Sept 28 – Specimen drop off info and facts of the week

Drop off information:
Thank you to everyone who has completed the drop off survey! About half of the participants have filled it out, so if you haven’t yet, please double check your emails from last week and fill out the survey (even if you already turned in your kit!)

If you can’t make it to one of the drop off days in the email, I should have reached out to you with an attempt to connect you with neighboring county collectors if you have completed the survey. I will be going back through the list again shortly to send out reminder emails to those who haven’t completed it.

Early or Late Drop off locations: If you want to turn in your kits before mid-October, consider dropping off your kit to the Akron or Newark locations. Be sure to email or call the location in advance so they know you plan to drop off any specimens and can make sure someone is there to accept them.

  • OSU Newark Campus: Goodell Lab in Adena Hall (contact MaLisa Spring spring.99@osu.edu)
  • The Dawes Arboretum in Newark (contact Livia Raulinaitis lhraulinaitis@dawesarb.org)
  • Akron Biological Field Station (contact Lara Roketenetz ldr11@uakron.edu or Dr. Randy Mitchell rjm2@uakron.edu) – only an early drop off location.

What to drop off:

  • Your sample box with specimens. Please write your name and county on the top and side of the box with sharpie. Please also label any additional boxes or containers if you ran out of space in your initial box.
  • Signed and completed paper form that includes GPS coordinates, type of soap used, specimen archival acknowledgement, and additional contact info for parks. (first page here: https://cpb-us-w2.wpmucdn.com/u.osu.edu/dist/2/86606/files/2020/05/Bee-Survey-Instructions-1-1.pdf)
  • All remaining sampling supplies, including any remaining bee bowls/paint strainers/etc.
  • A copy of any permits that you acquired to sample at your site (applies to people sampling at parks and preserves)
  • Optional: If you are able, please consider making a donation to help with the cost of the pinning and curation supplies. Thanks to all of our successful bee collectors, we are in need of thousands of vials, pins, collection boxes, and other curatorial supplies. A donation of $5 buys a pack of pins, and $70 buys an insect drawer for long term specimen storage, so every little bit helps! Anyone can donate to the project here: https://www.giveto.osu.edu/makeagift/OnlineGivingDonation.aspx?fund=317067&gs=include   Thanks to those who have already donated!

See last weeks post to see how we plan to process the specimens: https://u.osu.edu/beesurvey/2020/09/22/sept-20-specimen-drop-off-info-collection-reminder-and-facts-of-the-week/

Other frequently asked questions:

Will I get a report for my results?
Yes! Everyone who participated will get a list of species that was collected at their site. For people collecting at parks and other locations, I will also send the report to that agency as well.

Are you still going to do pinning training?
I am still working out the logistics for one on one pinning training for people who can make it to Newark. These will have to be scheduled in advance, but once I have the details down, I will try to make them available here or via direct email. I am still trying to make sure we get all of the collection dates input into the database so we can have large batches of labels available first.

Will you do a zoom meeting to show us the sorting and pinning process?
I am still working out our microscope camera situation, but I would like to make it so that people can watch specimen sorting and identification. Still working on the logistics for that (and I am not sure if the scope also has a mic and how that interfaces with the computer, so tbd). Don’t worry, I will let you know once I get things up and running 🙂


Bee facts of the week: 

As I mentioned previously, I have already covered many of the common groups of bees in Ohio. Since we have covered most of the easy, common things, that means I have no choice but to show you some uncommon bees that are likely overlooked or generally uncommon.

Which brings us to the Panurgine bees (Family Andrenidae, Subfamily Panurginae). Technically, we already covered one group of Panurgine bees: the genus Calliopsis.  Right now, there are two genera of Panurgines that we might expect to see: Pseudopanurgus and Perdita (though Perdita are sometimes referred to as Fairy Bees). Both are rather small, black bees, similar in size to the yellow faced bees (Genus Hylaeus), though the yellow faces bees tend to be thinner overall and will never have hairy legs or abdomens. You might also confuse them for really small dull green sweat bees, but the Panurgine bees should not have any metallic reflections, and lack a curved basal vein (which would be extra hard to see from a photo).

A female Pseudopanurgus photographed by Amy Schnebelin. Note the hairy legs and abdomen to differentiate from Hylaeus.

I have only photographed one Pseudopanurgus in Ohio and it was after I had collected it. Both Amy Schnebelin and Bill Stitt have photographed at least 5 individuals foraging on flowers. Meanwhile, Amy is the only one to have submitted photographs of living Perdita to iNaturalist for Ohio. If you look at her photos, you can see just how small the Perdita bees are as they are barely larger than the individual goldenrod flowers! Given how small these bees are, we might be overlooking them when photographing them, but it is likely they are generally uncommon. However, hopefully one or two of them get in our pan traps so we can identify them to species.


What’s that bycatch?

This cup is unusual, as it is the highest number of butterflies I have caught in a week, and they somehow all decided to go into the same bowl. They are all Crescents (genus Phycoides) of some sort.

The Monarch caterpillars need some sort of milkweed plant to grow, though the adult Monarch will use nectar from a variety of flowers.

You might also occasionally find butterflies foraging on things you wouldn’t expect, like mud puddles, scat, sweaty humans, or even dead things like this turtle. I’ve had a few Hackberry Emperors land on me and start trying to feed, which is probably an indication that I needed both to drink more water, but was also due for a shower. They forage on these somewhat odd places to get minerals and other nutrients not easily found in their otherwise plant based diet.

  • The easiest way to differentiate butterflies from moths is based on their wing positioning (wings often held up over the back) and the antennae that are clubbed at the ends. The skipper antennae generally come to a point a the end and moth antennae generally do not have a club of any sort.

This Eastern Tiger Swallowtail was one of several that was “puddling” at this muddy spot.

  • As people have asked me a few times, I am trying to make sure that as much of the bycatch as possible goes to good use. This survey is unprecedented in Ohio not just for the bees, but also the bycatch. I’ve already made efforts to make sure the other groups of bycatch have someone willing to look through them, and the Lepidoptera are no exception. I made sure that we acquired some cellophane envelopes for the Lepidoptera bycatch, which we can then store in index card boxes. Similar to Odonata, the most space efficient long term storage method for leps is actually in special clear envelopes, so that is what we will be doing as well. Thankfully, most of the butterflies are somewhat easy to identify, or we can utilize the computer vision of iNaturalist or LepSnap to at least get us to a genus level ID pretty quickly. Moths, meanwhile, are much trickier to identify from a photograph, but we will still archive them.

Is that a bee?

  • In this brief section, I will show a photo of a bee bowl and let you guess how many of the insects are actually bees. Don’t worry about properly identifying bees in your bowls.  This is just so you can start to recognize some of the bees and get an idea of how many bees you actually have.

How many bees do you see? Are there any bees in this image at all?

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.

.

.

Okay, did you make your guesses?

There are at least 13 bees in this bowl! Most of them look to be in the family Halictidae, with at least 2 bright green sweat bees. There are also a few flies, leafhoppers, and thrips in the image. This was the cup with the most bees from my last sample effort. Most of my other cups had none or one or two bees. I can tell flight season is almost over for most of the bees.

 

And that is all I have! Please be sure to check your email and respond to the drop off survey to figure out when/where to drop off your specimens.

 

Best wishes,

MaLisa

*Edit: Well, I forgot to update the title after I copied it, so likely the automated emails will all go out saying this is for Sept 20th. Oops. I updated the title to reflect the correct date.

Sept 20 – Specimen drop off info, collection reminder, and facts of the week

Winter is coming!
Or rather, fall is quickly on its way, and with it, the first hard frost. Once you have a hard frost in your area, there will be fewer bees out flying. So I recommend to stop collecting after that date and instead start to focus on getting the samples to one of the drop off locations. I know some people in the northern reaches of Ohio have already had light frosts, so keep an eye out! (and also harvest any remaining summer vegetables in your garden so those don’t get frosted either) 😉

Drop off information:
All collectors should have gotten the information for the drop off week via direct email yesterday. If you did not get an email, please check your junk folder and email MaLisa to confirm. For those who have already responded to the drop off day survey, thank you! I will be in touch shortly with those needing additional assistance getting their kits to the drop off days.

Early Drop off locations: If you want to turn in your kits before mid-October, consider dropping off your kit to the Akron or Newark locations. Be sure to email or call the location in advance so they know you plan to drop off any specimens and can make sure someone is there to accept them.

  • OSU Newark Campus: Goodell Lab in Adena Hall (contact MaLisa Spring spring.99@osu.edu)
  • The Dawes Arboretum in Newark (contact Livia Raulinaitis lhraulinaitis@dawesarb.org)
  • Akron Biological Field Station (contact Lara Roketenetz ldr11@uakron.edu or Dr. Randy Mitchell rjm2@uakron.edu)

What to drop off:

  • Your sample box with specimens. Please write your name and county on the top and side of the box with sharpie. Please also label any additional boxes or containers if you ran out of space in your initial box.
  • Signed and completed paper form that includes GPS coordinates, type of soap used, specimen archival acknowledgement, and additional contact info for parks. (first page here: https://cpb-us-w2.wpmucdn.com/u.osu.edu/dist/2/86606/files/2020/05/Bee-Survey-Instructions-1-1.pdf)
  • All remaining sampling supplies, including any remaining bee bowls/paint strainers/etc.
  • A copy of any permits that you acquired to sample at your site (mostly applies to people sampling at parks and preserves)
  • Optional: If you are able, please consider making a donation to help with the cost of the pinning and curation supplies. Thanks to all of our successful bee collectors, we are in need of thousands of vials, pins, collection boxes, and other curatorial supplies. A donation of $5 buys a pack of pins, and $70 buys an insect drawer for long term specimen storage, so every little bit helps! Anyone can donate to the project here: https://www.giveto.osu.edu/makeagift/OnlineGivingDonation.aspx?fund=317067&gs=include

What happens after you drop off the specimens?

I want to give a brief overview of how things will hopefully go for the next few months.

  • All boxes go into our freezers, where we will organize them by county
  • I cross check the provided gps coordinates with appropriate county, so then we can use that location data on the labels
  • We input each sample date from each kit into the database, so we can make batch labels for each sample period
  • We create the sampling event labels and make duplicate labels for bycatch specimens
  • We begin processing specimens! (Note: due to the ongoing pandemic we will not be having pinning parties, but can allow people to visit the lab to help sort and process specimens. Details on how you can help with this process will be forthcoming once I get more things up and running)
  • We sort the specimens by taxa: bees, robberflies, hoverflies, butterflies/moths, all other flies, and all other bycatch. The bees, robberflies, and hoverflies will all be pinned. The Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths) will be placed in clear envelopes. All remaining flies and other bycatch will be stored separately to be given to other research labs to process. Select counties will have spiders delivered to Dr. Rich Bradley to contribute to the Ohio Spider Survey.
  • Bees are washed, dried, fluffed, and pinned.
  • More labels will be created for each individual pinned specimen.
  • Once bees are pinned, then MaLisa can start the identification process. The first round of identification will be to genus for all bees. Then MaLisa will go through the harder groups and identify things to species, which tends to take more time to identify lower.
  • Once things have been identified*, MaLisa will send you a collection report to let you know what we found in your kit. People who opted to get duplicates will also be notified at this time. *Note: at this time, we are unsure exactly how many bees are in the kits. If we end up with 100,000 instead of 10,000 bees, then it will take much longer to get things pinned and in turn, take longer to get everything identified. We will have a better idea once we get started processing specimens, but I do not have a solid timeline for how long it will take to get everything pinned and identified. 

What about next summer?

  • At this time, we are not sure if we will be doing another bowl survey next summer. I want to make sure we can process all the specimens we currently have before committing to another summer of large quantities of specimen collection. I am working on a smaller project that involves targeting specific floral specialists, but the details for that project are still in the works.

Bee facts of the week: 

As I mentioned last week, I have already covered many of the common groups of bees in Ohio. However, there is one group that I missed: the bright green sweat bees! Granted, I did already cover the genus Agapostemon, but I did not go into detail about the other green bees in the Tribe Augochlorini.

The Striped Sweat bees in the Genus Agapostemon are in the Tribe Halictini, not Augochlorini. The bees of today’s post are all in the tribe Augochlorini.

The bright green sweat bees are stunning! But differentiating the different genera requires a careful eye.

The bright green bees all look rather similar from a distance. The easiest to differentiate is the genus Augochloropsis, which has as distinctly metallic color on bean shaped tegula (imagine a shoulder pad right above the wing), whereas the other two genera in Ohio (Augochlora and Augochlorella) have brown and oval tegulas. Augochloropsis is also a bit larger than the latter two, similar in size to the Agapostemon genus.

In this case, the tegula have a little bend and are mostly metallic, making this the genus Augochloropsis.

Differentiating Augochlora from Augochlorella can be a bit more tricky. For example, see the image below and try to guess which is which.

One is Augochlora and the other is Augochlorella. But which is which? They look similar, right?

The key difference between the two genera is how the marginal cell meets the edge of the wing (truncate/bent or at a point) and also the shape of the face.

Comparing face shapes (where the lateral margin of clypaeus meets the parocular area): Augochlora on the left and Augochlorella on the right. Images from Discoverlife.org

To compare the marginal cells, look closely where the end of the cell meets the edge of the wing. Is it truncated (bent) or does it meet at a point? The top is truncated, which indicates it is Augochlora. The bottom meets at a point, which is consistent with Augochlorella. Images from Discoverlife.org

Anyways, there are some nitty gritty ID tips for the tricky green bees. Aren’t you glad I am going to be helping with all the bee IDs for this project?

Check out more details about bee taxa in our Bees of Ohio field guide.


What’s that bycatch?

And that is all I have! Please be sure to check your email and respond to the drop off survey to figure out when/where to drop off your specimens.

 

Best wishes,

MaLisa

Sept 13 – Specimen drop off info, collection reminder, and facts of the week

Drop off information:
A few people have reached out about dropping off their boxes. As of right now, I am planning a drop off week on October 12-16th where I will stop at a few designated locations across the state to meet people that day to get their bees. Right now, I have drop off sites planned in the following counties: Hamilton, Licking, Summit, Lucas, Wayne, and Champaign counties.  Once solidified, these details will be emailed directly to participants (not just posted on the blog here), so watch your email!

Early Drop off locations: If you want to turn in your kits before mid-October, consider dropping off your kit to the Akron or Newark locations. Be sure to email or call the location in advance so they know you plan to drop off any specimens and can make sure someone is there to accept them.

  • OSU Newark Campus: Goodell Lab in Adena Hall (contact MaLisa Spring spring.99@osu.edu)
  • The Dawes Arboretum in Newark (contact Livia Raulinaitis lhraulinaitis@dawesarb.org)
  • Akron Biological Field Station (contact Lara Roketenetz ldr11@uakron.edu or Dr. Randy Mitchell rjm2@uakron.edu)

What to drop off:

  • Your sample box with specimens. Please write your name and county on the top and side of the box with sharpie. Please also label any additional boxes or containers if you ran out of space in your initial box.
  • Signed and completed paper form that includes GPS coordinates, type of soap used, specimen archival acknowledgement, and additional contact info for parks. (first page here: https://cpb-us-w2.wpmucdn.com/u.osu.edu/dist/2/86606/files/2020/05/Bee-Survey-Instructions-1-1.pdf)
  • All remaining sampling supplies, including any remaining bee bowls/paint strainers/etc.
  • A copy of any permits that you acquired to sample at your site (mostly applies to people sampling at parks and preserves)
  • Optional: If you’re able, please consider making a donation to help with the cost of the pinning and curation supplies. Thanks to all of our successful bee collectors, we are in need of thousands of vials, pins, collection boxes, and other curatorial supplies. For those interested, information on how to donate will be included in the drop off emails.

Freezer boxes:
I’ve had a few people reach out to say their boxes are getting pretty full in their freezer.  If you have the extra freezer space, you can use another box or plastic takeout container to store the overflow. Alternatively, if you happen to be traveling to the Newark or Akron area, you can organize to drop off part (or all) of your kit. Please email MaLisa if you plan to drop off anything before October.

Collection kit sampling reminder:
For those of you with collection kits, this is your reminder to try to put out your traps sometime this week, weather permitting. Please wait at least 7 days from your last sample date. If you want to wait to sample once every two weeks now, that is fine as well! You do not have to stick to the weekly sampling regimen.


Bee facts of the week: 

I’ve reached the point in the year where I have already covered so many groups that it is hard to remember which ones I have covered and which ones are left. For those wishing to review, click on the following links to go back to previous posts for bee facts of various groups: Honey Bees (Apis mellifera), Carder Bees (Anthidium spp), Mining bees (Andrena spp), Leafcutter bees (Megachile spp), Hibiscus Turret bees (Ptilothrix bombiformis), Bumblebees (Bombus spp), Parasitic bees in the genus Triepeolus, Longhorned bees (Melissodes spp), Masked Bees (Hylaeus spp), Digger bees (Anthophora spp), Oil Collecting bees (Melittidae), Dull green sweat bees (Dialictus spp), dark mining bees (Calliopsis spp), Striped Sweat Bees (Agapostemon spp), Mason Bees (Osmia spp), and Small carpenter bees (Ceratina spp).  

So that is 17 different groups of bees that I have covered. I will take a short break in covering the bees this week and will hopefully resume next week with another group.  Otherwise, feel free to check out more bee taxa in our Bees of Ohio field guide.


What’s that bycatch?
  • Sometimes other small insects or arthropods also land in our traps. Although they are not our intended focus of this project, I will try to give a little bit of info about different groups we might see in our traps. So hopefully you learn a little  entomology along with all of our awesome bee knowledge. If you want a specific group covered that you are seeing a lot of in your traps, let me know!

Any ideas what bycatch I will cover this week?

This week I will cover parasitic wasps! In this case, the micro-hymenoptera, meaning the super tiny wasps that are mostly smaller than a fleck of black pepper. So all those tiny things indicated with the black arrows are parasitic wasps. The only bee in the bowl is circled in red. There are also some longlegged flies and other flies in the bowl as well.

Don’t believe me that those tiny specks are actually wasps? Well, take a closer look with this magnified view! Note the constricted waist, long antennae, and two pairs of wings. Though the second pair of wings can be really hard to see or very reduced, so that isn’t always the best character to go by. And again, remember how small we are talking here, as most of these wasps would be naught but a speck of black to the naked eye.

To get another sense of scale, consider the following parasitic wasp which is rather large for one of the micro-hymenoptera.

This wasp somehow got stuck on one of my datasheets, so I decided to write next to it indicating a wasp was here ( <– waspy). Disregard my abysmal penmanship, but you get the idea for size.

  • Now that I have at least attempted to give a sense of scale for just how tiny these are, let’s get into some biology for these beasts. To broadly explain it, they are all parasites or parasitoids of other organisms. They also tend to be super specialists, often targeting only a small group of insects (like aphids or certain species of aphids), or targeting only eggs of certain insects (like the egg parasitoid of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug). For a broader introduction to the world of micro-hymenoptera, see: http://chrisraper.org.uk/blog/?page_id=98and https://bugguide.net/node/view/12325

This wasp specializes on aphids and bends forward to inject eggs into living aphids. The larvae develop inside the aphids before “mummifying” them.

  • There are easily several thousand species of parasitic micro-hymenoptera in Ohio, though identification is an extreme challenge. Moreover, many species of micro-hymenoptera such as these are still being described, meaning we do not yet have names for them. In fact, these are the focal organisms of the Johnson Lab at the Triplehorn Insect collection.

The wing venation also tends to be much reduced, sometimes to only the leading edge of the wing.

Also, although a normal sized wasp, I figured I would throw in this other wasp that was collected in a bowl and photographed by Heath White.

Similar to the chicken or the egg debate, Heath asked the question: “Which came first, the wolf spider or the spider wasp?” *inserts laugh track* I do not have a good answer for that question, so I will let you all ruminate on the potential answer.

So anyways, for those not familiar, there are a group of wasps that specialize on spiders. Specifically, they inject the spiders with a paralytic to paralyze them and then drag them back to their lair. There, the baby wasps take their good ole time slowly eating the provisioned spiders. I’ve only photographed one spider wasp, which was so intent on dragging its jumping spider prey home, that it did not hesitate to drag the spider over my waiting hand. I’m just glad there are not human sized versions of these wasps.


Is that a bee?

  • In this brief section, I will show a photo of a bee bowl and let you guess how many of the insects are actually bees. Don’t worry about properly identifying bees in your bowls.  This is just so you can start to recognize some of the bees and get an idea of how many bees you actually have.

How many bees do you see? Do you recognize any?

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.

.

.

Okay, did you make your guesses?

Aha! It was another tricky week, but no bees are visible in this photograph! There still could be a bee hiding under the skipper, but no bees are visible at the very least. There are two longlegged flies (greenish thin flies floating at the surface) and a few other types of flies. Otherwise, not much else in this bowl.

And that is all I have for this week!

Best regards,

MaLisa

Sept 6 – Collection reminder and facts of the week

Specimen storage:
I’ve had a few people reach out to say their boxes are getting pretty full in their freezer.  If you have the extra freezer space, you can use another box or plastic takeout container to store the overflow. Alternatively, if you happen to be traveling to the Newark or Akron area, you can organize to drop off part (or all) of your kit. Please email MaLisa if you plan to drop off anything before October.

Collection kit sampling reminder:
For those of you with collection kits, this is your reminder to try to put out your traps sometime this week, weather permitting. Please wait at least 7 days from your last sample date. If you want to wait to sample once every two weeks now, that is fine as well! You do not have to stick to the weekly sampling regimen.


Bee facts of the week: 

This is the first Honey bee that I have noticed in my bowls. Many of the larger bees can get out of the traps more easily, so we don’t often actually get larger bees.

  • Honey Bees (Apis mellifera, family Apidae) are the stereotypical bee that most people think of when you say “bee”. However, they are perhaps some of the weirdest bees, and not native to North America.
  • Reasons Honey Bees are Weird, according to MaLisa
    1. They are social (a majority of our native bees are solitary and live alone, whereas honey bees live in large colonies with castes and division of labor)
    2. They live in large cavities (a majority of our native bees live in the ground, often in small tunnels they dig themselves)
    3. They have hairy eyes (Aside from the genus Coelioxys, most of the other genera of bees in Ohio do not have hairy eyes)
    4. They make honey (none of our native bees make honey, so if you crave the sweet stuff, honey bees should still be your go to. Bumblebees do create nectar pots, but the sugar is not concentrated enough to make is shelf stable and cannot be considered USDA grade honey. You would need to completely destroy the bumblebee colony to get their nectar)
    5. They lose their stingers thanks to barbed hooks (Our native species have straight stings, so they can often sting and escape to safety. Meanwhile, honey bees have barbs at the tips of their stings that lodge into your skin. Then their sting rips out as they try to escape, leaving behind the sting and a venom sac that proceeds to add even more venom as it pumps)
  • For more info on honey bees and their weird life cycle, check out the many resources on the OSU Bee Lab Page here: https://u.osu.edu/beelab/

 ID tip of the week:

  • Honey Bees (Apis mellifera, family Apidae) are best identified by the shape of their body, legs, and head, but there are many other characters that we can use to differentiate them from other bees and insects. For one, honey bee wings are really weird, and they have three distinctly shaped submarginal cells (labelled 1-3 above). Most other bees have more squarish cells, or only two submarginal cells (the entire family of Megachilidae for ex).

  • Honey bees also have distinctly shaped hindlegs that lack hairs in the center, which allows them to pack pollen in large wads. Most other bees (aside from Bumblebees, which also have corbicula), have very hairy hindlegs and do not have a shiny/hairless center when viewed from any angle.


What’s that bycatch?
  • Sometimes other small insects or arthropods also land in our traps. Although they are not our intended focus of this project, I will try to give a little bit of info about different groups we might see in our traps. So hopefully you learn a little  entomology along with all of our awesome bee knowledge. If you want a specific group covered that you are seeing a lot of in your traps, let me know!

We have already covered skippers and several types of flies, but we have yet to cover hoverflies!

Many hoverflies get mistaken for bees, but they only have a single pair of wings, different wing venation, and often rather skinny legs (so they do not carry pollen in large batches like bees)

This hoverfly has succumbed to a fly killing fungus, which is often referred to as a zombie fungus by various media outlets as it changes their behavior once they get infected.

  • One of my favorite hoverflies is the Wavy Mucksucker (Orthonerva nitida), which has a ridiculous common name, but also some really cool eyes (see below).

Is that a bee?

  • In this brief section, I will show a photo of a bee bowl and let you guess how many of the insects are actually bees. Don’t worry about properly identifying bees in your bowls.  This is just so you can start to recognize some of the bees and get an idea of how many bees you actually have.

How many bees do you see?

.

.

.

.

Okay, did you make your guesses?

There are at least 6 bees in this image. There are also 7 larger flies and one butterfly. Don’t worry if you weren’t able to pick out all the bees, as I get to easily zoom in at the full resolution to inspect the details of each insect, so I have an unfair advantage to figuring these out 😉

And that is all I have for this week!

Best regards,

MaLisa

Aug 30 – Collection reminder and facts of the week

Specimen storage:
I’ve had a few people reach out to say their boxes are getting pretty full in their freezer.  If you have the extra freezer space, you can use another box or plastic takeout container to store the overflow. Alternatively, if you happen to be traveling to the Newark or Akron area, you can organize to drop off part (or all) of your kit. Please email MaLisa if you plan to drop off anything before October.

Collection kit sampling reminder:
For those of you with collection kits, this is your reminder to try to put out your traps sometime this week, weather permitting. Please wait at least 7 days from your last sample date. If you want to wait to sample once every two weeks now, that is fine as well! You do not have to stick to the weekly sampling regimen.


Bee facts of the week: 

This female Wool Carder bee is foraging on Anise Hyssop while a male wool carder hovers nearby.

  • Wool Carder bees (Genus Anthidium, family Megachilidae) are weird bees that use plant wool to line their nests. Female bees can be seen rubbing off the plant hairs from particularly hairy plants. They then take that ball of plant fiber and use it to line their cavity nest (check out this gif to see the plant hair collection). They can most often be found foraging for pollen resources on plants in the pea and mint families. We only have two species in Ohio, both of which are introduced from Europe. A third species has been documented in Montreal, Canada, but does not seem to have spread very far yet. The males in this genus can be particularly aggressive and are known to maintain territories around preferred plants. I’ve seen the males attack and successfully drive off carpenter bees from a patch of flowers.

As with other bees in the family Megachilidae, the wool carder bees collect pollen on their stomach (abdomen) in special hairs that are collectively called the scopa.

 ID tip of the week:

  • Wool Carder bees (Genus Anthidium, family Megachilidae) are another group of weird bees that do not look like bees. They are much chunkier than normal bees and brightly colored with brown and yellow stripes. They are likely to be mistaken for aggressive wasps based on their color patterning. They are relatively distinct for common bees, though bees in the genus Stelis also have brown with yellow stripes (but tend to be much smaller). An even rarer bee is Anthidellium, but is a bit smaller than the Anthidium.

This male wool carder bee briefly landed on the Anise Hyssop leaf before going off to defend more plants.


What’s that bycatch?
  • Sometimes other small insects or arthropods also land in our traps. Although they are not our intended focus of this project, I will try to give a little bit of info about different groups we might see in our traps. So hopefully you learn a little  entomology along with all of our awesome bee knowledge. If you want a specific group covered that you are seeing a lot of in your traps, let me know!

There was not much in this bowl aside from a fly, cricket, caterpillar poop, bee, and some springtails

  • This week I want to cover a group of insects that I have not payed enough attention to: crickets!

Close up of a fallen cricket

  • Most crickets are easily enough identified by their enlarged hindlegs, spiny tibia, and long/thin antennae. Crickets are similar to grasshoppers, but grasshoppers have much thicker antennae.
  • There about a dozen species of true crickets in the family Gryllidae found in Ohio, but over 100 species found in North America. They come in a variety of shapes, sizes, and colors. This year has been quite good for the population in my backyard, so you can often hear them chirping quite loudly at night. Many crickets are herbivorous and feed on a variety of plants.
  • There are several potential parasites of crickets, including horsehair worms. These worms will leave the host body if the cricket gets crushed or happens to jump in water. There are also parasitic wasps that are ecto parasitoids of some younger crickets, so watch out for weird lumps clinging to the cricket body.

For more about some weird cricket parasites, watch the following video. But be forewarned that this is perhaps not the best video to watch while eating dinner or right before bed. But be pleased to know that these particular worms do not infect humans.


Is that a bee?

  • In this brief section, I will show a photo of a bee bowl and let you guess how many of the insects are actually bees. Don’t worry about properly identifying bees in your bowls.  This is just so you can start to recognize some of the bees and get an idea of how many bees you actually have.

Do you see any bees in this image? Can you recognize anything else?

 

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.

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Okay, did you make your guesses?

 

There are two bees in this image (circled), though the one in the center is hard to see as it is floating vertically. All of the bigger insects are types of flies. The really tiny black dots are parasitic wasps.

 

 

And that is all I have for this week!

Best regards,

MaLisa

Aug 23 – Collection reminder and facts of the week

Specimen storage:
I’ve had a few people reach out to say their boxes are getting pretty full in their freezer.  If you have the extra freezer space, you use another box or plastic takeout container to store the overflow. Alternatively, if you have so many specimens and happen to be traveling to the Newark or Akron area, you can organize to drop off part of your kit if you want. I will send out the details on those options as a direct email in a few weeks, otherwise please email MaLisa directly for now.

Cup status:
How is everyone doing with the number of cups left? If you get below 15 usable cups, let me know and we can work on getting replacements.

It sounds like most people are mostly having pretty good luck with cups not being destroyed. I’ve somehow managed to only have one cup damaged beyond repair, which is in contrast to my undergraduate sampling where it seemed that I lost a quarter of my bowls every two sample periods. For those who have had transects destroyed by mowers/someone throwing them into the pond/curious chewing mammals, know that some level of destruction was expected.


Collection kit sampling reminder:
For those of you with collection kits, this is your reminder to try to put out your traps sometime this week, weather permitting. Please wait at least 7 days from your last sample date. If you want to wait to sample once every two weeks now, that is fine as well! You do not have to stick to the weekly sampling regimen.

If you can no longer put out your collection kit, please let me know so we can work on getting the kit into the hands of another volunteer instead.


Bee facts of the week: 

  • Mining bees (Genus Andrena, family Andrenidae) are one of our most species rich genera. Most of our mining bees emerge in the spring, but there are several that do not emerge until the fall (aka now!). So we have a few cool Andrena that we expect to start showing up. With almost 100 species expected to occur in Ohio, there are plenty to find, even in the fall. Another key thing about the mining bees is that many of them are floral specialists, meaning they only forage on a select set of plants. Thus, you often need to have the right plant around (and blooming) if you hope to find a certain type of specialist bee.

 ID tip of the week:

  • The easiest way to differentiate mining bees from other types of bees is that they are medium sized black/dark brown bees. They often have hair bands on their abdomen and visible facial fovea (vertical eyebrows) on their face. They are most often confused with the genera Halictus (no facial fovea, tend to be a little thicker and smaller), or Colletes (less common, thicker bands on the abdomen).

Species of late season mining bees to keep an eye on:


What’s that bycatch?
  • Sometimes other small insects or arthropods also land in our traps. Although they are not our intended focus of this project, I will try to give a little bit of info about different groups we might see in our traps. So hopefully you learn a little  entomology along with all of our awesome bee knowledge. If you want a specific group covered that you are seeing a lot of in your traps, let me know!

This week I had quite the surprise in my bycatch. And no, it was not another weird fly (though I am sure there were weird true flies in my bowls). It was an earwigfly, which is not a true fly (note number of wings), but instead an insect in the order Mecoptera!

  • Forcepflies! Earwigflies! Ahh! What are these drab monsters? Why, they are not monsters at all, unless you count the fact that we know so little about them that they surely haunt at least a few entomologists in their dreams. Both male and female Forcepflies (also known as earwigflies) are a drab brown color with many veins in their wings. They are in the strange order Mecoptera, which includes other weird insects such as Scorpionflies and Hanginglflies (none of which are true flies).

This female Forcepfly somehow fell into my bowl, which is likely coincidental.

  • We only have one species of Earwigfly in the US, which is Merope tuber, though there are 3 species described worldwide. They get their name from the male reproductive structures, shown below. These insects are the enigma of the entomology world as we have yet to figure out what they eat or even what their larvae look like. However, we know that we tend to find them active at night and attracted to certain lights (and sometimes a lucky person will find them at their moth sheet). They are more often found near wet forests, so if you live in a heavily forested part of Ohio, keep an eye out!

This male was found dead next to my porch light when I lived in Wooster. A normal sized dime for scale

  • These might be confused with brown lacewings, which are much more common, but tend to hold their wings over their body in a tent like fashion instead of flattened parallel against the body. Brown lacewings are much more common and more likely to be found in your bee bowls. That being said, if anyone else has found an earwigfly in their bowl, I would like to know! These rare, enigmatic creatures are a mystery that very few people have seen alive. These are also thought to be ancient insects, flying all the way back into the Jurassic period! See more info here: https://bugguide.net/node/view/36596

Is that a bee?

  • In this brief section, I will show a photo of a bee bowl and let you guess how many of the insects are actually bees. Don’t worry about properly identifying bees in your bowls.  This is just so you can start to recognize some of the bees and get an idea of how many bees you actually have.

Can you identify anything in this bowl? How many bees do you see?

 

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.

.

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Okay, did you make your guesses?

In this bowl there are….. no bees. Plenty of flies though!

 

Best wishes,

MaLisa

Aug 16th – Collection reminder and facts of the week!

For those who weren’t able to make it or couldn’t login due to the password issue, the update webinar from last week can be viewed by clicking here.

It is not a critical update, but I try to cover a few things about where we are going and answer a few questions. And if you still have questions after watching the webinar, let me know via email. -MaLisa


Collection kit sampling reminder:
For those of you with collection kits, this is your reminder to try to put out your traps sometime this week, weather permitting. Please wait at least 7 days from your last sample date.

If you can no longer put out your collection kit, please let me know so we can work on getting the kit into the hands of another volunteer instead.


Bee facts of the week: 

This cell phone photo of a leafcutter bee shows the characteristic pollen on the underside of the abdomen.

  • Leafcutter bees (Genus Megachile, family Megachilidae) are common bees that we find across Ohio. There are about 30 species that we expect to find in Ohio, with several of them foraging on plants in the pea or aster family. Most of the leafcutter bees are cavity nesters (for more information on nesting see: Ohio Bee Nest Factsheet), meaning they will nest in the straw nests that many people now buy at the store. They are also known for lining their nests with leaves (hence the common name), so don’t be surprised to see one flying around carrying a piece of leaf. You can often see the distinct cuts in certain plant leaves. I most often see them taking nesting material from Redbud trees or other plants with similarly smooth leaves.

Here is an example leafcutter bee nest showing the leaves.

ID tip of the week:

This male leafcutter bee has the expanded forelegs, rounded abdomen, and 2 submarginal cells.

  • Leafcutter bees (Genus Megachile, family Megachilidae) are sexually dimorphic, with males looking rather different from the females. The females have long tapered abdomens that end in a point, whereas the males have a more rounded end of their abdomen. The males sometimes also sport thickened forelegs. Both male and female leafcutter bees are generally black with white bands of hair on their abdomen. Females carry pollen on specialized pollen collecting hairs on their abdomen instead of their legs, so it often looks like they have yellow stomachs. (Though be careful as other groups of bees who collect pollen on their legs sometimes collect so much pollen that it rubs off on their abdomen, making it seem like they are collecting pollen on both legs and abdomen, so you have to use a variety of characters to confirm).

What’s that bycatch?
  • Sometimes other small insects or arthropods also land in our traps. Although they are not our intended focus of this project, I will try to give a little bit of info about different groups we might see in our traps. So hopefully you learn a little  entomology along with all of our awesome bee knowledge. If you want a specific group covered that you are seeing a lot of in your traps, let me know!

I know I already used this image in a previous post, but this time I want to highlight the bycatch instead of the bees. In this case, the ant!

In the top right image of the earlier image is this ant.

  • ANTS! I would be surprised if someone has not captured a stray ant in their bowls yet. There has been work on the ants of Ohio, and even a published book through the Ohio Biological Survey! The 2005 bulletin lists that there are 118 species of ants known to occur in our state, though that number has increased in the last decade and a half. The iNaturalist project for Ohio Ants only lists 55 species so far, but that isn’t surprising given that many ants need to be examined under a microscope to confirm to species. However, there are about 15,000 species described in the world, so there are plenty more ants to find.

This Immigrant Pavement Ant (Tetramorium immigrans) was not particularly cooperative, but you can see the segmentation on the waist clearly.

  • Similar to bees, ants have a narrow waist, but are not as hairy in comparison. Most ants also have distinct segments between their thorax and abdomen called the petiole (though ant people call the abdomen the gaster). Ants also have distinct antennae that have a long first segment followed by a bend with several more segments. A majority of our species found in Ohio will be black to brownish red.

There are both winged and non-winged forms of ants, but we are most likely to have the wingless workers in our bowls

Finally, I will leave you with another ant video from the Ant lab, which has lots of cool slo mo videos on ants (and now other insects as well)


Is that a bee?

  • In this brief section, I will show a photo of a bee bowl and let you guess how many of the insects are actually bees. Don’t worry about properly identifying bees in your bowls.  This is just so you can start to recognize some of the bees and get an idea of how many bees you actually have.

How many bees can you count? See anything else you recognize?

 

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.

.

.

Okay, did you make your guesses?

 

There are at least 6 bees in this bowl, circled in red. There might be two more (with black ? next to them), but I would want to move them around and view from other angles to confirm. There is also a single ant (black square), and at least 7 large black flies.

 

 

Best wishes,

MaLisa

Aug 9th – Event and collection reminder plus facts of the week

 

Don’t forget there is a Bee Survey update webinar on August 10th at 4:30 PM to discuss the status of the Ohio Bee Survey and our possible next steps. I will also recap some “ID Tips for Bedraggled Dead Bees in Water.” A recording will be provided at a later date for those who cannot attend.

Topic: Bee Survey update
Time: Aug 10, 2020 04:30 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

Join Zoom Meeting
https://osu.zoom.us/j/94990533812


Collection kit sampling reminder:
For those of you with collection kits, this is your reminder to try to put out your traps sometime this week, weather permitting. Please wait at least 7 days from your last sample date

If you can no longer put out your collection kit, please let me know so we can work on getting the kit into the hands of another volunteer instead.


Bee facts of the week: 

  • Hibiscus Turret Bees (Ptilothrix bombiformis, Family Apidae) are currently some of my favorite bees. They are floral specialists on Hibiscus (surprise!), but can also be found foraging on Buttonbush, Purple Coneflower, and a few others. I have planted some native Swamp Rose Mallow in my yard, so I am happy to report that I finally have the Hibiscus Turret bees now visiting my flowers! I regularly have males sleeping in my wilted flowers later in the day, which makes it fun to check each flower for potential visitors. Their nests can sometimes form little turret mounds around the entrance. They are also associated with wetlands (as are our native Hibiscus), and can sometimes be observed floating on top of water like striders!

ID tip of the week:

  • Hibiscus Turret Bees (Ptilothrix bombiformis, Family Apidae) are most likely to be confused with large Carpenter Bees (Xylocopa virginica) or Bumblebees (Bombus spp). The Hibiscus Turret bees are thinner than Carpenter bees and have shorter, denser hairs than our Bumblebees. They also have somewhat gangly long hindlegs, as can be seen on this one on my finger.

I somehow convinced this male Hibiscus Turret bee to pose on my finger for a photoshoot a few years ago. Check out those legs!

 


What’s that bycatch?
  • Sometimes other small insects or arthropods also land in our traps. Although they are not our intended focus of this project, I will try to give a little bit of info about different groups we might see in our traps. So hopefully you learn a little  entomology along with all of our awesome bee knowledge. If you want a specific group covered that you are seeing a lot of in your traps, let me know! (Potential topics for the upcoming weeks include hoverflies, ants, or parasitic wasps)

This bowl had two skippers and a carrot seed moth

The Silver-spotted Skipper (Epargyreus clarus) is one of the most commonly reported species in Ohio. It is one our larger skippers, so less likely to get caught in our traps.

 

  • As with most (but not all) moths and butterflies, skippers are herbivorous and eat plants as caterpillars. As adults, they can be flying around sites that have their host plants, so if you want a specific type of skipper, it helps to have the right host plant.

For example, this Common Checker-Skipper (Burnsius communis) feeds on plants in mallow family (Malvaceae), of which I have several in my yard. For some reason, I have only photographed these showing the checkered pattern with my cell phone, so this grainy photo will have to do.

Meanwhile, this Zabulon Skipper (Lon zabulon), feeds on a variety of grasses as a caterpillar and can be found nectaring on a variety of flowers as an adult.

  • Oh, and I realized I did not mention how to differentiate these lovely skippers from their moth and butterfly cousins! The easiest way to differentiate them is based on their wing positioning (wings often held up over the back) and the antennae that are expanded at the ends. To learn more, see this blog from the late Dennis Profant on Ohio skippers.

This Peck’s Skipper (Polites peckius) shows the clubbed antennae of skippers well. You can also see it using its long proboscis to drink from the Birdsfoot Trefoil flowers.


Is that a bee?

  • In this brief section, I will show a photo of a bee bowl and let you guess how many of the insects are actually bees. Don’t worry about properly identifying bees in your bowls.  This is just so you can start to recognize some of the bees and get an idea of how many bees you actually have.

Aside from the Skippers covered earlier, can you identify anything in this bowl? Do you recognize any of the bees?

 

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.

.

.

Okay, did you make your guesses?

Along with the skippers mentioned earlier, there are at least 44 bees in this cup! There are possibly more than that in the cup as we cannot see under the skipper and some of them are overlapping in the top, so I cannot be sure. The spot where this bowl sits is an open patch of sandy soil, so it is likely a nesting aggregation of the dull green sweat bees. All of the bees appear to be some type of sweat bee. None of my other cups had nearly this number of bees. I think this is probably the most bees I have had in a cup so far this year. What is the highest number of bees you think you have collected in a bowl?


 

 

Don’t forget there is a Bee Survey update webinar on August 10th at 4:30 PM to discuss the status of the Ohio Bee Survey and our possible next steps. I will also recap some “ID Tips for Bedraggled Dead Bees in Water.”  Don’t worry if you can’t attend live; we’ll post the recording link.

Topic: Bee Survey update
Time: Aug 10, 2020 04:30 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

Join Zoom Meeting
https://osu.zoom.us/j/94990533812

Meeting ID: 949 9053 3812
One tap mobile
+13017158592,,94990533812# US (Germantown)
+13126266799,,94990533812# US (Chicago)

If you require an accommodation such as live captioning or interpretation to participate in this event, please email MaLisa and we will try to get the needed accommodations.

To see the rest of the dial in numbers, click here to see the original post.

 

Best wishes,

MaLisa

Aug 2nd – Event and collection reminder plus facts of the week

Collection kit sampling reminder:
For those of you with collection kits, this is your reminder to try to put out your traps sometime this week, weather permitting. Please wait at least 7 days from your last sample date

If you can no longer put out your collection kit, please let me know so we can work on getting the kit into the hands of another volunteer instead.


Bee facts of the week: 

This is the inside of an experimental  nest of the Common Eastern Bumblebee (Bombus impatiens). Disclaimer: Do not open or attempt to dig up bumblebee nests. This entire nest was frozen and all bees are dead in this image. Bumblebees are likely to defend their nests if perturbed and unlike honey bees, they keep their stingers and can sting repeatedly if necessary.

  • Bumblebees (Genus Bombus, Family Apidae) are a group of our social native bees. Unlike honey bees with their colonies that can last several years, bumblebee colonies are annual, with new queens overwintering, then creating their new colonies in the spring. Their nests are much messier than the classic hexagonal shape of honey bees and instead can be described as messy pots of larvae and nectar. The pots of nectar are dilute, and thus cannot be the sugar concentration required to be considered USDA grade honey (nor would you want to go through the effort to harvest it).
  • Many bumblebees are considered generalists, meaning they will forage on a variety of available resources.  Many species of bumblebees can be found foraging on Wild Bergamont (Mondarda fistulosa), and its cousin, Scarlet Bee Balm (Mondarda didyma). I definitely wish I had these plants in my backyard sooner as they bring in quite the flurry of bees.

ID tip of the week:

Note the pattern of brownish hairs on T2 to determine that this is a Brown-Belted Bumblebee (Bombus griseocollis)

  • Bumblebees (Genus Bombus, Family Apidae) are most likely to be confused with large Carpenter bees (Xylocopa virginica), but the latter have wider heads, and lack dense hairs on the top of their abdomen. Another Bumblebee look-alike is the Hibiscus Turret Bee (Ptilothrix bombiformis), which is a specialist on Hibiscus flowers and associated with wetlands. The Hibiscus bee has shorter, dense yellow hairs on its head and thorax and relatively long legs. Another rare bee that people sometimes confuse for bumblebees are the Digger bees in the genus Anthorphora. The bumblebee mimics in this genus (A. bomboides and A. abrupta) are not common, so not many people get the chance to mess them up. See the earlier post covering Anthophora to differentiate them.

Note the pattern of yellow on T2 to determine that this is a female Two-spotted Bumblebee (Bombus bimaculatus)

  • There are 5 species of Bumblebees that are now relatively common in Ohio, though more than 10 species have been reported in Ohio historically. The most common bumblebee is the aptly named Common Eastern Bumblebee (Bombus impatiens), which only has yellow on the first abdominal segment with the rest black. The nest image above is Bombus impatiens. The second most commonly reported species for Ohio is the Brown-belted Bumblebee (Bombus griseocollis), which has darker wings and half of the second abdominal segment (t2) brown or yellowish. It can be confused with the Two-spotted Bumblebee (Bombus bimaculatus), but the later has the yellow more restricted to the center of t2 and is more often an early season species, with many colonies disappearing around this time of year. Another crowd-pleaser is the Golden Northern Bumblebee (Bombus fervidus), which has yellow on most of its thorax and abdominal segments, which  sets it apart from most of the other common species of bumblebees. The main source of confusion is with the Perplexing Bumblebee (Bombus perplexus), which can be perplexing to identify with its variable coloration. In general, the Perplexing Bumblebee is a richer yellow color than most of its cousins and limited black on the back of its thorax.

The abundance of yellow on the thorax and abdomen helps identify this pair as Golden Northern Bumblebees (Bombus fervidus)

Meanwhile, this male Perplexing Bumblebee (Bombus perplexus) is likely to be confused with the Golden Northern bumblebees, but lacks the black on the thorax.

  • I would be remiss to not mention the federally endangered species of bumblebee that used to be common in Ohio, but has declined so much that we have no recent records. That is the Rusty-patched Bumblebee (Bombus affinis), which has t1 all yellow and t2 with a rust colored patch surrounded by yellow, filling the segment. The likelihood of spotting the Rusty-patched Bumblebee in Ohio is now low, though not impossible. It is most similar to the Half-backed Bumblebee (Bombus vagans), which has the entire segment of t2 yellow and no rust color. The Rusty-patched Bumblebee is often confused with the Brown-belted Bumblebee, which does have a rusty patch on t2, but is not surrounded by yellow. For a good ID guide comparing the look alike species, see this great guide by the University of Minnesota: https://www.beelab.umn.edu/rusty-patched-identification

What’s that bycatch?
  • Sometimes other small insects or arthropods also land in our traps. Although they are not our intended focus of this project, I will try to give a little bit of info about different groups we might see in our traps. So hopefully you learn a little  entomology along with all of our awesome bee knowledge. If you want a specific group covered that you are seeing a lot of in your traps, let me know!

This bowl does not have any bees in it, but there are some springtails, parasitic wasps, some flies, and an Isopod.

  • Isopods (sometimes call sowbugs, pillbugs, or rolly-polies) are common arthropods across Ohio. However, many people do not realize that they are actually crustaceans, not insects. There are over 10,000 species of Isopods worldwide, though many of them are aquatic instead of terrestrial.

This isopod was crawling high on a yarrow plant around midnight. Normally, the isopods are found under logs and larger rocks during the day, but they come out and explore during the night

  • In general, isopods can be considered decomposers that often forage on decaying leaf litter. They prefer moist habitats, so during the driest parts of the day they might be hiding in the soil or under logs. On humid nights, I have seen them climb out on top of plants, sometimes several feet off the ground. They can potentially be problematic as they can change the leaf litter composition in forests (along with the lovely invasive earthworms).

Is that a bee?

  • In this brief section, I will show a photo of a bee bowl and let you guess how many of the insects are actually bees. Don’t worry about properly identifying bees in your bowls.  This is just so you can start to recognize some of the bees during the season and get an idea of how many bees you actually have.

How many bees do you see? Can you identify anything in this bowl?

.

.

.

.

Okay, did you make your guesses?

 

There are at least 5 bees in this image, with maybe a sixth indicated by the question mark. The angle makes it hard to see all the characters, so I am not sure about that one. They are all likely sweat bees in the family Halictidae, with the green one in the genus Agapostemon. There is also an ant, small fly, and some springtails in this image.


Also, there will be a Bee Survey update webinar on August 10th at 4:30 PM to discuss the status of the Ohio Bee Survey and our possible next steps. I will also recap some “ID Tips for Bedraggled Dead Bees in Water.”  Don’t worry if you can’t attend live; we’ll post the recording link.

Topic: Bee Survey update
Time: Aug 10, 2020 04:30 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

Join Zoom Meeting
https://osu.zoom.us/j/94990533812

Meeting ID: 949 9053 3812
One tap mobile
+13017158592,,94990533812# US (Germantown)
+13126266799,,94990533812# US (Chicago)

If you require an accommodation such as live captioning or interpretation to participate in this event, please email MaLisa and we will try to get the needed accommodations.

To see the rest of the dial in numbers, click here to see the original post.

 

Best wishes,

MaLisa

Edit:
After posting this, Dr. Rich Bradley contacted me to share his video of an observational bumblebee colony. So it should hopefully be embedded below if this saves properly.You can see the larger pots, which were likely for queens or some of the first large workers. You can also see the nectar gleaming in some of the open pots.