Strategic Doing: Leading Complex Collaborations, The Ohio State University

In this 2.5 day training, you’ll learn how to begin thinking differently about collaboration, how to help groups have different, and more productive kinds of conversations, and how to make sure conversation turns into action. There will be a simulation for the first two days of the training, and you’ll be learning Strategic Doing by doing it – as well as plenty of time for unpacking why it works so you can make it your own. On the last half-day, you’ll have time to consider how to start using Strategic Doing to approach your own challenges, and get assistance from the instructors as well as your peers. Participants will receive a copy of the book: Strategic Doing: Ten Skills for Agile Leadership (Wiley, 2019), a workbook, as well as access to an online library of resources. The workshop will start on Wednesday, November 6, 2019 at 8 a.m. and conclude Friday, November 8 at 1 p.m. Follow this link to access event details.

Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: Strategic Doing

Leadership Research Grant Program

The Fisher Leadership Initiative Research Grant and Academic Conference is an opportunity for faculty, staff, and students at The Ohio State University to generate new knowledge within the study of leadership and share practical, evidence-based solutions to leadership problems. The program provides ground for cross-disciplinary collaborations and discussions around leadership, aiming to uncover leadership challenges and test practical solutions that benefit leaders and managers across all industries. Since its inception in 2018, the Research Grant program has awarded over $100,000 in funding to collaborative and cross-disciplinary leadership research projects at The Ohio State University. This program is open to proposals from units and colleges throughout Ohio State and across all disciplines. All Ohio State University faculty, staff, graduate students, and undergraduate students are encouraged to apply. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: The Ohio State University

Conference Inspires Educator to Think About How to Help Residents Develop Careers

As a first-time participant of the National Urban Extension Conference (NUEC), I was delighted to be surrounded by Extension professionals who work within similarly diverse counties as the one I serve. Two specific things stuck with me from the conference. One was how D’Argagnan Scorza, from UCLA’s Institute of Environment and Sustainability and also Founder and Director of the Social Justice Learning Institute, challenged attendees to identify “what we do as Extension professionals.” After leaving us to think, he provided his answer “we develop.” The other presentation that stuck with me was a workforce development presentation by Geniphyr Ponce-Pore from Colorado State University. She connected 4-H’s Life Skill Wheel to the soft skills many employers seek as the basis of hiring. So, as an agricultural and natural resources (ANR) educator who is working to “develop” residents in the arena of agriculture and horticulture, how do I use this to inspire programing?

Building future career pools. The idea of building future career pools for nurseries, greenhouses, garden centers, and farms is exciting. Cross-programing 4-H and ANR could be a great opportunity to do so. Youth often only consider careers they are exposed to and see people like themselves in. In urban settings this doesn’t often include ag careers. I was left with the question of, how can I work with 4-H to widen those horizons, expose youth to careers they might have not otherwise considered? 4-H provides the soft skills and beyond. How can ANR provide the base of technical skills, experiences on farms and in greenhouses, and an introduction to the industry?

Working with adults seeking careers. In Cuyahoga, I already do some work to “develop people” who are seeking agricultural careers. We have a program called Market Gardener Training, and its goal is to allow people to learn what it takes to start their own farm business. The participants are interested in urban agriculture as a source of income and a way to provide fresh foods to their community. We have had more than 200 participants and continue to see interest year after year. The motivation to start a farm business is strong, however for some participants the agriculture and business development skills are not—this leaves people with an incredibly steep learning curve to climb.

After listening to the workforce development presentation, it got me thinking about methods and partners that could help participants climb fast. A review of new and beginning farmer programs advises practitioners to go beyond classroom lectures, to include on-farm experiential-learning, online resources, and support in building social and knowledge networks (Niewolny & Lillard, 2010). In the way of partners, there are workforce development agencies in Cleveland that focus on getting people into new careers quickly. I have a sense that workforce development agencies know the struggle of a steep learning curve and working with people who need to climb fast. I am interested in connecting with local workforce development agencies to better understand the strategies they use to address these struggles.

I still have much to explore. If anyone is working on building future career pools or working with adults seeking careers, I am interested to connect on the topic. Like the advice I give to beginning farmers, I am open to listening and learning from others for best practices and lessons learned. In this case, relating to developing people into agriculture and horticulture careers.

Niewolny, K. L., & Lillard, P. T. (2010). Expanding the boundaries of beginning farmer training and program development: A review of contemporary initiatives to cultivate a new generation of American farmers. Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development, 1(1), 65–88. Retrieved from https://www.foodsystemsjournal.org/index.php/fsj/article/view/11/4

 

Article Courtesy of Margaret Rivera, Agriculture and Natural Resource Educator, Cuyahoga County.

Heroes Garden Graduation

Eighteen active duty military veterans recently graduated from a five month farming and gardening training program called the Heroes Garden. The project was a collaboration between the Franklin County Office of OSU Extension and the Central Ohio Veterans Administration Healthcare System. Veterans participated in classroom sessions on urban farming and gardening topics in the early spring and then planted and maintained a vegetable garden at the new Extension Teaching and Learning Gardens at Waterman Farm on campus.
Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: OSU Franklin County Extension

Registration is Open for the 2019 Ohio Food Policy Summit

Join Ohio Food Policy Network for the 9th Annual Ohio Food Policy Summit on Monday, October 28, 2019 at the Nationwide & Ohio Farm Bureau 4-H Center, hosted by the Ohio Food Policy Network and the John Glenn College of Public Affairs. The Summit will kick-off with a morning workshop “Redesigning the Table: Using Equity and Systems for Collective Action,” which will be led by Johns Hopkins University’s Food Policy Network that is intended to strengthen and equip Ohio’s local food policy councils. This workshop is designed for members of local food policy councils, but anyone interested is welcome to register and attend.
Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: Ohio Food Policy Network

National Urban Extension Leaders Caucus Planning Survey

The 2020 NUEL Caucus planning team held it’s first meeting on August 22, 2019. Below is a tentative summary of the meeting:

  • Caucus Tentative Dates: May 14 & 15 or May 18 & 19 depending on availability of facilities and lodging
  • Caucus Location: Madison, WI
  • The local team in Madison, WI will assist with logistics planning
  • Five leadership themes of resources, systemic equity/cultural competency, healthcare, program delivery in urban areas, and technology were identified
  • Caucus members will be asked for input on topics

Please help NUEL by submitting topics you would like to explore during the Caucus by completing this survey, available until October 5, 2019. Please share with your urban colleagues who might be interested in attending the Caucus. The results of the survey will be presented during their next Caucus meeting on October 28, 2019.

Sourced from: NUEL

Great Lakes Ag Tech Summit

Join Urban Ag News, Hort Americas, and Current, powered by GE, for the inaugural Great Lakes Ag Tech Summit on Monday, September 23, 2019. The summit will be held at at the historic Nela Park campus in Cleveland, Ohio. The one-day event features keynote presentations and panel discussions from leading researchers and innovative growers in the Great Lakes region. Attendees will be able to connect with growers, scientists, researchers, and entrepreneurs as we shape the future of food and move controlled environment agriculture forward. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: Urban Ag News

Strategic Initiatives and Urban Engagement Welcomes New Graduate Student

DaVonti’ is the Graduate Associate working with the Strategic Initiatives and Urban Engagement unit.DaVonti’ Haynes is a doctoral student in the Department of Agricultural Communication, Education, and Leadership program in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. He earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Ohio State at the John Glenn College of Public Affairs and the College of Social Work. His research interest includes collegiate access for urban and Appalachian populations, successful transition mechanisms, retention, and programming for students from high school to college. DaVonti’ has previously participated in 4-H through the Cuyahoga County Extension Office, and will be a new member of the Strategic Initiatives and Urban Engagement team at Ohio State University Extension.

Welcome DaVonti’!