5 Interviewing Tips


It’s about that time in the school year when you start to think ahead to your summer plans and financial assistance. A lot of applications have been posted, and you are hearing back from people left and right to interview you. You’re thinking to yourself, “I made it through the application process and got to the interview portion. Woohoo! ” Well, congratulations to you! This is the true test, though. The closer it gets to the interview, the more nervous you feel. That’s okay! Being nervous is not always a bad thing; it just means that you care. Don’t let the nerves get the best of you, though. Whatever it may be—an internship, job or scholarship—you have to be confident in yourself that you will nail that interview. I will share a few tips you should think about prior to waiting for that interview date in order to prepare and be as ready as you’ll ever be.

Know your facts.

Make sure you do your research on the organization or position you are interviewing with. One time, I went in the interview, and the first question was “Tell me what you know about us?” That’s going to be extremely awkward if you don’t have an answer to this question. It will only take 10 minutes or so to read or polish up on the people you are interviewing with and the job or qualification requirements. Not only does it show you know your stuff, conducting research helps you answer questions along the lines of what the interviewer is looking for. Google is your best friend!

Review common interview questions.

The weirdest question I have ever gotten in an interview was, “If you could be any fruit, what would you be?” (I answered a guava, and I don’t know why. It was the first thing that came to mind, LOL!) I think it’s safe to say that you probably won’t get a question like that 99 percent of the time. Some common questions to review would be tell me a little bit about yourself, or what are your strengths and weaknesses? They may even come right out and ask, why should I hire you/give you this scholarship? In any case, you should be prepared to give your answer confidently and to the best of your ability. When you are in the interview, it is okay to take a pause to think and take a breath before answering the question that is being asked. Career Counseling and Support Services has a ton of interviewing tips and cover letter/résumé writing assistance.

Look AND dress the part.

It’s true! You only get one chance to make a first impression. This is why you want to make that first impression a good one. This tip is pretty simple. Make sure you adhere to the dress code that was given to you by the interviewer or employer. Body language is also an important part as well. You want to exude confidence and maintain proper posture the entire interview. Basically, you want to look like you want to be there AND dress to impress.

Sell yourself, not sell yourself short.

Now, you don’t have to go over the top with selling yourself. Keep in mind that to get to that point you must have shown them you are worth their time. Therefore, make sure you use that time effectively to show them who you really are and that you ARE, indeed, worth their time. Be elaborate with your skill set and accomplishments. Interviewers are truly interested in getting to know in such a short amount of time, so they need you to shine right away. C’mon! Name another time when you get to talk about yourself in detail for 20-30 minutes.

Ask questions, thank them, and follow up.

The last and final tip I deem to be important is asking questions. The worst thing is when they finish the interview, ask you if you have any questions, and you don’t say anything. Always inquire about something afterwards. It can be as simple as, “What can I expect the timeline to be following this interview?” This just lets the person know that you are really interested in hearing back from them, and you are serious about getting that internship, job, or scholarship. Then, you should thank them when you are done as a common courtesy practice. Now, following up can be done a few different ways. For instance, I have a friend who always sends thank-you notes to his interviewers no matter what. That’s just his method. You can send an email or call if it is necessary to even follow up. Be sure to give the interviewers time to make a decision, though, before doing this step. In some cases, it won’t be needed.

I really hope I’ve helped. Good luck! I am sure you will be great. (:


Why You Should Be A Peer Leader

Are you looking for a position where you can impact the lives of first year students? Check out this video where current Peer Leaders and a professional staff member discuss what it means to be a PL, outreach to specific populations, and our personal growth throughout the entire process. I would highly encourage you to apply for this amazing opportunity!


Love the Skin You’re in!

How many times have you asked yourself, “Ugh! Do I look fat in this?” or, “How many calories are in [insert some ridiculously small portion of something here]?” or maybe even, “If I ask for seconds, will you judge?” Society has made us question ourselves far too long.

 2011 VH1 Do Something Awards - Arrivals

Last year, Demi Levato said, “Kim Kardashian revolutionized our generation’s view of what beautiful is.” This view of beautiful is not realistic…at all. Perfect curves are not everyone’s reality, especially in college. The real question is,

How do I love the skin that I am in?

Great question! I am here to give you five tips as to how and why you should stop shaming yourself based on what you THINK you should look like.

Stop comparing yourself to others!

Just don’t do it. Accept yourself for who you are. Who says that you should look like the Victoria’s Secret model or have a perfect “beach bod”? Don’t listen to what society depicts as “beauty”. Beauty isn’t a certain shape, size, or color.


Get off of the scale…please.

College is stressful, so it is possible that your weight will fluctuate. However, not only is “Freshman 15” a myth, it’s a surface-level concept. Besides, “healthy” isn’t always “skinny” and beauty isn’t only skin-deep. It goes beyond that!



Instead of focusing on what you don’t have, focus on what you do have.

Make a list of things that you like about yourself. Appreciate the small things–whether that’s a widow’s peak, a gray hair, or a stretch mark–they’re what make you YOU! If everyone was the same, how much fun would that be? Remember, the grass isn’t always greener on the other side of the fence, and we are ALL human.


If YOU don’t like it, do something.

Notice “you” is in all caps. What I mean is if you don’t like something about yourself, then make those changes for you. Don’t make them because someone else told you to or someone else told you that you were not good enough. That’s not true! It’s your life; your opinion is the only one that matters.


Surround yourself with positive people.

Live your life according to your values and beliefs. Never feel pressured by those around you to be someone who you are not. Confide in family members, friends, and/or your Peer Leader, and seek out your support system when needed. You cannot change the people around you, but you CAN change the people around you.


Culture can be a strong influence on our depiction of beauty, but it shouldn’t be. Media, TV, and movies should not be the preferred method for ideas of what a “perfect body” looks like because it simply doesn’t exist. Self-love and self-image SHOULD be at the upmost importance. Just remember, you are NEVER alone. If you ever have any concerns or struggling with self-esteem or body image issues, please visit Counseling and Consultation Services website to make an appointment to talk to a professional, you can meet with seek out the Student Wellness center for wellness coaching. Always remember to love the skin you’re in!


4 Ways to Find Success as an Underrepresented Student

Discussing cultural differences is a touchy subject for some people; however, we cannot pretend like they don’t exist. In fact, that is a part of the beauty of the Ohio State experience–the diversity on campus. Navigating the diversity and trying to find yourself in the midst of learning more about your social identity is tough, especially when managing other aspects of your life like your academics, social life, and mental stability.

College marks a time when you are by yourself facing challenges like doing your own laundry, keeping up with a rigorous course load, and exploring the college scene. For some, that may be manageable, but for others…not so much. For minority students it is all of the above…and then some. I believe that being a minority does not just apply to race but also ethnicity, nationality, sexuality, age, gender, or anything else that would imply that you are not among “the majority”. So, let’s make this topic a little more comfortable for all of us.

Here are four tips to make the Ohio State campus experience a little less worrisome for you:

Join an ethnic group.

Find a safe place among your peers–who may also struggle with being the minority–because they can be your best support system. Whether you are Black, Asian, Mexican, a woman, a member of the LGBTQ community, you are never alone! I hate to break it to you, but in this case, you are not unique (smiley face). Human nature suggests that we are most interested in meeting people just like ourselves, so take initiative and put yourself out there to find those people first. Keep in mind that the best friendships begin unexpectedly, and it can all start with one organization meeting.

Take elective classes that best suit you.

Ohio State serves a diverse population. Therefore, the classes that can be taken are limitless: African American studies courses, Women’s, Gender and Sexuality studies courses, Religious Studies courses–the list goes on and on. Those courses are not just taken by people who personally identify with the course subject matter or who agree completely with the ideas conveyed by the instructor and other students; they are meant to expose you to new concepts and ways of thinking, which ultimately help you in that journey to finding yourself. Even if you want to learn about other cultures (as opposed to your own identity), don’t hesitate to take it–you are supposed to explore in college, and the possibilities here are endless!

Chill out.

Assume positive intent at all times. There is no need to be overly sensitive or constantly on edge because someone may or may not have offended you. Have a light heart and take some things with a grain of salt. While our differences are what make us awesome, try not to focus solely on that difference that you may have. Instead, focus on the similarities and common interests you share with others. There is so much more about you than what you identify as and so many ways to connect with other students.

Be proud!

Walk around with your head held high. Don’t be ashamed of who you are, and don’t let small things intimidate you from reaching your full potential. Embrace it! Sometimes I think the thought of reaching your full potential and being as great as you can be scares people. Don’t let that be the case for you because that hinders your ability to accomplish your goals. Always remember that you have the power to achieve anything you put your mind to. Just go for it!!