • Know that Cloverbud age children may have a wide range of emotions from sadness to empathy. Let them express themselves as needed. It is okay to not to know the answers to all their questions. Listening and being there for them is just as important as what you say.

As a 4-H Cloverbud Volunteer, remember to take care of yourself. Know that your Extension professional is always available for your support.

 

Myers-Walls, J. A. (2022). Talking with children when the talking gets tough. Coping in the Wake of Shootings, Mass Violence, and Terrorism. National Council on Family Relations. https://www.ncfr.org/resources/resource-collections/coping-wake-shootings-mass-violence-and-terrorism

Walls, M. T. (2022). How to talk to your child about the news. KidsHealth. https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/news.html

Cloverbud CloverBOT Challenge – Get Your Team Registered

What is the Cloverbot Challenge?

The Ohio 4-H Cloverbot Challenge gives 4-H Cloverbuds the opportunity to work cooperatively in teams to problem-solve using STEM (science, engineering, technology and math) skills. A new theme is selected each year and teams  research a topic, build a working model of their solution to the Challenge issue and create a poster to illustrate their findings. Teams present their models and findings to a team of reviewers, learn about other Cloverbuds’ projects, participate in age-appropriate STEM activities and are recognized at a closing celebration.

This year’s theme is Wonderful Water! We use water everyday: to drink, cook, take a bath, wash dishes and laundry. Water also provides energy and transportation, aids in manufacturing and helps grow our food. Water is critical to our survival! Find the details here.

New this year…three locations. Find the Challenge closest to you!

  • June 23 at 6:30 p.m., Montgomery County Extension Office in Dayton
  • June 23 at 6:30 p.m., Washington County Junior Fair Building, Marietta
  • June 25 at 10:30 a.m., Nationwide & Ohio Farm Bureau 4-H Center, Columbus
  • June 28 at 6:30 pm Cuyahoga County Fairgrounds

Cloverbud Volunteers can register teams by Friday, May 27, 2022 at: https://go.osu.edu/2022cloverbotchallenge

Cloverbuds and Social Emotional Learning: Now and for the Future

Youth’s social and emotional learning (SEL) skills are receiving increased attention, especially because of concerns about a loss of socialization opportunities during the coronavirus pandemic and overarching concerns about youth mental health. Social skills cannot be learned by reading about them in a book – they must be learned by doing, in situations where you interact with others, which makes Cloverbud meetings and activities an ideal learning environment.

There is no doubt that these skills are important for Cloverbud-age youth. How youth thrive may depend on whether they possess a variety of SEL skills. Being able to concentrate on SEL skills assumes a foundation having basic and safety needs met.

Social emotional learning, as conceptualized by the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning, consists of five overarching competencies (see the CASEL Wheel). The Ohio Department of Education also uses the CASEL SEL competencies. These five SEL competencies represent very broad areas.

  • Self-Awareness
  • Self-Management
  • Social Awareness
  • Relationship Skills
  • Responsible Decision Making

In addition to being important for Cloverbuds now, research indicates that SEL competencies have become increasingly important during the transition from middle childhood to early adolescence because they have been consistently linked to two primary developmental tasks of adolescence—academic achievement and social competence. In the most recent study, researchers studied five more specific indicators of social emotional development. The descriptions of these five skills are below.

  • Prosocial Behaviors: being able to take another person’s perspective, offer support, and help when others are in distress.
  • Cooperation: the ability to work well with peers, teachers, and other adults for a common benefit or goal.
  • Self-Control: being able to control and regulate attention and impulsive behavior in order to pursue and achieve long-term goals.
  • Emotion Regulation: identifying and managing emotions.
  • Work Habits: the ability to work hard and independently, to turn in work on time, to follow group rules, and to put forward one’s best effort to achieve goals.

This study found that there were distinct profiles of children’s SEL skills during middle childhood (measured in Grade 4). The researchers found that about half of the children displayed consistently high scores across all five SEL skills, while others were strong on some, but weaker on others, and still others were low on all skills. The other major finding was that these patterns were linked to distinctive peer and academic outcomes in early adolescence (measured in Grade 6), with the those displaying all five skills faring better. In contrast, the youth who exhibited prosocial and self-control skills were at risk of poor academic competence; the high cooperation/work habit youth were at risk of poor social functioning. Those with overall low SEL skills demonstrated the highest risk in poor academic and social functioning in early adolescence.

SEL and Cloverbud Volunteers

What does this mean for Cloverbud volunteers? A key takeaway from this research is that it is important to help youth achieve a variety of social emotional skills, not just any one skill. Children in the Cloverbud age group are learning social and emotional skills, but they are a work in progress – they are still mastering them. Small group activities help them learn how to get along with others and be social. As you work with Cloverbuds, how you set up activities and the interactions that occur between you and the members and between the members with each other will provide many opportunities to reinforce these skills. Encourage them to work with and talk to each other. These practices will create a positive social climate.

It’s easy to see how these SEL skills will help Cloverbuds get along in the world now and in the future. However, because they are more self-centered, it will be a while before Cloverbuds are totally able to see something from someone else’s perspective. Developing self-control allows them to share with others and to stay focused. Rules help establish group norms while teaching work habits, self-control, and emotion regulation. These rules should be focused on safety and well-being. If corrections are needed, the best practice is to start by getting the child’s attention by using their name, restating your expectations, and giving a specific instruction on how they can correct their behavior. When giving directions, start off by saying, “Soon, but not yet,…” and keep the number of steps simple.

In addition, you can teach these skills directly. For example, The Big Book of Cloverbud Activities has activities titled “My Feelings”; these activities help Cloverbuds learn to recognize and label emotions. Activities must take into account children’s developmental stage. For example, there is a gradual shift from the ability to recognize and name different emotional states (what does an angry face look like, and how is anger different from or similar to sadness?) to understanding that different people can have different emotional reactions to the same situation because of their own personal experiences and preferences (I feel angry when X happens, but my best friend feels sad).

These skills can also be embedded in many other activities. For example, many games involve waiting to take a turn. A game of “Freeze Frame” (play some music and when you pause, they are to freeze in whatever pose they are in when the music stops) can work on managing impulsivity. Another great way is to use books to introduce SEL concepts. Fortunately, there are many such books available (for example, see the Denver Public Library and the Deschutes Public Library for lists).

Developing SEL skills is not a one-shot deal; it’s a process that unfolds over time. As a Cloverbud volunteer, you get to be part of the process!

References

Collaborative for Academic, Emotional, and Social Learning. (n.d.). What is the CASEL framework? https://casel.org/fundamentals-of-sel/what-is-the-casel-framework/

Denver Public Library. (n.d.). Books for social, emotional, and academic learning. https://kids.denverlibrary.org/blog/k-3/books-social-emotional-and-academic-learning

Deschutes Public Library. (n.d.). DPL Kids: Social emotional learning (SEL) picture books. https://dpl.bibliocommons.com/list/share/362500057/1258121077

Ferrari, T. (2021, January). Using books to discuss mental, emotional, and social health. Cloverbud Connections. https://u.osu.edu/cloverbudconnections/2021/01/18/using-books-to-discuss-mental-emotional-and-social-health/

Jones, S. M., & Doolittle, E. J. (2017). Social and emotional learning: Introducing the issue. The Future of Children, 27(1), 3‒12. https://www.wallacefoundation.org/knowledge-center/Documents/FOC-Spring-Vol27-No1-Compiled-Future-of-Children-spring-2017.pdf

Ma, T.-L., Zarrett, N., Puente, K., Liu, Y., Vandell, D. L., Simpkins, S. D., & Yu, M. V. B. (2022). Longitudinal links between profiles of social emotional behaviors in childhood and functioning in early adolescence. Journal of Early Adolescence, 42(6), 765–792. https://doi.org/10.1177/02724316221078829

Matheis, L. (2021, December 2). Rebuilding children’s social skills during COVID. https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/special-matters/202112/rebuilding-children-s-social-skills-during-covid

Ohio Department of Education. (2019). Social and emotional learning standards. https://education.ohio.gov/Topics/Learning-in-Ohio/Social-and-Emotional-Learning/Social-and-Emotional-Learning-Standards

U.S. Surgeon General. (2021). Protecting youth mental health: The U.S. Surgeon General’s advisory. https://www.hhs.gov/surgeongeneral/reports-and-publications/youth-mental-health/index.html

What Do You Want To Be When You Grow Up?

The world appears much larger to youth once they enter elementary school! They are exposed to numerous extracurricular activities that provide a wide range of opportunities to help children develop their skills and identify their interests.

Once children start school, it’s natural for adults to begin asking, What do you want to be when you grow up? Their answers are often not surprising. They typically respond with teacher, doctor, astronaut, a professional athlete, just to name a few. Just by those responses, we know that youth naturally are thinking about their future careers through imagination, exploration, and role-playing. However, as adults, we know there are so many more careers in the world!

So, when should career education truly begin beyond role-playing? Many experts have embraced the developmental approach, which recommends career education beginning as early as kindergarten, while gradually becoming more of a focus as youth get older. Having access to different careers and the concept of work helps youth recognize the connection between what they’re learning and why that knowledge is valuable.

Here are some ways to incorporate career awareness into your Cloverbud program:

  • Read books that showcase various careers. This not only increases reading literacy but allows the opportunity to expand their knowledge about work. Check out 4-H Cloverbud Reading Adventures for career-related, literacy books and activities.  For example, Ada Twist, Scientist or What Do You Do with An Idea?
  • Talk to your Cloverbuds about your own work and explain what you do.
  • Find ways to incorporate less obvious careers into your conversations with your Cloverbuds. For instance, it was someone’s job to design and construct the home in which they live or the job of someone who changed the oil in their family vehicle.
  • Capitalize on the skills and abilities your Cloverbuds are developing. For example, do they enjoy drawing? Find ways to incorporate art into your Cloverbud activities. Invite local artists (graphic design, fiber artists, etc.) to share their talents with your Cloverbuds.
  • Check out the lessons included in Cloverbud Investigators Cloverbud Career Detectives. Each lesson allows Cloverbuds to explore science-based activities with a career twist!

There are many opportunities for Cloverbud volunteers to take advantage of a child’s natural curiosity and begin laying the foundation of positive attitudes and habits toward careers and work.  Ask your Cloverbuds, What do you want to be when you grow up?  You might be surprised at their responses!

References

Alexander, J., & Hubbs-Tait, L. (n.d.). Career exploration in elementary school. NC State Extension Publications. Retrieved April 13, 2022, from https://content.ces.ncsu.edu/career-exploration-in-elementary-school

Learning-Liftoff-Staff. (2019, April 1). Should career education begin earlier for kids? Learning Liftoff. Retrieved April 13, 2022, from https://www.learningliftoff.com/should-career-education-begin-earlier-for-kids/

Time to Get Outdoors!

Spring is officially here and that means it is a great time to get outdoors. Spending time outdoors feels like a foreign concept to many 4-H members these days, but being out in nature has many positive benefits. It allows members to disconnect from devices and technology, focus on being present in the moment, and engaging with others. Direct exposure to nature has also been found to have a restorative and calming effect.1

Most 4-H families associate being outdoors with going to summer camp or an event that takes much effort. However, spending time reconnecting to nature should not be scary or overwhelming.  Here are some easy ways to make time outdoors more accessible to young members:

  • Host a scavenger hunt! Click here for an activity sheet that you can share with your members. You can set up a marked off area at your club meeting space and hide similar pictures (bird, butterfly, etc.) around the area. Encourage members to complete a “BINGO” row (or the whole card) by visiting each station.
    • Have older members in your club that are working on reading skills? Include fun facts on the pictures and have the members read each one to ‘complete’ the station
  • Use this scavenger hunt on a club (or family) field trip. Visit an Ohio State Park and spend time hiking a trail. Pack one of these activity sheets to identify as many items as you can.

Want to include some other activities that combine time outdoors with protecting our environment? Bring the outdoors into a club meeting. Ohio 4-H has curriculum available to help you celebrate Earth Day on Friday, April 22nd. Visit the “Earth is Our Home” Curriculum at https://ohio4h.org/earthday. You and your members can learn more about Sustainability, Germination and Plant Growth, Climate Change or even Pollination.

Spring is a time of growth and renewal so why not try a new outdoor activity or two with your Cloverbud members!

 

References:

  1. https://u.osu.edu/4hjournal/2021/06/25/scavenger-hunts/
  2. Made for Retail. Scavenger Hunt List Pad – Explore & Backyard. 2018. Madeforretail.com

Just Like the Big Kids – Using “My 4-H Cloverbud Year”

Cloverbud members want to be “just like the big kids” and have a 4-H book to complete.  Have you considered using My 4-H Cloverbud Year with your members?

This fun book is a great way for Cloverbuds to learn the basics of 4-H and keep track of their activities and events. Completion of this book is optional and can be done with or without the help of an adult leader. It can be repeated each year a child is a Cloverbud.  It is especially appropriate for older Cloverbud members as they prepare to transition to project membership.

The length of your Cloverbud meetings or activity time might determine how best to use this resource. Here are two options:

  1. If you have plenty of time (approximately an hour) for your Cloverbud meeting, then you could have the members complete the sections after each group activity. It will probably take at least 15 minutes to help the members complete the two pages titled “Today at 4-H Cloverbuds”. Younger members will need help answering the questions about what they did, their favorite part of the activity, what they learned and what they want to learn more about. There is also a box to draw or add a picture about the day’s activity.
  2. Here is a second option if you are limited on time with your Cloverbuds. Plan one or two of your meetings around completing the beginning of the book where they will learn about themselves, all about 4-H, their club, meeting manners, the American Flag and the 4-H Flag. After these sections are finished, the book could be sent home with your Cloverbud members. Ask parents to help their child complete the “Today at 4-H Cloverbuds” section after each meeting or club activity. This will help reinforce learning and recall of information as well as begin practicing the life skill of recordkeeping.

My 4-H Cloverbud Year is for Cloverbud members who can write about themselves and their experiences, with or without the support of an adult helper. If your Cloverbuds struggle with writing, you can help them by providing prepared answers to paste into their books. On the Today at 4-H Cloverbuds pages, for example, “What we did” could be answered with a short typed, or printed response: We practiced reduce, reuse, and recycle.

The end of the book provides a spot for community service activities, county fair activities, and a place to add memories like photos, ribbons, or clippings.

Copies of My Cloverbud Year can be purchased from your local OSU Extension or from https://extensionpubs.osu.edu

4-H Cloverbud Day Camp: Creating a Welcoming Environment

For many young people, 4-H camp is the highlight of their year.  Filled with games, workshops, singing, and fun activities, what child wouldn’t love it?  As a 4-H camp director preparing for my 21st camping season here in Warren County, I have witnessed countless smiles and laughter of hundreds of young campers.   For many, there’s just something special about the camp experience that keep kids coming back year after year.  A question I repeatedly ask at the beginning of the camp planning season is “What training do my camp staff need in order to make this year’s camp successful and have kids want to keep coming back?”  This question is especially important when planning activities for Cloverbud campers.  Many 5-8 year old campers are experiencing camp for the first time and just beginning to spend time away from their parents and caregivers.  They are willing to exploring different social groups and learning how to master their physical skills while being open to trying new things.

The biggest contributor to camp success depends on how welcome and included campers feel, especially at the start of the experience.  Creating the camp environment needs to be intentional and well thought through with attention to the details.  Below are a few tips to include in the pre camp training of counselors and staff that will help create and sustain a welcoming environment.

Addressing Campers by Their Correct Name:   Addressing and correctly pronouncing the name of each camper is very important, especially at the beginning of camp.  When campers hear their name, especially by a camp leader, it reinforces their individual value and helps them feel important to the group.  This recognition contributes to the creation of a welcoming environment where everyone feels included.   Play lots of name games on day one.

Nonverbals Are Important:  Research shows that your body language and your tone of voice account for over 90% of what you communicate to others.  This is especially true for the young children who may be new at camp.  Pay particular attention to your body posture and eye contact when communicating with campers.  It often helps to bend down to their level and lean into the encounter.  This type of posture demonstrates that your attention is focused on them and communicates they are important and worth your time and focus.   Smiles and fist bumps are great too!

“Hands-on” Engagement:   Kids love toys and games.  Much of camp is about play and fun, but not all kids experience it in the same way.  Having a “Discovery Table” where kids can select and pick up items of interest is a great way to stimulate learning and interaction.  It is also a great distraction from unwanted feelings like homesickness and fear of not fitting in.   You can also apply this concept at the table where campers sit by covering it with craft paper and allowing them to use crayons to draw or doodle.  When you add the engagement with a table counselor, it can significantly add to creating a positive welcoming environment.

Here are some of my favorite Games to make campers feel welcome and included.

Group Juggle

The group stands in an inward facing circle and are asked to throw juggling balls amongst the group in a specific order. As the activity develops more juggling balls are introduced and the pressure to work well as a group increases.

Pick-a-Corner

Designate 4 corners around the room with 4 choices.  After you pick 4 choices around a topic or theme, ask campers to go to the designated corner that best matches their preference.  Make the topics fun.  (Example:  Favorite Food — 1. Mac and Cheese 2.  Pizza  3.  Mashed Potatoes   4.  Chicken Tenders;  Favorite Vacation spot   1.  Mountains    2.  Beach   3.  City   4.  Cruise)

Quarter Flip

Have everyone stand up.  Tell them they need to select heads or tails. (Illustrate by touching both hands on their head or their “tail”.)   Then flip the coin and call it to the group.  If they chose incorrect, instruct them to sit.  Game continues until one winner.  The winner gets to be the new caller.  Continue as time permits.

Creating a safe and inclusive environment for campers and staff is the strong foundation for a successful Cloverbud camp.  Camp is a great activity to help children transition away from depending on their parents and transfer that dependence to other caring adults.  These camp fundamentals of creating a welcoming and inclusive camp should accompany all aspects of pre-camp planning as well as all activities during the camp.

 

Sources:

Condensed Ages & Stages – Fact Sheet – 5-8years.  Retrieved from https://extension.purdue.edu/4h/Documents/1_5-8_Fact_Sheet.pdf

Games Resource:   “Find Something To Do”  (Jim Cain, 2012) Great Fun and No Prop Games for all ages

Yes, You Can Teach Science!

For many people, the word “science” seems to conjure up memories of complicated equations or dry lectures from high school or college classes. We sometimes question our ability to understand science concepts ourselves, much less try to teach them to young children. Nowadays, when there is so much focus on STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math), it may seem like an even more daunting task when you hear about coding, robotics, and all the other high-tech concepts students are learning.

But let’s go back to the basic definition of science. According to Merriam-Webster, it is “knowledge about the natural world that is learned through experiments and observation”. Do you remember when you were a child and you first saw a baking soda volcano? You probably weren’t intimidated by that, you just thought it was cool that mixing ingredients could cause such a huge reaction.

When working with Cloverbuds, it’s important to capitalize on their natural sense of wonder about the world. Whether they realize it or not, their instinct to figure out how things work, to take things apart, and gets their hands dirty are all scientific investigation. The next time you start to do a project with your Cloverbuds, talk about the steps of the scientific method:

  1. Identify the problem:  How can I make a machine to move a marshmallow across the room?
  1. Predict what will happen (make a hypothesis):  I could make a catapult out of popsicle sticks and rubber bands to shoot the marshmallow.
  1. Perform an experiment:  Design and test the catapult.
  1. Look at your results:  Did my catapult work the way I thought it would?
  1. Draw conclusions:  Next time, I will build a better base for my catapult.

Teaching STEM doesn’t have to be intimidating. Letting your Cloverbuds participate in short, hands-on activities.  Teaching them to think through the steps involved is the best way to make science fun and engaging.

For activity ideas beyond the Big Book of 4-H Cloverbud Activities, check out 10 Minute Science  or the Ohio 4-H STEM Blog

Caring for Others

Cloverbud aged children often focus on themselves as they are forming their self-concept. As young Cloverbud children (5 – 6 years old) become 7- to 8-year-olds, they start to increase their awareness and concern for others; in particular, they can have empathy toward others. Empathy results from an increase in their emotional understanding skills as thinking abilities develop and through social experiences.  In the 4-H Cloverbud program we can help members learn to care for others and grow their empathy skills.

Certainly, it’s a good thing to care for others and be kind, but why is empathy and caring for others important for Cloverbuds? By learning to care of others, children benefit in many ways:

  • Contributes to their overall healthy development
  • Builds positive relationships with other kids and adults
  • Feel a sense of accomplishment
  • Increase their self-esteem and confidence
  • Creates a sense of belonging

As Cloverbud volunteers and advisors, how can we promote a caring attitude with our Cloverbud kids? Here are some strategies to use:

  • Model caring behavior for them to see (share, offer compliments, hold a door open)
  • Talk about your feelings to encourage them to do also (“I am tired from a busy day, but happy to be with you,” “I feel sad because a family member is sick.” – fosters empathy)
  • Thank the children when they show care towards you and others (positive reinforcement)
  • Make kindness and caring a foundation for your Cloverbud club
  • Listen to children and where they are at without passing judgement

We can all make our community a better place to live. It starts with our children and the Cloverbud program is great place for kids to learn and practice caring for others and kindness.

I’m a Cloverbud Volunteer! Now What?

New year, new start!  Are you a new or returning Cloverbud volunteer?  Welcome! We are happy to have you join us in the Ohio 4-H Cloverbud program!

You’ve completed your Cloverbud Volunteer Training and you have a group of Cloverbuds, now what?  Time to plan your meeting activities.  The most valuable resource in your toolkit is The Big Book of 4-H Cloverbud Activities.  The Big Book has 50 lesson plans which you can use during your Cloverbud meetings.  Talk with your Cloverbuds to find out what they want to learn about in 2022.  Give them a list of topics to choose from and ask them to vote.  Your Cloverbud program is more likely to succeed if you consider input from your youth.  The Big Book of 4-H Cloverbud Activities is available for purchase from your county OSU Extension Office or from OSU Publications.

What should your Cloverbud meeting look like?  Once you have identified your topic, use the Cloverbud Meeting Planning Template to plan your meeting.  Decide on the day, time, and location of your meeting.  Be sure that all Cloverbud parents know when the meeting will take place.  Consider your planned activity.  What will you do for each portion of the meeting?  What supplies are needed?  Do the Cloverbuds need to bring anything to the meeting?  Will you have refreshments or recreation?  In general, Cloverbuds can participate in 4-H club meetings for the pledges and roll call.  Once the older 4-H members begin their business meetings, Cloverbuds can be dismissed to complete their own activities.  Upon completion of Cloverbud activities and the older club members’ business meetings, Cloverbuds can rejoin the group for refreshments and recreation, if age-appropriate.  This is a great time for Cloverbuds to present what they learned to the older club members.  This gives Cloverbuds a chance to do public speaking and also share their excitement for their activities.

My 4-H Cloverbud Year is a wonderful activity book for our Cloverbuds.  Cloverbuds enjoy having a book to complete like the older 4-H club members.  The activity book includes pages where the child can include information about themselves and their club, as well as about what they did at each Cloverbud meeting.  At the end of the year, the member has a nice memory book of their year as a Cloverbud. My 4-H Cloverbud Year is available for purchase from your county Ohio State University Extension Office or from OSU Publications.

To see other resources that are available to Cloverbud volunteers, check out the Ohio 4-H Cloverbud Resources link on the left hand side of this page.  You might be interested in Choose and Tell Cards or Clover Cubes.  Both are fun and easy resources to use with your Cloverbuds.

Don’t forget to check out the Ohio 4-H Cloverbud Reading Adventures!  Reading adventures connect Cloverbuds to literacy and include games, activities, and snacks to use with your Cloverbuds.

Fast forward – you’ve completed the year with your Cloverbuds, now what?  Check with your county extension office to see what other opportunities are available.  This might include day camps or fun days, exhibiting at the county fair (non-competitive events), Show and Tell, fair revues, Cloverbud graduation, and more!

Enjoy your time with your Cloverbuds!  They are eager to learn and will not hesitate to share their enthusiasm.  Spending time with Cloverbuds will put a smile on your face!