Exhibition: A Textured Transmission

wavy lines behind text "A Textured Transmission"

An exhibition of student work throughout Hopkins Hall & Online

Dec 8, 5 – 7pm; First floor work on view through Dec 10

Set in a hybrid of online and physical space, A Textured Transmission is an exhibition of student artwork showcasing the range and depth of work coming from art & technology area courses in the department of art. After a semester of exploration with tools, technology, and time, students are ready to broadcast their ideas and accomplishments. This exhibition signals an exchange of ideas and carries an energy that emerges as we make our way back to physical spaces.  It also melds with the new techniques and online spaces we have built over the past year. This is a textured transmission.

  • First Floor Hallway: Digital Imaging | 3D Modeling | Moving Image Art | Computer Animation
  • Collaboratory 167 & New Projects Lab 146: Studio Practice | New Media Robotics
  • Hopkins 340: Art & Science of Roots
  • Emerging Technology Studios 346: Virtual Reality and Video Game Artwork during the opening.
  • Meet the Art & Tech Student Club! They will be tabling on the first floor during the opening.
The Ohio State University, Hopkins Hall, 128 N Oval Mall, Columbus, OH 43210
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Art & Science of Roots – ART 5101

Professors Iris Meier and Amy Youngs will co-teach an interdisciplinary Art and Science course in Autumn 2021. We will do science experiments and art projects which culminate in a collaboratively designed and built art installation. Example artwork from past classes: Unbecoming Carbon: traveling in intercellular space and Where Rocks are Fed to Trees.

poster describing Art & Science course with picture of a hand holding roots

We welcome interested graduate students and advanced undergraduate students from any discipline. Contact youngs.6@osu.edu or meier.56@osu.edu

Un-becoming Carbon

Un-becoming Carbon: Traveling in Intercellular Space focuses on the importance of carbon sequestration by plants. The viewers enter the plants’ intercellular space, beginning their journey as a molecule of carbon dioxide, donating their carbon to the plant’s body, and emerging as life-giving oxygen. The interactive installation explores this process through physical, audio and virtual experiences. Entering a giant leaf through a stomatal opening, the viewers are surrounded by sculptural plant cells. Palisade Parenchyma droop from above while below Spongy Parenchyma and Stomata line the floor. Soft structures invite viewers to rest and continue their experience by entering virtual reality. An exploration between the macroverse and the microverse begins in a forest where the viewers take on the role of a carbon particle being absorbed into a leaf; first traveling through intercellular space, then moving into a cell to become part of its substance.

Concluding the experience, visitors are invited to adopt and nurture a living plant propagule to continue its carbon-binding work in their own home. Plant awareness posters act as a souvenir from their intercellular space travel.

This multimedia art installation was collaboratively created by the students and professors of an Art & Science class (Art 5001) by Ellie Bartlett, Jacklyn Brickman, Ashley Browne, Amanda Buckeye, Diva Colter, Mona Gazala, Youji Han, Saba Hashemi Shahraki, Brice Jordan, Liam Manning, Iris Meier, Brooke Stanley, Lily Thompson, Zachary Upperman, Stephen White, Taylor Woodie, and Amy Youngs.

Art and Technology show poster 2019

 

Presented as part of the Art & Technology exhibition, Non-Human Intelligence.

Come out and celebrate with us at the opening on December 4th, 5 – 7pm.

Hopkins Hall, the Ohio State University –  campus map and transportation

Jacklyn Brickman presents “Spellbreaker”

Jacklyn Brickman, MFA student in Art & Technology, was awarded a Tech Hub grant to produce an art installation that connects the human body to black walnut trees. She discusses her finished work Spellbreaker and her thoughts on the role that technology can play in helping us understand living systems.

Pinar Yoldas

Yoldas is an infradisciplinary designer/artist/researcher. Her work develops within biological sciences and digital technologies through architectural installations, kinetic sculpture, sound, video and drawing with a focus on post-humanism, eco-nihilism, anthropocene and feminist technoscience. She is a is a Turkish-American architect, artist and an assistant professor at University of California, San Diego.

  • Thursday April 19th, at 2:30pm 
  • Room 362 Hopkins Hall

Sponsored by the Student Art and Tech Club, Science and Technology Studies: a Humanities and Arts Discovery Theme and The Graduate Student Art Club.

Ecosystems of Excess, by Pinar Yoldas

Art-Science Panel

Art-Science Collaborations

A panel and discussion on current synergistic creative research and teaching partnerships between artists and scientists stimulating innovation, knowledge production and critical engagement. With a focus on environmentalism, the panelists will present examples of research shaped by the disciplines of art and science. Learn about projects that are created by scientists working with artists, by artists who teach and work with scientists, and by an artist who is also a scientist. What happens when there is friction? Who benefits from these collaborations? Is the career risk worth it? Join the moderated discussion at the end.

Panelists: 

Moderator: 

  • Kim Landsbergen, Associate Professor of Biology & Environmental Science, Antioch College

Friday April 6, 2018. 12 pm – 2 pm

  • Research Commons, 18th Avenue Library, The Ohio State University
  • Presentations 12pm – 1pm
  • Moderated discussion 1pm – 2pm

Co-sponsored by the Ohio State University’s Science and Technology Studies – a Humanities and Arts Discovery Theme, the STEAM Factory and Art and Technology in the Department of Art.