Exhibition: A Textured Transmission

wavy lines behind text "A Textured Transmission"

An exhibition of student work throughout Hopkins Hall & Online

Dec 8, 5 – 7pm; First floor work on view through Dec 10

Set in a hybrid of online and physical space, A Textured Transmission is an exhibition of student artwork showcasing the range and depth of work coming from art & technology area courses in the department of art. After a semester of exploration with tools, technology, and time, students are ready to broadcast their ideas and accomplishments. This exhibition signals an exchange of ideas and carries an energy that emerges as we make our way back to physical spaces.  It also melds with the new techniques and online spaces we have built over the past year. This is a textured transmission.

  • First Floor Hallway: Digital Imaging | 3D Modeling | Moving Image Art | Computer Animation
  • Collaboratory 167 & New Projects Lab 146: Studio Practice | New Media Robotics
  • Hopkins 340: Art & Science of Roots
  • Emerging Technology Studios 346: Virtual Reality and Video Game Artwork during the opening.
  • Meet the Art & Tech Student Club! They will be tabling on the first floor during the opening.
The Ohio State University, Hopkins Hall, 128 N Oval Mall, Columbus, OH 43210
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Welcome to Visiting Assistant Professor Illya Mousavijad

artwork
Between a Lost Home and a Losing Destination, 2020-21

We welcome emerging artist Illya Mousavijad as a Visiting Assistant Professor in Art and Technology at The Ohio State University.  He recently completed his MFA from the Weitzman School of Design at the University of Pennsylvania. Working across varied media, including installation, painting, video, and computer animation, his art practice investigates the limits and extents of exile, border and identity politics, Middle Eastern history, exile literature, US and Iran relations.

Currently, I am following the incredible and indescribable currents unfolding in the Middle East following the fall of Afghanistan. What has already and will continue to produce great numbers of exiles. Displacement, instability, and inaccessibility are increasing. I am in the process of expanding on my investigation of virtual production, including but not limited to computer animation and virtual reality, as the means to understand and articulate the profoundly liminal experience of exile.

In my classes too, I am seriously encouraging critical thinking about what it means to move through and to occupy a space, as well as the experience of time in sophisticated ways beyond its often linearly rendered convictions. My students are experiencing the process of creating computer animation with an internal collision with the realities and unrealities of the software used. They are learning to generate movement, time, and space on both individual and collective levels. Many incredible learning moments are unfolding for all of us, myself included. –Illya Mousavijad

Illya Mousavijad

Art & Science of Roots – ART 5101

Professors Iris Meier and Amy Youngs will co-teach an interdisciplinary Art and Science course in Autumn 2021. We will do science experiments and art projects which culminate in a collaboratively designed and built art installation. Example artwork from past classes: Unbecoming Carbon: traveling in intercellular space and Where Rocks are Fed to Trees.

poster describing Art & Science course with picture of a hand holding roots

We welcome interested graduate students and advanced undergraduate students from any discipline. Contact youngs.6@osu.edu or meier.56@osu.edu

Visiting Artist – Stephanie Rothenberg

Stephanie Rothenberg’s interdisciplinary art draws from digital culture, science and economics to explore relationships between human designed systems and biological ecosystems. Moving between real and virtual spaces her work investigates the power dynamics of techno utopias, global economics and outsourced labor. She has exhibited throughout the US and internationally in venues including Eyebeam (US), Sundance Film Festival (US), Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art / MASS MoCA (US), House of Electronic Arts / HeK (CH), LABoral (ES), Transmediale (DE), and ZKM Center for Art & Media (DE). She is a recipient of numerous awards, most recently from the Harpo Foundation and Creative Capital.

Artist Website: http://stephanierothenberg.com/

When: Monday, March 8, 12pm EST.

Contact Amy Youngs youngs.6@osu.edu for zoom link.

With thanks to the Department of Art Fund to support visiting artist presentations.

Can You See My Screen?

artwork by Ada Huang
3D render by Ada Huang. Text and poster design by Dalena Tran and Hirad Sab.

The contemporary moment is one of unprecedented transfiguration. A constant tug of war where institutions, communities, interests, and most importantly, individuals coincide in an undulating state of deformation and alteration. Those boundaries that defined our movements and occupations have blurred to the point of non-existence, facilitating an amorphous space for constant activity. Shopping for winter clothes while attending a lecture, replying to business emails at the dinner table, or participating in job training while taking the subway, the established limits of social and personal spaces are expunged, and with that, so are the boundaries of the individual. And while this shapeless chimeric reality in its unparalleled distraction and discontinuity demands the individual’s utmost awareness and participation, it continues to expand its disciplinary practices to every crevice of daily life. The punch clock is now next to the bed; better wake up, sunshine!

Nothing is ever finished anymore, and no one is ever done with anything—the corporation, the educational system, the factory, and the household subsist in a simultaneous state of coexistence. And it is at the dawn of this new day of bewildering complexity and anomalous virtual convergence that I ask from you, from you the eternal surveilling gaze, from you my mentor, my peer, my adversary, and my friend: the audio seems to be working, but can you see my screen?

EXHIBITION ARTWORKS

 

Dalena Tran and Hirad Sab join Art & Tech

We welcome this dynamic duo into the Art & Technology area in the Department of Art this year. As a team, they will fill the position as Visiting Assistant Professor, teaching courses, working on their research and participating our creative community.

Both earned their MFAs from the Media Arts program at the University of California Los Angeles in 2020. Their creative practices span widely across the field of new media art –  from interactive web comics to algorithmically-generated 3D animations, to music videos. They occasionally create artwork together and their live, audiovisual performances have been exhibited at MoMA PS1 and ICA London.

Dalena Tran hails from Salt Lake City, Utah, where she received her BA in Film & Media Arts with Honors from the University of Utah. She creates stories and situations that entangle subjectivity and temporality in response to notions of voyeurism, hegemony, memory, and the phenomenon of media. Her work has been featured in O FLUXO, Assembly Point, Flat Journal, Adult Swim, and Nowness.

Hirad Sab is from Tehran, Iran. He received his BS in Computer Science from the University of Utah. In conversation with emerging technologies, his work reflects on current political, social, and cultural realities intertwined with a critique of technoculturalism and technopositivism. He has exhibited at The Wrong Biennale, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, CHAO Art Center, and The LOW Museum of Contemporary Culture; and it has been featured in Der Spiegel, W Magazine, NPR, Vice, Dazed, and The Guardian.


Un-becoming Carbon

Un-becoming Carbon: Traveling in Intercellular Space focuses on the importance of carbon sequestration by plants. The viewers enter the plants’ intercellular space, beginning their journey as a molecule of carbon dioxide, donating their carbon to the plant’s body, and emerging as life-giving oxygen. The interactive installation explores this process through physical, audio and virtual experiences. Entering a giant leaf through a stomatal opening, the viewers are surrounded by sculptural plant cells. Palisade Parenchyma droop from above while below Spongy Parenchyma and Stomata line the floor. Soft structures invite viewers to rest and continue their experience by entering virtual reality. An exploration between the macroverse and the microverse begins in a forest where the viewers take on the role of a carbon particle being absorbed into a leaf; first traveling through intercellular space, then moving into a cell to become part of its substance.

Concluding the experience, visitors are invited to adopt and nurture a living plant propagule to continue its carbon-binding work in their own home. Plant awareness posters act as a souvenir from their intercellular space travel.

This multimedia art installation was collaboratively created by the students and professors of an Art & Science class (Art 5001) by Ellie Bartlett, Jacklyn Brickman, Ashley Browne, Amanda Buckeye, Diva Colter, Mona Gazala, Youji Han, Saba Hashemi Shahraki, Brice Jordan, Liam Manning, Iris Meier, Brooke Stanley, Lily Thompson, Zachary Upperman, Stephen White, Taylor Woodie, and Amy Youngs.

Art and Technology show poster 2019

 

Presented as part of the Art & Technology exhibition, Non-Human Intelligence.

Come out and celebrate with us at the opening on December 4th, 5 – 7pm.

Hopkins Hall, the Ohio State University –  campus map and transportation

Non-Human Intelligence

Art and Technology show poster 2019Art & Technology exhibition

Non-Human Intelligence: In the realm of animal, insect, plant and computer systems, can humans co-create with “other”? Can we look beyond human-dominated ways of understanding?

Artists, technologists, and scientists are as likely to collaborate with bees, bacteria, spiders as with artificial intelligence in the creation of their work, provoking difficult questions regarding the nature of creativity and non-human others’ consciousness. When working with living systems, the biggest struggle is to keep the systems alive and this requires a sensitive humility and respect. Donna Haraway’s concept of “becoming with” describes the back and forth nature of interacting with animals as we form a connection and broaden our notion of the nature of the intelligence of others. It entertains the idea of multispecies and transspecies interactions in the co-creative process. “Becoming-with” allows us to better acknowledge “others” right to exist, thrive, and express individual agencies.

Through an expanded understanding of the intelligent, intertwined, symbiotic nature of our living planet, might we become more human?

“Becoming-with” allows us to better acknowledge “others” right to exist, thrive and express individual agencies. Through accommodating non-human others, might we become more human in the process, by demonstrating an understanding of the deeply intertwined symbiotic nature of our living planet?

This semester, students in the Art & Technology courses – ranging from animation, art-science, 3D modeling, and internet art to robotics –  have created individual and group artworks related to this theme and they will be presenting them in this juried exhibition. Make sure to visit the special installation in the Emerging Technology Studios on the 3rd floor of Hopkins Hall.

  • Opening celebration: Wednesday, December 4, 2019, 5:00pm – 7:00pm
  • Open hours: Thursday, December 5, 11:00am – 5:00pm & Friday Dec 6, 11:00am – 4:00pm
  • Where: Hopkins Hall, the Ohio State University –  campus map and transportation
  • 1st floor lobby, corridor, and collaboratory, plus rooms 156, 160, and 346
  • Admission is free and open to the public.