Water Quality Extension Associates Planning Winter Meetings and Spring Research Need YOU!

By Rachel Cochran OSU Extension

The six water quality extension associates located in Northwest Ohio are gearing up for winter programming and need input from you! If there is a topic or series of topics that you would find helpful regarding water quality, soil health, cover crops, manure management, etc., please reach out to the water quality associate in your area to let us know. In addition, it’s never too early to start thinking about potential field research projects for next year. We would love to work with you to help answer questions you may have about your operation. See the different trials we’ve been working on this year in the 2021 eFields publication, set to be released in mid-January, or reach out to an associate for questions. Continue reading

Do’s and Don’ts of Local Beef

By Garth Ruff, Beef Cattle Field Specialist, OSU Extension

If you just glanced at the title of this column, you maybe surprised as to how the next few paragraphs unfold, however there are a couple of points that I want to make, and feel are warranted after seeing some misleading/untruthful advertisements for local/freezer beef here recently.

First off, I am a big supporter of local food production and direct marketing. When done properly in some production systems there are opportunities to capitalize on demand for locally produced food, serve as a direct link for consumer education, enhance economic sustainability of the farm enterprise, among other benefits.

I have taught dozens of programs on local foods and direct marketing in the last five or so years. In each of those programs I remind participants of these two things with regards to labeling and direct marketing;

  1. Do not misrepresent your product and
  2. Do not misrepresent or make false statements about the product of other producers.

Recently several friends of mine have shared with me several instances of both of the above scenarios. In one such instance a freezer beef producer’s (who shall not be named) attack on beef produced by other producers and the beef industry was egregious enough to get me wound up; and I try not to get too wound up about things seen on social media. Spreading falsehoods about the wholesomeness of beef is something as an industry we should not tolerate, and I hope that you as producers feel the same.

Continue reading

2021 Allen County Weed Survey

By Clint Schroeder OSU Extension

Each fall Ohio State University Extension conducts a survey of the different types of weeds present in soybean fields, as well as, the level of infestation. Weed Science State Specialist Dr. Mark Loux leads this study and uses the information gained to help develop future weed management programs. This study is conducted in each county where there is an Ag and Natural Resources Educator. The educator selects a route 80-100 miles long through the county and takes notes on one soybean field in each mile.

A total of 82 soybean fields were observed in Allen County this year.  Waterhemp and volunteer corn were the most prevalent and present in 30% of the observed fields.

2021 Allen County Weed Survey Results

Continue reading

Five Things to Know about Fall Herbicide Treatments

By:  Mark Loux OSU Extension

There is plenty of information on fall herbicide treatments in the C.O.R.N. newsletter archive and on other university websites.  Our philosophy on this has not changed much over the past decade.  A few brief reminders follow:

1.  When to spray?  Anytime between now and Thanksgiving will work, and possibly later.  We have applied into late December and still eventually controlled the weeds present at time of application.  Once hard freezes start to occur, there is usually a substantial change in the condition of certain weeds, such as dandelion and thistle, that renders them less sensitive to herbicides.  We discourage applications during periods of very cold weather which can occur starting about Thanksgiving, and also (obviously) when the ground is snow-covered. Continue reading

Grain Test Weight Considerations For Corn

By Bob Nielsen – Purdue University

Among the top 10 most discussed (and cussed) topics at the Chat ‘n Chew Cafe during corn harvest season is the grain test weight being reported from corn fields in the neighborhood. Test weight is measured in the U.S. in terms of pounds of grain per volumetric “Winchester” bushel. In practice, test weight measurements are based on the weight of grain that fills a quart container (37.24 qts to a bushel) that meets the specifications of the USDA-AMS (FGIS) for official inspection (Fig. 1). Certain electronic moisture meters, like the Dickey-John GAC, estimate test weight based on a smaller-volume cup. These test weight estimates are reasonably accurate but are not accepted for official grain trading purposes.

Fig. 1. A standard filling hopper and stand for the accurate filling of quart or pint cups for grain test weight determination. (Image: www.seedburo.com).

 

The official minimum allowable test weight in the U.S. for No. 1 yellow corn is 56 lbs/bu and for No. 2 yellow corn is 54 lbs/bu (USDA-AMS (FGIS), 1996). Corn grain in the U.S. is marketed on the basis of a 56-lb “bushel” regardless of test weight. Even though grain moisture is not part of the U.S. standards for corn, grain buyers pay on the basis of “dry” bushels (15 to 15.5% grain moisture content) or discount the market price to account for the drying expenses they expect to incur handling wetter corn grain. Continue reading

Combine Set-up Field Day

By Amanda Douridas

After the difficult harvest last year, and the prevalence of volunteer corn in soybean fields this year, there is a need to re-visit proper combine setup to minimize loss during good years or bad. Join us on September 16, 1-3:30 pm as experts discuss proper setup for corn and we look at this applied in the field. Dr. Elizabeth Hawkins will discuss yield monitor calibration through the season. Jason Hartschuh will walk over a combine and share set-up tips. We will also discuss care and cleaning which could save a lot of headaches this fall due to shortages in replacement parts and equipment. Lastly, a harvest demonstration will show yield loss with different setups and how to calculate it. Location is the corner of Clark and Herr Roads north of Urbana. Bring a lawn chair if you do not want to stand for the duration. In the event of a cancellation due to weather, please register to provide your contact information: http://go.osu.edu/CombineSetup.

Event Calendar for location map

Unusual Armyworm Outbreaks are Taking Many by Surprise

By Kelley Tilmon, Mark Sulc, Andy Michel, James Morris – OSU Extension

We have received an unusual number of reports about fall armyworm outbreaks particularly in forage including alfalfa and sorghum sudangrass, and in turf.  Certain hard-hit fields have been all but stripped bare (Figure 1).  Armyworm is not typically a problem in Ohio in late summer, so we encourage farmers to be aware of feeding damage in their fields.  Armyworms are much easier to kill when they are smaller, and feeding accelerates rapidly as they grow, so early detection is important.  Look for egg masses glued not only to vegetation but to structures like fence posts.  Egg masses have a fluffy-looking cover (Figure 2).  When the cover is peeled back, eggs are pearly and tan when new, and turn darker as they approach egg-hatch. Continue reading

Western Ohio Cropland Values and Cash Rents 2020-21

By: Barry Ward-OSU Extension

Ohio cropland varies significantly in its production capabilities and, consequently, cropland values and cash rents vary widely throughout the state. Generally, western Ohio cropland values and cash rents differ from much of southern and eastern Ohio cropland values and cash rents. The primary factors affecting these values and rents are land productivity and potential crop return, and the variability of those crop returns. Soils, fertility and drainage/irrigation capabilities are primary factors that most influence land productivity, crop return and variability of those crop returns.

Other factors impacting land values and cash rents may include field size and shape, field accessibility, market access, local market prices, field perimeter characteristics and potential for wildlife damage, buildings and grain storage, previous tillage system and crops, tolerant/resistant weed populations, USDA Program Yields, population density, and competition for the cropland in a region. Factors specific to cash rental rates may include services provided by the operator and specific conditions of the lease. Continue reading

Allen County Crop Scouting Update – Late July

Clint Schroeder – OSU Extension

As both corn and soybeans have entered the reproductive phase of the crop cycle it is an important time to be scouting for disease and insect issues. One of the most important parts of integrated pest management (IPM) is crop scouting. When done properly it can help farmers obtain higher yields and increased profit per acre. When heading to the field don’t forget your copy of the Corn, Soybean, Wheat, and Forages Field Guide to help determine identification and threshold levels for each disease or pest. The field guide can be purchased at the extension office if you do not already have a copy.

Corn

OSU Extension conducts weekly monitoring of Western Bean Cutworm (WBC) pheromone traps throughout the state and published the data in the weekly in the C.O.R.N. Newsletter. Those results can be found here. Trap numbers have remained low for Allen County, but there has been an uptick in surrounding counties. Now is the time to scout for egg masses on the upper leaves. Select 20 consecutive plants in 5 locations of the field. If over 5% of those plants have egg masses an insecticide application is warranted. Continue reading

Get your Waterhemp Populations Screened for Herbicide Resistance

By Mark Loux OSU Extension

We have been screening a random sample of waterhemp populations for herbicide resistance over the past two years.  Herbicides used in the screen include mesotrione, atrazine, 2,4-D, fomesafen, and metolachlor.  Results of our research show that it’s possible for Ohio waterhemp populations to have some level of resistance to one, several, or all of these herbicides.  Glyphosate is not included because we assume almost all populations are already resistant to this.  We are also part of a regional project that has been screening for dicamba and glufosinate resistance with populations that we supply, although none has been identified to date.  Our sample size has been small so far, so at this point we are looking to expand our screening to include waterhemp populations submitted by anyone in Ohio looking for more information about their response to herbicides.  It’s preferable to have seed from waterhemp plants that have survived POST herbicide treatments, or where it appears that preemergence herbicides were fairly ineffective, if possible.  But we will screen any populations provided within the constraints of time and greenhouse space.  For a quick reminder about how to tell when seed from waterhemp is mature, check out this video.  When seed is mature, you can cut off seedheads and place in an open paper bag until ready to get them to us.  Or just shake heads into some type of container to collect seed.  Send us an email and we will figure out the best way to get seed to us, or if you need more information.  loux.1@osu.edu

Also – a reminder that while we would like to have seed from surviving waterhemp plants, the most effective method of preventing future problems with this weed is to not let any go to seed.  Not only because plants that survive may have resistance, but because they produce gobs of seed that will result in misery the following year.  Removal of these plants should have high priority right now.  However, where it’s apparent that this is not going to happen for whatever reason, make a note of the infested fields, and check on them starting in a couple weeks for seed.  This should help us to get a better handle on how resistance in waterhemp is evolving.