Beef Quality Assurance Certification Training

Hardin County – Join Hardin County OSU Extension for a Beef Quality Assurance certification training scheduled for Tuesday, May 31 from 7:00-8:30 pm at the Extension office located at 1021 W Lima Street in Kenton. Beef Quality Assurance training is for beef cattle producers, needing to recertify or certify to sell cattle at auctions and other markets. Many of the major beef processors, auctions, and other markets began requiring producers to have a BQA certificate at the beginning of 2019. Beef Quality Assurance certification is for a period of three years and was previously held in Kenton in December 2018 and February 2021. Several local producers need to recertify in addition to any cattle producers who need to gain BQA certification for the first time.

Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) does more than just help beef producers capture more value from their market cattle. BQA also reflects a positive public image and instills consumer confidence in the beef industry. When producers implement the best management practices of a BQA program, they assure their market steers, heifers, cows, and bulls are the best they can be. Today, the stakes are even higher because of increased public attention on animal welfare. BQA is valuable to all beef and dairy producers because it demonstrates commitment to food safety and quality; safeguards the public image of the beef industry; upholds consumer confidence in valuable beef products; and improves the sale value of marketed beef cattle.

Training enhances herd profitability through better management. Ohio State University Extension, in cooperation with the Ohio Beef Council, the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association, and Ohio’s cattle auction markets, is working to offer Ohio’s cattle producers several opportunities to become Beef Quality Assurance Certified. Certification can also take place online at https://www.bqa.org. Register for this Kenton training at https://go.osu.edu/HardinBQA or call 419-674-2297. Registration is required and space is limited for this local no cost in-person training that is good for both initial BQA certification or recertification.

 

May 27, 2022

Good evening,

If you are fortunate enough to have your corn and soybeans planted, you may be part of the few farmers who are done in the county. However, according to the latest Ohio Crop Weather report, only 52% of the corn is planted and 36% of the soybean fields are planted across Ohio. I was out staging crops today and did notice some corn in the 4 leaf stage, but most soybeans that were up were VE emergence stage or VC cotyledon stage. Some wheat has flowered in earlier planted fields. We are definitely behind compared to last year and also compared to the 5 year average because of the cool spring and rain. As you get fields planted and think about nitrogen application to corn or fungicide applications to soybean or corn, you might consider cooperating with OSU Extension with on-farm research. I have attached an article about this subject so please me know if you are interested in setting up any field trials. Currently, I have black cutworm, true armyworm, and European corn borer traps set around the county that I have been monitoring. So far, weekly catches of adult moths have been low. Soon I will be setting western bean cutworm traps, which is a pest of corn. So let me know if you are interested in having a trap near the edge of one of your corn fields.

Ohio Crop and Weather Report

On-Farm Trials News Release

There is a Beef Quality Assurance certification training set up for Tuesday, May 31 at the Extension office starting at 7:00 pm. Beef Quality Assurance training is for beef cattle producers, needing to recertify or certify to sell cattle at auctions and other markets. Many of the major beef processors, auctions, and other markets began requiring producers to have a BQA certificate at the beginning of 2019. Beef Quality Assurance certification is for a period of three years and was previously held in Kenton in December 2018 and February 2021. Several local producers need to recertify in addition to any cattle producers who need to gain BQA certification for the first time. Certification can also take place online at https://www.bqa.org. Register for this Kenton training at https://go.osu.edu/HardinBQA or call 419-674-2297. Registration is required and space is limited for this local no cost in-person training that is good for both initial BQA certification or recertification. See the attached news release and flyer for more information.

Beef Quality Assurance Training News Release

Hardin BQA Flyer

The online Summer Northwest Ohio Agriculture Newsletter is now available for reading. It includes events including programs, meetings, and field days being held in our part of the state. There are several Hardin County OSU Extension events listed in this digital publication that I have attached to this edition of the Hardin County Agriculture and Natural Resources Update. Make sure you check it out so you can plan to attend our upcoming events being planned. I have also included some timely ag crops articles bellow that you may be interested in reading. Hopefully the fields will become fit again soon so planting can resume. Have a safe Memorial Day weekend.

2022 Summer NW Ohio Newsletter

Mark

 

Lep Monitoring Network Update – True Armyworm vs Fall Armyworm, Trap Count Updates – Amy Raudenbush, Suranga Basnagala , Kyle Akred, Mark Badertscher, Lee Beers, Alan Leininger, Clifton Martin, James Morris, Eric Richer, Beth Scheckelhoff, Cindy Wallace, Curtis Young, Andy Michel, Kelley Tilmon

True Armyworm vs Fall Armyworm— We all remember last year’s outbreak on alfalfa and forage from fall armyworm. Many growers are hearing “armyworm” again, and are worried about infestations in corn, wheat, oats and other small grains this spring. Keep in mind that we have two completely different species of armyworm:  True (or common) armyworm (Mythimna unipuncta) usually occurs in the spring.  Infestations are typically found in wheat or oats, before marching onto corn and turf later in the season. Read more at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-15/lep-monitoring-network-update-%E2%80%93-true-armyworm-vs-fall-armyworm

 

Low Head Scab Risk Across Ohio: A May 23 Update – Pierce Paul

Wheat is, or will soon be, flowering in parts of central and northern Ohio. After a relatively slow start to the season, several days of warm weather caused the crop to advance, reaching anthesis (Feekes 10.5.1) a few days earlier than usual in some locations. Feekes 10.5.1 is the growth stage at which wheat is most susceptible to infection by the fungus that causes head scab and produces vomitoxin. However, according to the FHB risk tool (www.wheatscab.psu.edu), fields across the state are currently at low risk for head scab. Finish reading about head scab risk at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-15/low-head-scab-risk-across-ohio-may-23-update

 

Replanting Decisions in Corn and Soybeans… What to Consider – Osler Ortez, Laura Lindsey, Alexander Lindsey

Early plantings, cold air and soil temperatures, precipitation, wind, and warmer temperatures during or after planting may lead to reduced stands in planted fields due to factors such as imbibitional chilling, frost damage, soil crusting, and standing water. These factors (or combinations of them) can negatively affect seedling vigor, plant growth, crop establishment, and plant stands. Reduced stands may result in lower yields. If reduced stands are a concern, a potential solution is to replant fields. However, before replanting, make sure you read this article at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-14/replanting-decisions-corn-and-soybeans%E2%80%A6-what-consider

 

Soybean Planting Progress and Vegetative Growth – Laura Lindsey

Cool, wet weather in April and early May delayed soybean planting progress; however, with some warmer and drier days, soybean planting was 18% complete by the second week of May. Soybeans that were planted the end of April or first week of May are likely at the VC growth stage or will be at the VC growth stage soon. There are several common misconceptions about soybean plants at the VC to V3 growth stage. Read about these misconceptions versus reality at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-15/soybean-planting-progress-and-vegetative-growth

 

Update of Corn Nitrogen Recommendations from MRTN – Greg LaBarge

This article provides an updated Maximum Return to Nitrogen Rate recommendation table for corn planted after soybean. There are a couple of changes to note with these revised tables. First, due to continued concerns about nitrogen source availability, urea was added to the source list to provide per unit N prices. In addition, a nitrogen rate quick lookup table is updated to reflect new data in the Corn Nitrogen Rate Calculator tool. The database for soybean-corn and corn-corn rotations now includes trials through 2021. Finish reading this article that includes urea pricing information and updated data at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-15/update-corn-nitrogen-recommendations-mrtn

 

Mark A. Badertscher

Agriculture and Natural Resources Educator

OSU Extension Hardin County

1021 W. Lima Street, Suite 103, Kenton, OH 43326

419-767-6037

hardin.osu.edu

 

May 6, 2022

Good afternoon,

The combination of cold weather and frequent rains have kept local farmers from getting a good start on the planting season. According to the latest attached USDA Ohio Crop Weather report, only 3% of the corn and 2% of the soybeans have been planted statewide. I checked a wheat field this past Friday and it was still in Feekes 6 with one joint on the stem, slowed down by the cool weather. It looks like the weather is set to warm up and we should see a dryer period to allow a window to plant corn and soybean fields. I have seen weed growth in fields since neither tillage or spring burn downs have happened in most fields. The unfavorable field conditions have also shortened the window for planting spring forages. I have included an article regarding forage legume stand evaluation for those who are questioning what to do with those fields that are questionable. Some early season manure applications have taken place so I have also included an article about using manure as a nutrient source. A few soybean fields have been planted in the county along with some corn fields. I have included an article titled “Set-Up Soybeans for Success in 2022” taking a look at best management practices.

Ohio Crop and Weather

Forage Stand Evaluation News Release

Early Season Manure Application News Release

Soybean Planting Recommendations News Release

There are a few events coming up locally that you may be interested in attending. OSU Extension is teaming up again with the Hardin Soil and Water Conservation District to offer the Hardin County Pond Clinic on Thursday, May 12. This event will start at 6:30 pm at Neil and Amy Dumbaugh’s pond located at 1547 County Road 50, Ada. It will include a tour of Ada Fish Farms, LLC with a discussion on using Tilapia fish as a way to control weeds. The main speaker will be Steve Fender from Fender’s Fish Farms, author of “Farm Pond Management, The Common Sense Guide” who will also be able to answer pond owner management questions. See the attached article and flyer for more information.

Pond Clinic News Release

Pond Clinic Flyer

The OSU Extension Master Gardener Volunteers are hosting their annual Hardin County MGV Plant Sale on Saturday, May 14. This event will be from 10:00 am – 12:00 pm at the Friendship Gardens of Hardin County located at 960 W Kohler Street. In addition to plants and garden items from the Hardin County MGVs, the Hardin County Men’s Garden Club and Star Farms Native Plants will have plants available for sale. Come and get your garden questions answered and pick-up free seed packets from the Ohio Victory Gardens program that OSU Extension is cooperating with the Ohio Department of Agriculture this year. If you are unable to attend the plant sale, extra seed packets will be made available at the Extension office and selected local libraries after this date. See the attached news releases and flyers for more details about the Hardin County MGV Plant Sale and Ohio Victory Gardens program.

Hardin County Plant Sale News Release

Plant Sale Flyer

Victory Gardens News Release

Ohio Victory Garden Flyer

That’s about all for this edition of the Hardin County Agriculture and Natural Resources Update. I have begun setting up insect traps around the county with three black cutworm traps this past week and today I will add three true armyworm traps as part of this statewide monitoring and research program. Each Friday I check these traps and report the data to entomologists at OSU, which is usually followed up by an article similar to the one below which will provide information and recommendations for management if necessary. Remember to be safe as the weather breaks and field work becomes more active. Tractors and equipment will be working for long hours in the fields and also on the roads. I have provided some ag crops articles below that you may be interested in reading that I believe are relevant and timely for Hardin County.

 

Mark

 

Lep Monitoring Network Update – Amy Raudenbush, Suranga Basnagala , Kyle Akred, Mark Badertscher, Lee Beers, Clifton Martin, James Morris, Eric Richer, Beth Scheckelhoff, Cindy Wallace, Curtis Young, Andy Michel, Kelley Tilmon

Eleven counties in Ohio will be monitoring for various agronomic Lepidopteran (moth/caterpillar) pests during the 2022 field season. These counties include Adams, Brown, Clark, Fulton, Hardin, Madison, Muskingum, Trumbull, Van Wert, Wayne and Wood. This network was established to monitor the current pest populations in various regions of Ohio for black cutworm (BCW), true armyworm (AMW), European corn borer (ECB-IA, ECB-NY), corn earworm (CEW), and fall armyworm (FAW). We will report regular updates on this trapping in CFAES’s C.O.R.N newsletter to track the status of these pests in Ohio. Traps for each pest will be deployed when the pest is most likely to be active throughout the season. Read more about this effort at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-12/lep-monitoring-network-update

 

Imbibitional Chilling – Is it a concern? – Alexander Lindsey, Laura Lindsey, Osler Ortez

Warmer temperatures combined with the excitement (and need) to get crops in the ground triggered planting around the state last week (April 18 to April 24) or even before. With some warm days without much precipitation forecasted this week (April 25 to May 1), planting will continue. However, cold temperatures and precipitation after planting can cause imbibitional chilling, and this is something that we should certainly be aware of (watch for!). Imbibitional chilling may occur in corn and soybean seeds if the soil temperature is below 50°F when the seed imbibes (rapidly takes up water from the soil, usually within 24 hours after planting). Imbibitional chilling can cause reductions in stand and seedling vigor. If seeds were planted into soil with at least 50°F of temperature and adequate moisture (at least 40-50% plant available water) for at least one day, the drop in temperature is not likely to lead to imbibitional chilling issues. Cold injury to seedings during emergence may still be a possibility, but until we know how cold the soil gets its unclear how severe that issue may be (if evident at all). Finish reading this article at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-11/imbibitional-chilling-%E2%80%93-it-concern

 

Springtime is Spray Time — Here are Some Tips for Better Spraying – Erdal Ozkan

Applying pesticides requires a high level of skill and knowledge. Increases in the size and complexity of sprayers over the years require even more attention to efficiency, efficacy, and safety. Although each crop requires a slightly different approach to the application of pesticides, some general principles apply to almost all spraying situations. Here are my top 10 recommendations (not in a particular order) that will make spraying efficient and effective resulting in a higher level of biological efficacy expected from pesticides applied. Continue reading at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-12/springtime-spray-time-here-are-some-tips-better-spraying

 

Making On-Farm Trials Easy – Taylor Dill, Elizabeth Hawkins

Planting season is upon us and is a little behind in comparison to last year. Many producers are planning on evaluating input costs and management practices on their farm this season to improve economic efficiency and stay profitable. However, there are some ways to plan on-farm research to get the most accurate data, and therefore make the best decision for your farm. The first element to establish is what are you trying to find out? Fully understanding the question and goal of the trial is imperative to set up the appropriate treatments. Maybe your question is “What is my most economically effective nitrogen rate?” or “Does this new fungicide increase yield and pay for itself?”. When doing on-farm research, consider assessing practices that are critical to the long-term success of the farm. Read more at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-12/making-farm-trials-easy

 

Alfalfa Weevil: Ready, Set, Scout! – Aaron Wilson, Kelley Tilmon, Mark Sulc, Andy Michel

Finally we’ve accumulated enough heat units that significant parts of Ohio are now or very soon will be in prime time for alfalfa weevil. Peak larval activity and feeding damage occur between 325 and 575 GDD. In short, most locations should begin scouting, especially in fields that were damaged last fall by the fall armyworm, because we don’t want to add more insult to those fields early this season. Alfalfa fields should be scouted weekly for weevils until at least the first harvest. Follow-up scouting may be needed after the first harvest in heavily infested fields. Spot problem fields early by checking alfalfa tips for feeding damage – small holes and a tattered appearance. Fields that have a south facing slope tend to warm up sooner and need to be checked for weevil earlier. Continue reading at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-12/alfalfa-weevil-ready-set-scout

 

Mark A. Badertscher

Agriculture and Natural Resources Educator

OSU Extension Hardin County

1021 W. Lima Street, Suite 103, Kenton, OH 43326

419-767-6037

hardin.osu.edu

April 1, 2022

Hello,

Since the last Hardin County Agriculture and Natural Resources Update, ARC/PLC decisions were due to the Farm Service Agency on March 15 as was explained in the attached news release. Also, the attached article on the Beef Banquet appeared in the local news media. Yesterday, we wrapped up the pesticide and fertilizer recertification with a make-up and specialty class held at the Extension office. Coming up next week are two Soil Health Workshops, both a beginner (April 4) and an advanced (April 6) being held at the Hardin County Extension office from 9:00-4:00 pm. See the attached news release and flyer for more information. If you are interested in participating in either or both of these workshops being held Monday and Wednesday, make sure you call the Extension office.

ARC-PLC News Release

Beef Banquet News Release

Soil Health Workshop News Release

Soil Health Workshop Series Flyer

The Hardin County OSU Extension Master Gardener Volunteers are hosting their Spring Garden Seminar “April Showers Bring Garden Flowers” Thursday, April 7 at Mid-Ohio Energy Cooperative in Kenton from 9:00-4:00 pm. You can read about the program in the attached news release and brochure. The Goat Banquet is scheduled for Saturday, April 9 with doors opening at 5:00 pm at the Kenton Christian Missionary Alliance Church. For more information on this event, you may want to read the attached article and flyer. With the changing weather, producers may be interested in evaluating their wheat stands. So, this week I submitted an article about this topic to local news media and have also included it with this email.

Spring Garden Seminar News Release

Spring Garden Seminar Flyer

Goat Banquet News Release

Goat Banquet Flyer

Wheat Stand Evaluation News Release

The big news that was reported by the Ohio Department of Agriculture this week was the fact that Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) was detected in a backyard poultry flock in Franklin County. This is a very serious issue to the poultry industry so I have attached both a fact sheet on HPAI from the Ohio Department of Agriculture along with a brochure put together by OSU Veterinary Extension on biosecurity and how to protect your poultry from this disease. Please take the time to read this information if you have poultry. Finally, I have included ag crops articles for you to read that I believe are timely and appropriate for Hardin County.

HPAI Fact Sheet

Avian Influenza Brochure

 

Mark

 

Soil Health Workshop Series in Kenton – Mark Badertscher

A series of Soil Health Workshops will be held on April 4th (Beginner) and April 6th (Advanced) at the Hardin County OSU Extension Office in Kenton. Jim Hoorman will be the main presenter. Hoorman has worked for OSU Extension for several years as a county extension educator in Putnam County and USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) in the Soil Health Division for Ohio and Michigan. To read more, click on https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-07/soil-health-workshop-series-kenton

 

Wheat Herbicides, Cressleaf Groundsel, Enlist – Weed Management Odds and Ends – Mark Loux

Based on the current price of wheat, some wheat fields with less than ideal stands are being taken to yield instead of terminated. A uniform wheat stand usually provides most of the weed control that’s needed. Weeds will likely be more evident and in need of control where stands are thin or erratic. We have been told wheat herbicides are scarce, so growers might want to check with suppliers soon. Reminder that any product containing dicamba has to be applied prior to jointing. Read more at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-07/wheat-herbicides-cressleaf-groundsel-enlist-weed-management-odds

 

Time to Assess Forage Legume Stands – Mark Sulc

With the onset of recent warm temperatures, forage stands are beginning to green up. Wet soil conditions and widely fluctuating temperatures have presented tough conditions for forage stands this winter. This is especially true of taprooted legumes like alfalfa and red clover. Many forage stands suffered significant fall armyworm feeding damage late last summer and into the fall, so those stands should be carefully evaluated this spring as they greenup. It is time to start walking forage stands (especially in southern and central Ohio) to assess their condition so decisions and adjustments for the 2022 growing season can be planned if necessary. Continue with article at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-07/time-assess-forage-legume-stands

 

Alternative Spring Burndown/Postemergence Strategies When Herbicides are in Short Supply – Mark Loux

There is a lot of speculation about herbicide shortages for the 2022 growing season, and some products are apparently getting more expensive and/or scarce now. This will affect herbicide buying and weed management decisions for the 2022 season. The two main active ingredients that we’re hearing about right now are glyphosate (Roundup, others) and glufosinate (Liberty, others), for which prices have increased substantially. There will likely be limited supplies of other pesticide active ingredients as well, but in the short term, a shortage of these two active ingredients poses some major challenges for corn and soybean production. The purpose of this article is to discuss ways to minimize the impact of herbicide shortages, primarily glyphosate, on corn and soybean production. As you search for alternatives to these two herbicides and others, the weed control guides and technical guides produced by University Extension and industry are an important tool for planning weed management programs and herbicide purchases. Find more at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-05/alternative-spring-burndownpostemergence-strategies-when

 

Topdressing Wheat with Liquid Swine Manure – Glen Arnold

Wheat fields are firming up across Ohio and topdressing with nitrogen fertilizer will soon start. Given the current fertilizer prices more livestock producers may be considering applying liquid swine manure as a top-dress for wheat. The key to applying the correct amount of manure to fertilize wheat is to know the manure’s nitrogen content. Most manure tests reveal total nitrogen, ammonia nitrogen and organic nitrogen amounts. The ammonia nitrogen portion is readily available for plant growth. The organic nitrogen portion takes considerably longer to mineralize and generally will not be available when wheat uptakes the majority of its nitrogen before mid-June. Finish reading at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-06/topdressing-wheat-liquid-swine-manure

 

Mark A. Badertscher

Agriculture and Natural Resources Educator

OSU Extension Hardin County

1021 W. Lima Street, Suite 103, Kenton, OH 43326

419-767-6037

hardin.osu.edu

 

Soil Health Workshop Series

Hardin County – A series of Soil Health Workshops will be held on April 4th (Beginner) and April 6th (Advanced) at the Hardin County OSU Extension Office. Jim Hoorman, Hoorman Soil Health Services will be the main presenter. Hoorman has worked for OSU Extension for several years as a county extension educator in Putnam County and USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) in the Soil Health Division for Ohio and Michigan.

The first workshop will be April 4th from 9:00 am – 4:00 pm, with topics ranging from soil ecology and nutrient recycling, dealing with soil compaction, and putting an economic value on soil health will be discussed in the morning. In the afternoon, topics on keeping nutrients in the soil and getting started with cover crops: clovers, legumes, grasses, and brassicas will be discussed.

The second day, April 6th from 9:00 am – 4:00 pm, topics will include setting up a no-till planter, adjusting to adverse weather, making no-till corn succeed, and learning more about beneficial microbes. Afternoon topics include fertilizing for higher yields with micronutrients, using humic compounds to enhance fertilizer and plant growth, and dealing with pests (weeds, insects, and diseases).

Participation is limited to 25 attendees for each workshop. Sign up by calling the Hardin County OSU Extension Office at 419-674-2297. The cost of each workshop will be $25 per day which includes lunch and materials. Registration is requested by April 1. Participants can enroll in either or both days.

March 1, 2022

Good evening,

It’s that time of year again when Hardin County’s agricultural community turns its attention to the youth and livestock with several livestock banquets. After a year or in some cases two years because of the pandemic, the different livestock commodity groups are back with the Horse Banquet (February 20), Lamb Banquet (March 5), Pork Banquet (March 19), Beef Banquet (March 26), Poultry Banquet (March 26), and Goat Banquet (April 9). This year the Dairy Service Unit decided not to host a Dairy Banquet. I put together an article that is attached about the Winter Livestock Banquets in addition to separate articles though the current news release and flyer on the Poultry Banquet for you to read which contain the details and how to go about getting tickets for these “annual” events.

Livestock Banquet Season Article

Horse Banquet News Release

Lamb Banquet News Release

Pork Banquet News Release

Poultry Banquet News Release

Poultry Banquet Flyer

The Conservation Tillage & Technology Conference will be held in person March 8-9 at Ohio Northern University in Ada. The good news is that the mask requirement has now been dropped by the university and because of this, you can still register for the early bird rate of $100 for both days through March 1. After that, the rate goes up to $150 for both days, and also includes access to the recorded videos of the approximately 60 speakers. Read more about this annual conference in the attached news release and brochure. There will be a variety of topics including Soil Health, Cover Crops, No-Till, Nutrient Management, Crop Management, Water Quality and Conservation Practices, along with Alternative Crops and Hot Topics. Go to ctc.osu.edu to register for this conference held in our own backyard and read about the different speakers and topics.

CTC News Release

CTC Flyer

After holding two New Fertilizer Certification training classes in February, we are gearing up for our annual Hardin County Pesticide and Fertilizer Recertification classes on March 11 and 17. There are only a few spots left so make sure you pre-register if this is your year to renew by calling the Extension office at 419-674-2297. We also have two make-up/specialty video classes scheduled for March 30 and 31 as this is our big year in the three year cycle with 70 pesticide and 100 fertilizer applicators in Hardin County alone needing recertification updates. Since the Plaza Inn put in a new bar in their back room, there is less seating so we had to schedule additional sessions. I have included both a flyer and news release with this email for more information.

Fertilizer Certification News Release

Fertilizer Certification Flyer

Pesticide-Fertilizer Recertification News Release

Hardin PAT-FACT Flyer

Have you made your ARC/PLC elections for the 2022 crop year yet? If not, make sure you make arrangements to get this taken care of before the March 15 deadline at the FSA office. If you are wanting to learn more about the farm bill election and enrollment, as well as a crop insurance primer, there is a recording of a webinar presented by Ross County OSU Extension Educator Chris Bruynis that has Hardin County examples. You can find  the recording of this webinar of the Farm Bill and Crop Insurance at https://osu.zoom.us/rec/share/SmSxQ4b9BDY1EzwgMjW3Rbb_Uca4USbRVBJfNhiriReOsjEDLJnsxEhZwehMVOSm.nw-J3KFlkHzEm5r9 and an article with additional information at https://u.osu.edu/ohioagmanager/2022/01/24/arc-plc-program-election-and-osu-extension-decision-tool/ written by Tuscarawas County OSU Extension Educator Chris Zoller. Let me know if you have questions.

I have included additional articles below for your review from the CORN Newsletter that you may be interested in reading. Hopefully I’ll see several of you at the upcoming training meetings and events that we have scheduled for March. If not then, maybe at one of the upcoming Hardin County livestock banquets.

Mark

 

CTTC Update – Masks Optional, Early Bird Registration Through March 1 – Mark Badertscher

Due to recent changes by the CDC with masking guidelines and the fact that the CDC COVID-19 transmission level for Hardin County has dropped, hospitalizations in the local area and in Ohio are declining, campus COVID case numbers are decreasing, and that severity continues to remain low, Ohio Northern University has indicated that masks are now optional in public indoor spaces on the ONU campus which includes the buildings that house the Conservation Tillage & Technology Conference. Read more at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-05/cttc-update-%E2%80%93-masks-optional-early-bird-registration-through

 

Using the Corn Nitrogen Rate Calculator – Eric Richer

Throughout this winter meeting season, fertilizer has been a hot topic. Generally, the discussion has been around nitrogen price and availability. Most of us have little to no influence on price or availability, but as a farmer, you decide your corn (and wheat) nitrogen rates, assuming you can get the nitrogen product you want. Your corn nitrogen rate could likely cost $100 per acre more in 2022 as compared to the year prior and nitrogen will probably surpass seed as the most expensive variable cost per acre this year. Finish reading this article at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-05/using-corn-nitrogen-rate-calculator

 

Corn College and Soybean School Recordings Available – Laura Lindsey, Amanda Douridas

Did you miss our Corn College and Soybean School this year? We have you covered! Check out the AgCrops Team YouTube channel for all the recordings. Recordings include: Soybean Management for 2022 by Dr. Laura Lindsey; Corn Management for 2022 by Dr. Osler Ortez; Soybean Cyst Nematode and Other Soilborne Pathogens by Dr. Horacio Lopez-Nicora; Field Crop Diseases: Emphasis on Corn Tar Spot by Dr. Pierce Paul; Insects Are Full of Surprises: Field Crop Gotchas by Dr. Kelley Tilmon; Corn Insect Management by Dr. Andy Michel; 2022 Weed Management Update for Corn and Soybeans by Dr. Mark Loux; and Meeting Nutrient Needs for Corn and Soybean by Dr. Steve Culman. Click on https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-05/corn-college-and-soybean-school-recordings-available to access these videos and more.

 

Considerations for managing P & K in 2022 – Greg LaBarge, Steve Culman

During this period of high prices and uncertain availability of phosphorus and potassium fertilizer, a few basic soil fertility concepts can help guide application decision-making. Fortunately, the work during 2014-2020 that led to the Tri-State Fertilizer Recommendation for Corn, Soybean, Wheat, and Alfalfa-2020 is current information we use. Here are a few key points from the Tri-States plus some other principles that may help. Go to https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-03/considerations-managing-p-k-2022 for tips to manage fertilizer inputs in 2022.

 

New Enlist Labels – When Enlist is Outlawed, Only Outlaws…… – Mark Loux

Sometimes you’d like the s**t to stop hitting the fan just long enough to get cleaned up, but you can’t get a break. Like when you’re in the middle of an endless pandemic, a worldwide shipping fiasco, herbicide scarcities and price increases, and parts shortages. And just when you had it worked out to use Enlist herbicides on Enlist soybeans for 2022 so you wouldn’t have to deal with dicamba, their use is no longer legal in your county. Finish reading this article at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-02/new-enlist-labels-%E2%80%93-when-enlist-outlawed-only-outlaws%E2%80%A6%E2%80%A6

 

Mark A. Badertscher

Agriculture and Natural Resources Educator

OSU Extension Hardin County

1021 W. Lima Street, Suite 103, Kenton, OH 43326

419-767-6037

hardin.osu.edu

 

Pesticide & Fertilizer Recertification Training

Hardin County – Some farmers have received a notice that informs them that their current pesticide and/or fertilizer applicator licenses will expire at the end of March 2022 and that they must complete their continuing education hours to renew before this date. Thirty dollars is sent to the Ohio Department of Agriculture in Reynoldsburg to renew the license and $35 to OSU Extension for the pesticide continuing education requirement. If fertilizer recertification is needed, the cost to OSU Extension is $10 for the fertilizer continuing education requirement.

Farmers must have a private applicator license to apply restricted use pesticides on their farm or for an employer’s crops. A commercial license is required for individuals who apply products on fields other than their own or as a business. The Environmental Protection Agency determines whether a product is designated restricted or general use. Restricted use products may be organic or traditional pesticides.

To obtain a private pesticide applicator license, farmers must pass a series of exams that test their competency in pesticide safety and application knowledge. They also must be certified in one or more of seven categories in addition to Core knowledge. These categories include Grain and Cereal Crops, Forage Crops and Livestock, Fruit and Vegetable Crops, Nursery and Forest Crops, Greenhouse Crops, Fumigation, and Specialty Uses.

Farmers must have a private fertilizer applicator license if they apply fertilizer on 50 or more acres of crops grown for sale. This does not include crops that are used on the farm for their livestock or fertilizer used through the planter. It does include fertilizer applied in the fall, pre-plant, or side dressing. If fertilizer is applied by a commercial applicator, the farmer does not need to have fertilizer certification. Like pesticide applications, there must be record keeping of fertilizer applied to the farmer’s crops that can be requested by the Ohio Department of Agriculture. If an applicator does not have a fertilizer license and needs one, they can attend a three-hour training to become certified or study the fertilizer manual and take a test on their own.

A license must be renewed every three years. A farmer can meet this requirement by completing three hours of approved pesticide continuing education anytime during the three year period and one hour of fertilizer continuing education during the same three year period. Recertification training emphasizes effective management strategies that enhance crop productivity, encourage responsible use of products, and promote safe practices for applicators, the public, and the environment. OSU Extension offices are currently offering recertification programs to fulfill the three hours of the pesticide continuing education requirement and additional one hour of the fertilizer continuing education requirement for license renewal. An applicator may also choose to retest every three years to renew a private pesticide or fertilizer license in place of recertification training.

Hardin County Pesticide and Fertilizer Recertification programs will be offered Friday, March 11 and Thursday, March 17 at the Plaza Inn Restaurant in Mt. Victory. The pesticide recertification session will begin at 9:00 am and end at 12:00 pm. This session is for private applicators and will consist of Core, Grain and Cereal Crops, Forage Crops and Livestock, and Fumigation. A lunch option will be made available at the Plaza Inn Restaurant for additional cost. The fertilizer recertification will start at 1:00 pm and end at 2:00 pm. Farmers need to call the Extension office at 419-674-2297, or stop by at 1021 W. Lima Street, Suite 103 in Kenton to pre-register. An option to pre-register online is available at https://go.osu.edu/HardinPAT-FACT. Further information regarding make-up or specialty recertification in other areas can be obtained by contacting the Extension office by March 23.

Both pesticide and fertilizer recertification for make-up and/or specialty categories will be offered on March 30, from 9:00 am – 3:00 pm and March 31, from 11:00 pm – 5:00 pm at the Extension office in Kenton. Pre-registration is required by calling the Hardin County Extension office. Be sure to include pesticide categories needed and whether fertilizer recertification is needed. On March 30, pesticide recertification will begin at 9:00 am for three hours, followed by an hour of fertilizer recertification and then the class will carry on with any needed extra pesticide recertification categories. On March 31, fertilizer recertification will begin at 11:00 am for an hour, followed by pesticide recertification for three hours, and then the class will carry on with any needed extra categories. Seating is limited to 25 people at the Extension office each day.

Training dates for commercial pesticide applicators can be found at http://pested.osu.edu/commercialapplicator. Training dates for Private Pesticide Applicators for other counties in Ohio may be found at http://pested.osu.edu/privateapplicator. The commercial and private applicator licenses are a way that commercial pesticide applicators and farmers show good stewardship in caring for our land and producing our food in a sustainable and environmentally responsible manner.

 

Fertilizer Applicator Certification Training in Kenton

Hardin County – Two three-hour fertilizer certification programs will be held in Kenton for any private or commercial applicator who needs to obtain fertilizer certification for the first time. These trainings will be held at the Hardin County OSU Extension office, 1021 W Lima Street, Kenton, Ohio on Monday, February 7 and Friday, February 11.  The classes will begin at 9:00 am and end at 12:00 pm. There is a $30 class fee payable to OSU Extension for these trainings.

Please arrive early so that materials can be distributed and the programs can start on time. These trainings will meet the fertilizer certification requirements for those with and without a pesticide license. Pre-registration is required by calling the Hardin County OSU Extension office at 419-674-2297 or register online at https://go.osu.edu/HardinPAT-FACT no later than two days before the training.

Agricultural fertilizer applicator certification is required in Ohio for farmers who apply fertilizer to more than 50 acres of agricultural production grown primarily for sale. This requirement was signed into law in June 2014, and also requires certification for commercial agricultural fertilizer applicators. Farmers who have their fertilizer applied by co-ops or custom applicators are not required to be certified.

Applicators who are a Certified Crop Adviser (CCA) or Certified Livestock Manager (CLM) are not required to attend the training. Fertilizer is defined for the regulation as any substance containing nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, or other plant nutrient in a dry or liquid formulation. All application types such as broadcast, side dress, sub-surface, knifing and other are included in the certification requirement. Lime and limestone are not included as fertilizer for the certification and farmers who only use starter fertilizer in their planter boxes are exempted.

The agriculture fertilizer certification is not required for manure applications as these are currently regulated, unless farmers are applying livestock or poultry manure from a Concentrated Animal Feeding Facility (CAFF). In this case, they would need to have either the CLM or Ohio Fertilizer Certification.

The Ohio Department of Agriculture is the agency issuing the certification for agriculture fertilizer applications. Once an applicator completes the fertilizer training, the ODA will bill them $30 for their fertilizer certificate unless the applicator currently holds a pesticide applicator license.

The Ohio Department of Agriculture website has information regarding the regulation at https://agri.ohio.gov/divisions/plant-health/fertilizers. For more information about other training sessions or general materials for the agriculture fertilizer certification, visit nutrienteducation.osu.edu or contact Mark Badertscher, Hardin County OSU Extension at badertscher.4@osu.edu

 

January 12, 2022

Good afternoon,

I hope that you had a good holiday season and are ready for the winter meeting season. There are a host of meetings and classes being offered by OSU Extension for you to take advantage. I have decided to try provide links to information in this edition of the Hardin County Agriculture and Natural Resources Update as opposed to using all attachments so I hope you enjoy this format to start the year. Tomorrow morning starts the Conservation Tillage Club breakfast series at the Plaza Inn Restaurant in Mt. Victory. Meetings are planned for January 13 on Soybean Diseases & SCN, January 27 on Water Quality, February 10 on Grain Marketing Outlook, and February 24 on Soil Health. Horacio Lopez-Nicora, Ohio State University Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology and OSU Extension Soybean Disease Specialist will kick-off the series tomorrow morning starting at 7:30 am with breakfast followed by a discussion on SCN and SDS. He will also provide an opportunity for farmers to have two fields tested for Soybean Cyst Nematodes at no cost. See the Conservation Tillage Club news release and flyer by clicking on the links below.

We are providing an opportunity for individuals to prepare for the Ohio Private Pesticide Applicator Class with our New Pesticide Applicator Class being held on January 26 at the OSU Extension office in Kenton. I have provided links to the news release and flyer below for you to read about this opportunity. This class will include books and help prepare individuals to take the test for Core and Category 1 (Grains and Cereal Crops). See the links below for more information. You can read the read the news release and flyer if you are interested. Our office will also be providing a Master Gardener Volunteer Training Course starting up January 25 here at the OSU Extension office in Kenton. It will be a new format, combining 6 evening classes with a self-paced online course. People who complete this horticulture series will be able to serve the county as a Master Gardener Volunteer upon successful completion. Check out the news release and flyer below for more information and how you can register.

The Hardin County Agriculture Hall of Fame recognized its 2020-21 class in December. See the linked news releases to read about the accomplishments of these individuals below. This past month, Ron Cronley, John Knedler, Ira Marshall, Jerry McBride, and Dave Russell were inducted. Nationally recognized farm broadcaster Joe Cornely was the guest speaker at this banquet.  You can read about the Ohio No-Till Conference that was held in December at Der Dutchman Restaurant in the link below with local farmer Jan Layman presiding. In October, I led a Statewide Sheep Tour to Indiana which visited three sheep farms along with Hunter Nutrition that you can read about in the links below. The Farm Science Review was held during the month of September, which featured a lot of new equipment and technology as you can read about below. Earlier in September, I did the Hardin County Weed Survey, checking 95 soybean fields. The good news that you can read about below is that waterhemp control improved this year, with the problem weed being found in 23% of the fields checked. The good news is that 38% of the fields checked were considered to be weed-free.

Other articles that I submitted to local news media can be accessed below at the link provided. These articles include information about Nitrogen Recommendations, Tillage Disease Management, Tar Spot, and Fall Armyworms. You can read about the August 2021, September 2021, and Season Rainfall 2021 Summaries. There are articles about the Hardin County Carcass Show of Champions, along with articles about programs held this fall in the Friendship Gardens of Hardin County by the OSU Extension Master Gardener Volunteers dealing with garlic and pumpkins. I’ve also included some articles from the CORN Newsletter if you are interested in reading about more ag crops topics.

Mark

I’m using Adobe Acrobat.
You can view “August 2021 Rainfall Summary.pdf” at: https://documentcloud.adobe.com/link/track?uri=urn:aaid:scds:US:33de389d-12be-48a1-af68-906f46ac2a4c
You can view “September 2021 Rainfall Summary.pdf” at: https://documentcloud.adobe.com/link/track?uri=urn:aaid:scds:US:66b0557c-6a96-46a7-84b3-7a7cce80b552
You can view “Season Rainfall 2021 Summary.pdf” at: https://documentcloud.adobe.com/link/track?uri=urn:aaid:scds:US:4ae65f2d-736f-46d8-a87d-4c96fb035c63
You can view “Nitrogen Recommendations News Release.pdf” at: https://documentcloud.adobe.com/link/track?uri=urn:aaid:scds:US:d883ecc2-d9f6-4706-b782-7265cd026e48
You can view “Tillage Disease Management News Release.pdf” at: https://documentcloud.adobe.com/link/track?uri=urn:aaid:scds:US:c28c708c-05a3-46d0-8887-c7a055408f8d
You can view “Ohio No-Till Conference News Release.pdf” at: https://documentcloud.adobe.com/link/track?uri=urn:aaid:scds:US:790cd15d-076a-4285-a730-7f8b9188dae8
You can view “2021 Ag Hall of Fame News Release.pdf” at: https://documentcloud.adobe.com/link/track?uri=urn:aaid:scds:US:cd924868-0d6c-41a0-99d0-a7cfe990ef07
You can view “County Weed Survey News Release.pdf” at: https://documentcloud.adobe.com/link/track?uri=urn:aaid:scds:US:ad649dae-9920-44b2-8c04-d3be4c10b563
You can view “Indiana Sheep Tour News Release.pdf” at: https://documentcloud.adobe.com/link/track?uri=urn:aaid:scds:US:3027ad7b-7129-4f72-9636-2ee65c5bb256
You can view “Pumpkin MGV News Release.pdf” at: https://documentcloud.adobe.com/link/track?uri=urn:aaid:scds:US:8ec84bbd-39ad-44ff-91cb-3d726ad0d147
You can view “Carcass Show Results News Release.pdf” at: https://documentcloud.adobe.com/link/track?uri=urn:aaid:scds:US:b90ef680-48cd-44ac-962d-18e32db4d3fe
You can view “Ag Hall of Fame Nominations News Release.pdf” at: https://documentcloud.adobe.com/link/track?uri=urn:aaid:scds:US:3e069c35-e80d-436a-b657-b3dfcc98cfa5
You can view “FSR News Release.pdf” at: https://documentcloud.adobe.com/link/track?uri=urn:aaid:scds:US:bc67fe85-1ce2-4e0b-b2f0-608469a6549d
You can view “Incredible Garlic News Release.pdf” at: https://documentcloud.adobe.com/link/track?uri=urn:aaid:scds:US:1dd08cf5-04ec-4abb-81fc-a244d0188dd1
You can view “Carcass Show News Release.pdf” at: https://documentcloud.adobe.com/link/track?uri=urn:aaid:scds:US:aa68c7d6-890e-43a4-8cbf-a9a6cacefc6f
You can view “Fall Armyworm News Release.pdf” at: https://documentcloud.adobe.com/link/track?uri=urn:aaid:scds:US:95616554-7283-4278-a5eb-2b6bbb7f083f
You can view “Tar Spot News Release.pdf” at: https://documentcloud.adobe.com/link/track?uri=urn:aaid:scds:US:4490e667-0be1-4400-ac0b-9d56ee071412
You can view “Tillage Club Breakfast News Release.pdf” at: https://documentcloud.adobe.com/link/track?uri=urn:aaid:scds:US:1d2c48a2-e4ab-4786-b901-e79544f01c8e
You can view “Tillage Club Flyer.pdf” at: https://documentcloud.adobe.com/link/track?uri=urn:aaid:scds:US:4b9c7c48-389e-43a9-aacc-3ed173158e71
You can view “New Master Gardener Volunteer Course News Release.pdf” at: https://documentcloud.adobe.com/link/track?uri=urn:aaid:scds:US:b4ab8b75-86e0-4c10-bd57-0dbc046d79e5
You can view “MGV Class Flyer.pdf” at: https://documentcloud.adobe.com/link/track?uri=urn:aaid:scds:US:496ce654-b0a6-4f1b-825e-ee7f2e43a159
You can view “New Pesticide Applicator Class News Release.pdf” at: https://documentcloud.adobe.com/link/track?uri=urn:aaid:scds:US:c7dcbcca-b9a7-4ec3-9cef-c49fc5997441
You can view “New Pesticide Applicator Flyer.pdf” at: https://documentcloud.adobe.com/link/track?uri=urn:aaid:scds:US:63bb0a0b-e552-479e-a606-181b57a4bfa6

2022 Ohio Weed University – John Barker, Mark Loux, Tony Nye

Are you concerned about the effectiveness of your herbicide program?  Want to sharpen your weed id skills?  Not sure which nozzles provide the best control options?  Is herbicide resistance REALLY that big of a problem?  These topics and many more will be discussed at the 2022 Ohio Weed University. Are you concerned about palmer amaranth?  Did you know that palmer amaranth, waterhemp and other invasive weeds can now be found in most Ohio Counties?  One female palmer amaranth plant can produce 1 million seeds.  I have it … now how do I control it?  How did I get it, how is it spread?  These issues will be discussed at the 2022 Ohio Weed University. Read more at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-01/2022-ohio-weed-university

 

Winter Application of Manure – Remember Setbacks – Glen Arnold

Some Ohio livestock producers will be looking to apply manure to farm fields frozen enough to support application equipment. This is due to the wet weather in later October, November, and December that also stretched out the crop harvest season. Permitted farms are not allowed to apply manure in the winter unless it is an extreme emergency, and then movement of manure to other suitable storage is usually the selected alternative. Thus, this article is for non-permitted livestock operations. Continue reading this article at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2021-41/winter-application-manure-remember-setbacks

 

2021 Ohio Corn Performance Test: Regional Overviews – Rich Minyo, Allen Geyer, David Lohnes, Matt Lowe

In 2021, 121 corn hybrids representing 16 commercial brands were evaluated in the Ohio Corn Performance Test (OCPT). Four tests were established in the Southwestern/West Central/Central (SW/WC/C) region and three tests were established in the Northwestern (NW) and North Central/Northeastern (NC/NE) regions (for a total of ten test sites statewide).  Hybrid entries in the regional tests were planted in either an early or a full season maturity trial. These test sites provided a range of growing conditions and production environments. Find out more information at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2021-40/2021-ohio-corn-performance-test-regional-overviews

 

2021 Ohio Soybean Performance Trial – Final Report Now Available! – Laura Lindsey, Allen Geyer

The purpose of the Ohio Soybean Performance Trials is to evaluate soybean varieties for yield and other agronomic characteristics. This evaluation gives soybean producers comparative information for selecting the best varieties for their unique production systems. A pdf copy of the trial can be downloaded here: https://stepupsoy.osu.edu/sites/hcs-soy/files/2021_OSPT_final.pdf The data will also be available soon for download on the Ohio Crop Performance Trials website- https://u.osu.edu/perf/ The 2021 trial included 19 brands of soybean tested in six Ohio counties (Henry, Sandusky, Mercer, Union, Preble, and Clinton). Entries included non-GMO (conventional), Xtend, Enlist, XtendFlex, sulfonylurea-tolerant, and Liberty Link/glyphosate tolerant (LLGT27). Soybean yield varied across the state. In Henry County, soybean yielded ranged from 26.0 to 52.0 bu/acre due to wet weather in the spring and fall; while in Clinton County, soybean yield ranged from 63.7 to 88.2 bu/acre with good growing conditions.

 

Alternative Spring Burndown/Postemergence Strategies when Herbicides are in Short Supply – Mark Loux

There is a lot of speculation about herbicide shortages for the 2022 growing season, and some products are apparently getting more expensive and/or scarce now.  This will affect herbicide buying and weed management decisions for the 2022 season.  The two main active ingredients that we’re hearing about right now are glyphosate (Roundup, others) and glufosinate (Liberty, others), for which prices have increased substantially.  There will likely be limited supplies of other pesticide active ingredients as well, but in the short term, a shortage of these two active ingredients poses some major challenges for corn and soybean production. The purpose of this article is to discuss ways to minimize the impact of herbicide shortages, primarily glyphosate, on corn and soybean production. As you search for alternatives to these two herbicides and others, the weed control guides and technical guides produced by University Extension and industry are an important tool for planning weed management programs and herbicide purchases. Finish reading this article at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2021-40/alternative-spring-burndownpostemergence-strategies-when

 

Mark A. Badertscher

Agriculture and Natural Resources Educator

OSU Extension Hardin County

1021 W. Lima Street, Suite 103, Kenton, OH 43326

419-767-6037

hardin.osu.edu

 

 

New Pesticide Applicator Class

Hardin County – A class to help farmers prepare to become private pesticide applicators has been planned for January 26 at the Hardin County Extension office, 1021 West Lima Street, Kenton. In Ohio, pesticide applicators are required by law to have an Ohio Pesticide Applicators License in order to purchase and apply restricted-use chemicals. These pesticides include but are not limited to herbicides, insecticides, and fungicides. This class will begin at 12:30 pm and end at 4:30 pm. There is a $30 registration fee which covers books for those enrolled.

The class will emphasize the two main categories that most Hardin County pesticide applicators need, which are Core (applying pesticides properly and safely), as well as Grain and Cereal Crops. Resources will be shared for other categories that are available for certification, which include Forage Crops & Livestock, Fruit & Vegetable Crops, Nursery & Forest Crops, Greenhouse Crops, Fumigation, and Specialty Uses. Once a trainee has properly prepared for their pesticide license, they can schedule to take a test at an Ohio Department of Agriculture testing site. Ohio Pesticide Licenses are good for three years, and then the applicator must recertify by attending a three-hour recertification meeting before license expiration or re-test.

There are several reasons why someone may wish to become a private pesticide applicator. These reasons may include that they plan to take over the pesticide certification for their farm due to retirement or a change in responsibilities, they plan to use restricted-use chemicals in addition to general-use chemicals to have more options to control problem weeds or pests, or they are new to spraying pesticides on the farm. The course is not designed for commercial pesticide applicators, as they must get training directly from the Ohio Department of Agriculture. Instructors for the class include Extension Educators Dennis Riethman, Mercer County; Matt Schmerge, Shelby County; and Mark Badertscher, Hardin County. Those planning to participate in the class need to call the Extension office at 419-674-2297 by January 19 to register.