Making Recycled Paper

Materials: Old newspaper, rotary egg beater, cream of tartar, large bowl, large rectangular cake pan, screen cut to fit inside the pan, dish towels, wax paper, scissors.

Note to the Volunteer: Since this activity takes more time than others and some waiting is necessary, other activities can be done while waiting.

Make your own paper! Tear the newspaper into very tiny pieces and put in the bowl. Fill the bowl half full with water, let the paper soak for a minute or two, then add two tablespoons cream of tartar. Beat the mixture until it is thick and “soupy” and place the screen in the rectangular pan. Pour the soupy mixture on it. Carefully lift the screen, catching the fibers. Stir and repeat until no screen shows through the pulp. Let the extra water drip into the pan. Lay the screen on top of several dish towels and cover it with wax paper. Press down on it to squeeze the moisture out. Put several heavy books on top of the wax paper. After a few minutes, take the books off and peel back the wax paper. You have just made recycled paper! Place in the sun to dry or in front of another heat source (oven, register, hair dryer). When the recycled paper is almost dry, gently peel from the screen. Cut into pieces so everyone can have their own sample of recycled paper!

Note to the Volunteer: Have the children make extra paper to use in the Art Exhibit and Cloverbud Display lessons in the subject area of Community Expressive Arts.

Application: The next time you go to the store, look at greeting cards, paper and stationery.


  • Can you tell which are recycled?
  • Can you find any that look like the paper you made?

Reprinted from Ohio 4-H Cloverbud Connections – Summer 2010 Edition.

Source: Ohio 4-H Cloverbud Curriculum Series 1, Helping our Environment: Reduce, Reuse & Recycle. Author: Bobbie Grawemeyer.

 

Cloverbud Cooperation Though Non-Competitive Games

One of the 4-H Cloverbud program foundations states the children of Cloverbud age should engage in non-competitive games.  Most of the time when we think of games, one player wins and everyone else loses.  That can lead to players feeling left out or upset.  When children play non-competitive games there is more interaction with each other, more activity, and everybody wins.

Cooperative activities offer a chance for players to work together as a group to achieve their goal. In activities where nobody loses there are no disappointed children.  Everyone is having fun.  Children will actually participate in more active play as opposed to sitting on the sidelines watching others play.

Here are a few non-competitive activities to get you started:

Parachutes

Using a parachute is a great way for Cloverbuds to have fun in a non-competitive way.  Some ways to use the parachute are putting a ball in the middle and having the children try to keep it from falling off.  You could add more than one ball also.  (If you don’t have access to a parachute you could use a sheet or a blanket.)  I have done this with Cloverbuds and they had a lot of fun.  Another idea to use with a parachute is having the kids raise it over their heads and try to get under it as it comes down.

Beanbags

Beanbags can help Cloverbuds work on their eye-hand coordination or balance.  Some ideas to use with beanbags are:

  • toss it in the air and catch it or toss back and forth to a partner
  • balance it on their heads or try balancing it on different parts of your body
  • playing a game of Freeze while balancing the beanbag on a different body part

Rope Circles

You can make rope circles by using a stiff rope and some duct tape. They can be made any size.  The circles can then be used for several activities with the Cloverbuds.  They can use them to jump from one circle to another.  They can also use them for balancing by placing them on one foot and lifting that foot up or twirling it around their hand or arm. You can also lay them on the ground and see how many different body parts they can get in the circle. Example of this could be: one foot and one hand, your head and knee, etc.

You could use a hula hoop instead of the rope circles and have the Cloverbuds partner up with each other and do some of the same activities. This is especially fun when they have to figure out how many different body parts they can get in the hula hoop – maybe three elbows and two knees. You could also use the hula hoops instead of chairs for musical chairs by removing a hoop each time. No one is out and kids need to figure out how to get everyone in the remaining circles. Until there is only one circle left.

Hopefully this will get you thinking about some activities that you usually do but with a non-competitive twist.

Healthy Relationships

This lesson aims to help kids recognize everyone, including themselves, as unique members of the human family.

BACKGROUND/INTRODUCTION
People are all members of the family of mankind, or the human family. As human beings they have many things in common; for example, needs for food, clothing, shelter, affection, security, feelings, emotions, and ideas. Simultaneously, they meet these needs in different ways; they have different ideas and beliefs;
they look different and have different personalities.

Click here for the complete activity: HealthyRelationships-1-1e2lzre

Reprinted from Ohio 4-H Cloverbud Connections – Summer 2008 Edition.

Source: The 4-H Kid Stuff Activity Book (4-H 958 – 1993). Ohio State University Extension. The Ohio State University.
Submitted by: Sheila Meyer, 4-H Program Assistant, Ohio State University Extension, Hocking County, Ohio.

Follow the Water from Brook to Ocean – A Cloverbud Reading Adventures Activity

Cloverbuds are thirsty to learn new topics and discover new adventures.  One of those is the Reading Adventure Series the Ohio 4-H Cloverbud Design is working on.  This team of Ohio 4-H Professionals is working to make these activities and book ideas available soon.  Summer is a great opportunity for outdoor learning.

Young children, Cloverbud age, love to be read to.  It helps them discover new topics, exercise their brain, and understanding how to read themselves while adding to their vocabulary. Look for your favorite childhood book at your local public library, or take a field trip with your Cloverbuds to the library.  Advisors can choose a book and read to the members.  Advisors can take it one step further and add a themed snack and craft activity to build on the Cloverbuds learning activity.

A Summer Book Idea:

Find Follow the Water from Brook to Ocean by Arthur Dorros.  Reading the book to your Cloverbuds and making a crab handprint craft is the perfect way to tie in some summer learning fun.  You may also visit a small creek or brook and let the Cloverbuds explore for 20 minutes.

At the conclusion of your activity and exploration enjoy a themed snack of crushed graham crackers with blue yogurt and add some craisans for fun.  Wrap up your activity with a game of shark tag or duck, duck goose.  These activities will awaken the outdoor exploration creativity bug in your Cloverbuds and help make learning about the environment fun, safe and interesting.

Fun Fit Hike

According to the National Association for Sports and Fitness, children 6 – 12 years of age need a minimum of 60 minutes of exercise daily. The American Heart Association recommends at least 30 minutes a day to maintain a healthy heart. Outdoor exercise is just a trail, large yard or park away and a hike is one of the
simplest ways to get children outdoors and moving. Here are a few creative ideas to turn an ordinary hike into fun exercise:
Youth will need:
• Appropriate dress for weather
• Sneakers or trail shoes
• Bottle of water
• Healthy snack

Click here for the complete activity: FunFitHike-1yfyl2j

 

Reprinted from Ohio 4-H Cloverbud Connections – Spring 2008 Edition.

Source: Rebecca Miller, Hocking County Soil and Water Conservation District Education Specialist.

Cloverbud Activities and Events

Cloverbud participating in Watermelon Eating Contest at the Greene County Fair . Photo courtesy of Xenia Gazette

Cloverbud youth can participate in most of the club and county 4-H activities. With a little thought and pre-planning, most activities can be adapted for all members.

Keep in mind the Program Foundations when planning activities and events.  These specific requirements are listed at http://go.osu.edu/CloverbudFoundations. Remember their activities must be noncompetitive, safe and age appropriate.

Cloverbuds are able to experience 4-H camp! This can be during the county overnight camp or a separate day camp.

  • Cloverbud Camp- youth may participate only in overnight and/or day camps that meet their needs
  • Cloverbud veggie car – youth make cars out of vegetables such as cucumbers, carrots, eggplants for the body and other vegetables for the wheels and decorations
  • Watermelon eating – how much watermelon can you eat
  • Cloverbot Challenge- age appropriate STEM activities
  • Cloverbud graduation- celebrating youth transiting from Cloverbuds to project age membership
  • Show and Tell- youth share their favorite collection, item, stuffed animal, activity, etc.
  • Demonstrations- recite 4-H pledge during county demonstrations to expose them to public speaking at a young age
  • Snack- prepare snacks for a club meeting
  • Thank you note contest- youth design a 4-H related picture to be printed on county thank you note cards

Cloverbuds are often excited to work closely with older members. Include Cloverbud youth in community service projects, gardening, and in club meetings. Have them lead the 4-H Pledge or Pledge of Allegiance at a meeting.

There are a few things to keep in mind when it comes to where Cloverbuds are developmentally. Activities should be age appropriate. The Cloverbud Program is noncompetitive since young children have a hard time understanding the concepts of winning and losing.

When working through activities, be mindful to connect youth with real life experiences using the experiential learning model (http://go.osu.edu/CloverbudFoundations). It is important to work with youth so they fully understand the concept of the activity.

Talk with the county Extension Office if you have questions or suggestions of activities to offer for Cloverbuds. Remember, you are setting the stage for a long, successful, and impactful youth development experience!

Produce Handling Game

A perennial favorite with Cloverbuds in Cuyahoga County is the “Produce Handling Game.” It helps young members learn to identify fruits and vegetables, using only the sense of touch (and possibly smell). They can also imagine themselves as working in the produce department of a local grocery. If the right mix of produce is used, it can also teach members which vegetables come from roots, stems, leaves, or are fruits of plants.

Items Needed:

  • 1 recycled copy paper or printer paper box with detachable lid (the kind that holds about 10 reams).
  • pictures of fruits and vegetables from magazines, garden catalogues, etc.
  • small piece of felt or other cloth
  • variety of vegetables and fruits from garden or store (onions and ripe tomatoes not recommended!)

Instructions:

  1. Cut out pictures of vegetables and fruits, and glue to outside of box to decorate.
  2. Cut small window (about 6 x 8 in) in one side of box. Glue or staple cloth over window like a curtain, so players can’t see inside.
  3. Put produce in box where players can’t see what goes in. A good mix would be things like bell pepper, sweet potato, carrot, celery stalk, leaf lettuce bunch, lemon or lime, kiwi fruit.
  4. Players take turns reaching inside (no peeking!) and guessing one or more vegetables or fruits that are inside, using only sense of touch, feeling shapes and textures of items inside. Players can whisper their guess to game moderator so a not to “spoil” turn of next player.
  5. After everyone has had a chance to guess, take lid off and reveal what is inside.

Reprinted from Ohio 4-H Cloverbud Connections – Spring 2004. Authored by Greg Seik, Former 4-H Youth Development Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Cuyahoga County, Ohio

Summertime Fun: Cloverbuds Go To Camp

No matter what the age of a 4-H member is, 4-H Camp is the highlight of their summer.  Cloverbuds can experience 4-H camp, too!

Camps for Cloverbuds can take place in a variety of settings.  Fairgrounds, parks, etc. may be utilized when planning your Cloverbud Camp.  Be sure that the facility will provide a safe and welcoming environment for your campers.  There should be enough space for campers to utilize their large motor skills in addition to being able to accommodate small group activities.

When planning 4-H camp for Cloverbuds, keep in mind their developmental needs and be sure that activities are age-appropriate.  Programs should be activity based and include a variety of short-term experiences.  Remember that Cloverbud activities should be noncompetitive and foster cooperative learning with participants.  Most importantly, activities should be safe and fun!

Whether you offer a day camp of one day or a series of days, or an overnight camp, be sure that you have the appropriate number of approved volunteers.  Required staffing patterns for a Cloverbud overnight camp is a minimum of one approved volunteer per five campers.  For Cloverbud Day Camps, the ratio is one approved volunteer per six campers.  A minimum of 80% of approved camp volunteers must be 18 years of age or older as of the first day of camp.

Make your 4-H Cloverbud Camp fun!  Come up with a creative theme and design your activities around that theme.  For example, a camp with the theme of “Nocturnal Nature” might feature activities related to animals that are active at night (bats, raccoons, etc).  “Explore the Outdoors” might feature activities related to trees, flowers, or animals.  STEM activities might be featured at a camp with the theme of “Wacky World of Science”.

Check with your OSU Extension Educator for 4-H Youth Development for policies and guidelines that apply specifically to Cloverbud Camp.  They can help you to plan a safe and effective camp for your Cloverbuds.

 

Left, Right, Center, Keep

This is a great game to play with all ages, children and adults. I have played it with all age groups and it is always enjoyed. It is a great way to reinforce right and left, plus teaching fair play and sharing.

What you need :

  • a minimum of 3 wooden blocks for each group of 5-10 players
    (blocks need to be large enough to have a letter written on each side but small enough that all three blocks can be held in a child’s hand at the same time – these can be purchased in the craft department of many stores or cut out your own)
  • Using a permanent marker – write one letter on each side of the block as follows – one K, one C, two sides will have R and two sides will have L. So the blocks will contain one K, one C, 2 R’s and 2 L’s. I place the R and the L on opposite sides of the block.
  • 3 pieces of wrapped candy per player ( I like chewable wrapped candy as opposed to hard candy. Lollipops work well too! )
  • people to play

Instructions to play:
The players sit in a circle facing one another. Each person receives three pieces of candy. They place their candy in front of them. One person begins by picking up all three blocks and rolls these into the center of the circle.

  • For example – lets state that the dice rolled come up with K, C , R

The person who rolled the dice will then K = Keep one piece of candy, C = place one piece of candy into the Center of the circle and R = hand one piece of candy to the person sitting on their Right. The next person (go around the circle either direction ) takes the three blocks and rolls.

  • For example – this person gets L, L , C. This person would then hand the person on their Left 2 pieces of candy and place one piece of candy into the Center of the circle. The game continues. A person can be completely out of candy and then a few rolls later receive some from a “ neighbor” A person rolls the number of blocks corresponding to the number of pieces of candy that he or she has.
  • For example – one piece of candy – roll one block, 2 pieces of candy – roll 2 blocks, 3 pieces of candy – roll 3 blocks, more than 3 pieces of candy – still you roll 3 blocks as that is the maximum number of blocks.

Several circles can be playing at one time. I suggest having a teen leader or adult volunteer supervise each circle of players. The game ends when only one person has any candy left and the last two players with candy have rolled a final time. The person ending up with the last piece of candy is then allowed to take all the candy from the center of the circle and distribute it to all the players. With little ones, sometimes a small talk on sharing is needed!

Reprinted from Ohio 4-H Cloverbud Connections – Spring 2004 Edition.

Author – Barbara Phares, Former Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development, Ohio State University Extension, Mercer County, Ohio

Campus Connections

Hello again! Great to make this 4-H Cloverbud “Blog” Connection with you.

Have you ever heard the phrase “ages and stages”?  You probably have a good sense about what that means. Basically that kids at particular ages have general characteristics about how they think, relate (social), feel (emotion), and grow (physical abilities). Yes, kids develop at different rates and are certainly not the same, but they do possess general developmental characteristics.

Ages and stages are important for our 4-H Cloverbud program because it is designed with activities and structure to promote positive development. It is also why the 4-H Cloverbud program is different than the program for older youth. The characteristics of 5 to 8 years olds have program implications. Here are a few examples:

  • Characteristic: Short Attention Span = Implication: Activities are short in length (5 – 10 minutes)
  • Characteristic: Energetic = Implication: Engage kids with movement and hands-on activities
  • Characteristic: Hard time separating winning/losing from own identity = Implication: Provide encouragement in noncompetitive settings

As you are doing your great work as a 4-H Cloverbud volunteer, think about the “ages and stages” of your Cloverbud kids. In doing so, we can help grow their life skills.

Thanks for your commitment to the 4-H Cloverbud program as we enhance the healthy development of children throughout the state!