2020 Western Bean Cutworm Monitoring Program: Farmer Participation Needed

By Clint Schroeder – OSU Extension Allen County

OSU Extension will be monitoring for Western Bean Cutworm (WBC) moths again during the 2020 growing season. Western bean cutworm moths overwinter in the soil and emerge as adults in late June or early July. Adults then mate and lay eggs in clusters on the top surface of the upper third of a corn plant. The eggs require five to seven days to develop, during which time the egg color changes to tan and then to purple immediately before hatching. As the eggs hatch the larvae will look to feed on the exposed tassels and then make their way into the husks to feed on the developing corn ear. Scouting is critical as larvae that hatch prior to tasseling have a low survival rate, and larvae that have entered the husk will be protected from insecticide applications.

Western Bean Cutworm Moth

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Omitting residual herbicides in soybeans – really – we have to have this argument again?

By Dr. Mark Loux OSU Weed Science

According to our network of sources, the effectiveness of new soybean trait systems has some growers once again thinking about omitting preemergence residual herbicides from their weed management programs.  Some people apparently need to learn the same lessons over and over again.  Having gone through this once in the early 2000’s when Roundup Ready soybeans had taken over and we all sprayed only glyphosate all day every day, we think we’re pretty sure where it leads.  We’re sensitive to concerns about the cost of production, but the cost-benefit analysis for residual herbicides is way in the positive column.  We’re not the ones who ultimately have to convince growers to keep using residual herbicides, and we respect those of you who do have to fight this battle.  Back in the first round of this when we were advocating for use of residuals, while the developers of RR soybeans were undermining us and telling everyone that residuals would reduce yield etc, we used to have people tell us “My agronomist/salesman is recommending that I use residuals, but I think he/she is just trying to get more money out of me”.  Our response at that time of course was “no pretty sure he/she is just trying save your **** and make sure you control your weeds so that your whole farm isn’t one big infestation of glyphosate-resistant marestail.”  And that answer probably works today too – maybe substituting waterhemp for marestail.

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Event Notice – Pesticide and Fertilizer Re-certification

We still have space available for our fertilizer and pesticide re-certification course. Please call our office at 419-879-9108 to get signed up for this training opportunity by March 6th. The training will begin on March 11th with fertilizer re-certification starting at 5pm. The pesticide training will start immediately afterwards at 6pm and finish at 9pm. The class will be held in the Student Services Building (old extension office) on the OSU Lima Campus.

Make Safety Your First Priority When Emptying Grain Bins

By Charles Schwab & Dirk Maier, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach

Following the wet and late harvest of 2019, several Midwest states are on the edge of a dangerous cliff when it comes to emptying their grain bins. Conditions are aligning to create the potential for tragic accidents and grain suffocation deaths to occur when grain bins start to be emptied.

It is common knowledge that quality harvested grain placed in storage, coupled with a best management practice of caring for grain, yields quality grain leaving storage for market. Inversely, either poor quality grain being placed in storage or poor management practices for caring for grain leads to spoiled grain leaving storage.grain facility system.

Getting spoiled grain out of storage always poses an increased safety risk for entrapment and suffocation to a farm operator and worker. There are years of documentation that illustrate the direct connection from spoiled grain leaving storage to a tragic grain entrapment and the resulting fatality. Continue reading

Managing Stored Grain

By:  Jason Hartschuh, OSU Extension

Managing stored grain throughout the winter is an important part of your grain marketing plan for farm profitability. This winter we are already receiving reports of stored grain going out of condition, which can lower the value and be a hazard to those working around the grain facility. At a minimum, stored grain that has gone out of condition can cause health hazards, especially when grain dust contains mold and bacteria. Out of condition grain can also form a crust or stick to the bin walls and if someone enters the bin for any reason an entrapment could occur. For more information on safety when working around grain visit http://go.osu.edu/AFM and listen to episode 41 of the podcast on grain bin safety.

Too many of us know the scare of a close call with grain entrapment but lived to tell the story. Even if it was just in a wagon or a truck while unloading wet grain, the fear is real. Unfortunately, it does not always stop us from entering a bin without the proper safety equipment. To help raise awareness of the dangers of working around stored grain, Champaign County will be showing a screening of the movie SILO on February 6 at 6pm at the Gloria Theater in Urbana. SILO is “inspired by true events, SILO follows a harrowing day in an American farm town. Disaster strikes when teenager Cody Rose is entrapped in a 50-foot-tall grain bin. When the corn turns to quicksand, family, neighbors and first responders must put aside their differences to rescue Cody from drowning in the crop that has sustained their community for generations.” RSVP at https://silourbana.eventbrite.com.

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Ohio Farm Custom Rate Survey 2020

By: Barry Ward OSU Extension

 A large number of Ohio farmers hire machinery operations and other farm related work to be completed by others. This is often due to lack of proper equipment, lack of time or lack of expertise for a particular operation.  Many farm business owners do not own equipment for every possible job that they may encounter in the course of operating a farm and may, instead of purchasing the equipment needed, seek out someone with the proper tools necessary to complete the job. This farm work completed by others is often referred to as “custom farm work” or more simply “custom work”. A “custom rate” is the amount agreed upon by both parties to be paid by the custom work customer to the custom work provider. Continue reading

Farm Succession Workshop to be held in Kenton, Ohio

By:Jeff Stachler OSU Extension

A two-day workshop about Farm Transition / Succession is planned for February 3 and 25, 2020.  Participants must attend both days.  The workshop will be held at Mid-Ohio Energy conference room which is located at 1210 Lima Street, Kenton, OH 43326.  Each day the program runs from 10:00 am to 3:00 pm with registration at 9:30 am.

One of Extension’s most knowledgeable individuals regarding Farm Transition is David Marrison from Coshocton County.  On the first Day of the workshop David will discuss about the Key questions to answer when planning for the future of the family farm business, Providing income for multiple generations and developing the next generation of farm managers, Retirement strategies, and much more. Continue reading

Event Notice – 2020 Allen County Ag Outlook and Agronomy Day

Join Allen County OSU Extension Office on Thursday, February 6 from 8:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. for the 2020 Allen County Ag Outlook and Agronomy Day at the Allen County Fairgrounds (2750 Harding Hwy, Lima, Ohio). Speakers for this event include Ben Brown, Barry Ward, Aaron Wilson, Ian Sheldon, Jeff Stachler and Elizabeth Hawkins. Vendors will also be onsite.

The registration fee is $15 by January 31, or $20 at the door. Light breakfast, lunch, and a presentation folder are included in the registration fee. Register at 419-879-9108 or schroeder.307@osu.edu.

2019 eFields Report is Available

By Elizabeth Hawkins and John Fulton, OSU Extension

The spring planting season of 2019 was a season that many of us may want to forget, but the weather conditions we dealt with provided us an opportunity to learn how we can be more resilient in agriculture. Looking back at the lessons learned can help us be prepared for similar conditions in the future. The 2019 eFields Research Report highlights 88 on-farm, field scale trials conducted in 30 Ohio counties. Research topics include nutrient management, precision crop management, cover crops, and forages. Other information about production budgets, planting progress, and the 2018 Farm Bill is also included.

The 2019 report is now available in both a print and e-version. To receive a printed copy, contact your local OSU Extension office or email digitalag@osu.edu. The e-version can be viewed and downloaded at go.osu.edu/eFields with the online version readable on smartphone or tablet devices. Continue reading