Student Teaching Spotlight – Kayla Erickson, Fairfield Union High School

Written by:
Kayla Erickson
agriscience education
senior

Student teaching has been a whirl wind of emotions. Some good, others not quite as a good but the whole experience has been amazing none the less. One of my favorite parts of student teaching has been getting to know the students. Each student has their own personality. In turn, each class has its own personality. Some things work for some students and classes while they do not work with others. It’s been fun getting to know the personalities of the students and the different classes and differentiating for each.

A part of student teaching that I have struggled with is behavior management. I have a hard time deciding where my line is. The students definitely test that line, but it is hard to discipline them if I am not sure where it is. My cooperating teacher has been great about giving me advice and helping me through this learning curve. I have also got good advice before from my peers as well. While I struggle with this part of teaching, I appreciate the opportunity to learn from my mistakes and successes throughout this process.

I was not really sure what to expect when I began student teaching. I thought that I was unprepared, I was concerned with making relationships with students, and whether teaching was a good fit for me. Standing on the other end of student teaching, I realize that I was as prepared as I could have been for the experience. I often had to remind myself that four months was not a lot of time to form strong relationships. I made relationships with students that were unique to the experience. I am sad to think that I may not get to see the students anymore. We learned a lot together throughout my time teaching. As far as teaching being a good fit for me, I will say that I was not sure that I would teach up until this point. After student teaching, I could absolutely see myself becoming an agriscience educator.

My cooperating teacher and I are very similar. I think that our personalities and out teaching styles are very much alike. I think the students appreciated the similarities. I think that made the transition a little easier for them. The individuals that chose the student teaching placements did a fantastic job when they picked my placement and cooperating teacher.

The thing that I will miss the most about student teaching will be the students. I have enjoyed getting to know them and their learning needs. I will also miss working with my cooperating educator and learning from her years of experience. The students, teacher, and school district that I have gotten to be a part of has been so welcoming and great to work with throughout my experience.

The entire experience has made me look forward to having a classroom of my own. I am excited to decorate the room and interact with the students on a daily basis. I am looking forward to experimenting with lessons to see what works and what doesn’t work. I look forward to developing relationships with students, faculty, and staff within the school that I will be working with. I am excited for the next step in my teaching career.

I have earned a lot of valuable experience from my time student teaching. I am sad that it was cut short, but I am thankful for the time that I got. I am looking forward to the next steps in my teaching career.

Below are some pictures from my student teaching experience.

 

 

 

 

News Release: Hovermale selected for national agricultural education symposium

 

Ohio State agriscience education student Maggie Hovermale was selected to attend the Future Agriscience Teacher (FAST) Symposium as part of the National Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources and Related Sciences (MANRRS) Conference in Minneapolis, Minnesota on April 1-4, 2020.

Hovermale is one of 20 agriscience education students from across the nation who were selected to attend the conference’s track for current preservice agricultural educators. Throughout the MANRRS conference, students participating in the FAST Symposium will be provided with a professional development experience for preservice agricultural education majors that includes networking and mentoring with current and future agricultural educators from across the country, as well as attending sessions focused on creating inclusive classroom environments, inquiry based learning, classroom management and job interview success.

“I’m excited for Maggie to have the opportunity to grow in her professional development skills with an experience like the FAST Symposium,” said Dr. Scott Scheer, interim chair of the Department of Agricultural Communication, Education, and Leadership. “She will gain key information that will aid her in creating an inclusive learning environment for her future students.”

Hovermale is a senior at Ohio State studying agriscience education. She is a graduate of Westfall High School and is currently competing her student teaching experience at Northwestern High School under the supervision of Mrs. Erica Hillard.

The agriscience education major at Ohio State prepares its students to acquire a license to teach agricultural science in secondary high schools in Ohio and across the country, with extensive training in agricultural science, educational psychology, instructional methods, and youth development. For additional information on the agriscience education major, visit acel.osu.edu or call 614.247.6358.

FFA Alumni Spotlight: Rose Zeedyk

Rose Zeedyk is a freshmen studying agriscience education at Ohio State. She came to OSU from the Fairview FFA chapter in Sherwood, Ohio.

Why did you choose Ohio State?
I chose Ohio State because it felt like somewhere I could make “home” for four years and it has a really great agriculture program.

How did FFA help you choose your major?
FFA impacted my choice of major because it showed me how much I loved teaching and advocating for agriculture.

How did FFA prepare you for your future career?
FFA prepared me for my future career by making me step out of my comfort zone and develop skills to communicate clearly and think critically.

News Release: Ohio State students selected for national agricultural education symposium

Ohio State agriscience education students Elizabeth Landis, Chloe Metcalf and Brittany Weller were selected to attend the Future Agriscience Teacher (FAST) Symposium as part of the National Association of Agricultural Educators’ (NAAE) annual conference in December in Anaheim, CA.

Landis, Metcalf and Weller are three of 29 agriscience education students from across the nation who were selected to attend the conference’s track for current preservice agricultural educators. Throughout the conference, students participating in the FAST Symposium will experience professional development, networking and mentoring. The sessions will focus on creating an inclusive classroom environment, inquiry-based learning, classroom management, professional development and collegiality.

“The FAST Symposium is a wonderful opportunity for Elizabeth, Chloe and Brittany to expand their network with a diverse group of educators and learn skills that will benefit their future students,” said Dr. Scott Scheer, chair of the Department of Agricultural Communication, Education, and Leadership. “I am proud of these three students for not only being selected for this competitive program, but also going above and beyond to expand their professional development skills before entering the classroom.”

Landis, Metcalf and Weller, of Bellevue, are seniors studying agriscience education. Landis, Metcalf and Weller will begin student teaching in January. Landis, of Anna, Ohio, will complete her student teaching at Marion-Local High School in Marion, Ohio, under the supervision of Mr. Matt Elsass. Metcalf, of New Bloomington, will complete her student teaching at Bowling Green High School in Bowling Green, Ohio, under the supervision of Stephanie Conway. Weller, of Bellevue, will complete her student teaching at South Central High School in Greenwich, Ohio, under the supervision of Sarah Lucha.

The agriscience education major at Ohio State prepares its students to acquire a license to teach agricultural science in secondary high schools in Ohio and across the country, with extensive training in agricultural science, educational psychology, instructional methods, and youth development. For additional information on the agriscience education major, visit acel.osu.edu or call 614.247.6358.

Weller

Metcalf

Landis

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Mabry awarded American FFA Degree

Written by:
Jasmine Mabry 
sophomore

agricultural education

My involvement in the FFA can be described as nothing less than incredible. The experiences I’ve had, skills I have gained, and memories I’ve made are irreplaceable.

FFA is what lead me to pursue a degree in agriscience education. Being able to lead students into becoming the best, most successful versions of themselves is my aspiration. Although my time in the blue corduroy is over, I know there will be so many new and incredible experiences to come as an agricultural educator.

When I look back on my time in the FFA, the most memorable things are receiving my State FFA Degree, receiving a gold-rated Secretary book twice, camping for my senior officer retreat, the many conventions, competing in public speaking, all of the time spent on trips (regardless of location), and receiving my American FFA Degree.

I got my inspiration to achieve the honor of receiving my American Degree from my FFA Advisor. Miss Sarhra Flinn was very persistent in helping me to achieve my dreams. She works diligently to ensure the success of her students, and I know I wouldn’t be where I am today without her pushing me and showing me that I can achieve many things if I put the work in.

Receiving my American Degree is a dream I’ve had since my freshman year of high school. Walking across the stage at the National FFA Convention and Expo meant so much to me because it was the last “hoorah” to close out the past five years of hard work, determination, memories, and experiences.

 


Walls to attend graduate school at Iowa State

Congratulations to 2019 agrsicience education graduate Kayla Walls, who will be continuing her education this fall at Iowa State University.

Kayla will be pursuing a master’s degree in industrial and agricultural technology, which is part of the Iowa State Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering department.

Best of luck Kayla! We can’t wait to see you succeed in graduate school and beyond!