Be on the lookout for Potato Leafhopper

Alfalfa Weevil and Potato Leafhopper Status in Ohio’s Alfalfa Crop

https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/15-2021/alfalfa-weevil-and-potato-leafhopper-status-ohio%E2%80%99s-alfalfa-crop

Alfalfa leaves with attached alfalfa weevil net-like cocoons.Alfalfa leaves with attached alfalfa weevil net-like cocoons.

The activity and threat of the alfalfa weevil is mostly coming to an end for this year. Observations made in alfalfa fields across Ohio reveal that the alfalfa weevil larvae are finishing their feeding and spinning net-like cocoons in the alfalfa foliage in which to pupate. The pupae are the stage in which this insect goes through metamorphosis into the next adult stage.  These adults do little damage to the crop. They feed for a short time, then enter an inactive period called aestivation. They will become active again in late-summer and fall to feed again to prepare to overwinter. Some larvae are still present.  These larvae can produce strips of damage under wind rows after the first cutting resulting in browned out strips where the wind rows laid in the field. Once the hay is baled, the larvae will be exposed to predation.

pupae

Alfalfa weevil net-like cocoons and exposed alfalfa weevil pupae.

Our next threat to our alfalfa crop production will be potato leafhopper (PLH). Each year, PLH must migrate back into Ohio from the southern states. As our weather patterns shift to movement from the south toward the north, the winds pick up populations of adult PLH and carry them north allowing them to colonize Ohio’s alfalfa fields, soybean fields, clover fields and many other types of plants. This regularly occurs in mid- to late May every year.  Once the migrant PLH adults arrive, they begin laying eggs. It only takes about 3 weeks for these eggs to hatch into nymphs and develop into adults. Thus, populations of PLH can rapidly explode into a serious threat to alfalfa production. This is one insect that we can predict will be a serious threat to our crop production almost every year.

New spring seedings of alfalfa can be extremely impacted by the relatively low numbers of PLH and should be scouted regularly (weekly) for PLH. Action thresholds can be exceeded very fast in these slow growing new stands.  Once damaged, PLH can impact their growth for the rest of the year.

Older stands can tolerate higher numbers of PLH, but as the second-cut alfalfa grows, producers should be scouting regularly for increasing PLH populations in their fields. Proper scouting must be done with a standard-sized sweep net.  For a video on scouting techniques visit:  https://forages.osu.edu/video/scouting-potato-leafhopper-alfalfa

If alfalfa is more than seven days from a cut and plants are under normal stress, a good rule of thumb for an action threshold for treatment is when the number of PLH (nymphs+adults) in a 10-sweep set is equal to or greater than the height of the alfalfa. For example, if the alfalfa is 10 inches tall, and the average number of PLH per sample is 10 or higher, treatment is warranted. If the average is nine or lower, the grower should come back within a few days to see if the population is continuing to increase (treatment warranted), staying the same (come back again in a few days) or declining (treatment not warranted). Vigorous alfalfa can tolerate higher numbers, and stressed alfalfa can tolerate fewer, so you may need to adjust your action threshold based on the condition of the alfalfa.

For a video with detail on damage, ID, and control options visit:  https://forages.osu.edu/video/potato-leafhopper-identification-and-damage-alfalfa

Ohio State University Extension’s factsheet on potato leafhopper in alfalfa is at: https://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/ENT-33

An excellent resource for other forage-related questions is the OSU Extension’s Forage Page at: https://forages.osu.edu/home

CROP OBSERVATION AND RECOMMENDATION NETWORK

C.O.R.N. Newsletter is a summary of crop observations, related information, and appropriate recommendations for Ohio crop producers and industry. C.O.R.N. Newsletter is produced by the Ohio State University Extension Agronomy Team, state specialists at The Ohio State University and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC). C.O.R.N. Newsletter questions are directed to Extension and OARDC state specialists and associates at Ohio State.

New Brown County Field Reports Posted!

New field reports available at http://go.osu.edu/fieldreport.

Have a pest report? Contact the Brown County Extension Office!  937-378-6716 or morris.1677@osu.edu

  1. New corn field added in Mt. Orab https://brown.osu.edu/program-areas/agriculture-and-natural-resources/field-reports/corn/mt-orab-1
  2. New Corn field -Cover Crop added in Georgetown:https://brown.osu.edu/program-areas/agriculture-and-natural-resources/field-reports/corn/georgetown-corn-cover-crop
  3. Updates on Bean Leaf Beetle on Soybeans: https://brown.osu.edu/program-areas/agriculture-and-natural-resources/field-reports/soybeans/farm-1-ripley-soybeans
  4. Update on Alfalfa Weevil and Potato Leaf Hooper lookout. https://brown.osu.edu/program-areas/agriculture-and-natural-resources/field-reports/alfalfa

Soybeans Field Report

 

FARM #1: RIPLEY-A
Plant Date: April 28, 2021

Full Site available at: go.osu.edu/fieldreport 

Report Date: May 10, 2021

Description: Emergence started.

Growing Degree Day since planting: ~100

Total Growing Degree Day since 01/01/21: 435

Report Date: May 20, 2021

Growing Degree Day since planting: ~100

Total Growing Degree Day since 01/01/21: 435

Growth: Wide Variety of seedling stages (non-emerged to VC). Some seeds still in the soil were rotten and others were still viable and germinating.

 

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Pest: Bean Leaf Beetles (BLB) and foliar damgae presesnt.

Source: Hammond, et al. Bean Leaf Beetle on Soybean, Ohioline.osu.edu

  • Description: BLB can overwinter in the adult stage and will pass through 2 generations in Ohio. Overwintering adults are found now feeding of soybean foliage. 2nd generations appear around August and September.
  • Early Seaon Scouting and Damage: As with this field, early planted fields can become a trap crop for the first generation, especially if minimal soybeans are emergend in surrounding areas. However, economic injury is rare at this stage. “Severe leaf feeding can cause significant damage and should be stopped if defoliation goes over 50%, plants are being stunted, and beetles are still actively feeding.”  The foliar damge foud in this field ranged from 5-10%.
  • Late Season and Scouting: Later planted soybeans that are still green in September can also serve as a trap crop if others nearby have reach physiological maturity. “Scouting, sweeping for population or for defoliation assessment, pull 20 plants and estimate damage among entire plant. Rescue treatment is justified when defoliation exceeds: 40% prior to bloom, 15% from bloom to pod-fill, and 25% after pod-fill to plant yellowing.” BLB can slaco vector bean pod mottle virus (BPMV.) “Infection by this virus results in plants that remain green well past harvest maturity, with seeds that often are severely mottled”
  • More details on identification and management:
    1. Ohio Sate Bean Leaf Beetle Fact Sheet | https://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/ENT-23

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Kroger Announces Go Fresh & Local Supplier Accelerator

America’s largest grocery retailer invites local and regional growers and producers to apply for new accelerator program

CINCINNATI, May 12, 2021 – The Kroger Co. (NYSE: KR) today announced the Go Fresh & Local Supplier Accelerator, a new partnership program inviting American growers and producers to apply for the opportunity to work with the retailer. The program, sponsored by Gourmet Foods International, will enable Kroger to discover new suppliers to support the continued expansion of its fresh departments – including produce, deli, bakery, meat, seafood, dairy, specialty cheeses, and floral – and its commitment to being Fresh for Everyone™.
Starting today and through May 31, suppliers can apply to join the Go Fresh & Local Supplier Accelerator, which will be held in Cincinnati in August. In collaboration with Efficient Collaborative Retail Marketing and RangeMe, Kroger’s category management and fresh director team will review applications in multiple rounds, selecting 15 finalists (one finalist per region per category) to attend the event. All finalists will present to a panel of judges during a pitch session, with one overall winner selected from each region. The prize package for the five overall winners includes product placement on shelf within Kroger’s Family of Companies; recommended partnerships with Gourmet Foods International; and business development coaching from Kroger merchandising and sales leaders as well as PearlRock Partners CEO Brian Kelley, a 30-year consumer product industry veteran and former president of Keurig Green Mountain and Coca-Cola Refreshments.
“At Kroger, our Fresh for Everyone mission is anchored in consistently and creatively providing fresh and affordable food to our customers,” said Dan De La Rosa, Kroger’s group vice president of fresh merchandising. “We’re dedicated to fostering innovation and investing in local, regional, and small businesses that make the best of food accessible to all. Our first Go Fresh & Local Supplier Accelerator is an extension of our commitment and we’re eager to invite suppliers of every size to participate, providing the potential to grow our businesses together.”
Kroger welcomes growers and producers to apply to the relevant regional categories below, in alignment with the following regional versus local grouping criteria:

● Regions:
○ Region 1: QFC, Fred Meyer, Ralphs, and Food 4 Less
○ Region 2: Fry’s Food Stores, Smith’s, King Soopers, City Market, and Dillons
○ Region 3: Kroger Houston, Kroger Dallas, Kroger Delta, and Kroger Nashville
○ Region 4: Mariano’s, Metro Market, Pick ‘n Save, Kroger Central, Kroger Michigan, Kroger Columbus
○ Region 5: Kroger Atlanta, Kroger Mid-Atlantic, Kroger Louisville, Harris Teeter and Kroger Cincinnati-Dayton

● Groupings:

○ Local:
■ Small producers;
■ Located in-state or the immediate market;
■ Community-inspired and locally relevant items;
■ Merchandised in less than approximately 100 stores.

○ Regional:
■ Larger producers;
■ Cross state and division boundaries;
■ Still locally relevant to customers;
■ Merchandised in approximately 100 or more stores.

“Kroger is committed to offering the best assortment of fresh products enabled by an innovative portfolio of suppliers. In 2020 alone, we invested $4.1 billion in diverse suppliers — a 21% increase versus the previous year — and we’re working with intention to scale that number to $10 billion by 2030,” said Stuart Aitken, Kroger’s chief merchant and marketing officer. “The Go Fresh & Local Supplier Accelerator will help us achieve our goal as well as advance our freshness commitment in our nearly 2,800 stores and across our Kroger.com e-commerce services, including Pickup, Delivery, and Ship.”

To apply and learn more about the Go Fresh & Local Supplier Accelerator, visit https://www.thekrogerco.com/gofreshlocal/. Media Assets To download Kroger store and fresh department photography, visit https://brandfolder.com/kroger/go-fresh-local-supplier-accelerator. About Kroger At The Kroger Co. (NYSE: KR), we are dedicated to our Purpose: to Feed the Human Spirit™. We are nearly half a million associates who serve over nine million customers daily through a seamless digital shopping experience and 2,800 retail food stores under a variety of banner names, serving America through food inspiration and uplift, and creating

#ZeroHungerZeroWaste communities by 2025. To learn more about us, visit our newsroom and investor relations site. -30- Contacts Kroger Media: Sheila Regehr, (620) 200-3209 sheila.regehr@dillonstores.com Investors: Rebekah Manis, (513) 762-4969

Alfalfa Field Report

MAY 7, 2021

1. Farm Name & Location: Georgetown-1A

Growing Degree Day Accumulation (GDD): 419

Pest: Alfalfa Weevil

Description: Alfalfa plants had moderate to high levels of defoliation in the upper canopy. 30 stems were collected and a total of 31 weevil larva were found. Ranging from 1st instar to 3rd instar.

FoliarImage B

Management: This field’s average plant height was 14″ tall. When using the chart below, the 14” height and the average of 1 insect per plant, there is no immediate control needed. GDD accumulation is ahead of our average Souther, Ohio. Weevil damage is commonly kept at lower levels by parasitic wasps and a type of fungal pathogen. Sevre damage is also normally closer to harvest and an early harvest can be used to reduce further damage. Producers should watch the regrwoth very closely for weevil feeding.

In this situtation the level of defoliation was higher than expected for this early in the season. Therfore, we will collect samples from this field again in 3 days and if defoliation increases, a rescue treatment of an insecticide may be warranted.

Alfalfa Weevil Thresholds

More Information: 

  1. More information about scouting, managment, and lifecycles can be found at: Alfalfa Weevil on Alfalfa| Ohioline Fact Sheet
  2. Specific chemical control options can be found at: Control of Insect Pests of Field Crops | PDF

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2. Farm Name & Location: Russellville-1A

Growing Degree Day Accumulation (GDD): 419

Pest: Alfalfa Weevil

Description: Alfalfa plants had low to high levels of defoliation in the upper canopy. 30 stems were collected and a total of 45 weevil larva were found. Ranging from 1st instar to 3rd instar. Overall, more quantity of early instart weevils and less foliar damage as compared to Georgetown-1A.

foliarweevil

Management: This field’s average plant height was over 16 ” tall. When using the chart below, the 16” height and the average of 1 insect per plant, there is no immediate control needed. GDD accumulation is ahead of our average Southern Ohio. Weevil damage is commonly kept at lower levels by parasitic wasps and a type of fungal pathogen. Severe damage is also normally closer to harvest and an early harvest can be used to reduce further damage. Producers should watch the regrwoth very closely for weevil feeding.

We will collect samples from this field again in 3 days and if defoliation increases, a rescue treatment of an insecticide may be warranted.

Alfalfa Weevil Threshold

More Information: 

  1. More information about scouting, managment, and lifecycles can be found at: Alfalfa Weevil on Alfalfa| Ohioline Fact Sheet
  2. Specific chemical control options can be found at: Control of Insect Pests of Field Crops | PDF

Calving Workshop & BQA

Registration deadline: May 21, 2021

Max occupancy: 80

Meal provided by: Georgetown Farm Supply and Cherry Fork Farm Supply

Link to Register:  go.osu.edu/calvingBQA or use code on flyer. Contact the Brown County Extension office for any questions. 937-378-6716