Evaluating the Economic Impact of Local Food Systems

If every dollar or pound spent within the local economy has the potential to increase localized spending and support smaller-scale enterprise, does this mean that local food systems show similar impacts? This local multiplier effect is what Becca Jablonski, Dawn Thilmany McFadden, and their team of Agricultural Economists from across the U.S. set out to investigate. With the backing of the United States Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Marketing Service, they developed the Local Food Systems Toolkit to evaluate the economic impact of local food systems policies, programming, and initiatives, with the hopes of making the evaluation of impacts more standardized and accessible to policymakers and funders. Follow this link to learn more.
Follow this link to access the toolkit.

Sourced from: Urban Food Futures

Professional Development Travel Scholarships Available to Attend the Urban Food Systems Symposium

Twenty-five travel grants of up to $500 each will be awarded to Urban Food Systems professionals including extension educators, state and federal agency workers, educators, and not-for-profit professionals serving the urban food system. This scholarship can be used towards lodging, registration, meals, airfare and mileage during the Urban Food Systems Symposium which is being held in Kansas City from June 3-6, 2020. Scholarship winners will also receive complimentary registration to the Pre-Symposium Workshop with Mark Winne.

Important Dates:
Application Open: October 15, 2019
Application Deadline: December 20, 2019
Recipients Announced: February 1, 2020

Eligibility

Current professionals working in Urban Food Systems or a related field
Successfully submitted statement of interest.
Criteria For Selecting Professional Travel Grant Awardees
The statement of interest should include: why you are interested in Urban Food Systems and how the symposium will help you develop your professional goals.

Follow this link to submit your statement of interest form.

NUEL December 2019 Steering Committee Update

Julie Fox participated in the National Urban Extension Leaders Steering Committee meetings last week and has shared these thoughts from the committee conversations.

Ohio State University Extension is not alone in:

  • working through what “urban” means for Extension as our states continue to address the scale, diversity, and complexity in our metro areas.
  • sharing the message of it’s not urban or rural, it’s both and …
  • addressing urban (and urban/rural) issues related to water, food systems, youth development, health, civil dialogue, etc
  • understanding that issues transcend city and county boundaries
  • exploring CITY support for urban Extension – in addition to COUNTY support
  • recognizing our responsibility to provide public value in our states (urban location and diversity of residents)
  • acknowledging that many counties have urban, suburban, and rural influence
  • discussing individual behavior change and community level change through PSE and collective impact
  • considering what’s uniquely urban about Extension in densely populated communities
    • positioning (awareness and accessibility – location/s, communications, etc.)
    • programs (audiences – relevance and impacts),
    • personnel (capacity, diversity, alignment)
    • partnerships (connection and reach)

For Your Calendars:

  • NUEL NC Regional Caucus Meeting, May 2020 in Madison, WI
  • National Urban Extension Conference, Atlantic City, NJ on May 17-20, 2021 at Bally (+NYC), Themes include Rural, Suburban, Urban

Please contact Julie if you have questions. fox.264@osu.edu

Alliance for the American Dream Presentations

The Ohio State Alliance Pitch to the Community is a chance to learn more about their top teams and their ideas to foster true social mobility, true equality of opportunity, and a true middle class that is attainable and sustainable. The event will be held Tuesday, January 14, 2020 from 6:30-9 p.m. at the Nationwide and Ohio Farm Bureau 4-H Center. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: The Alliance for the American Dream

Correlations Exist Between Life Expectancy, Poverty, and Race

Not everyone has an equal opportunity to live a long and healthy life, as is evidenced by the wide disparities in life expectancy throughout Ohio. There is much more to health than health care; the conditions in the community in which you live influence how healthy you will be and how long you will live. Being able to measure health outcomes at the very local level is important if we are to shape policies and services that improve these conditions for vulnerable communities. It is in that spirit that the U.S Small-Area Life Expectancy Estimates Project (USALEEP) came to be, and through this research, we are able to look at life expectancy at the census tract level.  Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: The Center for Community Solutions

Nutrition Considerations for Smart Aging: Webinar

Approximately 80% of older adults have at least one chronic disease that directly impacts their quality of life. This webinar will discuss how nutrition affects the quality of life in older adults, and what can lead to poor nutrition in later life. An Introduction to the Aging and Eating curriculum will be presented by Jenny Lobb and Kathy Tutt. The webinar will take place Friday, December 6, 2019. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: The North Central Region Aging Network

Disrupting Food Insecurity

An estimated 40 million Americans—including 12.5 million children—struggle with food insecurity, meaning they can’t afford an adequate diet. Federal nutrition programs and charitable meals make up the first line of defense, but solving this challenge will require communities to go beyond food to disrupt the root causes of economic distress. This dashboard equips counties with data about their food insecurity levels and related risk factors, identifies cross-cutting opportunities for intervention, and groups counties by shared challenges. Dive into your county’s data and explore strategies tailored to your county. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: The Urban Institute

6 New Cities to Address Health Hazards in Housing

Health and success begin at home, yet millions of Americans live in housing that is making them sick. Young children are particularly vulnerable to lead poisoning and asthma. NLC is committed to supporting member efforts to provide safe and affordable housing for every family. NLC has selected six cities through a competitive application process to come together on health hazards in housing. The Healthy Housing City Leaders’ Forum will first convene in Charlotte, North Carolina in December. The six participating cities are:

  • Baton Rouge, Louisiana
  • Bloomington, Illinois
  • Charlotte, North Carolina
  • Detroit, Michigan
  • Durham, North Carolina
  • Jersey City, New Jersey

Each city has convened a cross-sector team that includes city department heads, implementers, and health partners. With the generous support of The JPB Foundation, this initiative will enable city teams to develop and implement a targeted action plan to improve housing conditions in their community. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: Cities Speak