Visiting Artist – Stephanie Rothenberg

Stephanie Rothenberg’s interdisciplinary art draws from digital culture, science and economics to explore relationships between human designed systems and biological ecosystems. Moving between real and virtual spaces her work investigates the power dynamics of techno utopias, global economics and outsourced labor. She has exhibited throughout the US and internationally in venues including Eyebeam (US), Sundance Film Festival (US), Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art / MASS MoCA (US), House of Electronic Arts / HeK (CH), LABoral (ES), Transmediale (DE), and ZKM Center for Art & Media (DE). She is a recipient of numerous awards, most recently from the Harpo Foundation and Creative Capital.

Artist Website: http://stephanierothenberg.com/

When: Tuesday, March 8, 12pm EST.

Contact Amy Youngs youngs.6@osu.edu for zoom link.

With thanks to the Department of Art Fund to support visiting artist presentations.

Ruth Burke Visiting Artist

OSU Art & Tech Alumna Ruth Burke (BFA 2012) is visiting to present her recent artwork. Her work involves interspecies collaborations with animals; inspired by her relationships with them. Ruth’s visit is sponsored by the Graduate Student Art Club at Ohio State University.

Ruth Burke digital imaging art
Susurrus 2019, by Ruth Burke

More on Ruth’s Website.

Flyer for Ruth Burke visiting artist

Jacklyn Brickman presents “Spellbreaker”

Jacklyn Brickman, MFA student in Art & Technology, was awarded a Tech Hub grant to produce an art installation that connects the human body to black walnut trees. She discusses her finished work Spellbreaker and her thoughts on the role that technology can play in helping us understand living systems.

Pinar Yoldas

Yoldas is an infradisciplinary designer/artist/researcher. Her work develops within biological sciences and digital technologies through architectural installations, kinetic sculpture, sound, video and drawing with a focus on post-humanism, eco-nihilism, anthropocene and feminist technoscience. She is a is a Turkish-American architect, artist and an assistant professor at University of California, San Diego.

  • Thursday April 19th, at 2:30pm 
  • Room 362 Hopkins Hall

Sponsored by the Student Art and Tech Club, Science and Technology Studies: a Humanities and Arts Discovery Theme and The Graduate Student Art Club.

Ecosystems of Excess, by Pinar Yoldas

Art-Science Panel

Art-Science Collaborations

A panel and discussion on current synergistic creative research and teaching partnerships between artists and scientists stimulating innovation, knowledge production and critical engagement. With a focus on environmentalism, the panelists will present examples of research shaped by the disciplines of art and science. Learn about projects that are created by scientists working with artists, by artists who teach and work with scientists, and by an artist who is also a scientist. What happens when there is friction? Who benefits from these collaborations? Is the career risk worth it? Join the moderated discussion at the end.

Panelists: 

Moderator: 

  • Kim Landsbergen, Associate Professor of Biology & Environmental Science, Antioch College

Friday April 6, 2018. 12 pm – 2 pm

  • Research Commons, 18th Avenue Library, The Ohio State University
  • Presentations 12pm – 1pm
  • Moderated discussion 1pm – 2pm

Co-sponsored by the Ohio State University’s Science and Technology Studies – a Humanities and Arts Discovery Theme, the STEAM Factory and Art and Technology in the Department of Art.

Brandon Ballengée – visiting artist

While at Ohio State, Brandon Ballengée will participate in several events:

Tuesday, April 3

Marine Species Eco-Action and Vertebrate Specimen Preservation Workshop
Globally marine fisheries are suffering from species decline with many populations verging on collapse. Choosing locally sourced sustainable seafood is a key to marine conservation, yet few of us know which species are ecologically safe to eat. Join artist/ biologist Brandon Ballengée on a seafood market survey of fishes, mollusks, arthropods and other species. Ballengée will discuss encountered species natural history, ecological status and collectively we will choose specimens for a dissection and preservation workshop following the tour. When back at the lab participants will learn how to dissect and preserve specimens at a Natural History Museum standard.

  • 12:00 pm – meet at The Fish Guys in the North Market, 59 Spruce St, Columbus, OH 43215
  • 2:30 pm – we will meet back at the Museum of Biological Diversity for the dissection and preservation part of the workshop
  • Bring a sketchbook and some money to purchase a fresh specimen at the market.
  • Limited participants: please email youngs.6@osu.edu for availability

Wednesday, April 4

Praeter Naturam: Beyond Nature Artist Talk, 4 pm, Wexner Center for the Arts, Film/Video Theatre

Thursday, April 5

Ohio Ecology on Tap & Crude Life Portable Museum Exhibition 6-8 pm, The Spacebar, 2590 N. High Street

Thursday, April 6

Art & Science Panel 12 pm – 2 pm, Research Commons, 18th Avenue Library

Adam Zaretsky – visiting artist

Please join us for two BioArt workshops – a hands-on, do-it-yourself DNA isolation, followed by a novel culinary experience: Radical Gastronomy Microsushi Injection Lab!

Both on Thursday, February 15th, in Hopkins Hall Lobby, at the Ohio State University.

• 5:30 – 6:30 pm: The Hybrid DNA Isolation Skill-Share Lab • Zaretsky will show us how to extract DNA from Anything Living. Our lab is all ages and animal and tree nut free. Our lab is a communal performance ritual that can easily be repeated at home. Participants are asked to bring non-animal, living samples for DNA Isolation.

• 6:30 – 7:30 pm: Methods of Transgenesis Bioart Inject Lab: Microinjection • Participants will learn about the history of microinjection and practice Do It Yourself (DIY) microinjection. A Microinjector is a thin glass micropipette. The tiny needle is so small that it can inject directly into the nucleus of living cells. It is often used to get novel genes into the genomes of living cells. DNA is mixed with liquids and injected into various living beings. This is known either as transgenesis transfection, trans-gene infection, transformation, genetic modification or transgenic production. We will talk about the history and symbolism of microinjection development and the ethics of genetic modification. Participants will have a chance to test a variety of DIY and commercially available microinjectors. We will work on making gourmet microsushi with sterile solutions of wasabi or soy sauce and perhaps microinject some zebrafish embryos with DNA from the Hybrid DNA Isolation Lab.

The goal of these labs is to create an open-ended interface between life and the arts. To keep all expressive options dilated, the focus is not on the logic of the biologic. Instead, our cultural relationships to the world of life are exposed in their contradictory and slippery illogics. The interfaces between human society and the ecosphere are identified, rethought and collaged together to form signs of definitional breakdown. Consider the categories for whom should be treated to artistic xenophilia: Food, Nature, the Laboratory, Our Bodies and other non-humans. By defining where and how we interface with all lifeforms and by mixing these logics into art media instead of fact production, we arrive at unusual conceptual re-evaluations… towards a kinship with biodiversity and general life as complex for appreciation.

For this experiment, we want as many varieties of non-animal samples as possible. Participants have been requested to bring one or more samples of living, growing, raw or recently alive materials for Isolation and Purification of an admixture of these samples. We will take a portion of everything that is provided.

These samples will be mixed together during the isolation. Through a series of simple protocols, using household items, the hybrid DNA is extracted and collected by the group. We then use artistic techniques to work with this New and Very Old Media to make monoprints, sculpture and conceptual art.

Adam Zaretsky is a Wet-Lab Art Practitioner mixing Ecology, Biotechnology, Non-human Relations, Body Performance and Gastronomy. Zaretsky stages lively, hands-on bioart production labs based on topics such as: foreign species invasion (pure/impure), radical food science (edible/inedible), jazz bioinformatics (code/flesh), tissue culture (undead/semi-alive), transgenic design issues (traits/desires), interactive ethology (person/machine/non-human) and physiology (performance/stress). A former researcher at the MIT department of biology, for the past decade Zaretsky has been teaching an experimental bioart class called VivoArts at: San Francisco State University (SFSU), SymbioticA (UWA), Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI), University of Leiden’s The Arts and Genomic Centre (TAGC) and with the Waag Society. He has also taught DIY-IGM (Do-It-Yourself Inherited Genetic Modification of the Human Genome) at New York University (NYU) and Carnegie Melon University (CMU). He also runs a public life arts school: VASTAL (The Vivoarts School for Transgenic Aesthetics Ltd.) His art practice focuses on an array of legal, ethical, social and libidinal implications of biotechnological materials and methods with a focus on transgenic humans. Adam is currently Media Arts Faculty in the School of Communication and the Arts at Marist College. Zaretsky received his BFA in Studio Art from the University of California at Davis, his MFA in Art and Technology from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and his Ph.D. in Integrated Electronic Arts from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

 

From Molecules to Ecosystems

Announcing a new special topics course for Fall 2017

This Art/Science studio course will explore connections between micro and macro, plants and humans, local and global, anthropocentric and ecocentric. Co-taught by Molecular Genetics professor Iris Meier and Art professor Amy Youngs, students will learn to apply both scientific and artistic methods to creative projects. Working individually and collaboratively, we will do experiments in the lab and art studios, creating works that explore  • climate stress & adaptation • biotech / bioart • constructed ecosystems • biomimicry • hypernature • symbiosis.

All forms of art making welcome in this class. While we will be discussing, reading, and experimenting with molecules, plants and eco-aesthetics, students can chose to work in media appropriate to their creative skill sets. Ideal for graduate students, and advanced undergraduates in studio-based or lab-based disciplines such as Art, Biology, Science, Design, Music and Architecture.

email Amy youngs.6@osu.edu or Iris meier.56@osu.edu for permission to enroll