UN Secretary-General’s Policy Brief on COVID-19 in an Urban World

The UN Secretary-General has launched the UN Comprehensive Response to COVID-19 to save lives, protect societies, recover better. As part of the response, the UN Secretary-General is issuing policy briefs to provide ideas to governments on how to address the consequences of this crisis and COVID-19 in an urbanizing world is part of this series. The Policy Brief describes how cities can manage the pandemic and emerge as the hubs of energy, resilience, and innovation that make them such vibrant and appealing places for many to live. It also looks at how the pandemic has exposed deep inequalities in how people live in cities, and how cities serve their residents, with the most vulnerable suffering the most. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: UN-Habitat

Webinar: Green Infrastructure, Urban Planning and Design, and the Urban Heat Island

Jean-Michel Guldmann
Department of City and Regional Planning

Green Infrastructure, Urban Planning and Design, and the Urban Heat Island: Mitigation Strategies in the Era of Climate Change

October 7, 2020  *  4-5 p.m.
CarmenZoom: link to be distributed via email to registered participants

Nested within the global warming problem, the urban heat island (UHI) is a specifically local warming problem that is becoming critical in most metropolitan areas of the world. Columbus and Beijing will be used as a case study settings of the phenomena. He will illustrate how expanding greenery at both ground level and on building roofs can reduce temperatures and how the UHI varies across seasons including the dual beneficial role of vegetation, reducing temperatures in the summer, but increasing them in winter.

The Ohio State University Emeritus Academy Lecture Series

Registration Link

Register for the 2021 Leadership in the City Course

Are you interested in Extension in urban areas and ready to improve your knowledge, skills, and results?

The Leadership in the City course will help you learn about leadership, networks, innovation, and management. The 5-month online program will prepare you, as an Extension professional, to be relevant locally, responsive statewide, and recognized nationally.

The goal of this comprehensive professional development program is to improve the knowledge, skills, and results of university Extension professionals working in large cities. You will connect with peers from around the country to engage in critical thinking and creative problem solving to become better prepared to be relevant locally, responsive statewide, and recognized nationally.

The program was developed based on a foundation of entrepreneurial theory and urban Extension practice and will build upon existing leadership experiences, management training, and Extension professional development.

You will learn from experienced leaders; apply what you learn in your city, region, or state; engage in critical thinking and creative problem solving; and participate in online collaborative learning. Each competency-based module incorporates interactive digital delivery and the flipped classroom model for active learning and engagement.

Upon completion of the course, you will be better prepared to:

  • Evaluate, illustrate, and build upon their four dimensions as an entrepreneurial leader (traits and drivers; competencies and experiences).
  • Navigate as a leader working in the urban and university contexts.
  • Implement elements of entrepreneurial organizations.

The investment in the program is $500 plus a commitment to work hard and have fun investing 8-14 hours per month. The 5-month online course begins in January 2021. If you have multiple participants from the same institute, you are each entitled to a $100 discount (Promotion code: LITC21-MULT).

This course is led by Dr. Julie Fox from the Ohio State University Extension.

Complete details and registration information can be found at https://cityextension.osu.edu/leadership. The deadline for registration is November 30.

Feeding Youth Outside of School During COVID

As COVID-19 continues to push families further into financial distress, making sure that families have access to all the benefits that they can is critical for the long-term viability of our communities. Pre-COVID-19 more than 37 million people, including more than 11 million children lived in a food-insecure household. According to the Food Research and Action Center (FRAC) more than 1 in 5 Black and Latinx adults with children reported in July that they sometimes or often did not have enough to eat. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: Cities Speak

Confronting Prejudice: How to Protect Yourself and Help Others

Dealing with prejudice—whether it’s microaggressions, bias, or discrimination—is physically and psychologically demanding. But avoiding it is not always an option. “Not everyone has the luxury of leaving a prejudicial workplace or neighborhood,” said Natasha Thapar-Olmos, PhD, Program Director at OnlinePsychology@Pepperdine,  “But there might be things we can do and some tools to cope.”

So what is Prejudice?

Word choice matters. We often use words like prejudice, bias, and bigotry interchangeably, and there are aspects to each of these concepts that overlap. But when addressing prejudice, it’s important to understand some of the subtle distinctions. To understand prejudice, we also need to understand stereotypes. A stereotype is an oversimplified and widely held standardized idea used to describe a person or group. A form of social categorization, stereotypes are a shortcut for the brain when grouping information. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: Pepperdine

Oh, Deer: How to Keep Your Yard from Becoming a Buffet

The Ohio Department of Natural Resource Division of Wildlife is accustomed to fielding complaints about nuisance deer, especially in urban areas. With the coronavirus pandemic keeping folks at home, more people are planting gardens for the first time. Someone new to the game might not know how to handle a hungry four-legged visitor, said Geoff Westerfield, a wildlife biologist with ODNR.  Stark County’s deer population tends to be stable in rural areas, such as Minerva, and growing in more urban areas. In rural areas, ODNR can adjust hunting regulations to help keep populations in check. In cities, that’s not typically an option, and without control, populations will grow, he said. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: Canton Repository

Join a North Central Region NUEL’s Action Team

The North Central Region of NUEL is seeking a vibrant, forward thinker to participate in national discussions focused on sustaining an integrated approach to urban Extension.

As an Action Team representative for the North Central Region you will be asked to participate in each of the quarterly regional meetings and the monthly NUEL Steering Committee meetings. Your role during the meetings will be to share and explore ideas aimed to strategically enhance urban Extension’s relevance locally, responsiveness statewide, and recognition nationally. This role will require, on average, four hours of your time per month. This is a great opportunity to highlight your knowledge and skills while advocating for yourself and your urban Extension peers.

If you are interested in becoming an Action Team representative, please email a 250-word bio that highlights your commitment to urban Extension, which Action Team you would like to contribute to, and why you are perfect for this position. Send this information to Nicole at debose.8@osu.edu no later than September 29. This position carries a 3-year term and will begin on January 1, 2021. The Action Teams are listed on the NUEL website.

For any question, please reach out to Nicole Debose.8.

Sourced from: NUEL

Assessing Racial Equity in Organizational Culture

Join Kirwan Research Associate Kip Holley on Thursday, September 24, 2020 at 11 a.m. as he hosts a forum on assessing and cultivating racial equity in organizational culture. Follow this link to register.

Sourced from: The Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity