Exhibition: A Textured Transmission

wavy lines behind text "A Textured Transmission"

An exhibition of student work throughout Hopkins Hall & Online

Dec 8, 5 – 7pm; First floor work on view through Dec 10

Set in a hybrid of online and physical space, A Textured Transmission is an exhibition of student artwork showcasing the range and depth of work coming from art & technology area courses in the department of art. After a semester of exploration with tools, technology, and time, students are ready to broadcast their ideas and accomplishments. This exhibition signals an exchange of ideas and carries an energy that emerges as we make our way back to physical spaces.  It also melds with the new techniques and online spaces we have built over the past year. This is a textured transmission.

  • First Floor Hallway: Digital Imaging | 3D Modeling | Moving Image Art | Computer Animation
  • Collaboratory 167 & New Projects Lab 146: Studio Practice | New Media Robotics
  • Hopkins 340: Art & Science of Roots
  • Emerging Technology Studios 346: Virtual Reality and Video Game Artwork during the opening.
  • Meet the Art & Tech Student Club! They will be tabling on the first floor during the opening.
The Ohio State University, Hopkins Hall, 128 N Oval Mall, Columbus, OH 43210
Marker View on map

Radicant Bodies

In Botany, to be radicant is to have roots that grow above the ground. This form of rooting allows plant species to mobilize, adapt, and grow on any surface. During an unprecedented moment of remoteness, our proximity to the tactile, irregular, and bumpy surfaces of everyday life in the classroom, in our labs, and our studios are suddenly smoothened, stretched thin, and illuminated through our screens.
RADICANT BODIES highlights the work of students who have found new ways to enact senses of creativity, community, and care during an incredible shift in our relationship towards technology and social proxemics. Our bodies negotiate distance and intimacy; the line between visibility and surveillance; what is organic and inorganic, to make sense of the complex terrain and interfaces we find ourselves traversing today. Student works featured in this Spring’s Art & Technology exhibition are selected from their courses in Digital Imaging, Internet Art, 3D Modeling, Moving Image Art, New Media Robotics, Computer Animation, Graphic Novel, Art Games, Sound & Image, and Studio Practice.

Art & Science of Roots – ART 5101

Professors Iris Meier and Amy Youngs will co-teach an interdisciplinary Art and Science course in Autumn 2021. We will do science experiments and art projects which culminate in a collaboratively designed and built art installation. Example artwork from past classes: Unbecoming Carbon: traveling in intercellular space and Where Rocks are Fed to Trees.

poster describing Art & Science course with picture of a hand holding roots

We welcome interested graduate students and advanced undergraduate students from any discipline. Contact youngs.6@osu.edu or meier.56@osu.edu

Visiting Artist – Stephanie Rothenberg

Stephanie Rothenberg’s interdisciplinary art draws from digital culture, science and economics to explore relationships between human designed systems and biological ecosystems. Moving between real and virtual spaces her work investigates the power dynamics of techno utopias, global economics and outsourced labor. She has exhibited throughout the US and internationally in venues including Eyebeam (US), Sundance Film Festival (US), Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art / MASS MoCA (US), House of Electronic Arts / HeK (CH), LABoral (ES), Transmediale (DE), and ZKM Center for Art & Media (DE). She is a recipient of numerous awards, most recently from the Harpo Foundation and Creative Capital.

Artist Website: http://stephanierothenberg.com/

When: Monday, March 8, 12pm EST.

Contact Amy Youngs youngs.6@osu.edu for zoom link.

With thanks to the Department of Art Fund to support visiting artist presentations.

Can You See My Screen?

artwork by Ada Huang
3D render by Ada Huang. Text and poster design by Dalena Tran and Hirad Sab.

The contemporary moment is one of unprecedented transfiguration. A constant tug of war where institutions, communities, interests, and most importantly, individuals coincide in an undulating state of deformation and alteration. Those boundaries that defined our movements and occupations have blurred to the point of non-existence, facilitating an amorphous space for constant activity. Shopping for winter clothes while attending a lecture, replying to business emails at the dinner table, or participating in job training while taking the subway, the established limits of social and personal spaces are expunged, and with that, so are the boundaries of the individual. And while this shapeless chimeric reality in its unparalleled distraction and discontinuity demands the individual’s utmost awareness and participation, it continues to expand its disciplinary practices to every crevice of daily life. The punch clock is now next to the bed; better wake up, sunshine!

Nothing is ever finished anymore, and no one is ever done with anything—the corporation, the educational system, the factory, and the household subsist in a simultaneous state of coexistence. And it is at the dawn of this new day of bewildering complexity and anomalous virtual convergence that I ask from you, from you the eternal surveilling gaze, from you my mentor, my peer, my adversary, and my friend: the audio seems to be working, but can you see my screen?

EXHIBITION ARTWORKS

 

Alumni Snapshot – Sarah Hockman

Sarah Hockman, (BFA 2016) visited the Studio Practice course this semester to share her career path with us. After graduating, she researched jobs online while traveling to California in her van. Her first job was at Unity Labs in San Francisco, as a Virtual Reality Lab Assistant. Her creativity and working knowledge of emerging technologies were very helpful skills for this position.

Eventually, she sought new challenges. She had quite a bit of experience working in animation and video as an Art & Technology major, and she knew she really enjoyed it. She aimed her job search at smaller companies, which would allow her to have more creative control of projects and she found a great match as a Motion Graphics Designer at Avalanch Media in Salt Lake City, Utah. After a few years of working there, she decided to leave so she could go on a long bike trek in Spain.


With her work portfolio and a solid network, she is able to find clients as a freelancer now. Check out her website here.

 

Some of her advice to students included:

  • reinvent your brand regularly
  • maintain an up-to-date website
  • don’t get too fancy with your resume
  • make time for your own creative projects
  • make sure to enjoy your life, too!