Un-becoming Carbon

Un-becoming Carbon: Traveling in Intercellular Space focuses on the importance of carbon sequestration by plants. The viewers enter the plants’ intercellular space, beginning their journey as a molecule of carbon dioxide, donating their carbon to the plant’s body, and emerging as life-giving oxygen. The interactive installation explores this process through physical, audio and virtual experiences. Entering a giant leaf through a stomatal opening, the viewers are surrounded by sculptural plant cells. Palisade Parenchyma droop from above while below Spongy Parenchyma and Stomata line the floor. Soft structures invite viewers to rest and continue their experience by entering virtual reality. An exploration between the macroverse and the microverse begins in a forest where the viewers take on the role of a carbon particle being absorbed into a leaf; first traveling through intercellular space, then moving into a cell to become part of its substance.

Concluding the experience, visitors are invited to adopt and nurture a living plant propagule to continue its carbon-binding work in their own home. Plant awareness posters act as a souvenir from their intercellular space travel.

This multimedia art installation was collaboratively created by the students and professors of an Art & Science class (Art 5001) by Ellie Bartlett, Jacklyn Brickman, Ashley Browne, Amanda Buckeye, Diva Colter, Mona Gazala, Youji Han, Saba Hashemi Shahraki, Brice Jordan, Liam Manning, Iris Meier, Brooke Stanley, Lily Thompson, Zachary Upperman, Stephen White, Taylor Woodie, and Amy Youngs.

Art and Technology show poster 2019

 

Presented as part of the Art & Technology exhibition, Non-Human Intelligence.

Come out and celebrate with us at the opening on December 4th, 5 – 7pm.

Hopkins Hall, the Ohio State University –  campus map and transportation

Non-Human Intelligence

Art and Technology show poster 2019Art & Technology exhibition

Non-Human Intelligence: In the realm of animal, insect, plant and computer systems, can humans co-create with “other”? Can we look beyond human-dominated ways of understanding?

Artists, technologists, and scientists are as likely to collaborate with bees, bacteria, spiders as with artificial intelligence in the creation of their work, provoking difficult questions regarding the nature of creativity and non-human others’ consciousness. When working with living systems, the biggest struggle is to keep the systems alive and this requires a sensitive humility and respect. Donna Haraway’s concept of “becoming with” describes the back and forth nature of interacting with animals as we form a connection and broaden our notion of the nature of the intelligence of others. It entertains the idea of multispecies and transspecies interactions in the co-creative process. “Becoming-with” allows us to better acknowledge “others” right to exist, thrive, and express individual agencies.

Through an expanded understanding of the intelligent, intertwined, symbiotic nature of our living planet, might we become more human?

“Becoming-with” allows us to better acknowledge “others” right to exist, thrive and express individual agencies. Through accommodating non-human others, might we become more human in the process, by demonstrating an understanding of the deeply intertwined symbiotic nature of our living planet?

This semester, students in the Art & Technology courses – ranging from animation, art-science, 3D modeling, and internet art to robotics –  have created individual and group artworks related to this theme and they will be presenting them in this juried exhibition. Make sure to visit the special installation in the Emerging Technology Studios on the 3rd floor of Hopkins Hall.

  • Opening celebration: Wednesday, December 4, 2019, 5:00pm – 7:00pm
  • Open hours: Thursday, December 5, 11:00am – 5:00pm & Friday Dec 6, 11:00am – 4:00pm
  • Where: Hopkins Hall, the Ohio State University –  campus map and transportation
  • 1st floor lobby, corridor, and collaboratory, plus rooms 156, 160, and 346
  • Admission is free and open to the public.

 

Art Contest

SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED TO APRIL 19

The Center for Ethics and Human Values has teamed up with the Department of Art to create an art contest related to the theme of “Technology”. Artworks of all media are eligible. Graduate and Undergraduate students apply by filling out the online form and by exhibiting their artwork in the Fall and/or Spring open house exhibitions in the Department of Art. Prizes will be awarded at both times and the award-winning artworks will be exhibited at the STEAM Factory, which will include artworks juried from the larger Columbus community.

More info about this year’s COMPAS theme and events.

OverClocked Exhibition

Overclocked computers have been configured to run at faster speeds than intended. Overclocking can lead to instability in the system and unpredictable behavior. Overclocking is an act of pushing computers for more speed, while it is also a metaphor for high tech low brow techniques of hacking to wrest control from computer engineers. Overclocking can reference the dream of a higher-performance computer as well as the nightmare of runaway technological growth at the expense of biological and ecological systems. Now fueled by new forms of artificial intelligences that allow machines to upgrade themselves, who might be holding the joystick?

This semester, students in the Art & Technology courses – ranging from animation, digital imaging, moving image art, and 3D modeling, to robotics –  have created individual and group artworks related to this theme and they will be presenting them in this juried exhibition.

Opening: Monday April 23, 5:00pm – 8:00pm

Open hours: Tuesday 4/24 – Thursday 4/26, 11:00am – 5:00pm & Friday 4/27, 11:00am – 4:00pm

Where: Hopkins Hall Gallery, Lobby, Corridor, and Collaboratory – directions

Admission is free and open to the public

Trans-Species Skins

Trans-Species Skins is a themed art exhibition exploring skin as a metaphor and substance that transcends species categories. Skin is the multilayered and multipurpose organ that shifts from thick to thin, tight to loose, wet to dry, across the landscapes of bodies and machine interfaces. Natural and artificial skin responds to heat, cold, pleasure and pain. It lacks boundaries and flows seamlessly from exposed surfaces to our internal cavities real and virtual. It is a self-repairing, semi-permeable surface, with inner layers that are flush with nerves and glands, sensors and chips. New tools allow artists, designers, and engineers to look at a new emerging organicism that takes shape across the surface of the grown and manufactured. Skins can modulate meaning, touch, function and can provide feedback and change with light and heat. Flexible membranes embedded with sensors and materials are bent, impregnated, or inflated to become structure. Re-skinning allows deceit; the non-living can approximate life, and the living can appear otherwise.

This semester, students in the Art & Technology courses – ranging from animation, art-science, digital imaging, and 3D modeling to robotics –  have created individual and group artworks related to this theme and they will be presenting them in this juried exhibition.

Opening Wednesday, December 6, 5:00pm – 8:00pm

Open hours: Thursday, December 7, 11:00am – 5:00pm & Friday Dec 8, 11:00am – 4:00pm

Where: Hopkins Hall Gallery, Lobby, Corridor, and Collaboratory – directions

Admission is free and open to the public

 

 

Filter Bubbles and Inequality

Filter Bubble is an Art & Technology Student Exhibition open to the public Wednesday, December 7, 2016 to Friday, December 9, 2016. Located in Hopkins Hall Gallery, Lobby, Corridors, Collaboratory and New Media Labs – all on the first floor of Hopkins Hall.

Reception: Wednesday, December 7 from 5-8 PMFilter Bubble banner
Filter Bubble is a themed, new media art exhibition that examines the hyper-personalization of information surrounding each of us, based on algorithms that are trained by our individual interests and world views. Students working in 3D animation, 3D modeling and rapid prototyping, robotic art, internet art, game art, and moving image art forms will exhibit their investigations into the meanings, consequences, and futures of a citizenship shaped by like-minded viewpoints.

What does it take to break your filter bubble? Is it possible to see through someone else’s?


The Center for Ethics and Human Values, is offering awards to artists in the exhibition – and throughout the Department of Art Open House  – who have made compelling artwork related to the theme of Inequality.

Moral concern with inequality is about far more than economic inequality. It is also about political, legal, educational, and health inequalities and how these interact with each other. And it’s about how these inequalities connect with underlying issues of race, gender, ethnicity, religion, LGBTQ status, geography, and other factors. These different dimensions of inequality are often difficult to appreciate, especially when we do not experience them firsthand. An artwork can change this. An artwork can force us to confront the significance of inequalities we often overlook. Submissions will be evaluated both for artistic merit and for how they explore issues related to the COMPAS theme.

This contest is open to:

  • Graduate and undergraduate students currently enrolled in a class in the Department of Art
Prizes:
  • Grand Prize, $500
  • Up to 3 awards of excellence, $250 each
  • Up to 12 awards of distinction, $50 each
All types of art presented at the Department of Art Open House are eligible: painting/drawing, sculpture, glass, photography, art and technology, printmaking, ceramics, etc.
Your work must be presented in the Department of Art Open House or Filter Bubble exhibition, December 7th 2016, in order to be considered.
Entrants must register by December 6th: http://go.osu.edu/inequality-art-registration
Winners will be announced by email and on our social media accounts on December 9th.

Maker Faire Ottawa

selfie moment
Selfie Moment, by Ethan Schaefer

Art and Tech students and faculty and alumni presented work at Maker Faire in Ottawa Canada in a special art exhibition titled Preternatural, co-curated by Ohio State University Professor Ken Rinaldo and Maker Faire curator Remco Volmer. They invited artists whose works address the perspectives of animals, media and technological representations, ecosystems, futures, coevolution, symbiosis and friction between human and non-humans. These included 3D rapid prototyped sculptures, 3D animations, robotic artworks, performance and moving image art installations.

makemag
Makezine wrote a story about the Preternatural exhibition
Ada Fruit story on Simon
AdaFruit wrote about Jeremy Viny and Andrew Frueh’s project in the exhibition

Invited artists: Madeleine Rico, Jeremy Viny, Trademark Gunderson, Jordan Reynolds, Ethan Schaefer, Catherine Lee, Danner Seyffer-Sprague, Danielle Popp, Yoni Mizrachi, Sarah Goetz, Amy Youngs, Grant Parish, Casey Hamilton, Daniel Popp, Christine Rucker, Katherine Beigel, Drew Grigsby, Christina Howard, Kyler Holland, Maggie Barrie, Riley Patrick, Makayla Combs, Nick Cunningham, Hui Yang, Jayne Kennedy, Brandon Messner, Jacob Markusic, Brandon Ball, Michael Anderson, Leah Lafarciola, Gaopeng Chen, Jay Young and Ken Rinaldo.

Special Thanks to the United States Department of State for the generous grant allowing travel funds for these artists and to Maker Faire Ottawa for this generous opportunity as well as the Department of Art at the Ohio State University in supporting this international opportunity.

BioPresence Exhibition documentation

Visit the online catalog and video that documents the work of the artists who presented work in the BioPresence exhibition December 2015. This non-human animal themed exhibition, included Art and Tech faculty, graduates and undergraduates as well as other invited artists and international sound artists.

Biopresence exhibition website and catalog

Where Rocks are Fed to Trees

showposter-web
The faculty and students of the Underground Symbiosis class are ready to show you something you’ve never seen before.

We invite you to experience Where Rocks are Fed to Trees, an art installation inspired by the subterranean, fungal communication networks that enable the sharing and transport of nutrients between different species.

This multi-channel video projection environment was collaboratively created within the context of an Art/Science course at the Ohio State University, Art 5001: Underground Symbiosis: the art and science of mycorrhizal networks. This co-taught course built on synergies between Professor Iris Meier’s research in Arbuscular Mycorrhizae and Professor Amy Youngs’ ecosystem installation artworks. Together, with 16 undergraduate students, we performed scientific experiments such as microscopy, staining, chemical analysis and plant growth trials, to better understand mycorrhizae. Artistic methods, such as observation, speculation, synthesis, manipulation, construction and presentation, were also employed throughout our investigations, which have culminated in this co-created, immersive, art/science installation.

It will be presented as part of the Art and Technology exhibition, Loving the Obligate Symbiont, in Hopkins Hall, at the Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. We invite the public to join us for the reception on Monday, April 25th, 5 – 8pm. Or visit during open hours on April 21, 22 or 25th. More info.

Artists: 

Trent Bailey, Brandon Ball, Katherine Beigel, Gaopeng Chen, Tyler Collins, Sarah Hockman, Shatae Johnson, Eric Lo, Jacob Markusic, Iris Meier, Yoni Mizrachi, Julianne Panzo, Edwin Rice, Ethan Schaefer, Aaron Theesfeld, Robert Ward, and Amy Youngs.

Special thanks to our supporters:

  • The Department of Molecular Genetics
  • The Department of Art
  • College of Arts and Sciences Small Grant Program
  • Biological Sciences Greenhouse
  • Chadwick Arboretum

And thanks to the following individuals, for inspiring our class with presentations and technical assistance: Eduardo Acosta, Dr. Ana Alonso, Jean-Christophe Cocuron, Dr. Dobritsa, Anna Griffis, Norman Groves, Kim Landsbergen, Joan Leonard, Galen Rask, and Emily Yoders-Horn.

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More class photos here.