Statewide Sheep Tour

Hardin County – A statewide sheep production tour of Knox, Licking, and Crawford Counties has been planned for Ohio Sheep Producers the weekend of Saturday, October 15 and Sunday, October 16, 2022. This year’s tour is jointly sponsored by the Ohio Sheep Improvement Association and Hardin County OSU Extension. Join us for a drive your own, sheep production tour focusing on dry lot/confinement sheep operations. There will be four tour stops on this year’s statewide tour, with each farm stop only being offered at the time listed.

The first farm stop will be at Cable Family Lamb Feedlot (10491 Canal Road, Hebron, Ohio 43025). This Licking County stop will be at 10:00 am Saturday, October 15. The Dave Cable family is the host of this stop which includes a large contract lamb finishing feedlot in Ohio feeding several thousand lambs from all over the United States. This farm has more recently added a dry lot/confinement ewe flock to produce additional lambs for the Cable Farms feedlot. Primary facilities include hoop buildings. Lunch will be on your own at 11:30 am.

The second stop on the tour will be Lone Pine Ranch (25267 Blanchard Road, Howard, Ohio 43028). This Know County stop will be at 1:00 pm Saturday, October 15. Greg and Bev Miller are the host of this stop which is in the prime sheep producing area of Knox County. Historically known for their pasture-based sheep production systems, but for the purpose of this production tour, we will be concentrating our educational efforts on their buildings and facilities, where they lamb out their 160 commercial ewe flock and feed out their own lambs for market.

The third stop on the tour will be Skyline Farms (14501 Skyline Drive, Danville, Ohio 43014). This Knox County stop will be at 3:00 pm Saturday, October 15. The Don Hawk family will be the host of this stop, which is a large contract lamb finishing feedlot in Ohio feeding several thousand lambs from all over the United States. This operation has more recently added a dry lot/confinement ewe flock to produce additional lambs for the Skyline Farms feedlot. The primary facilities include renovated turkey barns. There will be a scheduled overnight stay in the Mt. Vernon area. If you need hotel accommodations, contact Hardin County OSU Extension Educator Mark Badertscher at badertscher.4@osu.edu or 419-767-6037 for details. Dinner will be on your own.

The second day of the tour will feature a stop at Hartschuh Livestock (6348 Parks Road, Sycamore, Ohio 44882). This Crawford County stop will be at 10:30 am Sunday, October 16. The Greg Hartschuh family will be the host of this stop, which has recently added a dry lot/confinement commercial and Club Lamb operation in combination with their confinement dairy herd. The recently built confinement/lot building has new and innovative methods of feeding the ewe flock and concentrate many resources to high quality forages due to the dairy cattle part of the operation.

Producers and others who are interested in participating on this statewide sheep tour should register at https://www.ohiosheep.org/osia-programs.html#tour to let the tour hosts know how many people to expect at each stop. Hotel reservations need to be made in advance to assure room availability. Tour participants will be responsible for their own hotel room and meals. As in the past, we have rented a van for Hardin and Hancock County area producers to travel together. If there is enough interest from our area, we will meet for breakfast and travel together in the van. Let me know how many from your family plan to attend so we can make local arrangements.

Leaf Rubbings, Scarecrows & Scavenger Hunts

Children’s Program at Friendship Gardens

Hardin County – The Hardin County OSU Extension Master Gardener Volunteers are hosting a children’s program at the Friendship Gardens called “Leaf Rubbings, Scarecrows & Scavenger Hunts” on Saturday morning, September 24. This event is from 10:00 am until noon and will provide several activities for kids of all ages. Each child will be able to leave with a leaf rubbing and scarecrow that they made themselves with the help of the Master Gardener Volunteers. There are also garden scavenger hunts planned for the kids. The event will take place at the Friendship Gardens of Hardin County, which is located at 960 W. Kohler Street in Kenton.

Each child is asked to bring either an old button-down kid’s shirt, hat or maybe even both, to dress their scarecrow. Children of all ages are welcome with a responsible adult.  The adult must remain with their children for the entire event. Wear old clothes as making scarecrows involves participants painting faces on their project. The event is free and open to the public with no registration necessary. Come enjoy fall activities in the garden! Questions about this event can be directed to the Hardin County OSU Extension Master Gardeners Facebook page or by calling the OSU Extension office at 419-674-2297.

Carcass Show of Champions

Hardin County – Have you ever wondered how well the grand and reserve champion fair animals will grade out on the rail?  The OSU Extension office is announcing that the 2022 Hardin County Fair Carcass Show of Champions will be held in-person at Jenkins Meats, 670 E. Marion Street, Mt. Victory on Monday, September 19 starting at 6:00 pm. Viewers will be also be able to watch the OSU Meat Judge giving oral reasons and results at both the Hardin County OSU Extension and Ohio State – Hardin County 4-H Facebook pages in addition to the hardin.osu.edu website after the event. The carcass show will evaluate the meat value of the grand champion and reserve champion steers, barrows, gilts, and lambs from this year’s Hardin County Fair.

Carcass value will be determined by evaluating the dressing percentage, yield grade (external fat thickness, ribeye area (in2), internal fat, and hot carcass weight), as well as quality grade (marbling score and skeletal maturity). Carcass information is very important to breeding livestock operations for making genetic improvements in their seed stock animals; and serves as an effective marketing tool for producers who sell their livestock for meat. The Hardin County Fair Carcass Show of Champions is sponsored by Ohio State University Extension, Jenkins Meats, the Hardin County Fair Board, the Hardin County Sheep Improvement Association, the Hardin County Cattle Producers, and the Hardin County Pork Producers.

Fruit and Vegetable Crop Walk

Hardin County – There is a segment of agriculture in southeastern Hardin County that specializes in commercial fruit and vegetable production. Hardin County is also home to the Scioto Valley Produce Auction near Mt. Victory where much of this produce is sold. Hardin County OSU Extension has planned a Fruit and Vegetable Crop Walk program on Tuesday, August 2 from 6:00-8:00 pm to help with fruit and vegetable production issues. The location of the program will be on a produce farm at 15237 County Road 209, Kenton. It is open to all fruit and vegetable producers, whether they are commercial or home gardeners.

OSU Extension Integrated Pest Management Coordinator Jim Jasinski will provide information on using IPM techniques to control pests with produce. Ashley Leach, OSU College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences Assistant Professor of Entomology will provide an update on specialty crops insects. Gary Gao, OSU Extension Small Fruit Production Specialist will provide information on growing grapes and raspberries. Brad Bergefurd, Technical Specialty Crop Agronomist, Brandt Discovery and Innovation will provide an update for growers on vegetable production fertility. Hardin County OSU Extension Educator Mark Badertscher will provide information about Driftwatch; a voluntary communication tool that enables crop producers, beekeepers, and pesticide applicators to work together to protect specialty crops and apiaries through use of mapping programs.

The program will be held outside so bring your lawn chair and umbrella in case of rain. There will be a diagnostic table so be sure to bring along any weeds, plant nutrition problems, plant diseases, and insect specimens in a sealed plastic bag for questions and answers. The program will conclude with a walk through a produce field, pointing out fruit and vegetable issues and steps to properly manage them. There is no cost to attend this event.

Summer Garden Programs

Hardin County – The Hardin County OSU Extension Master Gardener Volunteers are hosting two summer garden programs at the Friendship Gardens of Hardin County located at 960 W. Kohler Street in Kenton. The events begin at 6:30 pm with an event on edible plants, “I can eat THAT??!!” on July 19 and another on “Growing Cucurbits” on August 16.

Learn about foraging for food in your backyard Tuesday, July 19 with the edible plants program “I can eat THAT??!!” There are many plants besides fruits and vegetables that are growing in your yard or woods that can be used as food. Come learn about some of them and try a taste. This is a good way to stretch your food budget. This will be presented by Master Gardeners Vicki Phillips and Kim Thomas.

What are cucurbits? Why they are squash, cucumbers, pumpkins, melons, and gourds, of course. Learn the tricks on how to grow these delicious vegetables, and tips on how to keep them pest and disease free. This program on “Growing Cucurbits” will be held Tuesday, August 16 and will be presented by Master Gardener Stewart Coats who is an award-winning gardener.

These events are free and open to the public, rain or shine with the featured program inside the shelter house at the Friendship Gardens with seating. Registration is not necessary to attend. Master Gardener Volunteers will be stationed throughout the Friendship Gardens before and after the programs to answer your gardening questions. All interested gardeners are encouraged to attend.

Planting for Color Topic of Evening Garden Affair

Hardin County – The Hardin County OSU Extension Master Gardener Volunteers are hosting “An Evening Garden Affair” on Tuesday evening, July 12 at the Friendship Gardens of Hardin County located at 960 W. Kohler Street in Kenton. The event is from 6:30 to 8:00 pm and will feature Rachel Hoverman of OSU Extension-Van Wert County with a program about “Planting for Year-Round Color.”

Attendees will gather in the Friendship Gardens of Hardin County for tours at 6:30 pm with Hardin County OSU Extension Master Gardener Volunteers. Learn about the many different themed gardens at this educational demonstration garden. There will be snacks and drinks available before moving to Simon Kenton School gymnasium at 7:00 pm for the program presented by speaker Rachel Hoverman, Van Wert County 4-H Youth Development/Master Gardener Volunteer Program Coordinator. Following her presentation on “Planting for Year-Round Color,” a basket of garden themed items will be sent home with a lucky winner.

This event is free and open to the public, rain or shine with the featured program inside the Simon Kenton School with seating. Registration is not necessary to attend. Master Gardener Volunteers will be stationed throughout the Friendship Gardens starting at 6:30 pm to answer your gardening questions. All who have an interest in gardening will not want to miss this event. Parking is at the garden off West Kohler Street or in front of Simon Kenton School. For further information contact the OSU Extension office at 419-674-2297.

Beef Quality Assurance Certification Training

Hardin County – Join Hardin County OSU Extension for a Beef Quality Assurance certification training scheduled for Tuesday, May 31 from 7:00-8:30 pm at the Extension office located at 1021 W Lima Street in Kenton. Beef Quality Assurance training is for beef cattle producers, needing to recertify or certify to sell cattle at auctions and other markets. Many of the major beef processors, auctions, and other markets began requiring producers to have a BQA certificate at the beginning of 2019. Beef Quality Assurance certification is for a period of three years and was previously held in Kenton in December 2018 and February 2021. Several local producers need to recertify in addition to any cattle producers who need to gain BQA certification for the first time.

Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) does more than just help beef producers capture more value from their market cattle. BQA also reflects a positive public image and instills consumer confidence in the beef industry. When producers implement the best management practices of a BQA program, they assure their market steers, heifers, cows, and bulls are the best they can be. Today, the stakes are even higher because of increased public attention on animal welfare. BQA is valuable to all beef and dairy producers because it demonstrates commitment to food safety and quality; safeguards the public image of the beef industry; upholds consumer confidence in valuable beef products; and improves the sale value of marketed beef cattle.

Training enhances herd profitability through better management. Ohio State University Extension, in cooperation with the Ohio Beef Council, the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association, and Ohio’s cattle auction markets, is working to offer Ohio’s cattle producers several opportunities to become Beef Quality Assurance Certified. Certification can also take place online at https://www.bqa.org. Register for this Kenton training at https://go.osu.edu/HardinBQA or call 419-674-2297. Registration is required and space is limited for this local no cost in-person training that is good for both initial BQA certification or recertification.

 

May 27, 2022

Good evening,

If you are fortunate enough to have your corn and soybeans planted, you may be part of the few farmers who are done in the county. However, according to the latest Ohio Crop Weather report, only 52% of the corn is planted and 36% of the soybean fields are planted across Ohio. I was out staging crops today and did notice some corn in the 4 leaf stage, but most soybeans that were up were VE emergence stage or VC cotyledon stage. Some wheat has flowered in earlier planted fields. We are definitely behind compared to last year and also compared to the 5 year average because of the cool spring and rain. As you get fields planted and think about nitrogen application to corn or fungicide applications to soybean or corn, you might consider cooperating with OSU Extension with on-farm research. I have attached an article about this subject so please me know if you are interested in setting up any field trials. Currently, I have black cutworm, true armyworm, and European corn borer traps set around the county that I have been monitoring. So far, weekly catches of adult moths have been low. Soon I will be setting western bean cutworm traps, which is a pest of corn. So let me know if you are interested in having a trap near the edge of one of your corn fields.

Ohio Crop and Weather Report

On-Farm Trials News Release

There is a Beef Quality Assurance certification training set up for Tuesday, May 31 at the Extension office starting at 7:00 pm. Beef Quality Assurance training is for beef cattle producers, needing to recertify or certify to sell cattle at auctions and other markets. Many of the major beef processors, auctions, and other markets began requiring producers to have a BQA certificate at the beginning of 2019. Beef Quality Assurance certification is for a period of three years and was previously held in Kenton in December 2018 and February 2021. Several local producers need to recertify in addition to any cattle producers who need to gain BQA certification for the first time. Certification can also take place online at https://www.bqa.org. Register for this Kenton training at https://go.osu.edu/HardinBQA or call 419-674-2297. Registration is required and space is limited for this local no cost in-person training that is good for both initial BQA certification or recertification. See the attached news release and flyer for more information.

Beef Quality Assurance Training News Release

Hardin BQA Flyer

The online Summer Northwest Ohio Agriculture Newsletter is now available for reading. It includes events including programs, meetings, and field days being held in our part of the state. There are several Hardin County OSU Extension events listed in this digital publication that I have attached to this edition of the Hardin County Agriculture and Natural Resources Update. Make sure you check it out so you can plan to attend our upcoming events being planned. I have also included some timely ag crops articles bellow that you may be interested in reading. Hopefully the fields will become fit again soon so planting can resume. Have a safe Memorial Day weekend.

2022 Summer NW Ohio Newsletter

Mark

 

Lep Monitoring Network Update – True Armyworm vs Fall Armyworm, Trap Count Updates – Amy Raudenbush, Suranga Basnagala , Kyle Akred, Mark Badertscher, Lee Beers, Alan Leininger, Clifton Martin, James Morris, Eric Richer, Beth Scheckelhoff, Cindy Wallace, Curtis Young, Andy Michel, Kelley Tilmon

True Armyworm vs Fall Armyworm— We all remember last year’s outbreak on alfalfa and forage from fall armyworm. Many growers are hearing “armyworm” again, and are worried about infestations in corn, wheat, oats and other small grains this spring. Keep in mind that we have two completely different species of armyworm:  True (or common) armyworm (Mythimna unipuncta) usually occurs in the spring.  Infestations are typically found in wheat or oats, before marching onto corn and turf later in the season. Read more at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-15/lep-monitoring-network-update-%E2%80%93-true-armyworm-vs-fall-armyworm

 

Low Head Scab Risk Across Ohio: A May 23 Update – Pierce Paul

Wheat is, or will soon be, flowering in parts of central and northern Ohio. After a relatively slow start to the season, several days of warm weather caused the crop to advance, reaching anthesis (Feekes 10.5.1) a few days earlier than usual in some locations. Feekes 10.5.1 is the growth stage at which wheat is most susceptible to infection by the fungus that causes head scab and produces vomitoxin. However, according to the FHB risk tool (www.wheatscab.psu.edu), fields across the state are currently at low risk for head scab. Finish reading about head scab risk at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-15/low-head-scab-risk-across-ohio-may-23-update

 

Replanting Decisions in Corn and Soybeans… What to Consider – Osler Ortez, Laura Lindsey, Alexander Lindsey

Early plantings, cold air and soil temperatures, precipitation, wind, and warmer temperatures during or after planting may lead to reduced stands in planted fields due to factors such as imbibitional chilling, frost damage, soil crusting, and standing water. These factors (or combinations of them) can negatively affect seedling vigor, plant growth, crop establishment, and plant stands. Reduced stands may result in lower yields. If reduced stands are a concern, a potential solution is to replant fields. However, before replanting, make sure you read this article at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-14/replanting-decisions-corn-and-soybeans%E2%80%A6-what-consider

 

Soybean Planting Progress and Vegetative Growth – Laura Lindsey

Cool, wet weather in April and early May delayed soybean planting progress; however, with some warmer and drier days, soybean planting was 18% complete by the second week of May. Soybeans that were planted the end of April or first week of May are likely at the VC growth stage or will be at the VC growth stage soon. There are several common misconceptions about soybean plants at the VC to V3 growth stage. Read about these misconceptions versus reality at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-15/soybean-planting-progress-and-vegetative-growth

 

Update of Corn Nitrogen Recommendations from MRTN – Greg LaBarge

This article provides an updated Maximum Return to Nitrogen Rate recommendation table for corn planted after soybean. There are a couple of changes to note with these revised tables. First, due to continued concerns about nitrogen source availability, urea was added to the source list to provide per unit N prices. In addition, a nitrogen rate quick lookup table is updated to reflect new data in the Corn Nitrogen Rate Calculator tool. The database for soybean-corn and corn-corn rotations now includes trials through 2021. Finish reading this article that includes urea pricing information and updated data at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-15/update-corn-nitrogen-recommendations-mrtn

 

Mark A. Badertscher

Agriculture and Natural Resources Educator

OSU Extension Hardin County

1021 W. Lima Street, Suite 103, Kenton, OH 43326

419-767-6037

hardin.osu.edu

 

May 6, 2022

Good afternoon,

The combination of cold weather and frequent rains have kept local farmers from getting a good start on the planting season. According to the latest attached USDA Ohio Crop Weather report, only 3% of the corn and 2% of the soybeans have been planted statewide. I checked a wheat field this past Friday and it was still in Feekes 6 with one joint on the stem, slowed down by the cool weather. It looks like the weather is set to warm up and we should see a dryer period to allow a window to plant corn and soybean fields. I have seen weed growth in fields since neither tillage or spring burn downs have happened in most fields. The unfavorable field conditions have also shortened the window for planting spring forages. I have included an article regarding forage legume stand evaluation for those who are questioning what to do with those fields that are questionable. Some early season manure applications have taken place so I have also included an article about using manure as a nutrient source. A few soybean fields have been planted in the county along with some corn fields. I have included an article titled “Set-Up Soybeans for Success in 2022” taking a look at best management practices.

Ohio Crop and Weather

Forage Stand Evaluation News Release

Early Season Manure Application News Release

Soybean Planting Recommendations News Release

There are a few events coming up locally that you may be interested in attending. OSU Extension is teaming up again with the Hardin Soil and Water Conservation District to offer the Hardin County Pond Clinic on Thursday, May 12. This event will start at 6:30 pm at Neil and Amy Dumbaugh’s pond located at 1547 County Road 50, Ada. It will include a tour of Ada Fish Farms, LLC with a discussion on using Tilapia fish as a way to control weeds. The main speaker will be Steve Fender from Fender’s Fish Farms, author of “Farm Pond Management, The Common Sense Guide” who will also be able to answer pond owner management questions. See the attached article and flyer for more information.

Pond Clinic News Release

Pond Clinic Flyer

The OSU Extension Master Gardener Volunteers are hosting their annual Hardin County MGV Plant Sale on Saturday, May 14. This event will be from 10:00 am – 12:00 pm at the Friendship Gardens of Hardin County located at 960 W Kohler Street. In addition to plants and garden items from the Hardin County MGVs, the Hardin County Men’s Garden Club and Star Farms Native Plants will have plants available for sale. Come and get your garden questions answered and pick-up free seed packets from the Ohio Victory Gardens program that OSU Extension is cooperating with the Ohio Department of Agriculture this year. If you are unable to attend the plant sale, extra seed packets will be made available at the Extension office and selected local libraries after this date. See the attached news releases and flyers for more details about the Hardin County MGV Plant Sale and Ohio Victory Gardens program.

Hardin County Plant Sale News Release

Plant Sale Flyer

Victory Gardens News Release

Ohio Victory Garden Flyer

That’s about all for this edition of the Hardin County Agriculture and Natural Resources Update. I have begun setting up insect traps around the county with three black cutworm traps this past week and today I will add three true armyworm traps as part of this statewide monitoring and research program. Each Friday I check these traps and report the data to entomologists at OSU, which is usually followed up by an article similar to the one below which will provide information and recommendations for management if necessary. Remember to be safe as the weather breaks and field work becomes more active. Tractors and equipment will be working for long hours in the fields and also on the roads. I have provided some ag crops articles below that you may be interested in reading that I believe are relevant and timely for Hardin County.

 

Mark

 

Lep Monitoring Network Update – Amy Raudenbush, Suranga Basnagala , Kyle Akred, Mark Badertscher, Lee Beers, Clifton Martin, James Morris, Eric Richer, Beth Scheckelhoff, Cindy Wallace, Curtis Young, Andy Michel, Kelley Tilmon

Eleven counties in Ohio will be monitoring for various agronomic Lepidopteran (moth/caterpillar) pests during the 2022 field season. These counties include Adams, Brown, Clark, Fulton, Hardin, Madison, Muskingum, Trumbull, Van Wert, Wayne and Wood. This network was established to monitor the current pest populations in various regions of Ohio for black cutworm (BCW), true armyworm (AMW), European corn borer (ECB-IA, ECB-NY), corn earworm (CEW), and fall armyworm (FAW). We will report regular updates on this trapping in CFAES’s C.O.R.N newsletter to track the status of these pests in Ohio. Traps for each pest will be deployed when the pest is most likely to be active throughout the season. Read more about this effort at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-12/lep-monitoring-network-update

 

Imbibitional Chilling – Is it a concern? – Alexander Lindsey, Laura Lindsey, Osler Ortez

Warmer temperatures combined with the excitement (and need) to get crops in the ground triggered planting around the state last week (April 18 to April 24) or even before. With some warm days without much precipitation forecasted this week (April 25 to May 1), planting will continue. However, cold temperatures and precipitation after planting can cause imbibitional chilling, and this is something that we should certainly be aware of (watch for!). Imbibitional chilling may occur in corn and soybean seeds if the soil temperature is below 50°F when the seed imbibes (rapidly takes up water from the soil, usually within 24 hours after planting). Imbibitional chilling can cause reductions in stand and seedling vigor. If seeds were planted into soil with at least 50°F of temperature and adequate moisture (at least 40-50% plant available water) for at least one day, the drop in temperature is not likely to lead to imbibitional chilling issues. Cold injury to seedings during emergence may still be a possibility, but until we know how cold the soil gets its unclear how severe that issue may be (if evident at all). Finish reading this article at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-11/imbibitional-chilling-%E2%80%93-it-concern

 

Springtime is Spray Time — Here are Some Tips for Better Spraying – Erdal Ozkan

Applying pesticides requires a high level of skill and knowledge. Increases in the size and complexity of sprayers over the years require even more attention to efficiency, efficacy, and safety. Although each crop requires a slightly different approach to the application of pesticides, some general principles apply to almost all spraying situations. Here are my top 10 recommendations (not in a particular order) that will make spraying efficient and effective resulting in a higher level of biological efficacy expected from pesticides applied. Continue reading at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-12/springtime-spray-time-here-are-some-tips-better-spraying

 

Making On-Farm Trials Easy – Taylor Dill, Elizabeth Hawkins

Planting season is upon us and is a little behind in comparison to last year. Many producers are planning on evaluating input costs and management practices on their farm this season to improve economic efficiency and stay profitable. However, there are some ways to plan on-farm research to get the most accurate data, and therefore make the best decision for your farm. The first element to establish is what are you trying to find out? Fully understanding the question and goal of the trial is imperative to set up the appropriate treatments. Maybe your question is “What is my most economically effective nitrogen rate?” or “Does this new fungicide increase yield and pay for itself?”. When doing on-farm research, consider assessing practices that are critical to the long-term success of the farm. Read more at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-12/making-farm-trials-easy

 

Alfalfa Weevil: Ready, Set, Scout! – Aaron Wilson, Kelley Tilmon, Mark Sulc, Andy Michel

Finally we’ve accumulated enough heat units that significant parts of Ohio are now or very soon will be in prime time for alfalfa weevil. Peak larval activity and feeding damage occur between 325 and 575 GDD. In short, most locations should begin scouting, especially in fields that were damaged last fall by the fall armyworm, because we don’t want to add more insult to those fields early this season. Alfalfa fields should be scouted weekly for weevils until at least the first harvest. Follow-up scouting may be needed after the first harvest in heavily infested fields. Spot problem fields early by checking alfalfa tips for feeding damage – small holes and a tattered appearance. Fields that have a south facing slope tend to warm up sooner and need to be checked for weevil earlier. Continue reading at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-12/alfalfa-weevil-ready-set-scout

 

Mark A. Badertscher

Agriculture and Natural Resources Educator

OSU Extension Hardin County

1021 W. Lima Street, Suite 103, Kenton, OH 43326

419-767-6037

hardin.osu.edu

April 1, 2022

Hello,

Since the last Hardin County Agriculture and Natural Resources Update, ARC/PLC decisions were due to the Farm Service Agency on March 15 as was explained in the attached news release. Also, the attached article on the Beef Banquet appeared in the local news media. Yesterday, we wrapped up the pesticide and fertilizer recertification with a make-up and specialty class held at the Extension office. Coming up next week are two Soil Health Workshops, both a beginner (April 4) and an advanced (April 6) being held at the Hardin County Extension office from 9:00-4:00 pm. See the attached news release and flyer for more information. If you are interested in participating in either or both of these workshops being held Monday and Wednesday, make sure you call the Extension office.

ARC-PLC News Release

Beef Banquet News Release

Soil Health Workshop News Release

Soil Health Workshop Series Flyer

The Hardin County OSU Extension Master Gardener Volunteers are hosting their Spring Garden Seminar “April Showers Bring Garden Flowers” Thursday, April 7 at Mid-Ohio Energy Cooperative in Kenton from 9:00-4:00 pm. You can read about the program in the attached news release and brochure. The Goat Banquet is scheduled for Saturday, April 9 with doors opening at 5:00 pm at the Kenton Christian Missionary Alliance Church. For more information on this event, you may want to read the attached article and flyer. With the changing weather, producers may be interested in evaluating their wheat stands. So, this week I submitted an article about this topic to local news media and have also included it with this email.

Spring Garden Seminar News Release

Spring Garden Seminar Flyer

Goat Banquet News Release

Goat Banquet Flyer

Wheat Stand Evaluation News Release

The big news that was reported by the Ohio Department of Agriculture this week was the fact that Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) was detected in a backyard poultry flock in Franklin County. This is a very serious issue to the poultry industry so I have attached both a fact sheet on HPAI from the Ohio Department of Agriculture along with a brochure put together by OSU Veterinary Extension on biosecurity and how to protect your poultry from this disease. Please take the time to read this information if you have poultry. Finally, I have included ag crops articles for you to read that I believe are timely and appropriate for Hardin County.

HPAI Fact Sheet

Avian Influenza Brochure

 

Mark

 

Soil Health Workshop Series in Kenton – Mark Badertscher

A series of Soil Health Workshops will be held on April 4th (Beginner) and April 6th (Advanced) at the Hardin County OSU Extension Office in Kenton. Jim Hoorman will be the main presenter. Hoorman has worked for OSU Extension for several years as a county extension educator in Putnam County and USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) in the Soil Health Division for Ohio and Michigan. To read more, click on https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-07/soil-health-workshop-series-kenton

 

Wheat Herbicides, Cressleaf Groundsel, Enlist – Weed Management Odds and Ends – Mark Loux

Based on the current price of wheat, some wheat fields with less than ideal stands are being taken to yield instead of terminated. A uniform wheat stand usually provides most of the weed control that’s needed. Weeds will likely be more evident and in need of control where stands are thin or erratic. We have been told wheat herbicides are scarce, so growers might want to check with suppliers soon. Reminder that any product containing dicamba has to be applied prior to jointing. Read more at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-07/wheat-herbicides-cressleaf-groundsel-enlist-weed-management-odds

 

Time to Assess Forage Legume Stands – Mark Sulc

With the onset of recent warm temperatures, forage stands are beginning to green up. Wet soil conditions and widely fluctuating temperatures have presented tough conditions for forage stands this winter. This is especially true of taprooted legumes like alfalfa and red clover. Many forage stands suffered significant fall armyworm feeding damage late last summer and into the fall, so those stands should be carefully evaluated this spring as they greenup. It is time to start walking forage stands (especially in southern and central Ohio) to assess their condition so decisions and adjustments for the 2022 growing season can be planned if necessary. Continue with article at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-07/time-assess-forage-legume-stands

 

Alternative Spring Burndown/Postemergence Strategies When Herbicides are in Short Supply – Mark Loux

There is a lot of speculation about herbicide shortages for the 2022 growing season, and some products are apparently getting more expensive and/or scarce now. This will affect herbicide buying and weed management decisions for the 2022 season. The two main active ingredients that we’re hearing about right now are glyphosate (Roundup, others) and glufosinate (Liberty, others), for which prices have increased substantially. There will likely be limited supplies of other pesticide active ingredients as well, but in the short term, a shortage of these two active ingredients poses some major challenges for corn and soybean production. The purpose of this article is to discuss ways to minimize the impact of herbicide shortages, primarily glyphosate, on corn and soybean production. As you search for alternatives to these two herbicides and others, the weed control guides and technical guides produced by University Extension and industry are an important tool for planning weed management programs and herbicide purchases. Find more at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-05/alternative-spring-burndownpostemergence-strategies-when

 

Topdressing Wheat with Liquid Swine Manure – Glen Arnold

Wheat fields are firming up across Ohio and topdressing with nitrogen fertilizer will soon start. Given the current fertilizer prices more livestock producers may be considering applying liquid swine manure as a top-dress for wheat. The key to applying the correct amount of manure to fertilize wheat is to know the manure’s nitrogen content. Most manure tests reveal total nitrogen, ammonia nitrogen and organic nitrogen amounts. The ammonia nitrogen portion is readily available for plant growth. The organic nitrogen portion takes considerably longer to mineralize and generally will not be available when wheat uptakes the majority of its nitrogen before mid-June. Finish reading at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-06/topdressing-wheat-liquid-swine-manure

 

Mark A. Badertscher

Agriculture and Natural Resources Educator

OSU Extension Hardin County

1021 W. Lima Street, Suite 103, Kenton, OH 43326

419-767-6037

hardin.osu.edu