May 21, 2018

Good afternoon,

Farmers have been busy planting the past three weeks with a few moderate rains to break things up.  This year planting was delayed by a couple weeks due to cool and wet conditions.  Because of that, the activities such as spraying fields with herbicides, applying fertilizer and tillage activities were not completely done by the usual date of the beginning of May.  Most farmers only began working in the fields by that time this year.  Planting progress for both corn and soybeans jumped ahead of the five-year average following a delayed start to the planting season.  High temperatures with moist soil conditions also helped to promote corn emergence.  Winter wheat has started to head and alfalfa will soon be cut.  For more information about Ohio Crop Weather and planting season progress, see the attached USDA report.  Most of the corn has been planted in Hardin County, however soybeans are still being planted in several area fields.  Because of this activity along with other field activity, keep an eye out for farm machinery on the roads.  I have attached an article written by Ed Lentz, OSU Extension-Hancock County that discusses farm machinery safety on the roads that you may want to read to bring yourself up to date with guidelines for transporting agricultural equipment.

Ohio Crop Weather Report

Farm Machinery Road Safety News Release

If you are a beef cattle producer, you may be interested in checking out the Beef Quality Assurance training flyer for an program being held June 9 in Lexington.  This event will cover proper ear tagging, tattooing and recordkeeping for purebred cattle.  The Southeastern Ohio Hay Day has been planned for June 21 at the Eastern Research Station in Caldwell.  See the attached flyer for registration details about this field day, which will offer demonstrations of hay harvesting equipment, tradeshow exhibits, educational presentations, dinner, and door prizes.  Lady Landowners Leaving a Legacy is an interactive workshop series that provides women landowners with the confidence, skills, and resources necessary to interact with tenants and ensure the integrity of their land is preserved for future generations.  See the attached flyer for more information about this series which begins June 14 in Urbana.  I have also attached a flyer about a Dairy Educational Tour scheduled for June 16 in Mt. Gilead if you are interested in learning more about this industry.

Beef Quality Assurance Flyer

Southeastern Ohio Hay Day Flyer

Lady Landowner Flyer

Educational Dairy Tour Flyer

Upcoming local events include a Master Gardener Volunteers meeting tonight starting at 7:00 pm at Harco Industries.  Dairy Beef Feeder tagging, vaccination, and weigh-in will be held Saturday, May 26 from 8:00-10:30 am at the Hardin County Fairgrounds.  For more specific Information, go to https://hardin.osu.edu/news/dairy-beef-feeder-possession-deadlineregistration-due-extension-office.  If you have Beef Feeders for this year’s Hardin County Fair, you will want to read about the rules at https://hardin.osu.edu/news/beef-feeder-registration.  The rules for Hardin County Fair Rabbits can be found at https://hardin.osu.edu/news/rabbit-registration-due-june-1st.  If you have further questions, call the Extension office and ask for Amanda Raines or Mark Light.  Other than that, you may want to read the agronomy articles that I have posted below as you get ready to mow hay, spray weeds, or sidedress corn.

Mark

 

Warm Weather Continues…High Rainfall Variability – Jim Noel

Above normal temperatures will continue for the rest of May. Unlike temperatures, rainfall will be very inconsistent with a tendency to be wetter than normal. Some areas of Ohio will receive flooding rain while other areas will struggle to receive an inch or perhaps less than a half inch of rain for the rest of the month. Uncertainty is high for where the flooding rains will occur and where the driest areas are. Runoff will also be highly uncertain the rest of May.  If you would like to read more about the weather, go to https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-13/warm-weather-continueshigh-rainfall-variability.

 

Corn, Soybean, and Alfalfa Yield Responses to Micronutrient Fertilization in Ohio – Steve Culman, Anthony Fulford, Laura Lindsey, Douglas Alt

Ohio farmers often wonder if micronutrient fertilization will increase grain yields. A recent study exhaustively compiled the last 40 years of Ohio State University micronutrient fertilizer trials in corn, soybean and alfalfa. A total of 194 trials (randomized and replicated) were found across 17 Ohio counties. In general, micronutrient fertilization rarely resulted in a statistically significant yield response. Manganese (Mn) fertilization or a blend of Mn with other micronutrients increased soybean yield in 9 out of 144 trials. Boron fertilization had no effect on corn grain yield in 8 out of 9 trials and actually decreased yield in one trial. Micronutrients had effect on alfalfa yields in 17 total trials. Go to https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-12/corn-soybean-and-alfalfa-yield-responses-micronutrient to read more about micronutrient fertilization efficacy in Ohio.

 

Be Mindful of Honeybees and Other Pollinators During Planting – Reed Johnson, Kelley Tilmon, Andy Michel

The winter of 2017-2018 is destined to go down in Ohio beekeeping history as one of the worst on record.  In October, the OSU honey bee lab had 50 living colonies, but by the beginning of April, we were down to just 5 survivors. While some of these honey bee colonies died as a result of the exceptionally long, cold winter, more than half of our losses occurred before the first snow fell in November 2017.  In talking with other beekeepers around the state it has become clear that 90% losses were typical for many beekeepers this year.  To finish reading this article, click on https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-12/be-mindful-honeybees-and-other-pollinators-during-planting.

 

2018 Small Grains Field Day – Rory Lewandowski

Plan now to attend the 2018 Small Grains Field Day on June 12.  The event will begin with registration and sign in at 9:30 am at the OARC Schaffter farm located at 3240 Oil City Road, Wooster OH.  The cost is $25 per person when registered by June 4. Beginning June 5, registration will be $35 per person. Lunch is included in the registration fee. Commercial and private pesticide applicator credits as well as Certified Crop Advisor (CCA) credits are available to field day participants. Go tohttps://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-11/2018-small-grains-field-day to find out more about this year’s Small Grains Field Day in Wooster.

 

Chance to view Ohio’s 2018 Conservation Tillage and Technology Conference video sessions – Sarah Noggle

For those of you who did not attend the 2018 Conservation Tillage and Technology Conference in Ada, Ohio in March, or you want to learn from concurrent sessions you missed, here is another chance.  Sixty-six recorded video presentations are available at https://fabe.osu.edu/CTCon/ctc-2018-archive.  Topics from the conference included: regenerative agriculture, climate change, healthy soil, water quality, research reporting of data, cover crops, federal policy, and nutrient management.  Plan now to attend in 2019 on March 5-6.

 

 

 

Mark A. Badertscher

Agriculture and Natural Resources Educator

OSU Extension Hardin County

1021 W. Lima Street, Suite 103, Kenton, OH 43326

419-674-2297 Office

hardin.osu.edu

May 10, 2018

Good evening,

 

Things have been rolling the past two weeks in the fields throughout the county.  Very little corn has emerged although many acres have been planted in the past two weeks. Several farmers are completing corn planting and have switched to soybean. Warmer weather days are accumulating, which will soon be followed by crop emergence around the county.  Corn typically requires 100 to 120 growing degree days (GDDs) to emerge (but emergence requirements can vary from 90 to 150 GDDs).  For more information about growing degree days, see the attached news release about Growing Degree Days.  As of May 6, it was estimated that 23% of the corn was planted and only 8% of the soybeans were planted in Ohio as indicated on the attached USDA Ohio Crop Weather report.  However, favorable weather in Hardin County this week has greatly increased that amount.  I have heard from some area farmers that they are done planting corn or soon will be.  Several have changed over to soybeans, in between the moderate rains we have experienced.  For the time period of April 15-30, Extension rainfall reporters recorded an average of 1.56 inches of rain in Hardin County.  Last year, the average rainfall for the same time period was 3.16 inches.  Rainfall for the April 15-30 time period is 0.61 inches less than the ten year average rainfall during the same dates.  Check out the April 15-30 rainfall summary for more local rainfall information.

Growing Degree Days News Release

Ohio Crop Weather

April 15-30 Summary

This Saturday will be the Hardin County Plant Sale sponsored by the OSU Extension Master Gardener Volunteers.  Head out to the fairgrounds Arts and Crafts building for the 9:00 am start to this annual plant sale to select local plants from local gardeners.  See the attached flyer for more details and be sure to get there early as the sale only lasts until 11:00 am as most plants are gone in the first hour.  The Master Gardeners have also planned Summer Friendship Garden programs each month this summer.  The first demonstration program is Saturday, May 19 at 9:00 am and will focus on planting different types of vegetable gardens.  I have attached a news release that will provide you with additional information if you are interested.  Do you raise fruit?  If so, you might be interested in taking a look at the May 2018 Ohio Fruit News that I have included with this newsletter.

 Plant Sale Flyer

Summer Friendship Garden Programs News Release

May 2018 Ohio Fruit News

Upcoming local events include a Men’s Garden Club meeting at the Extension office on Monday, May 14 starting at 6:30 pm.  There is also a Soil and Water Conservation District meeting at the SWCD office on Thursday, May 17 starting at 7:30 am.  Other than that, hopefully by the end of next week most of the crops should be in the ground if the weather continues to cooperate.  Until then, I have attached some ag crops articles for you to read.

 

Mark

 

 

 

Adjusting Corn Management Practices for a Late Start – Steve Culman, Peter Thomison

As prospects for a timely start to spring planting diminish, growers need to reassess their planting strategies and consider adjustments. Since delayed planting reduces the yield potential of corn, the foremost attention should be given to management practices that will expedite crop establishment. The following are some suggestions and guidelines to consider in dealing with a late planting season. Although the penalty for late planting is important, care should be taken to avoid tillage and planting operations when soil is wet. Yield reductions resulting from “mudding the seed in” are usually much greater than those resulting from a slight planting delay. Yields may be reduced somewhat this year due to delayed planting, but effects of soil compaction can reduce yield for several years to come. Keep in mind that we typically do not see significant yield reductions due to late planting until mid-May or even later in some years. To finish reading this article, go to https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-10/adjusting-corn-management-practices-late-start.

 

 

 

Adjusting no-till burndown programs for a prolonged wet spring – Mark Loux

This is a revision of an article we seem to publish in C.O.R.N. about every three years, when wet weather prevents early planting and in some cases also prevents early burndown applications.  Not a lot of either has occurred yet, although it’s starting to dry out and warm up.  The good news is that cool weather has slowed weed growth, but even so, the weeds obviously continue to get bigger under wet conditions, and what is a relatively tame burndown situation in early to mid-April can become pretty hairy by early to mid-May.  One issue with later burndowns certainly is that there can be a need for a more aggressive herbicide mix, but also a need to plant as soon as possible, and these can be conflicting goals.  For example, unless dicamba is an option, we would say keep 2,4-D ester in the mix if at all possible, but this means waiting 7 days to plant.  Go to https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-11/adjusting-no-till-burndown-programs-prolonged-wet-spring to read more.

 

 

 

Soybean Planting Date, Seeding Rate, and Row Width – Laura Lindsey

Before heading out to the field this spring, download a free pdf of the recently revised Ohio Agronomy Guide available here: https://stepupsoy.osu.edu/soybean-production/ohio-agronomy-guide-15th-edition Also, check out other information related to soybean management at http://stepupsoy.osu.edu. Planting date. Planting date strongly influences soybean yield. In 2013 and 2014, we conducted a planting date trial at the Western Agricultural Research Station near South Charleston, Ohio.  In both years, soybean yield decreased by 0.6 bu/ac per day when planting after mid-May. The greatest benefit of planting May 1 to mid-May is canopy closure which increases light interception, improves weed control by shading out weeds, and helps retain soil moisture. Click on https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-11/soybean-planting-date-seeding-rate-and-row-width to read more about soybean planting recommendations.

 

 

 

Using the Slake Test to Determine Soil Crusting – Alan Sundermeier

An easy to use test can be done to predict potential soil crusting on farm fields.  All you need is some chicken wire, water, a glass jar, and a dry clump of soil.  When you immerse the clump of soil in the jar of water, the longer it holds together, the better the soil structure to resist crusting. The slake test compares two chunks of topsoil in water to see how well and how long they will hold together. Poor structure soil that easily falls apart will form small soil aggregates, which collect at the soil surface and will dry into a hard crust.  Crusted soil will make it difficult for seed emergence and will limit future rainfall infiltration and cause runoff and erosion.  Go to https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-10/using-slake-test-determine-soil-crusting to find out more about conducting the Slake Test.

 

 

 

Inversion and Drift Mitigation Webinars available – Cindy Folck, Amanda Bennett

The recorded webinars from the Inversion and Drift Mitigation Workshop held in April are available online at https://ipm.osu.edu/information/specialty-crops. The recordings include: Understanding Inversions and Weather Conditions by Aaron Wilson, Weather Specialist & Atmospheric Scientist, OSU Extension, Byrd Polar & Climate Research Center; and Using Tools in the Ohio Sensitive Crop Registry by FieldWatch by Jared Shaffer, Plant Health Inspector, Ohio Department of Agriculture. This project was funded by: The Ohio IPM Program and USDA-NIFA Project 20177000627174.

 

 

The Ohio State University

Mark A. Badertscher

Agriculture and Natural Resources Educator

OSU Extension Hardin County

1021 W. Lima Street, Suite 103, Kenton, OH 43326

419-674-2297 Office

hardin.osu.edu

 

cid:image002.png@01D39518.9F4C7C60

 

 

May 3, 2018

Good evening,

Mother Nature decided to give our local farmers a chance to get some fieldwork done with the warmer temperatures and drier conditions.  This has enabled a good start on fertilizer, manure, and herbicide burndown applications.  Tillage is going on in several fields around the county and some planting of corn has begun.  Rainfall reports are coming in for the second half of April to begin our annual township rainfall reporting, but let’s hope it doesn’t start out like last year.  In case you are interested, I attached the Hardin County Rainfall Report for 2017.  It has township rainfall amounts for each month of the growing season as well as the ten year average for each month.  Last year we ended up with 28.25 inches of rain compared with our ten year average of 23.35 inches as reported by our township rainfall reporters for the period of April 15-October 15.  If you are interested in the Ohio Crop Weather Report, I have attached it as well.  It shows only 1% of the Ohio corn and soybeans planted as of this past week with only 2.6 days of suitable weather for field work.  If you want to know how Ohio crop prices fared, March corn, at $3.79 per bushel, increased $0.15 from February and increased $0.10 from last year; March soybeans, at $10.10 per bushel, increased $0.28 from last month and increased $0.18 from last year; March wheat, at $4.90 per bushel, increased $0.44 from February and increased $0.68 from last year; March milk, at $15.80 per cwt., increased $0.10 from last month, but decreased $2.70 from last year according to the attached USDA report released April 30.

Rainfall Report 2017

Ohio Crop Weather

Ohio Crop Prices

If you were one of the people who attended fertilizer recertification this past March in Hardin County, you might remember taking a fertilizer survey.  Several applicators are taking a look at their fertilizer use, and in some cases making changes based on what OSU Extension has been teaching the past three years.  There is still much work to do in order that the nutrients we apply stay in the field and not end up in our waterways.  One thing that I have been doing related to this issue is on-farm nutrient management research in the county.  If you look at the Ohio No-Till News that is attached, you will see that Hardin County OSU Extension has been awarded a Conservation Tillage Conference mini-grant to continue this research into 2018 with a nitrogen timing trial.  This past year we did a nitrogen rate trial with the 2017 mini-grant, and in 2016 we did a nutrient placement trial with a mini-grant from the CTC.  Thanks to the cooperating farmers who helped make this happen.  Currently, research reports are going through a peer review process before being released to the public.  I have also attached a copy of the Master Gardener Volunteers Plant Sale news release and flyer for this annual event that is coming up May 12 at the fairgrounds, along with this season’s schedule for the Scioto Valley Produce Auction in Mt. Victory.

Hardin Fertilizer Survey

Ohio No-Till News

Plant Sale News Release

Plant Sale Flyer

Scioto Valley Produce Auction Schedule

Other local upcoming events include a Fairboard meeting tonight (5/2) starting at 7:00 pm in the fair office.  Feel free to join us Friday morning (5/4) for Ag Council breakfast starting at 7:00 am at Henry’s Restaurant.  In addition to our monthly roundtable discussion, I will have information to share about soil temperatures and growing degree days for corn.  Hardin County Farm Bureau will be having a Legislative Dinner with an Energy Policy question and answer session with Ohio Farm Bureau Energy Specialist Dale Arnold about wind, solar, and pipeline energy policy on May 9.  Call the Hardin County Farm Bureau office at 419-447-3091 if you are interested in attending this program which includes dinner.  It starts at 6:00 pm at the Plaza Inn Restaurant.  I have included some agronomy articles below if you are interested in reading them.

Mark

Wheat Growth Stages and Associated Management- Feekes 6.0 through 9.0 – Laura Lindsey, Pierce Paul, Ed Lentz

With below average temperatures and snow, wheat growth and development is slower this year compared to the previous two years. Last year, wheat in Pickaway County reached Feekes 6.0 growth stage the last week of March. Remember, exact growth stages cannot be determined by just looking at the height of the crop or based on calendar dates. Correct growth identification and knowledge of factors that affect grain yield can enhance management decisions, avoiding damage to the crop and unwarranted or ineffective applications.  Go to https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-08/wheat-growth-stages-and-associated-management-feekes-60-through to finish reading this article.

 

Spring Warm-Up: How does 2018 Soil Temperature Compare? – Aaron Wilson, Elizabeth Hawkins

The calendar says it’s time for spring field activity in Ohio and farmers are eager to prep fields and plant this year’s crops. However, average temperatures across Ohio have remained cooler than usual with the previous 30-day period (March 16 – April 15, 2018) running 2 to 6 degrees Fahrenheit below normal (based on 1981-2010). Combined with precipitation up to twice the normal amount in some areas, the weather is certainly not cooperating with ideas of an early jump on planting.  Read more about this spring’s soil temperatures at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-09/spring-warm-how-does-2018-soil-temperature-compare.

 

Seed is Precious – Anne Dorrance

We are off to a rough start again, as we saw the pictures on Facebook of replanting.  So I thought I should chime in here about how precious this seed is and what a seed treatment can and cannot do.  In this eastern soybean belt – we have a lot of poorly drained soil.  More importantly, we also have a lot of inoculum and a great diversity of watermolds, Pythium and Phytophthora, that can infect both corn and soybeans.  When soils are saturated – like today and tomorrow, these watermolds will form swimming spores that are attracted to the young seeds and seedlings.  Based on the past 10 years of research we only see a benefit of the seed treatments when there is soil saturation, typically 2” of rain within 2 weeks of planting.  Sometimes it only takes an inch of rain if the soils are “just fit” and it rains again immediately after planting.  Go tohttps://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-09/seed-precious to finish reading about seed and seed treatments.

 

When to begin Alfalfa Weevil Scouting – Andy Michel, Kelley Tilmon

The larvae of alfalfa weevil can cause considerable damage, especially when alfalfa is just starting its growth in the spring. When temperatures are greater than 48 degrees F, the adults become active and start to lay eggs. After hatch, the plump and green larvae (which resemble little worms) feed, with 3rd instar (mid-aged) larvae being the hungriest. The heaviest feeding can occur between 325 and 500 heat units. As of the time of writing this article, the heat units (base 48 degrees F) for the Western Ag Research Station in South Charleston are 98, and for the South Station in Piketon is 175. Scouting for larvae should begin at around 250 heat units.

 

OARDC Branch Station Two Inch Soil Temperatures – Greg LaBarge

The Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC) Agricultural Research Stations located throughout the state have 2 and 4 inch bare surface soil temperatures monitored on an hourly basis. The chart provided here summarizes the average daily two inch bare soil temperature from several stations. More complete weather records for the just passed day as well as long term historical observations can be found at http://www.oardc.ohio-state.edu/weather1/ . Observations include temperature, precipitation, different measures of degree day accumulation and other useful weather measures.

 

 

 

 

Mark A. Badertscher

Agriculture and Natural Resources Educator

OSU Extension Hardin County

1021 W. Lima Street, Suite 103, Kenton, OH 43326

419-674-2297 Office

hardin.osu.edu

 

April 19, 2018

Hello,

Inclement weather continues to keep planting season from getting off to a good start.  Most of the wheat fields in the county have been top-dressed after green-up and if not yet done, will need to get done before jointing.  Research has shown that yields will be reduced if nitrogen application is delayed after initial jointing.  Also, jointed plants are prone to damage from application equipment, which may also reduce yields.  See the attached article written by Hancock County OSU Extension Educator Ed Lentz about wheat nitrogen.  I have also attached a trifold brochure about the new Ohio Sensitive Crop Registry system called Fieldwatch.  As a pesticide applicator, you can create an account for free and monitor where sensitive crops such as fruits and vegetables are planted as well as where bees are located if they have been entered into the system.  There is no charge to use this Fieldwatch system that Ohio and several other states are now using.

There is a new invasive insect that poses a threat to Ohio.  Although it has not yet been found in Ohio, the Spotted Lanternfly has the potential to feed on about 70 different trees and cause damage.  See the attached article written by Hardin County OSU Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Barb Snyder.  I have also included photos of both the immature nymph and adult for you to be able to identify this new pest.  If you suspect that you have found the spotted lanternfly in Ohio, please contact the Ohio Department of Agriculture at (614) 728-6270.  As local farmers get ready to plant this year’s corn and soybeans, crop yields from the 2017 growing season have been released from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Agricultural Statistics Service.  Although these crop production numbers are based on estimates, they are used for crop insurance and government reporting purposes. Read the attached news article to find out how Hardin County compares with area counties with this past year’s corn, soybean, and wheat crops.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today (4/19) was the rescheduled day for pick-up of trees ordered from the Soil and Water Conservation District after the monthly SWCD meeting at the SWCD office.  Monday (4/23) there is a Master Gardener Volunteers meeting starting at 7:00 pm at Harco Industries.  Wednesday (4/25) is the first session of the Ohio Beef School, starting at 7:00 pm at the Extension office.  The second session will be the following Monday (4/30), also starting at 7:00 pm at the Extension office.  For topics of these presentations and registration information, see the attached flyer.  As usual, see the agronomy articles below for timely information about ag crops.

Mark

Reduced Cost Manure Samples and Soil Samples Available to Pork Producers – Glen Arnold

The Ohio Pork Council, Brookside Labs, Menke Consulting Inc., and OSU Extension  are teaming up to encourage pork producers to learn more about livestock manure and soil sampling by offering discounts on manure sample analysis and soil sample analysis through the end of 2018. Soil sample bags and manure containers have been mailed to approximately 18 county Extension offices in central and western Ohio. Sample containers are also available by stopping in at Brookside Labs.  To find out how to take advantage of this opportunity, go to https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-07/reduced-cost-manure-samples-and-soil-samples-available-pork.

“What’s your number?” The SCN Coalition is launched – Anne Dorrance, Terry Niblack

Over the course of the next year, you will hear much about the pest, soybean cyst nematode.  No stranger to Ohio, since the 1980’s, farmers in Ohio have been monitoring this pest.  The first surveys, early 1990’s, SCN occurred sporadically in the state but some populations were very high.  In a survey of fields in southern Ohio, high populations of SCN were found in fields where yields were consistently low.  One of the more recent check-off funded projects, identified that more fields than 20 years ago has SCN.  Read more at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-07/“what’s-your-number”-scn-coalition-launched

Pattern Favors Only Slow Improvement – Challenging Weather to linger throughout April! – Jim Noel

The expected cold and wet weather pattern for spring that has been forecast since December continues. There will be some relief this week after a cold start to the week with temperatures 10 degrees below normal we will switch and see temperatures by the end of the week a good 10+ degrees above normal but when average out through Sunday April 15, we will return to about average temperatures for the week. Drying is expected as well through Friday with only minor precipitation events but another rain event is expected this weekend. There is a lot of uncertainty on amounts and placement so confidence is low but there is potential for some heavy rain in parts of Ohio. Go to https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-08/pattern-favors-only-slow-improvement-challenging-weather-linger to finish reading about the weather.

Avoiding Compaction – Alan Sundermeier

Heavy farm machinery compacts the soil, both on tilled ground and no-tilled ground. Compaction induced by agricultural machinery often affects soil properties and crop production. Axle load is the first factor that has to be considered in soil compaction, according to Randall Reeder, Ohio State University Emeriti and Dr. Sjoerd Duiker, Penn State Soil Specialist. Axle load is the total load supported by one axle, usually expressed in tons or pounds. Farm equipment with high axle loads on wet soil will cause compaction in the topsoil and subsoil, whereas low axle loads will cause compaction in the topsoil and the upper part of the subsoil only.  Deep subsoil compaction can only partially be alleviated with subsoilers, and at considerable cost.  Click on https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-08/avoiding-compaction to learn more about soil compaction.

OARDC Brach Station Two Inch Soil Temperatures – Greg LaBarge

During our recent survey of CORN Newsletter users, one item suggested for addition was a chart of soil temperatures in the spring. The Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC) Agricultural Research Station located throughout the state have 2 and 4 inch bare surface soil temperatures monitored on an hourly basis. The chart provided here summarizes the average daily two inch bare soil temperature from several stations. More complete weather records for the just passed day as well as long term historical observations can be found at http://www.oardc.ohio-state.edu/weather1/ . Observations include temperature, precipitation, different measures of degree day accumulation and other useful weather measures.

 

 

 

Mark A. Badertscher

Agriculture and Natural Resources Educator

OSU Extension Hardin County

1021 W. Lima Street, Suite 103, Kenton, OH 43326

419-674-2297 Office

hardin.osu.edu

April 5, 2018

Hello,

Nearly a month has passed since the Conservation Tillage Conference was held in Ada.  The two day conference attracted 875 people, including speakers, moderators and exhibitors.  If you didn’t get a chance to hear a speaker that you were interested in or if you didn’t attend this year but are thinking about going next year, almost all of the speaker presentations are now online for viewing,  See the attached mid-April Ohio No-Till News for more information or go to ctc.osu.edu to view videos from the 70+ speakers who presented at this year’s conference.  The first ever annual Hardin County Goat Banquet will be held on Saturday, April 7 at the Family Center of the Christian Missionary Alliance Church located at 15436 State Route 309 in Kenton. Registration and seating will open at 5:00 pm. Supper and the speaker will begin at 5:30. There is no cost, as each family is asked to bring a side dish and/or dessert. The main dishes, drinks, and table service will be provided. There is no need to pre-register.  See the attached news release and flyer for more information about this year’s goat banquet.

A Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs) class has been planned in Hardin County. GAPs classes are training sessions for fruit and vegetable producers taught by personnel from Ohio State University’s Fruit and Vegetable Safety Program. The April 11th program will be from 12:30 – 3:30 pm at the Scioto Valley Produce Auction, 18715 County Road 200, Mt. Victory. The GAPs class is open to all fruit and vegetable producers and will be presented without technology.  If you are interested in attending this program, see the attached article and flyer for registration details.  The OSU Extension Beef Team has announced the details for the 2018 Ohio Beef Cattle School. The Hardin County Extension office will serve as a host site for this spring’s video series. The 2018 Ohio Beef School will begin on April 25 and will conclude on April 30. The theme of this year’s beef school will focus on ‘Gaining Greater Market Access for Ohio Feeder Calves.’  Following the beef cattle school, Beef Quality Assurance training will be offered at a later date. Sessions will be hosted at the Hardin County OSU Extension office, 1021 W. Lima Street, Kenton so check out the news release and flyer for more information about this year’s speakers.

The Ohio Pork Council is partnering with Brookside Laboratories to offer discounted manure ($20) and soil samples ($3) for swine producers in an effort to promote best management practices and water quality.  In order to qualify for the discounted rate, swine producers must take a short survey and then pick-up the sample bottles or bags at the Extension office.  You will need a special code to get the discounted rate, so see the attached news release to take advantage of this special opportunity and get your swine manure and soil sampled to improve nutrient management on your farm.  There is a special Inversion & Drift Mitigation Workshop being held on April 10 from 10:00-noon.  How to recognize an inversion and other weather conditions that affect applications, as well as New tools are available in the sensitive crop registry to meet label requirements, plan herbicide applications, and integrate with spray application equipment will be topics of this program that can be attended either in person in Columbus or online.  See the attached flyer for information about how you can participate or give me a call at 419-674-2297 if you would like to view it at the Extension office.  Finally, the Ohio Sensitive Crop Registry is changing to include two components: DriftWatch, and BeeCheck.  See the attached flyer to find out more.

As always, be sure to check out the agronomy articles below for timely information from the C.O.R.N. Newsletter.  Upcoming local events this week include Ag Council tomorrow morning (4/6) starting at 7:00 am at Henry’s Restaurant.  Join us for a discussion on Ag Policy with Farm Bureau covering the cost of breakfast.  Men’s Garden Club will meet at the home of Bob Terry near Kenton Monday (4/9) starting at 6:30 pm.  The Soil and Water Conservation District fish sale order pick-up is Tuesday (4/10) starting at 2:30 pm at the SWCD office.  The Sheep Improvement Association will meet on Tuesday (4/10) starting at 7:30 pm at the Extension office.  The Soil and Water Conservation tree sale order pick-up is Thursday (4/12) at the SWCD office.

Mark

Big Claims, Big Questions, Big Potential in Small Packages: Learn More About Microbe-containing Crop Biostimulants – Matt Kleinhenz

A large and increasing number of agronomic, forage, and specialty (horticultural) crop producers use or are interested in microbe-containing crop biostimulants advertised to enhance crop growth, perhaps especially under sub-optimal conditions. These inoculants are applied as a seed treatment, soil amendment (e.g., during transplanting and irrigation), or, less often, foliar spray. Inoculating crops with potentially beneficial microbes is a very long-standing practice but much has changed in recent years. The spike in the number and diversity of microbe-containing products, number of acres to which they are applied, and range of cropping systems and settings within those acres are just three noticeable changes. Unfortunately, those changes have not been matched by the availability of resources providing reliable guidance on getting the most from these products.  To read more, go to https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-06/big-claims-big-questions-big-potential-small-packages-learn-more.

New Ohio Recommended Corn Nitrogen Fertilizer Rates Now Available – Steve Culman, Anthony Fulford, Peter Thomison, Rich Minyo, Eric Richer, Harold Watters, Greg LaBarge, Joe Nester, Karen Chapman

Ohio State University corn nitrogen rate recommendations follow a unified framework used throughout the Corn Belt. Together with six other states (Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Wisconsin), the Ohio recommended nitrogen rates are not based on yield goals, but on economic returns. Corn yield responses along with corn and nitrogen prices are used to calculate the point at which the last unit of added nitrogen returns a yield increase large enough to pay for the added nitrogen cost. This approach, called the maximum return to nitrogen (MRTN), is favored because of the economic volatility in both corn grain and nitrogen fertilizer prices. The past 10 years provides ample evidence of these fluctuations.  Go tohttps://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-07/new-ohio-recommended-corn-nitrogen-fertilizer-rates-now-available to read more about the MRTN method of calculating corn nitrogen rates.

Pay Attention to Nozzle Selection to Meet Label Requirements for the New 2,4-D and Dicamba Products – Erdal Ozkan

Generally, this is the time of the year you complete shopping for nozzles because the spraying season is just around the corner. This task must be on top of your to do list if you are one of those who will be applying the new 2,4-D or Dicamba products for crops that are resistant to these products. If you plan to use Dicamba products for weed control, you better check the labels because you now have to use one of the nozzles they recommend on their labels, and operate those nozzle within a recommended range of pressures.  Go to https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-07/pay-attention-nozzle-selection-meet-label-requirements-new-24-d to finish reading this article.

Spring Management of Ohio Winter Malting Barley – Laura Lindsey

Management of Ohio Winter Malting Barley (including spring management) is now available online at: https://stepupsoy.osu.edu/winter-malting-barley Keep in mind, this is a working document that will be updated as we learn more about winter malting barley management. Ohio farmers need to carefully consider growing winter malting barley as it may not be suitable for all operations. Malt quality barley must meet several criteria to avoid being rejected by the malt facility- this risk may be too high for certain farmers since today there are no markets in Ohio for barley that does not meet the requirements for malt. Malting barley is not sold through traditional grain elevators like corn, soybean, and wheat, so contracts or agreements should be in place before planting. Special considerations for post-harvest handling include drying capability, grain cleaning, and delivering in totes (versus hopper trucks). Each farmer must understand the unique challenges of growing malt quality barley before contracting and purchasing seed.
Inversion and Drift Mitigation Workshop to be held April 10 – Cindy Folck

Do you know the weather conditions that contribute to inversions? A workshop on April 10 will focus on tools to help farmers recognize inversions and other weather conditions that affect drift. Aaron Wilson, weather specialist and atmospheric scientist, will discuss weather trends and how to recognize inversions. Additionally, workshop attendees will learn about the new tools available through the Ohio Sensitive Crop Registry by Field Watch to increase communication between field crop and specialty crop growers. The workshop will be April 10, from 10 a.m. to noon. Farmers can attend the workshop in person for no charge at the Ohio 4-H Center on the Ohio State University Columbus campus. Farmers can also attend virtually for no cost. Links for registration for in-person or virtual attendance are available at http://go.osu.edu/IPM. Pesticide applicator recertification credit will only be available at the in-person workshop at the Ohio 4-H Center in Columbus. For more information, contact Cindy Folck at folck.2@osu.edu or 614-247-7898. The workshop is supported by the Ohio IPM Program and USDA NIFA 20177000627174.

 

 

 

Mark A. Badertscher

Agriculture and Natural Resources Educator

OSU Extension Hardin County

1021 W. Lima Street, Suite 103, Kenton, OH 43326

419-674-2297 Office

hardin.osu.edu

March 23, 2018

Good evening,

Spring is here even though the weather might not agree with the date.  Each spring the Dairy Service Unit holds their semi-annual cheese sale.  The spring sale has a variety of cheeses to choose from including Colby, Muenster, Smoked Cheddar, Mozzarella, Marble, American Processed, Farmers Cheese, Cheddar, Big Eye Swiss, Baby Swiss, Lacey Swiss (low cholesterol, low fat), Hot Pepper, and also Trail Bologna.  Order forms can be obtained at the Extension Office, 1021 W. Lima Street, Suite 103 in Kenton or online at hardin.osu.edu.  The deadline for ordering cheese is April 4, with pick-up dates April 13 from 12:00 pm to 7:00 pm or April 14 from 9:00 am until 12:00 pm at Dan and Molly Wagner’s dairy farm.  Funds from the semi-annual cheese sale are used to support dairy youth activities such as scholarships, royalty, awards, and other activities planned by the Dairy Service Unit.  For a complete list of items and prices, see the attached news release and order form.

Do you raise livestock and are looking for a way to dispose of dead animals?  One legal method in Ohio is Livestock Mortality Composting, but it requires certification.  In order to get certified, you must attend either a workshop put on by OSU Extension or do an online training.  Hardin County Extension will be hosting a Livestock Mortality Composting workshop on Wednesday, March 28 from 1:00-4:00 pm at the Extension office.  Pre-registration is required as mentioned in last week’s newsletter, so go to https://hardin.osu.edu/news/livestock-mortality-composting-workshop to register online or call the office by Tuesday at 419-674-2297 to register.  There is a $10 registration fee to cover manuals and refreshments, so please let us know if you are planning to attend.  I have attached the flyer to this email as well if you need further information.

Although we had our Hardin County Pesticide and Fertilizer Recertification program on March 13 at the Plaza Inn, there may still be applicators out there that missed the training or have specialty categories on their license.  If you are one of these people, we will be having a Make-up/Specialty Pesticide and Fertilizer Recertification training at the Hardin County Extension office on Friday, March 30.  We will be starting at 9:00 am with fertilizer, and then carry on with pesticides at 10:00 am.  Go to http://www.cvent.com/events/march-30-2018-hardin-county-specialty-make-up-pat-fact-recertification/event-summary-98e45558a1b945f0a824d9d80d1c3b79.aspx if you plan to attend, or call our office to let us know which categories you still need certification training by Thursday if you haven’t already pre-registered.  As there was an increase in the number of pesticide complaints in 2017, the Ohio Department of Agriculture has outlined the process with a handout.  I have attached the Pesticide Complaint Handout to this email so you are aware of the process in case you are ever on either end of a pesticide complaint.

I have included flyers for upcoming programs in the area and around the state that you may be interested that include Weed Identification and Management in the Home Garden and Landscape on April 26 in Wapakoneta; East Ohio Women in Agriculture Conference on April 6 in Massillon; and also the 2018 Northeast Ohio Small Farm Conference and Trade Show on April 7 also in Massillon.  Yes, I know Hardin County is not in eastern Ohio, but there are not equivalent conferences being held in western Ohio this year as of this point in time.  Make sure you call the phone numbers on the flyers if you are interested in attending either of these two events.  Finally, when campers, counselors, instructors and camp directors make their way to Ohio FFA Camp Muskingum the second week of June this year, their beloved Ohio Forestry & Wildlife Conservation Camp will have a new name and corresponding brand that pays homage to its inception in 1950, and its growth and success since then.  Read more about ‘Camp Canopy’ in the attached news release if you have a high schooler who may be interested in attending this summer.  Other local events happening this week include the Beef Banquet Saturday (3/24) starting at 6:00 pm in the Community Building at the fairgrounds, Master Gardener Volunteers meeting, Monday (3/26) starting at 7:00 pm at Harco Industries, and Farm Succession – Part 2 dinner and program sponsored by Ag Credit, Tuesday (3/27) starting at 6:00 pm at the Masters Building on the Wyandot County Fairgrounds in Upper Sandusky,   As usual, see below for agronomy articles.

Mark

Deciphering preplant dicamba labels and tank mixtures – Mark Loux

Dicamba can have a good fit in spring preplant burndown programs, especially for control of overwintered marestail in fields not treated the previous fall. We typically recommend a preplant burndown that includes at least two herbicides with substantial activity on marestail in this situation, such as Sharpen + 2,4-D or Gramoxone + 2,4-D + metribuzin. Dicamba is the most effective burndown herbicide on glyphosate-resistant marestail in the spring though, and in our research has usually killed or at least stopped emerged marestail in their tracks without help from other herbicides. To read more about using dicamba preplant, go tohttps://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-5/deciphering-preplant-dicamba-labels-and-tank-mixtures.

Winter Wheat Stand Evaluation – Laura Lindsey, Ed Lentz

Feekes 5 growth stage (leaf sheaths strongly erect) is a good time to evaluate winter wheat stand. Over the past two years, with funding from the Ohio Small Grains Marketing Program, we evaluated the relationship between wheat stems (main stem + tillers) and yield. Keep in mind that In our research, we counted the number of wheat stems which included both the main stem (main plant) and tillers. Make sure to count the number of stems in several areas of the field. In our research, stem counts at Feekes 5 growth stage predicted wheat yield better than stem counts at Feekes 6 growth stage (first node visible).  Go to https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-06/winter-wheat-stand-evaluation to learn more about evaluating winter wheat stands.

Proven Production Practices for Increasing Corn Yields and Profits – Peter Thomison, Steve Culman

In the quest for high corn yields, considerable attention has been given to increasing various inputs, including seeding rates and fertilizers, narrowing row spacing, and making preventative applications of foliar fungicides, growth regulators and biological stimulants. However, the significant drop in crop net returns that’s occurred in recent years warrants developing strategies to lower input costs. An input that might have paid for itself with $5.50/bu corn may not at $3.75/bu corn. A practical and economic approach to achieving high yields is to follow proven cultural practices that enhance corn performance.  To read more practices to increase corn yields and profits, click on https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-06/proven-production-practices-increasing-corn-yields-and-profits.

Spring Seeding of Forages – Mark Sulc

Late this month (depending on the weather) and on into April provides one of the two preferred times to seed perennial cool-season forages. The other preferred timing for cool-season grasses and legumes is in late summer, primarily the month of August here in Ohio. The relative success of spring vs. summer seeding of forages is greatly affected by the prevailing weather conditions, and so growers have success and failures with each option. Probably the two primary difficulties with spring plantings are finding a good window of opportunity when soils are dry enough before it gets too late, and managing weed infestations that are usually more difficult with spring plantings.  To finish reading about spring seeding of forages, go to https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-06/spring-seeding-forages.

Nitrogen Rate Recommendations for Wheat – 2018 – Ed Lentz, Laura Lindsey, Steve Culman

Wheat has already reached green-up across the state so spring N may be applied anytime fields are fit. Keep in mind that research has shown no yield reduction for N applications before Feekes GS 7 (two visible nodes). However, wheat is growing slow because of the cool temperatures. Nitrogen applied early has the potential to be lost since wheat will use little N until after jointing. Urea-ammonium nitrate (UAN) or 28% has the greatest potential for loss and ammonium sulfate the least. Urea will have little potential for loss as long as it does not volatize. No stabilizer will protect the nitrate component of UAN, which is roughly 25% of the total N in UAN at application time. Go to https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-06/nitrogen-rate-recommendations-wheat-2018 to finish reading this article.

 

 

 

Mark A. Badertscher

Agriculture and Natural Resources Educator

OSU Extension Hardin County

1021 W. Lima Street, Suite 103, Kenton, OH 43326

419-674-2297 Office

hardin.osu.edu

March 16, 2018

Hello,

This past week we recertified 57 pesticide and 79 fertilizer applicators in Hardin County.  If you were not there, I have attached a couple of important handouts that I thought you should have.  One is on the Dicamba Label Modificaitons for 2018 for use of the Engenia, Xtendimax, and FeXapan products.  Another handout is regarding the changes coming for the Ohio Sensitive Crop Registry (OSCR) that will be happening soon to help protect sensitive crops and bees in Ohio.  The Hardin County Cattle Producers will hold their annual Beef Banquet on Saturday, March 24 in the Community Building at the fairgrounds, starting at 6:00 pm.  Pre-sale adult tickets are $15 ($20 at the door), youth ages 6-12 are $7.50 ($10 at the door), kids under 6 years old are free, and 2017 Hardin County Junior Fair Beef Barn Exhibitors are free with a reservation given to any Cattle Producers Director.  Tickets can be purchased from the following county Cattle Producers Directors: Marcia Hoovler, Adam Billenstein, Jeff Oestreich, Holli Underwood, Stacia Hall-Boughan, Derek Dunson, Dane Jeffers, Traci Deckling, Deana Gibson, Dick Cronley, and Mark Badertscher.  Reservations can also be made by calling the Extension office at 419-674-2297 ahead of the banquet and pay at the door.  See the attached news release for more information about this banquet.

There will be a follow-up ‘Tools for the Transition’ farm succession workshop being hosted by Ag Credit that will be March 27 in the Masters Building on the Wyandot County Fairgrounds in Upper Sandusky starting at 6:00 pm with a dinner.  See the attached flyer and contact Kenton Ag Credit at 419-675-2303 if you plan to attend but have not yet registered.  Poultry, dairy, swine, beef cattle and other livestock producers wanting to learn economically and environmentally beneficial ways to handle the death of their animals can earn livestock mortality composting certification through a course offered by experts and hosted by OSU Extension and the local Soil and Water Conservation District.  The workshop begins at 1:00 p.m. and will end by 4:00 p.m. March 28 at the Hardin County OSU Extension office, 1021 W Lima Street, Suite 103, in Kenton.  Registration is $10, which includes a workbook and certificate, and can be paid at the door.  Please pre-register by calling Hardin County OSU Extension or going to hardin.osu.edu to register online.  See the attached news release and flyer for more details.

Other area events that you might be interested in attending are a Turkey Hunting Workshop being held on March 21 and a Controlling Woodland Invasive Plants Workshop being held on March 22.  Both of these events are taking place in Urbana and I have attached flyers to this email.  OSU Extension is also hosting a Swine Management Day in Celina on April 4, so check out the attached flyer for more details on this upcoming program.  Individuals interested in selling their locally produced food through various market channels who want to explore ways to improve their sales skills and business relationships, and those who are considering or are just developing a new food business may be interested in the Market Ready Producer Training program flyer that I have included with this newsletter.  Upcoming local events coming up soon include the Hardin County Poultry Banquet Saturday (3/17) starting at 6:00 pm at the Christian Missionary Alliance Church in Kenton, Hardin County Pork Banquet Saturday (3/17) starting at 6:30 pm at St. John’s Evangelical Church in Kenton,  and the ‘Go Native’ plants seminar being held by the OSU Extension Master Gardener Volunteers Thursday (3/22) starting at 9:00 am at Mid-Ohio Energy Cooperative Community Room in Kenton.  Other than that, I have included some agronomy articles below from the CORN newsletter.

Mark

 

Crop Production Costs – Do you know yours? A quick look at the 2016 Ohio Farm Business Analysis – Dianne Shoemaker, Haley Shoemaker

Which number is closest to your total direct and overhead cost of production per bushel of corn: $3.08, $4.17, or $6.21? Do you know? Forty-two farms completed their 2016 farm business and crop enterprise analysis in 2017. The four lowest cost producers averaged $3.08 per bushel, the median COP was $4.17, and the four highest cost producers averaged $6.21 per bushel. Only the high 20% of these corn enterprises generated a positive net return for corn. For the other 80%, the personalized benchmark reports they receive helped them identify strengths and areas of opportunity in each crop enterprise.  To read more, go to https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-04/crop-production-costs-%E2%80%93-do-you-know-yours-quick-look-2016-ohio

 

Spring Planting and Summer Growing Outlook – Jim Noel

La Nina, cooling of the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean waters, remains in place and is classified as a weak La Nina. This means many other things will ultimately impact our weather and climate since it is weak but it will contribute to our pattern. Indications are this could linger into spring and possibly summer before ending. Regardless of when it ends, it tends to impact weather patterns in the atmosphere longer, sometimes up to three to six months later. So there will be a contribution to our climate pattern into at least the planting season if not growing season.  Go to https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-5/spring-planting-and-summer-growing-outlook to continue reading this article.

 

Get Your Fertilizer Certification…Before Planting Begins – Eric Richer

Ohio is now seeing full implementation of Ohio’s Agricultural Fertilizer Applicator Certification regulation. The regulation was result of Senate Bill 150, which can be found at http://codes.ohio.gov/orc/905.322 and http://codes.ohio.gov/orc/905.321. The 2014 regulation required farmers to complete a fertilizer certification program if they applied fertilizer to more than 50 acres of land in agricultural production primarily for sale. Exemptions included fertilizer applied through a planter, individuals whose crops remained on the farm for their livestock and not sold, or fertilizer applied by a commercial applicator. Click onhttps://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-5/get-your-fertilizer-certificationbefore-planting-beginsto find out remaining fertilizer certification options.

 

Soybean Planting…How Early Is Too Early? – Laura Lindsey

Soybean planting date is absolutely critical to maximize yield (in most years and environments). Over the past few years, we’ve participated in a North Central Soybean Research Program (NCSRP) funded project with the goal of identifying causes of the “soybean yield gap.” (What factors are reducing soybean yield?) Across the Midwest, planting date was the most consistent management factor that influenced soybean yield. Finish reading this article at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-5/soybean-planting%E2%80%A6how-early-too-early.

 

Soil Health Workshop – Archbold – Garth Ruff

Are you interested in learning about cover crops and soil health? If so, consider attending a Soil Health Workshop on March 28th with OSU Extension, NRCS, and Henry SWCD. Jim Hoorman and Alan Sundermier will be presenting a variety of topics including: Biology of Soil Compaction, Economics of Cover Crops, Keeping Nutrients out of Surface Water, Managing Grasses and Brassica Cover Crops, Managing Pests: Voles & Slugs, Maximizing Mycorrhizae in Your Cropping System, and Open Discussion: Using & Managing Cover Crops. The workshop will take place at Northwest State Community College Room C200, 22600 St. Rt. 34 Archbold, Ohio 43502. There is no cost to attend the program and lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to the Henry County Extension office at 419-592-0806, by March 21st.

 

 

 

Mark A. Badertscher

Agriculture and Natural Resources Educator

OSU Extension Hardin County

1021 W. Lima Street, Suite 103, Kenton, OH 43326

419-674-2297 Office

hardin.osu.edu

March 9, 2018

Good evening,

Another week has come and gone and we are one week closer to spring!  Next week area farmers will be participating in the Hardin County Pesticide and Fertilizer Recertification on Tuesday, March 13 at the Plaza Inn Restaurant in Mt. Victory.  We will begin at 9:00 am with pesticides, break for lunch at noon, and then start fertilizer at 1:00 pm.  Check your Ohio Pesticide or Fertilizer Applicator card to see when yours expires.  According to the attached maps, Hardin County has 44 private pesticide applicators and 63 fertilizer certificates expiring this year.  Registration starts at 8:30 am at the door if you need to attend but have not yet registered.  If you don’t want to wait in line, contact the Extension office at 419-674-2297 on Monday to provide your information over the phone.  If you still need to get your fertilizer certification, see the attached flyer for two 3-hour fertilizer certification classes being offered March 26 in Botkins with a meal included for $30.  You can also now have the option to study on your own and take a test for fertilizer certification, just like you can for pesticide certification.

Our Master Gardener Volunteers are offering a Native Plants seminar.  ‘Go Native’ will be held March 22 at the Mid-Ohio Energy Cooperative Community Room, 1210 W Lima Street in Kenton. The cost is $40 which includes a continental breakfast, lunch, handouts, and door prizes.  For Active OSU Master Gardener Volunteers the fee is $35.  Registration opens at 8:00 a.m. and the program starts at 9:00.  Registration Deadline is March 15, class size is limited.  For more information call: 937-935-3970.  See the attached news article and brochure for more details and a registration form.  The 2nd Annual Hardin County Poultry Banquet will be held at 6:00 pm, Saturday, March 17, 2018 at the Family Center of the Kenton Christian Missionary Alliance Church located at 15436 State Route 309 in Kenton.  Each family is asked to bring a side dish and dessert, as there will be no additional charge for the evening.  The meat and table service will be provided.  See the attached news release and flyer for more information on this year’s Poultry Banquet.

Other upcoming events that you may be interested include The OSU Hops Conference, Bus Tour, and Trade Show in Piketon on March 23-24; Ohio & West Virginia Food Hub Network Meeting: Growing Growers in Columbus on March 14; and Ohio SMART Agriculture: Solutions From The Land in Bowling Green on March 14.  I included flyers for these events in case you want more information.  Local events of agricultural interest include the Hardin County Agricultural Society Consignment Sale Saturday (3/10) starting at 9:00 am at the fairgrounds, Men’s Garden Club Monday (3/12) starting at 6:30 pm at the home of Ken Carlson near Kenton; Soil and Water Conservation District meeting Thursday (3/15) starting at 7:30 am at the SWCD office; and theHardin County Pork Banquet Saturday (3/17) starting at 6:30 pm at St. John’s Evangelical Church in Kenton.  Don’t forget that the Ohio Beef Expo is next weekend (3/16-3/18) at the Ohio Expo Center in Columbus.  If that’s not enough to keep you busy, I’ve included some agronomy articles below.

Mark

Eliminating marestail as a determiner for postemergence soybean herbicide selection – Mark Loux

Soybean herbicide systems have evolved back to a fairly high level of complexity to deal with the herbicide resistance we have in various broadleaf weeds. By the time we use a comprehensive mix of burndown and residual herbicides, we tend to be coming back with postemergence herbicides primarily for marestail, ragweeds, and waterhemp (and grasses). Postemergence tools available for control of these broadleaf weeds vary with the type of soybean trait being used, but can include glyphosate, PPO inhibitors (fomesafen, Cobra), glufosinate, dicamba, and soon 2,4-D choline. ALS inhibitors have become somewhat irrelevant on these weeds due to widespread ALS resistance, although they may have activity on some ragweed populations still sensitive to ALS inhibitors. Resistance to various sites of action can further limit the number of options. Go to https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-04/eliminating-marestail-determiner-postemergence-soybean-herbicide to finish reading this article.

Soil Infiltration – Alan Sundermeier

Infiltration is the downward entry of water into the soil. Infiltration rate is expressed in inches per hour. Rainwater must first enter the soil for it to be of value. Water moves more quickly through the large pores of a sandy soil compared to slower movement through a clay soil with small pores. Infiltration is an indicator of the soil’s ability to allow water movement into and through the soil profile. Soil temporarily stores water, making it available for root uptake, plant growth and habitat for soil organisms.  Read more about soil infiltration at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-03/soil-infiltration.

 

Bin run seed – some lessons from the past  – Anne Dorrance

With lower prices and higher input costs in today’s soybean farming operations, some farmers are looking where to shave a few dollars off their costs of farming. Based on the calls directly from farmers on which seed treatments to use – it is not too hard to figure out where some of those savings might be coming from. This used to be general practice but there are ways to do this to be sure it really is saving farmer’s money.  To find out more about precautions of using bin run seed in the planter or drill, go to https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-04/bin-run-seed-%E2%80%93-some-lessons-past.

 

Topdressing Wheat with Liquid Swine Manure – Glen Arnold

Despite the rainfall expected across Ohio this week, wheat fields will eventually firm up and the topdressing of nitrogen fertilizer will commence. There is usually a window of time, typically around the last week of March or the first week of April, when wheat fields are firm enough to support manure application equipment. By this date, wheat fields have broken dormancy and are actively pulling moisture and nutrients from the soil. The key to applying the correct amount of manure to fertilize wheat is to know the manure’s nitrogen content. Most manure tests reveal total nitrogen, ammonia nitrogen and organic nitrogen amounts. The ammonia nitrogen portion is readily available for plant growth. The organic nitrogen portion takes considerably longer to mineralize and generally will not be available when wheat uptakes the majority of its nitrogen in the months of April and May.  Read more at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-04/topdressing-wheat-liquid-swine-manure.


Malt Barley Workshop – March 15th
– Mary Griffith, Wayne Dellinger

OSU Extension Union County is hosting a half day workshop for growers interested in learning about malting barley. Malting barley acres have increased in Ohio with a growing craft brewery industry. While new markets exist for Ohio grown barley, malting barley markets have different quality and protein standards than feed-grade barley traditionally grown in Ohio making it a very different crop to manage. This workshop offers an opportunity to learn more about managing malting barley.  Go to https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-5/malt-barley-workshop-march-15th to find out more information about this upcoming event in Marysville.

 

 

 

Mark A. Badertscher

Agriculture and Natural Resources Educator

OSU Extension Hardin County

1021 W. Lima Street, Suite 103, Kenton, OH 43326

419-674-2297 Office

hardin.osu.edu

March 1, 2018

Good evening,

Hardin County has a rich tradition of active livestock commodity group organizations.  Each of these organizations have winter banquets and we are in the middle of these banquet events.  In case you haven’t kept up on all of the winter livestock banquets happening this winter or if you would like to plan ahead to attend, I have attached a news article discussing basic information about each banquet.  The Hardin County Pork Producers will hold their annual Pork Banquet on Saturday, March 17 at St. John’s Evangelical Church, starting at 6:30 pm.  The fun-filled evening will include selection of the Queen and Scholarship Recipients as well as amazing food and door prizes.  Ticket prices are $8, and half price for 2017 Hardin County Junior Fair Swine Exhibitors, as well as Fair Workers from the Food Pavilion, and children under the age of 12.  The banquet is open to all interested persons but advance tickets are required.  Tickets can be purchased through March 9 from the following county Pork Producers Directors: Grant Mizek, Kevin (Dewey) Skidmore, Steve Searson, Doug & Christine Heilman, Tim Holbrook, Mark Watkins, Rob Wilson, Matthew Holbrook, Lavern & Nancy Weaver, Rob Underwood, Nathan Weaver, Tyler & Tiffany Sparks, Rusty Bingham, Wes VanScoy, and Jody Dye. Tickets can also be reserved from the Extension office by calling 419-674-2297.  For more information about the Pork Banquet, see the attached news release.

So what is the relationship between healthy soils and healthy water?  How can you manage inputs and planting date for high economic corn yields?  Which soils should respond to sulfur applications?  What are some opportunities and considerations with subsurface placement of nutrients?  How can you build soil health and organic matter with cover crops and no-till?  How can you use economics in the choice between growing corn and soybeans?  What will the revised P index look like?  How can you get started in honey bees, barley, or hops production?  What are some methods to manage invasive plants around the farm?  These are all questions you might have asked yourself, but have struggled to find an answer.  This year’s Conservation Tillage Conference (CTC) has the answers to these questions and many more. The McIntosh Center at Ohio Northern University will once again be the location where about 60 presenters, several agribusiness exhibitors, and approximately 900 participants will come together March 6th and 7th in Ada.  Make plans now to attend this conference by reading the attached article.

Some farmers have received a notice that informs them that their current pesticide and/or fertilizer applicator licenses will expire at the end of March 2018 and that they must complete their continuing education hours to renew before this date.  Thirty dollars is sent to the Ohio Department of Agriculture in Reynoldsburg to renew the license and $30 to OSU Extension for the pesticide continuing education requirement.  If fertilizer recertification is needed, the cost to OSU Extension is $10 for the fertilizer continuing education requirement.  The Hardin County Pesticide and Fertilizer Recertification program will be offered Tuesday, March 13 at the Plaza Inn Restaurant in Mt. Victory. The pesticide recertification session will begin at 9:00 am and end at 12:00 pm. This session is for private applicators and will consist of Core, Grain and Cereal Crops, Forage Crops and Livestock, and Fumigation.  A lunch option will be made available at the Plaza Inn Restaurant for additional cost.  The fertilizer recertification will start at 1:00 pm and end at 2:00 pm.  Farmers must pre-register online at http://pested.osu.edu, call the Extension Office at 419-674-2297, or stop by at 1021 W. Lima Street, Suite 103 in Kenton to register.  Pre-registration is encouraged if not already done so to eliminate long lines at the door.  Further information regarding make-up or specialty recertification in other areas can be obtained by contacting the Extension office before March 30.  For more information, check out the attached article and flyer.

I have included flyers of other events going on that you might be interested, including a Malting Barley Workshop on March 15 in Marysville, OSU Blueberry, Bramble, and Wine Grape Pruning School in Piketon on March 15, a Women in Agriculture event March 22 in Fort Loramie, and an OSU Junior Swine Day in both Columbus and Wooster on March 25.  Have you noticed the maple trees that have been tapped around the county?  Have you ever thought about tapping maple trees and wondered where you can buy maple syrup equipment?  OSU Extension put together a brochure of maple syrup equipment dealers that producers can use that serve Ohio.  I have attached this brochure to this email if you are interested.  Finally, local events coming up soon include Ag Council breakfast tomorrow morning (3/2) at Henry’s Restaurant starting at 7:00.  I plan to share information about land values and cash rent so feel free to join us in the banquet room.  The Lamb Banquet will be Saturday evening (3/3) at St. John’s Evangelical Church in Kenton starting at 6:30 pm.  OSU Dairy Science professor Dr. Maurice Eastridge will be the guest speaker at the Dairy Service Unit annual meeting at the Extension office Monday evening (3/5).  We plan to start with a meal at 6:30 followed by the meeting at 7:00 pm.  Feel free to join us if you are interested in learning more about his topic, ‘Forces Affecting Dairying in the Future.’  The Cattle Producers will also be meeting Monday evening (3/5) at the Allmax Building starting at 7:30 pm.  Farm Bureau will be meeting Tuesday evening (3/6) at Ag Credit starting at 7:00 pm.  The Fairboard will be meeting Wednesday evening (3/7) at the fair office starting at 7:00 pm.  And don’t forget the Ag Society Consignment Sale selling used farm machinery Saturday morning (3/10) at the fairgrounds starting at 9:00 am.  As always, I have included some agronomy articles for you to consider reading.

Mark

Winter has seen wild swings in the weather – Jim Noel

The winter has seen wild swings in the weather and climate from cold to warm to cold. The outlook for February calls for this wild swing pattern to continue with periods of cold and mild along with periods of wet, snow and dry. The end result should be temperatures slightly colder than normal for February and precipitation at or above normal. Over the next two weeks precipitation liquid equivalent should average 1.5-2.5 inches over Ohio. Normal is about 1 inch in this period. See attached graphic for details. La Nina continues in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean with cooler than normal waters. This tends to lead to more challenging years in the Ohio Valley for agriculture.  To read more about the weather, go to https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-03/winter-has-seen-wild-swings-weather.


Soil Aggregate Stability – a soil health physical indicator – Alan Sundermeier, Vinayak Shedekar

A suite of soil health measurements are becoming available which are not part of the traditional soil chemical tests. Soil aggregate stability is an important physical indicator of soil health, which protects organic matter accumulation, improves soil porosity, drainage and water availability for plants, decreases soil compaction, supports biological activity, and nutrient cycling in the soil. Aggregates are primary soil particles (sand, silt, clay) held together in a single mass or cluster, such as a crumb, block, prism or clod using organic matter, calcium and metals as cementing materials. Soil aggregates are formed by natural forces (such as alternate wetting-drying) and organic substances derived from root exudates, roots, soil animals and microbial by-products which cement primary particles into smaller aggregates (micro-aggregates) or smaller aggregates into larger particles, such as macro-aggregates. To read more, go to https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-02/soil-aggregate-stability-%E2%80%93-soil-health-physical-indicator.

Ohio Farm Business Analysis Program – Dianne Shoemaker, Haley Shoemaker

The message is clear: farms must know their costs of production for corn, soybeans, hay, milk, meat, and any other commodities they produce. Why? To make informed marketing, production, and financial management decisions that contribute to the overall profitability of the whole farm business. To help Ohio’s farm families achieve financial success in today’s challenging marketplace, the Ohio Farm Business Analysis Program is expanding our capacity to serve farmers across Ohio. Thanks to a USDA/NIFA grant, four additional Farm Business Analysis Technicians are ready to help farmers complete analysis of their 2017 business year. Farm business analysis is a tool that can be applied to any farm, regardless of size, crop, or livestock enterprise. Financial management is critical to the success of every farm business, and with analysis, farms are able to better understand the numbers behind their profits or losses.  To find out more about the Ohio Farm Business Analysis Program, click on https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-03/ohio-farm-business-analysis-program.

CORN Newsletter Reader Survey – Amanda Douridas, Amanda Bennett, Mike Gastier, Greg LaBarge

We want to thank all our readers for their interest in the CORN newsletter over the years. It has been several years since we have conducted a reader survey. We are asking readers to complete this survey to provide important information about the future content of the newsletter. Our goal is to provide farmers and consultants with accurate, researched based information that helps improve farm efficiency, profitability and sustainability. Completion is voluntary. All survey responses are anonymous and cannot be linked to respondents. Only summary data will be reported. If you receive the newsletter through an email subscription then you should have received an email about the survey with a personalized link. Please use this email to complete the survey. If you do not receive the CORN newsletter through email, we ask that you complete the survey by going to: https://osu.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_577r8yARYgUZk9f . Thank you for your time and feedback as we strive to meet the needs of our readers.

Nutrient Management and Cover Crops Meeting – Jeff Stachler

Applying crop nutrients when they are not needed is costly, especially in the current farm economy and harmful to the environment. Conversely, not applying enough fertilizer will cause a reduction in crop yield causing a decrease in profitability. Cover crops are important to soil health, but how do you make them work? There are many options, what is the best option for your operation? Is soil health important? These questions along with nutrient management will be addressed at the upcoming meeting entitled: “Improving Your Bottom Line With Nutrients and Cover Crops”. The meeting will be held March 13, 2018 from 9:15 AM to 3:40 PM at the Eagles in Wapakoneta (25 E. Auglaize St.). To find out more about this meeting, go to https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-04/nutrient-management-and-cover-crops-meeting.

 

 

 

Mark A. Badertscher

Agriculture and Natural Resources Educator

OSU Extension Hardin County

1021 W. Lima Street, Suite 103, Kenton, OH 43326

419-674-2297 Office

hardin.osu.edu

November 7, 2017

Good afternoon,

The weather is turning into a foe with regards to the completion of harvest in Hardin County.  Progress on soybean harvest has been slow over the past couple of weeks with the onset of rain, causing the need for dryer weather to finish the fields that are still out there.  Some were double cropped beans that needed the extra time anyway to be ready.  Corn harvest has continued until the latest significant rain that has caused fields to become soft.  We’ll need some dryer days before harvest resumes.  Much of the corn that was harvested so far has come off around 17% moisture with yields anywhere between 120-170 bushels per acre based on what I have been told.  Soybean averages have been near the mid-forties.  Proper drying and cool down is important to maintain grain quality as mentioned in the attached article on Corn Storage written by Jeff Stachler, Auglaize County Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources Educator.

Earlier in the fall I discussed the Hardin County Weed Survey that was completed in September.  Harold Watters, Extension agronomist has summarized weed survey information across the state in an article titled “Weed Management in Ohio” that you might find interesting.  He discusses weed resistance and the impact of Waterhemp in the western part of the state.  I, too have seen the spread of Waterhemp around the county this year so this is a weed that farmers will need to keep an eye out for and begin aggressive weed control programs to manage if it appears in their fields.  See Harold’s article in the “November 2018 CORN to go” that I have attached to this email.  We will provide more information about these hard to control weeds in our winter pesticide recertification programs, or you can stop by the Extension office to pick up more informatiion.

Upcoming programs in the area include a Grain Marketing 101 in Darke County on November 14.  It will cover Cash Contract Tools, Basis, Market Outlook: What’s Going On, and What Drives the Market.  There is also an Advanced Grain Marketing workshop in Greenville on November 15.  Topics of this workshop include Tools to Utilize to Maximize Profits and Options Trading.  Registration for both of these grain marketing workshops are due now so be sure to call Darke County Extension at 937-548-5215 for openings if you are interested.  There is also a series of West Central Ohio Dairy Luncheons planned for the third Wednesday of the month, starting November 15 in New Bremen.  If you are interested in learning more about berry production, there is Fruit Grower – Blueberry program being offered in Vermillion.  I have attached flyers for all of these events.

Local events coming up include a Farm Bureau meeting tonight (11/7) at Ag Credit, starting at 6:30 pm; Men’s Garden Club meeting Monday, November 13 starting at 6:30 pm at the home of Jim Candler near Ridgeway, and a Sheep Improvement Association meeting Tuesday, November 14 starting at 7:30 pm at the Extension office.  This past week we were able to work on two Anaerobic Soil Disinfection trials in the county with local produce growers in an effort to learn how to control diseases of tomatoes grown in greenhouses.  We also were able to harvest our Alger Nitrogen Rate fertilizer trial which is being done as part of the research the past three years to update the Tri-State Fertilizer Recommendations.  Both of these research projects are being done in Hardin County with the assistance of the Ohio Agriculture and Research Development Center (OARDC).  As usual, I have included some agronomy articles below that you may be interested in reading during these cool, wet days.

Mark

Yet More Rain during Delayed 2017 Harvest: Managing the Risk of Soil Compaction – Elizabeth Hawkins, Kaylee Port, John Fulton

Waiting for optimal field conditions may no longer be an option with harvest lagging behind the trending pace due to delayed planting and recent wet weather. Observation data from the CoCoRaHS network indicated weekend storms brought nearly 3 inches of rain to some areas bringing harvest to a halt in Ohio. Before rushing to resume harvest in marginal soil conditions, it is important to consider the consequences, namely; soil compaction.  Go to https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2017-38/yet-more-rain-during-delayed-2017-harvest-managing-risk-soil to finish reading this article.

2017 Ohio Soybean Performance Trials- Yield Data Available – Laura Lindsey, Wayde Looker

Yield results for the 2017 Ohio Soybean Performance Trials are available online at: https://stepupsoy.osu.edu/soybean-production/variety-selection/ohio-soybean-performance-trial Seed quality information will be available within two weeks. The purpose of the Ohio Soybean Performance Trials is to evaluate soybean varieties for yield and other agronomic characteristics. This evaluation gives soybean producers comparative information for selecting the best varieties for their unique production systems. New for 2017- Varieties were grouped, tested, and analyzed by maturity (early and late trials). Conventional, Liberty Link, Roundup Ready, and Xtend varieties were tested in the same block to allow for head-to-head comparisons. A double asterisk (**) is used to denote the variety with the highest yield within a yield and maturity grouping. A single asterisk (*) is used to denote varieties with yield not statistically different than the highest yielding variety.

Cover Crop Field Day – Dean Kreager

A Cover Crop Field Day will be held in Licking County on Thursday November 16th, 2017 from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. Producers can learn potential benefits of cover crops, including soil quality improvement, erosion control, fertility improvement, and weed suppression.  Management issues such as termination of cover crops will be addressed.  We will have plots displaying seeding utilizing different methods and examples of a few types of cover crops such as cereal rye, oats, turnips, radish, and clover. The cost will be $10 per person.  Preregister by November 9th by calling 740-670-5315 or emailing kreager.5@osu.edu. For more information, including a detailed agenda, click here: https://agcrops.osu.edu/sites/agcrops/files/imce/Cover%20Crop%20Field%20Day%2011.16.17.pdf.

 

Updating the Tri-State Fertilizer Recommendations – Steve Culman, Anthony Fulford

In 2014, the OSU Soil Fertility Lab (soilfertility.osu.edu) started work to update the Tri-State Fertilizer Recommendations. These recommendations form the basis of our corn, soybean, wheat and alfalfa nutrient recommendations, but were last updated in 1995. We have partnered with many OSU extension county educators, private crop consultants and individual farmers to run extensive strip trials across the state over the past 4 years. To date, we have over 100 P trials, and nearly 100 K trials that have been conducted in 33 Ohio counties (Figure 1). We have also conducted extensive N rate trials, N timing trials and some trials looking at sulfur needs. For more information about updating the Tri-State Fertilizer Recommendations, go to https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2017-37/updating-tri-state-fertilizer-recommendations.

 

Malting Barley in Ohio – Pierce Paul, Laura Lindsey, Mark Loux

The number of acres planted to malting barley in Ohio this fall is at an all-time high and will likely continue to increase over the next few years. Although barley is not new to Ohio, raising it for malt is new to us and considerably different from raising it for feed or raising wheat for grain. In particular, the grain quality requirements for malting barley are different from the requirements for feed or grain, and as such there are a few differences in terms of how the crop is managed during the growing season. However, in spite of these differences, there are several key fall management guidelines for wheat and feed barley that would apply equally well to malting barley. For instance, variety selection, planting date, weed, disease, and pest control are just as important for malting barley as they are for wheat. See the links below from Ohio State and Cornell Universities for helpful tips on how to manage barley for malt in Ohio and the eastern US in general:

https://u.osu.edu/osuweeds/files/2017/10/barley-guide-2n9akle.pdf

https://fieldcrops.cals.cornell.edu/small-grains/malting-barley

 

 

 

Mark A. Badertscher

Agriculture and Natural Resources Educator

OSU Extension Hardin County

1021 W. Lima Street, Suite 103, Kenton, OH 43326

419-674-2297 Office

hardin.osu.edu