Can I drink this beer while on medication?

NFL playoffs and the OSU Spring Semester are in full swing, and this may mean an increase in alcohol consumption during the months to come. There are many drugs that interact with alcohol to some extent. These interactions can either metabolize medications and decrease the medications effectiveness, or can have the opposite additive effect and increase the risk of toxicity.

Here is a limited chart of studied alcohol-drug interactions and the risk/warnings of combining the two, be sure to ask your pharmacist about any drug-drug interactions before taking your medication:

Common OTC/Prescribed Medications Clinical Effects Recommendations
Pain Medications:
Acetaminophen (can be found in multiple OTC/prescribed drugs) Acute alcohol use in large amounts can increase risk of liver toxicity Do not consume >3 alcoholic drinks/day while taking this medication
Aspirin (Excedrin), ibuprofen (Motrin) and naproxen (Aleve) Increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding Do not consume >3 alcoholic drinks/day while taking this medication
Codeine, hydrocodone + acetaminophen (Norco, Lortab, Lorcet, Vicodin), oxycodone + acetaminophen (Percocet, Endocet) and tramadol (Ultram) Co-ingestion may lead to respiratory failure, increased dizziness, sedation and can potentially be fatal Avoid alcohol consumption while on these medications
Antidepressants/Seizure medications:
Amitriptyline (Elavil), imipramine (Tofranil), clomipramine (Anafranil); and bupropion (Wellbutrin/Zyban); phenytoin, perampanel (Fycompa) Increased risk of sedation, dizziness, fainting; may also increase risk of seizures; may cause psychiatric effects Minimize or avoid alcohol use, speak to your doctor/pharmacist about alternatives
Diabetic medications:
Glyburide (Diabeta), metformin (Glucophage) and insulin therapies May cause vomiting, nausea, headache, muscle or stomach pain and visual disturbance. Unpredictable effects while on insulin may occur Avoid heavy alcohol consumption (>3 drinks/day)
Antihistamines:
Diphenhydramine (Benadryl, ZZZquil) and doxylamine (Sleep Aids) Increased risk of sedation and dizziness Advise against alcohol consumption, speak to your doctor/pharmacist about alternatives
Antihypertensives:
Amlodipine (Norvasc), nicardipine (Cardene), nifedipine (Procardia), atenolol (Tenormin), and metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL) Increased risk of dizziness and fainting

 

Advise against heavy alcohol consumption (>3 drinks/day)
Antimicrobials:
Doxycycline (Vibramycin), ketoconazole, metronidazole (Flagyl), and isoniazid May decrease effectiveness of medication, as well as increase risk of vomiting, nausea, stomach pain. Isoniazid and alcohol may cause liver damage Advise to avoid alcohol on all antimicrobial agents ask your pharmacist about interactions with your medications

 

Next time someone hands you an alcoholic drink and you are taking medication, ask yourself… is it worth the risk?

 

Justin Corpus

PharmD Candidate 2018

References:

  1. Alcohol and Drug Interactions. Pharmacist’s Letter/Prescriber’s Letter. December 2015.

Sick as a dog? Keep the cold/flu at bay!

Taking an antibiotic for the cold or flu? What is the point?

Antibiotics are medications that are used to treat infections caused by bacteria. The common cold and flu are viral infections, and asking your prescriber for an antibiotic to treat these conditions is something we do not encourage you to do.

When is it ok for you vs not okay to take antibiotics?

Common Cause: Virus Common Cause: Bacteria
Sore throat, sinusitis

Vomiting and diarrhea

Runny nose, cough, head cold

Kidney infection

Skin infection

Meningitis

Pneumonia

Antibiotics rarely needed Antibiotics needed

 

If you were to take antibiotics when they are not needed this may create antibiotic resistance, which can occur when bacteria are exposed to antibiotics and can learn to resist them. How can you avoid antibiotic resistance?

  1. If you have been prescribed an antibiotic COMPLETE the course of medication by taking all of the dispensed pills
  2. DO NOT skip doses of antibiotics if prescribed
  3. DO NOT save pills for later

Don’t want to get sick this winter … then take these precautions and you can limit your exposure to feeling ill.

  1. Wash your hands!
    1. Your hands are a good environment for cold viruses, and these viruses can stay on your skin for up to 2 hours.
  2. Try and avoid close contact to those who are ill!
  3. Sneeze or cough into the pit of your elbow, to avoid virus from spreading onto your hands!

If you unfortunately catch the common cold or flu, then symptomatic treatment until the virus passes is the best option. If symptoms do not resolve after a week, or worsen, we would encourage you to schedule an appointment with our providers at Student Life Student Health Services, or visit your primary care physician.

 

Symptoms Treatment
Sore throat Acetaminophen or Ibuprofen

Honey and lemon, or anesthetic lozenges

Dry cough (lack of mucus)

Wet cough (production of mucus)

Dry cough—dextromethorphan

Wet cough—guaifenesin

Fever, pain, joint or muscle ache Acetaminophen or ibuprofen
Runny nose, or congestion Nasal sprays—oxymetazoline (do not use more than 3 days, ask your pharmacist if symptoms persist)

Oral Decongestants—pseudophedrine or phenylephrine

 

Justin Corpus

PharmD Candidate 2018

 

References:

  1. Marjama, K. Treating the common cold. Pharmacy Times (2017). 83 (12): 95-96.
  2. Allan, M., Arrol, B. Prevention and treatment of the common cold: making sense of the evidence. CMAJ (2014); 186 (3): 190-199.
  3. Schroeder, M., Brooks, B., Brooks, A. The complex relationship between virulence and antibiotic resistance. Genes (2017). 8 (1): 39-62

New Year’s Resolutions

At the beginning of a new year, many of us resolve to take better care of ourselves.  This often includes a desire to eat more healthfully.  How to accomplish that can be confusing.  There are numerous “experts” and guidelines.  They sometimes conflict and often do not seem to be practical or helpful.

The types of foods we consume can have a huge effect on how we feel and think.  Sugar intake has markedly increased over the past few decades.  This correlates with a significant rise in obesity, diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, and other health problems.

It appears highly likely that reducing sugar intake can have a big effect not only on how we feel and look now, but also reduce our chances for numerous chronic diseases in the future.

This does not mean that you have to “diet” or be hungry.  I would encourage you to eat when you are hungry and include a diverse range of foods such as unprocessed meat, fish, chicken, nuts, vegetables, and fruits.

However, try to avoid sugar and foods that cause a rapid elevation of blood sugar levels.  Examples of foods to avoid include the following:

  • Processed grains such as breads and cereals
  • Foods and condiments containing sugar
  • Sweets (e.g. candy, soda)
  • Potatoes

Eating healthfully can be a challenge.  However, it can make a big difference.  Please make an appointment at the Student Life Student Health Center (614-292-4321) if you would like more information.

Submitted by Matthew Peters, M.D.