Dalena Tran and Hirad Sab join Art & Tech

We welcome this dynamic duo into the Art & Technology area in the Department of Art this year. As a team, they will fill the position as Visiting Assistant Professor, teaching courses, working on their research and participating our creative community.

Both earned their MFAs from the Media Arts program at the University of California Los Angeles in 2020. Their creative practices span widely across the field of new media art –  from interactive web comics to algorithmically-generated 3D animations, to music videos. They occasionally create artwork together and their live, audiovisual performances have been exhibited at MoMA PS1 and ICA London.

Dalena Tran hails from Salt Lake City, Utah, where she received her BA in Film & Media Arts with Honors from the University of Utah. She creates stories and situations that entangle subjectivity and temporality in response to notions of voyeurism, hegemony, memory, and the phenomenon of media. Her work has been featured in O FLUXO, Assembly Point, Flat Journal, Adult Swim, and Nowness.

Hirad Sab is from Tehran, Iran. He received his BS in Computer Science from the University of Utah. In conversation with emerging technologies, his work reflects on current political, social, and cultural realities intertwined with a critique of technoculturalism and technopositivism. He has exhibited at The Wrong Biennale, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, CHAO Art Center, and The LOW Museum of Contemporary Culture; and it has been featured in Der Spiegel, W Magazine, NPR, Vice, Dazed, and The Guardian.


Un-becoming Carbon

Un-becoming Carbon: Traveling in Intercellular Space focuses on the importance of carbon sequestration by plants. The viewers enter the plants’ intercellular space, beginning their journey as a molecule of carbon dioxide, donating their carbon to the plant’s body, and emerging as life-giving oxygen. The interactive installation explores this process through physical, audio and virtual experiences. Entering a giant leaf through a stomatal opening, the viewers are surrounded by sculptural plant cells. Palisade Parenchyma droop from above while below Spongy Parenchyma and Stomata line the floor. Soft structures invite viewers to rest and continue their experience by entering virtual reality. An exploration between the macroverse and the microverse begins in a forest where the viewers take on the role of a carbon particle being absorbed into a leaf; first traveling through intercellular space, then moving into a cell to become part of its substance.

Concluding the experience, visitors are invited to adopt and nurture a living plant propagule to continue its carbon-binding work in their own home. Plant awareness posters act as a souvenir from their intercellular space travel.

This multimedia art installation was collaboratively created by the students and professors of an Art & Science class (Art 5001) by Ellie Bartlett, Jacklyn Brickman, Ashley Browne, Amanda Buckeye, Diva Colter, Mona Gazala, Youji Han, Saba Hashemi Shahraki, Brice Jordan, Liam Manning, Iris Meier, Brooke Stanley, Lily Thompson, Zachary Upperman, Stephen White, Taylor Woodie, and Amy Youngs.

Art and Technology show poster 2019

 

Presented as part of the Art & Technology exhibition, Non-Human Intelligence.

Come out and celebrate with us at the opening on December 4th, 5 – 7pm.

Hopkins Hall, the Ohio State University –  campus map and transportation

Non-Human Intelligence

Art and Technology show poster 2019Art & Technology exhibition

Non-Human Intelligence: In the realm of animal, insect, plant and computer systems, can humans co-create with “other”? Can we look beyond human-dominated ways of understanding?

Artists, technologists, and scientists are as likely to collaborate with bees, bacteria, spiders as with artificial intelligence in the creation of their work, provoking difficult questions regarding the nature of creativity and non-human others’ consciousness. When working with living systems, the biggest struggle is to keep the systems alive and this requires a sensitive humility and respect. Donna Haraway’s concept of “becoming with” describes the back and forth nature of interacting with animals as we form a connection and broaden our notion of the nature of the intelligence of others. It entertains the idea of multispecies and transspecies interactions in the co-creative process. “Becoming-with” allows us to better acknowledge “others” right to exist, thrive, and express individual agencies.

Through an expanded understanding of the intelligent, intertwined, symbiotic nature of our living planet, might we become more human?

“Becoming-with” allows us to better acknowledge “others” right to exist, thrive and express individual agencies. Through accommodating non-human others, might we become more human in the process, by demonstrating an understanding of the deeply intertwined symbiotic nature of our living planet?

This semester, students in the Art & Technology courses – ranging from animation, art-science, 3D modeling, and internet art to robotics –  have created individual and group artworks related to this theme and they will be presenting them in this juried exhibition. Make sure to visit the special installation in the Emerging Technology Studios on the 3rd floor of Hopkins Hall.

  • Opening celebration: Wednesday, December 4, 2019, 5:00pm – 7:00pm
  • Open hours: Thursday, December 5, 11:00am – 5:00pm & Friday Dec 6, 11:00am – 4:00pm
  • Where: Hopkins Hall, the Ohio State University –  campus map and transportation
  • 1st floor lobby, corridor, and collaboratory, plus rooms 156, 160, and 346
  • Admission is free and open to the public.

 

Jacklyn Brickman presents “Spellbreaker”

Jacklyn Brickman, MFA student in Art & Technology, was awarded a Tech Hub grant to produce an art installation that connects the human body to black walnut trees. She discusses her finished work Spellbreaker and her thoughts on the role that technology can play in helping us understand living systems.

OverClocked Exhibition

Overclocked computers have been configured to run at faster speeds than intended. Overclocking can lead to instability in the system and unpredictable behavior. Overclocking is an act of pushing computers for more speed, while it is also a metaphor for high tech low brow techniques of hacking to wrest control from computer engineers. Overclocking can reference the dream of a higher-performance computer as well as the nightmare of runaway technological growth at the expense of biological and ecological systems. Now fueled by new forms of artificial intelligences that allow machines to upgrade themselves, who might be holding the joystick?

This semester, students in the Art & Technology courses – ranging from animation, digital imaging, moving image art, and 3D modeling, to robotics –  have created individual and group artworks related to this theme and they will be presenting them in this juried exhibition.

Opening: Monday April 23, 5:00pm – 8:00pm

Open hours: Tuesday 4/24 – Thursday 4/26, 11:00am – 5:00pm & Friday 4/27, 11:00am – 4:00pm

Where: Hopkins Hall Gallery, Lobby, Corridor, and Collaboratory – directions

Admission is free and open to the public

Adam Zaretsky – visiting artist

Please join us for two BioArt workshops – a hands-on, do-it-yourself DNA isolation, followed by a novel culinary experience: Radical Gastronomy Microsushi Injection Lab!

Both on Thursday, February 15th, in Hopkins Hall Lobby, at the Ohio State University.

• 5:30 – 6:30 pm: The Hybrid DNA Isolation Skill-Share Lab • Zaretsky will show us how to extract DNA from Anything Living. Our lab is all ages and animal and tree nut free. Our lab is a communal performance ritual that can easily be repeated at home. Participants are asked to bring non-animal, living samples for DNA Isolation.

• 6:30 – 7:30 pm: Methods of Transgenesis Bioart Inject Lab: Microinjection • Participants will learn about the history of microinjection and practice Do It Yourself (DIY) microinjection. A Microinjector is a thin glass micropipette. The tiny needle is so small that it can inject directly into the nucleus of living cells. It is often used to get novel genes into the genomes of living cells. DNA is mixed with liquids and injected into various living beings. This is known either as transgenesis transfection, trans-gene infection, transformation, genetic modification or transgenic production. We will talk about the history and symbolism of microinjection development and the ethics of genetic modification. Participants will have a chance to test a variety of DIY and commercially available microinjectors. We will work on making gourmet microsushi with sterile solutions of wasabi or soy sauce and perhaps microinject some zebrafish embryos with DNA from the Hybrid DNA Isolation Lab.

The goal of these labs is to create an open-ended interface between life and the arts. To keep all expressive options dilated, the focus is not on the logic of the biologic. Instead, our cultural relationships to the world of life are exposed in their contradictory and slippery illogics. The interfaces between human society and the ecosphere are identified, rethought and collaged together to form signs of definitional breakdown. Consider the categories for whom should be treated to artistic xenophilia: Food, Nature, the Laboratory, Our Bodies and other non-humans. By defining where and how we interface with all lifeforms and by mixing these logics into art media instead of fact production, we arrive at unusual conceptual re-evaluations… towards a kinship with biodiversity and general life as complex for appreciation.

For this experiment, we want as many varieties of non-animal samples as possible. Participants have been requested to bring one or more samples of living, growing, raw or recently alive materials for Isolation and Purification of an admixture of these samples. We will take a portion of everything that is provided.

These samples will be mixed together during the isolation. Through a series of simple protocols, using household items, the hybrid DNA is extracted and collected by the group. We then use artistic techniques to work with this New and Very Old Media to make monoprints, sculpture and conceptual art.

Adam Zaretsky is a Wet-Lab Art Practitioner mixing Ecology, Biotechnology, Non-human Relations, Body Performance and Gastronomy. Zaretsky stages lively, hands-on bioart production labs based on topics such as: foreign species invasion (pure/impure), radical food science (edible/inedible), jazz bioinformatics (code/flesh), tissue culture (undead/semi-alive), transgenic design issues (traits/desires), interactive ethology (person/machine/non-human) and physiology (performance/stress). A former researcher at the MIT department of biology, for the past decade Zaretsky has been teaching an experimental bioart class called VivoArts at: San Francisco State University (SFSU), SymbioticA (UWA), Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI), University of Leiden’s The Arts and Genomic Centre (TAGC) and with the Waag Society. He has also taught DIY-IGM (Do-It-Yourself Inherited Genetic Modification of the Human Genome) at New York University (NYU) and Carnegie Melon University (CMU). He also runs a public life arts school: VASTAL (The Vivoarts School for Transgenic Aesthetics Ltd.) His art practice focuses on an array of legal, ethical, social and libidinal implications of biotechnological materials and methods with a focus on transgenic humans. Adam is currently Media Arts Faculty in the School of Communication and the Arts at Marist College. Zaretsky received his BFA in Studio Art from the University of California at Davis, his MFA in Art and Technology from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and his Ph.D. in Integrated Electronic Arts from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

 

Trans-Species Skins

Trans-Species Skins is a themed art exhibition exploring skin as a metaphor and substance that transcends species categories. Skin is the multilayered and multipurpose organ that shifts from thick to thin, tight to loose, wet to dry, across the landscapes of bodies and machine interfaces. Natural and artificial skin responds to heat, cold, pleasure and pain. It lacks boundaries and flows seamlessly from exposed surfaces to our internal cavities real and virtual. It is a self-repairing, semi-permeable surface, with inner layers that are flush with nerves and glands, sensors and chips. New tools allow artists, designers, and engineers to look at a new emerging organicism that takes shape across the surface of the grown and manufactured. Skins can modulate meaning, touch, function and can provide feedback and change with light and heat. Flexible membranes embedded with sensors and materials are bent, impregnated, or inflated to become structure. Re-skinning allows deceit; the non-living can approximate life, and the living can appear otherwise.

This semester, students in the Art & Technology courses – ranging from animation, art-science, digital imaging, and 3D modeling to robotics –  have created individual and group artworks related to this theme and they will be presenting them in this juried exhibition.

Opening Wednesday, December 6, 5:00pm – 8:00pm

Open hours: Thursday, December 7, 11:00am – 5:00pm & Friday Dec 8, 11:00am – 4:00pm

Where: Hopkins Hall Gallery, Lobby, Corridor, and Collaboratory – directions

Admission is free and open to the public