McMullen places first in regional interview contest

McMullen, 2020

Nicole McMullen, a junior studying agriscience education, earned the top award in the interview contest during the virtual Region V Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Related Sciences (MANRRS) Cluster. She will represent Ohio State and Region V at the National MANRRS Conference this spring.

MANRRS is a national society of people of all racial and ethnical groups in agricultural and related science careers with a focus on promoting these fields in a positive manner among ethnic minorities.

The interview contest is an opportunity to practice real-life skills needed to apply for a job. Participants prepare a resume and cover letter for a job they chose from the Interview Contest Job Descriptions. Contestants are also evaluated on their performance during a mock interview.

The goal of this contest is for participants to consistently meet and practice the skills that bring the benefits of comfort in interview scenarios; confidence, critical thinking, effective verbal and written communication, impromptu speaking, self-esteem and non-verbal practice and awareness.

“We are proud of Nicole for the growth and effort she put forward to lead to success in this contest,” said Dr. Shannon Washburn, professor of agriscience education and chair for the Department of Agricultural Communication, Education, and Leadership. “Participation in organizations like MANRRS and the opportunities they provide to students are valuable in the development of their careers. Nicole will benefit greatly from this experience as she enters the agricultural education profession.”

In 2019, McMullen was awarded first place in the impromptu speech contest for Region V. She completed a virtual internship this past summer with John Deere, which she obtained during a career fair at the 2019 Region V MANRRS Cluster at the University of Wisconsin – Madison.

Agriscience education is one of three undergraduate majors within ACEL. This major prepares students to acquire a license to teach agricultural science in secondary schools through extensive training in agriculture science, educational psychology, instructional methods and youth development. For additional information on the agriscience education major or how you can make a financial contribution to student scholarships, visit acel.osu.edu.

News Release: Shaffter awarded national agricultural education scholarship

Paige Schaffter, a senior in agriscience education from Edon, Ohio, has been selected for the 2020 Upper Division Agricultural Education Scholarship from the National Association of Agricultural Educators.

NAAE awards the $1,500 scholarships to twenty students across the United States. The purpose of the scholarship is to offset expenses during the recipients’ student teaching experience and selection was based on academic performance, as well as on leadership and service activities. Schaffter will be student teaching with Pettisville High School in Pettisville, Ohio during the 2021 Spring Semester.

“We are thrilled to hear that Paige has been selected as a recipient of this scholarship,” said Dr. Shannon Washburn, professor and chair of the Department of Agricultural Communication, Education, and Leadership at The Ohio State University. “Paige is deserving of this national recognition and this scholarship will help her as she works in a full-time student teacher position with evening and weekend responsibilities that are part of the agricultural education profession.”

The agriscience education major at Ohio State prepares its students to acquire a license to teach agricultural science in secondary high schools in Ohio and across the country, with extensive training in agricultural science, educational psychology, instructional methods, and youth development. For additional information on the agriscience education major, visit acel.osu.edu or call 614.247.6358.

Ohio 4-H Week Alumni Spotlight: Sara Deakin

Sara Deakin is a third-year student studying community leadership with a specialization in community and extension education. She is from Columbus, Ohio – Franklin County, where she was an active member of the K-9 Wonderdogs and Fantastic Futures 4-H Club for 7 years.

During your time in 4-H, what projects did you complete?

Dog project, veterinary science, shooting sports, market hogs, market goat, market rabbit, and beef feeder. I learned how to take care of many different animals along with public speaking skills, and leadership skills.

Why did you turn Green & White into Scarlet & Gray?

4-H is the reason I am studying extension education and I hope to one day be an Ohio 4-H extension educator.

Ohio 4-H Week Alumni Spotlight: Jasmine Mabry

Jasmine Mabry is a second-year agriscience education student from Camden, Ohio – Preble County, where she was an active member of the Just Horsin’ Around 4-H Club for 10 years. 

During your time in 4-H, what projects did you complete?

I completed several different projects and learned many valuable life skills. Through my horse project, I learned the value of patience, determination, and independence. Through my goat project – the importance of hard work and persistence. With my various miscellaneous projects, I learned many new skills that are applicable to adulthood.

Why did you turn Green & White into Scarlet & Gray?

4-H is what began my passion for agriculture. It is what fueled my love for serving others and inspired me to go the distance. I am pursuing a career as an educator because my 4-H advisors, senior fair board members, and extension educator all inspired me with their willingness to help students be successful in all aspects of life.

Ohio 4-H Week Alumni Spotlight: DaVonti’ Haynes

DaVonti’ Haynes is a Ph.D. student studying agricultural communication, education, and leadership with a focus in community and extension education. 

He is from Cleveland, Ohio – Cuyahoga County, where he was an active member of the Youth Advisory Committee of Cuyahoga County.

During your time in 4-H, what projects did you complete?

All of our projects were related to leadership and service; such as the Cuyahoga County Annual Youth Summit. My involvement with 4-H was really the prelude to me discovering my passion of advocating for, empowering, and uplifting others and communities. 

What did you learn through your involvement in 4-H?

4-H helped prepare me for my academic and professional career in ways that I could not have expected. It instilled in me a love for giving back and servant leadership and helped equip me for success after high school by providing me with the necessary supports, environment, and network of friends, educators, and mentors to grow. 4-H introduced me to life-long leadership skills such as resilience, facilitation, communication, and advocacy, among many others. The experiences, skills, and knowledge that I gained during my time in Cuyahoga County 4-H have (and will continue to) directly contribute to my personal, professional, and academic growth and success.

Ohio 4-H Week Alumni Spotlight: Emma Newell

 

Emma Newell is a fourth-year studying agricultural communication at Ohio State. She is from Pickerington, OhioFairfield County, where she was an active member of the Unleashed 4-H Club for 11 years and has served as an advisor for 3 years. 

During your time in 4-H, what projects did you complete?

Dogs, Alpacas, Pigs, Chickens, various Leadership projects, numerous Community Service projects, PetPALS (certified therapy animals visiting those in need). I also served on the following leadership boards: Ohio 4-H Teen Leadership Council, Ohio 4-H Foundation Board, National 4-H Young Alumni Advisory Committee, Fairfield County Junior Leaders, Fairfield County Junior Fair Board, National 4-H Conference (Roundtable Facilitator)  

Why did you turn Green & White into Scarlet & Gray?

I always knew I would one day turn from a clover into a Buckeye. The active participation of the college within the youth development program solidified my desire to attend The Ohio State University at a very young age. I grew up admiring the professors and learning from them at workshops and sessions. There is always more to learn and people within this network who are willing to share their knowledge.

Ohio 4-H Week Alumni Spotlight: Lindsey Okuley

Lindsey Okuley is a first-year studying agricultural communication at Ohio State. She is from Wapakoneta, Ohio – Auglaize County, where she was an active member of the Fryburg Happy Farmers 4-H Club for 7 years. 

During your time in 4-H, what projects did you complete?

I completed various poultry projects and was also a member of the junior fair board. 

What did you learn through your involvement in 4-H?

I learned the value of responsibility, how to lose, and how to effectively work to solve issues as a team member and leader.

Why did you turn Green & White into Scarlet & Gray?

4-H helped flame the fire of the love I had for agriculture. It helped guide me to Ohio State and CFAES due to connections I made through my show days and experiences unique to 4-H through OSU.

Buchenroth awarded Ambassador of the Year in home town

 

Last week, agricultural communication student Kolt Buchenroth was awarded the “Ambassador of the Year” award by the Hardin County Chamber & Business Alliance.
 
In their news release, the stated “Kolt is known throughout the community for his dedication to helping wherever he is needed with kindness and excellence. Kolt is a behind the scenes humble volunteer that works on providing solutions for critical tests for the Alliance.”
 
Congratulations Kolt!

News Release: Hovermale selected for national agricultural education symposium

 

Ohio State agriscience education student Maggie Hovermale was selected to attend the Future Agriscience Teacher (FAST) Symposium as part of the National Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources and Related Sciences (MANRRS) Conference in Minneapolis, Minnesota on April 1-4, 2020.

Hovermale is one of 20 agriscience education students from across the nation who were selected to attend the conference’s track for current preservice agricultural educators. Throughout the MANRRS conference, students participating in the FAST Symposium will be provided with a professional development experience for preservice agricultural education majors that includes networking and mentoring with current and future agricultural educators from across the country, as well as attending sessions focused on creating inclusive classroom environments, inquiry based learning, classroom management and job interview success.

“I’m excited for Maggie to have the opportunity to grow in her professional development skills with an experience like the FAST Symposium,” said Dr. Scott Scheer, interim chair of the Department of Agricultural Communication, Education, and Leadership. “She will gain key information that will aid her in creating an inclusive learning environment for her future students.”

Hovermale is a senior at Ohio State studying agriscience education. She is a graduate of Westfall High School and is currently competing her student teaching experience at Northwestern High School under the supervision of Mrs. Erica Hillard.

The agriscience education major at Ohio State prepares its students to acquire a license to teach agricultural science in secondary high schools in Ohio and across the country, with extensive training in agricultural science, educational psychology, instructional methods, and youth development. For additional information on the agriscience education major, visit acel.osu.edu or call 614.247.6358.

Reid shares experiences with future students at university’s Buckeye Bound event

This past weekend, community leadership student Deja Reid served on a panel of current Ohio State students at the Buckeye Bound event.

Buckeye Bound is a series of visit days for admitted students. Deja, and her fellow current Buckeyes, shared with the high school students about their experiences at Ohio State.