Minor Spotlight: Communication Minor

The ability to communicate effectively is an essential skill in today’s society. The Communication minor equips students with this essential skill that employers most desire. Students learn how to communicate effectively to form relationships and influence others, and how to use mass communication and communication technologies to craft messages that improve our work and civic life. Students also learn how advertising can be used strategically to create the most positive impact.

There is one prerequisite course and 4 required minor courses.  All are available online, 100% at a distance, each and every semester including Summer term.  None of the courses have prerequisite requirements and all could be taken concurrently if desired.

Students do not need to meet with a School of Communication advisor to declare the minor.  Interested students just need to plan to complete the required courses and their major advisor can declare the minor.  Any deviations or proposed course substitutions to the minor requirements must be approved by petition to the Chair of the Undergraduate Program Committee in the School of Communication.  Substitution requests can be submitted via email to butte.1@osu.edu.


There are also five more-specific Communication minors, including the Health, Environment, Risk, & Science Communication Minor, which may be of interest to CBC students.

Spotlight on Chemistry: RNA Vaccines

RNA vaccines produced by Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna were amongst the first vaccines approved for emergency use in fighting the COVID-19 pandemic. The following graphic created by Andy Brunning for Chemical & Engineering News looks at how the vaccines are made:

Want to learn more about what the COVID-19 RNA vaccines really are? Or the Oxford University & AstraZeneca viral vector vaccines? Visit Brunning’s website, Compound Interest, for infographics about these topics and more.

Career Success Launching New Podcast

The Arts & Sciences Center for Career and Professional Success (Career Success) is excited to launch a new podcast: Getting Ahead with Career Success.

Episode one focuses on online presence for a virtual job search and includes advice from employers and branding experts. The content covers online portfolios, consistency with your virtual imprint and core platforms such as LinkedIn and the career management system Handshake in building a reputable online presence.

Course Spotlight: CHEM 5240 – Intro to Protein Modeling

Offered in Spring 2020.
MWF 1:50 – 2:45pm
Dr. Richard Spinney

Students will have an opportunity to explore the theories and methods of molecular modeling and computational chemistry in CHEM 5240: Introduction to Protein Modeling.

The course allows students to get hands-on experience with computational chemistry software, using molecular mechanics, and modeling dynamic systems (molecular dynamics) as applied to large biological molecules such as proteins. The course focuses on the application of modern modeling techniques, rather than the mathematical formulation, used to solve current problems in biochemistry and pharmacology. The course runs like a workshop with extensive computer time using modern protein modeling software.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of CHEM 2520 (Organic Chemistry II)

Course Spotlight: CHEM 5520 – Nanochemistry

Offered in Spring 2020.
Tuesdays/Thursdays, 9:35am – 10:55am
Dr. Josh Goldberger

Nanoscale materials are materials with nm size dimensions, with properties that exist in the border between molecules and solids. Due to the unique properties that emerge in this regime, these materials have already impacted numerous industries including electronics, energy generation and storage, and medicine. This course provides a comprehensive introduction to nanoscale materials, their synthesis, their unique properties, and applications.

Prerequisites: Students should have completed General Chemistry II (Chem 1220, 1620, 1920H) and will need instructor permission.

Course Spotlight: CHEM 5430 – Carbohydrate Chemistry

Offered in Spring 2020
Tuesdays and Thursdays 9:35am – 10:55am
Instructor: Dr. Christopher Callam
Prereqs: CHEM 2520 or 2620 or 2920

The main objective of CHEM 5430 is for students to gain a better understanding of glycol-science. Students will develop a working knowledge of the synthesis, conformation, and biological importance of carbohydrates and oligosaccharides, including nomenclature, protecting groups, glycoside synthesis, biosynthesis and biology, and NMR methods.

This course is designed to help develop scientific problem solving skills and application of organic and biochemistry to new situations.

Click here to learn more.