TickTalk with TickReport Webinars

A FREE series brought to you by the UMass Laboratory of Medical Zoology and UMass Extension

TickTalk with TickReport is back for 2020! Each month we will hear from Dr. Stephen Rich and the Laboratory of Medical Zoology (LMZ)! TickTalk in 2020 will also feature exciting guest speakers on tick topics that you told us were important to YOU. The series will include seasonality and life stages of ticks (key to planning intervention and prevention), emerging or invasive tick species, how ticks use vegetation and leaf litter throughout their life cycle, increasing fears of Alpha-gal allergies (allergies to certain meat and animal-related products), dispelling myths of tick control, and many more. Mosquito concerns, including life cycle, behavior, and EEE infection, will also be addressed and Dr. Rich will discuss the tens of thousands of mosquitoes the LMZ tests each year for a range of viruses. Tune in the 2nd Wednesday of the month! 

Preregistration is required to access the webinars. To be notified of upcoming webinar dates and topics, join our e-mail list at: https://ag.umass.edu/landscape/email-list

NOTE REGARDING TICK TESTING: TickReport at the UMass Laboratory of Medical Zoology is open and accepting tick samples for testing. For more details on how to submit samples, go to https://www.tickreport.com.

2020 WEBINAR SCHEDULE – 2nd Wednesday of the month

AUGUST 12, 2020 – Extinction of Deer Ticks in North America
Speaker: Dr. Stephen Rich, Professor of Microbiology, University of Massachusetts Amherst; Director the Laboratory of Medical Zoology
Dr. Stephen Rich will discuss a recent publication in Nature (June 2020) from the Laboratory of Medical Zoology that provides insight to the evolutionary and ecological origin of the primary Lyme disease vectors in North America. Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7268068031726182913

SEPTEMBER 9, 2020 – Biology of Ticks and Other Tick-Borne Disease
Speaker: Daniel Sonenshine, Professor Emeritus, Old Dominion University; Laboratory of Malaria and Vector Research, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIH)
Dr. Rich will host Dr. Daniel Sonenshine, preeminent tick biologist who quite literally wrote the book on ticks (Biology of Ticks in two volumes, co-authored with Dr. R. Michael Roe).  Dr. Sonenshine’s research interest in ticks precedes the discovery of Lyme disease in North America and he is thus uniquely qualified to provide a historical context for this public health challenge. Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/751678229293240321

OCTOBER 14, 2020 – Tick-borne Disease Surveillance in the US
Speaker: Dr. Ben Beard, Deputy Director, Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 
Dr. Rich welcomes Dr. Ben Beard to the TickTalk webinar.  Dr. Beard will present the latest CDC findings on the burdens of tick-borne disease and public health trends.  Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7480889502398662145

NOVEMBER 18, 2020 – Babesiosis
Speaker: Dr. Sam R. Telford III, Professor, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University
Dr. Telford III joins Dr. Rich on the TickTalk webinar to discuss the second most commonly reported tick-borne disease in North America (after Lyme disease).  Babesiosis is a malaria-like illness transmitted by the same ticks as Lyme.  Dr. Telford is recognized as a global authority on this disease. Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3144222128403757825

DECEMBER 9, 2020 – Topic TBD
Register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2502047964154713345


ARCHIVED WEBINARS (see links below)

2020

2019

Enroll in On-Line Veterinary Entomology Certificate Courses offered by The Ohio State University Department of Entomology

Introduction to Veterinary Entomology

An introduction to the fascinating world of Veterinary Entomology and arthropod pests that impact the health of domestic animals. This course is approved for CE credit by the Ohio Veterinary Medical Licensing Board (OVMLB) on an hour per hour basis. It can be completed in 3-6 hours.

 

Veterinary Entomology:  Mites and Ticks         

The goals of this on-line course are to introduce you to mites and ticks, as well as highlight some fascinating aspects about their basic biology and the impacts they have on animal and human health (with an emphasis on domestic animals). This course is pending approval for CE credit by the OVMLB on an hour per hour basis. It can be completed in 2-3 hours.

 

Veterinary Entomology:  Mosquitoes

The goals of this on-line course are to introduce you to mosquitoes, as well as highlight somehttps://www.vectorbase.org/sites/default/files/ftp/image_gallery/Aedes%20Species/A.%20albopictus/2165.jpg.thumb fascinating aspects about their basic biology and the impacts they have on animal and human health (with an emphasis on domestic animals). This course is pending approval for CE credit by the OVMLB on an hour per hour basis. It can be completed in 1-2 hours.

 

The content for each course is delivered in a series of on-line lectures and readings. Each module has a 15 question quiz to test comprehension of the lecture and reading materials; each quiz requires a score of 70% to earn a certificate (multiple attempts are allowed).

For additional details please contact Dr. Peter Piermarini: 1@osu.edu

Efficacy of Active Ingredients From the EPA 25(B) List in Reducing Attraction of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) to Humans

Abstract

Mosquitoes of the Aedes genus are vectors for dengue, chikungunya, Zika, and yellow fever viruses. Mosquito repellents are an effective way to prevent mosquito bites and reduce the spread of mosquito-borne diseases. In the early 90s, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a list of active ingredients that pose minimum risk to human health that can be used as pesticides or repellents without passing the EPA registration process. The present study examined the efficacy of 21 of the active ingredients listed by the EPA 25 (B) exempt list and five commercially available sprays that only contained active ingredients from the EPA 25(B) list in repelling female Aedes aegypti (L.) females. We performed choice bioassays in a controlled laboratory environment, using a Y-tube olfactometer to determine attraction rates of humans to female Ae. aegypti in the presence of one of the 21 active ingredients and five commercially available repellent sprays. We found that cinnamon oil, peppermint oil, spearmint oil, lemongrass oil, and garlic oil reduced mosquito attraction to human odor. Of the five commercial repellent sprays, only one reduced mosquito attraction for up to 30 min in our assay. The EPA 25 (B) list contains active ingredients that under the conditions of our assay repel Ae. aegypti.

For full pdf, click HERE

Lyme Disease in Ohio Continues to Increase

By: Sarah Short and Spencer Blankenship (OSU Biology Undergraduate)

As the 2019 season wraps up, reports indicate that occurrences of Lyme disease continue to increase in Ohio.  From 2009 to 2018, the number of cases has increased over 500%! (Figure 1)

 

Data from the Ohio Department of Health https://odh.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/odh/know-our-programs/zoonotic-disease-program/resources/lyme-disease

Lyme has been expanding westward across Pennsylvania and occurrences in Ohio are primarily in the Eastern half of the state (Figure 2). 2019 reports indicate the worst year yet for Lyme, with 371 cases reported as of October 21st.

 

Data from the Ohio Department of Health https://odh.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/odh/know-our-programs/zoonotic-disease-program/resources/lyme-disease 

Lyme disease is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and is most commonly contracted through a bite from a nymph (an immature tick), however, adult ticks can spread the disease as well. Nymphs are only about 2 millimeters in size, leaving many people unaware that they were bitten. The tick that spreads the disease, Ixodes scapularis (more commonly referred to as the blacklegged tick or deer tick) is increasing in number and expanding its range. It is important that Ohioans be aware of the situation and take steps to prevent infection. See the resources here for information on how to protect yourself outdoors.

Online Course in Veterinary Entomology Available

Enroll in ‘Introduction to Veterinary Entomology’ On-Line Certificate Course

This on-line certificate course provides an introduction to the fascinating world of arthropod pests and vectors (ticks, fleas, flies, etc.) that impact the health and well-being of domestic animals. This introductory course consists of two self-paced modules focused on core concepts in Veterinary Entomology. The topics covered include: 1) What is Veterinary Entomology and why is it relevant?; 2) Epidemiology of vector-borne diseases; 3) The evolution of blood feeding in arthropods; and 4) Human influences on vectors and the pathogens they transmit.  The content is delivered in a series of on-line lectures and readings. Each module has a 15 question quiz to test comprehension of the lecture and reading materials; each quiz requires a score of 70% to earn a certificate (multiple attempts are allowed).

 

Please click on the link below to register for the course (enrollment fee is $35).

 

http://www.cvent.com/d/fgq8ry/4W

— > For further details please contact Dr. Peter Piermarini (Entomology): piermarini.1@osu.edu