Gaining Greater Market Access for Ohio Feeder Calves

Stan Smith, OSU Extension PA, Fairfield County

The World is expecting a lot more information about the food they buy.”

During the first segment of the Ohio Beef School, OSU Extension Beef Coordinator John Grimes visits with Bill Tom of United Producers, and Henry Zerby from Wendy’s, about the rapidly changing demands in the beef cattle market

Consumers are concerned for animal health, and the sustainability of the production systems their food’s raised in.”

Traceability and transparency are of growing concern to consumers.”

Vaccination is not necessarily the same as immunization when it comes to preventing health issues.”

Feed and bunk management, and avoiding nutritional stress are keys to calf health.”

These are just a few of the comments that will be emphasized, and Continue reading

A Little Background May Help

– Justin Sexten, Ph.D., Director, CAB Supply Development

Let’s say you weaned calves last fall but didn’t sell. Instead, you helped them cross the bridge to independent life in your dry lot pen and maybe on to a grazing program. Chances are, those “backgrounded” calves have moved on to a finishing yard or the next phase of heifer development.

You’ve got calving on your mind now, but that means weaning will surely follow this fall and some of your decisions then will be framed by decisions made this spring. So back to those pens and fields, perhaps empty now, but ready for planning.

Researchers at the University of Nebraska recently compared three backgrounding systems, and at least one of them Continue reading

Beef 510 Registration Deadline Approaching

John F. Grimes, OSU Extension Beef Coordinator

Beef 510 is a one-day program to be held on March 3 designed for those who have participated in Beef 509, but is open to all cattlemen. The program will continue the traditional beef sensory sessions and BQA presentations, but will also present information designed to help producers better prepare their operations and their cattle to meet challenges of the future. All who attend will be certified in Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) at the end of the course. Beef 510 is a joint program coordinated by the Ohio Beef Council, the Department of Animal Sciences – OSU, and OSU Extension. The registration deadline is February 16, 2018.

The list of speakers include: Continue reading

Beef 510 set for March 3

Beef 510 is a one-day program designed for those who have participated in Beef 509, but is open to all cattlemen. The program will continue the traditional beef sensory sessions and BQA presentations, but will also present information designed to help producers better prepare their operations and their cattle to meet challenges of the future. All who attend will be certified in Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) at the end of the course.

Beef 510 is a Continue reading

BQA Transportation Training and Certification Program

The checkoff-funded Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) program has launched a new training and certification program for cattle transportation. The program, known as Beef Quality Assurance Transportation (BQAT), provides cattle producers and haulers with comprehensive training based on their roles in the cattle industry. Online training will be made available beginning immediately, and in-person training Continue reading

Label Language Continues to Confuse Consumers

Garth Ruff, AgNR Extension Educator, OSU Henry County Extension

I have always been curious about what goes through a person’s mind while shopping at the grocery store. In the past couple of weeks, I have read several articles regarding consumer surveys, gauging consumer wants and purchasing habits when at the grocery store. I shared one such article in my weekly online newsletter titled, Informed Consumers Won’t Pay More For ‘Natural’. In this experiment researchers at Arizona State University polled 663 beef eaters about Continue reading

Will the real truth about meat please stand up?

Troy Marshall (reprinted with permission of the author from BEEF Magazine on-line)

I’m terribly guilty as a cattle rancher. Don’t get me wrong; I believe in what I do, and I know the integrity and quality of people involved in this business. As a result, while I occasionally read the propaganda and the falsehoods that are accepted as truth about our industry, I also tend to dismiss them. Truth has a way of always winning out, right?

Well, in today’s world science and facts are not what they used to be. Truth is some malleable concept that is determined by consensus. Truth is determined by those who are the most effective in delivering their version of it. And that’s why I’m guilty as a Continue reading

Are You Ready and Willing to Change?

John F. Grimes, OSU Extension Beef Coordinator (originally published in The Ohio Farmer)

There is no doubt that in nearly every aspect of life, change is inevitable. You don’t have to look too hard to find examples of this in everyday life. Changes such as automated steering in farm equipment, self-driving cars, the home delivery of meal kits, “smart” phones, DNA tests in humans and animals to identify genetic traits and defects, Facebook, and YouTube are a few of the changes that have impacted countless lives since the turn of the century. These changes remind me of the phrase that goes “Not all change is progress but progress is certainly change!”

The cow-calf sector of the beef industry is currently undergoing Continue reading

5 ways we are getting better at cattle handling

– W. Mark Hilton, DVM, PAS, DABVP, clinical professor emeritus, Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine; and senior technical veterinary consultant, Elanco Animal Health.

We like to pat ourselves on the back (and rightly so) for improvements in nutrition and animal health. But we never give ourselves enough credit for the major improvements in cattle handling. Cue the applause.

Think about your beef operation today, and then reflect back 10 to 20 years. What has improved, and what is the same? My guess is that Continue reading

ODA Announces Changes to Ohio’s Livestock Care Standards

REYNOLDSBURG, Ohio (Nov. 13, 2017) – The Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) wants to remind producers and livestock owners about upcoming changes to Ohio’s livestock care standards.

Effective January 1, 2018, veal calves must be housed in group pens by ten weeks of age. Additionally, whether housed in individual stalls or group pens the calves must be allowed to turn around and cannot be tethered. Also effective January 1, tail docking on dairy cattle can only be performed by a licensed veterinarian and if only medically necessary.

The above changes were recommended by the Ohio Livestock Care Standards Board, a group of 13 members from Continue reading