Internship Spotlight: Ryan Miller

Major: Natural Resource Management

Specialization:  Parks and Recreation, Sub-specializing in Wildlife and Forestry

Minor: Soil Science

Graduation: December, 2017

Internship:  Habitat and Access Technician for the Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD)

Duration: May 15 – August 15

Click Here For More Information

I found out about the opportunity from the Texas A&M Job Board. I applied for a multitude of jobs that I found on there. This one happened to work out for me. I was based out of Saratoga, Wyoming, a small town of roughly 1700 people in the south east to south central portion of the state.

Much of my job revolved around working on WGFD’s Wildlife Habitat Management Areas (WHMA’s) that were comprised of state land, deeded and commissioned land, and BLM land. On the WHMA’s I did a lot of fence line maintenance (splicing fence, fixing fence), fence line construction, irrigation work (working with sub-surface ditch and flood irrigation) which irrigated the WHMA’s meadows for wildlife foraging, general construction work, and general road work using heavy equipment. In addition I was able to get involved with some permitting and other relatable meetings. I did this to see what other kind of opportunities are out there within my field that are outside of Ohio. What I enjoyed most was being able to explore both Wyoming and Colorado in great lengths. I learned a great deal about wildlife management and how much management can differ between areas of the United States.

Alumni Spotlight: Aaron Laver

Aaron 1Major: Environmental  Science (ES)
Specialization: Water Science
Graduated: December 2014

Post Gradation Experience: Environmental Scientists, GIS and aquatic ecology specialist with MAD Scientist Associates.
When: December 2014 – Present
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My internship started with MAD Scientist Associates in April of 2014. At that time, if I had been asked whether or not I expected my full-time career to launch in the world of environmental consulting, I’d give a staunch and resounding “Not a chance.” After graduation, I was planning to move to the warm, sunny coast to scuba dive and conduct marine research for the rest of my life. I didn’t realize how rewarding, exciting, and opportunistic a job at MAD could be.

I’m Aaron Laver. I graduated from Ohio State SENR in December of 2014 with an Environmental Science major, specializing in Water Science. Since graduation, I have been employed full time at MAD as an Environmental Scientist as their Geographic Information System (GIS) and aquatic ecology specialist. Oh, and for the record… I still get plenty of diving in while on paid vacation!

For whatever reason, I feel the majority of employees are “broken in” at the company with an overnight excursion to conduct some sort of field work. I was no exception. I kicked off my experience at MAD with a four day wetland delineation in the Akron/Canton area. For those of you not aware of what a wetland delineation is, fear not. Google knows. The important thing to note from a personal perspective is that wetland field work often puts you in the middle of exhausting summer heat, a typical-Ohio blanket of humidityAaron 2, 6 inches of muck beneath (and around) your feet, and all the in-your-face (sometimes literally) nature you can handle. I doubt I even need to say it, but I’ll clarify that from day one I was in heaven! Since those first days, I’ve become a certified delineator and conducted many more delineations throughout Ohio and surrounding states. Other field activities I conduct and participate in include mussel surveying, environmental education events, restoration and site enhancement planning, bathymetric and topographic surveying, and my personal favorite, ecological assessment and characterization. The thing I like the most about any field work is that it really makes you pay attention to and appreciate the intricacies of the biota all around you. There’s something to be gained even if your site is located in the middle of suburban Columbus. I try to leave every site having learned a new kind of plant or adding a “first-time life sighting” animal to my list. With that being said, it’s often times not the work itself that is so appealing, but rather the setting in which I’m conducting the work.

aaron 3More on the nerdy side of things: I fell into my GIS specialization at the company by chance. I took just one required course on the subject in college. I’m so glad I got the introduction! As an intern at MAD, I found myself helping the full time staff with generation of the simplest maps and figures to be used in our reports. Over time, including many personal hours of learning QGIS and ArcGIS software, I found myself hooked to the technology, and I was quickly becoming the company’s go-to guy for all things that were map related. More importantly, I was learning how powerful of a tool a GIS can be outside of graphically representing field-collected data. Fast forward to today, and I never go into the field without first conducting a preliminary GIS analysis of the site. Two hours of GIS work can inform strategy and save the company hours, sometimes even days, in the field.

Even though I don’t have near enough time to share about my experience in depth, I want to stress just how diverse environmental consulting can be. I tend to get bored easily, so that’s one of the principles that I have grown to love. I’m always honing my craft, always trying new things, and above all I’m always learning on the job. At MAD, Mark and Chris (the owners) have created an environment that is conducive to creating top-quality products for clients while fostering each employee’s goals and aspirations in a way that brings both personal and company success, and for that I’ll always be grateful.

Student Spotlight: Alexis Johnson

Alexis_JMajor: Environmental Policy and Decision Making (EPDM)
Specialization: International Issues
Graduation: May 2016

Internship: Farm Credit Mid America
When: Summer 2014 and Summer 2015

My name is Alexis Johnson and I am fourth year student studying Environmental Policy and Decision Making with a minor in African History. I am from Cleveland, OH and when you think of Cleveland, you do not necessarily think environmentally friendly or thoughts of agricultural production do not readily form images in your mind, but if you travel to Cleveland today, signs of urban agriculture welcome you with open arms. These past two summers, I had the opportunity to have an internship with Farm Credit Mid America where I focused on understanding the urban agriculture movement in Cleveland and how Farm Credit could be of assistance. I spent my time meeting with various stakeholders and interviewing urban farmers to better understand the urban market. I quickly became an expert in urban farming and how it is helped to revitalize the City and open the door for people from low income neighborhoods to have access to locally grown fruits and vegetables. Children have a better understanding of where their food comes from, crime has gone down in various neighborhoods that contain community gardens, people understand the importance of eating healthier, and communities are being rebuilt all around the city. This urban farming movement is definitely something to be excited about and I am glad that I had the chance to experience this positivity first hand. Having this internship with Farm Credit Mid America is just one of the many experiences I have had being a student within the School of Environment and Natural Resources. I am thankful to be part of such a community and to continually experience my passion for environmental studies in a variety of ways.

Study Abroad Experience: Alpha Zeta Partners Program of Study
When: Spring Semester 2014- 6 week program
Location: Piracicaba, Brazil

Alexis_2For me studying abroad served as a unique experience that I will always remember during my time at Ohio State and beyond. At the time, OSU was ranked the fourteenth university in the nation to send students on study abroad trips and therefore I knew I came to the right school and would eventually fulfill a dream of traveling outside the U.S. again; his time for a longer and more focused period of time. Little did I know that dream would come true as early as spring semester of my sophomore year. I remember calling my mom and telling her that I would be traveling to Brazil for six weeks to study Brazilian history, economics, governmental policies, and agriculture. We both were really excited and I soon began the process of finding scholarships and talking with the Office of International Affairs on ways to finance my trip. Once the time finally came I felt more than ready to go and set off on an adventure of a lifetime. With nineteen other buckeyes, we dove head first into the Brazilian culture and way of life. Beautiful weather, fresh fruit, and unrecognizable words surrounded us as we made Brazil our home away from home.

Choosing this particular study aboard program allowed me to form lasting friendships with people who shared similar interest in agricultural and environmental issues. Brazil allowed us to explore our interests on a global scale, while helping us develop a closer bond. This bond then allowed us to support and challenge one another to think deeper about agricultural issues.

Alexis3.0Intellectually, I gained knowledge that cannot be taught in classrooms in the United States. To know is to experience. The only way to gain a first-hand experience in the way Brazil handles their agricultural and environmental issues with respect to history and their economy is to travel and learn from well educated people who study and work in the agricultural sector. Furthermore, being able to travel to Brazil has made me a better-rounded individual and has given me an insight on how agricultural processes work in a different country. Having this insight sets me a part in the job market because employers are seeking people who have had out of the country experiences to help influence decisions and give a new perspective on processes, especially in the agriculture industry.

Lastly, I enjoyed my time studying abroad so much in Brazil that I have decided to do it again, this time in a much colder environment. This past spring semester I was selected to participate in Ohio State’s first ever study abroad trip to Antarctica during Winter Break 2015 and I am beyond excited for such an opportunity! Being a student in the School of Environment and Natural Resources has definitely allowed me to explore my passion for environmental studies while stepping out of my comfort zone. Each day weather inside or outside the classroom, I am challenged to think differently about the world around me. I personally do not think I could have gained this much awareness about our environment had not chosen to be a part of the SENR community.

Alexis_4

 

STEP Program
Click HERE to see Alexis’s digital story entitled City Roots, Country Heart, highlighting her STEP Experience during her sophomore year here at OSU!

Study Abroad/ Internship Spotlight: Grace Poling

312482_10200576099791560_202948942_nMajor: Environmental Science (ES)
Specialization: Ecosystem Restoration
Graduation: May 2015

Program: Alpha Zeta Partners-Brazil
Location: Piracicaba, Brazil
When: Fall 2012

Grace Poling had the amazing opportunity to travel to Brazil with Aloha Zeta Partners. Students attend classes at the branch campus of University of Sao Paulo, ESALQ, in Piracicaba, Brazil. In Piracicaba, the students also stay with a host family for a weekend and meet with them periodically throughout the trip. When not in classes, the students go on tours throughout the country including a 9-day bus tour through several regions of Brazil. The students also have time to relax and participate in fun activities such as white water rafting, snorkeling, samba dancing, sightseeing and hiking.

148346_10200575821904613_1202918340_nDuring an interview, Grace said that she applied for this program in early February in 2012. At the time she knew the experience would be amazing, but she was blown away at how is shaped the rest of her time at OSU and her confidence after going through this program. Grace took four seminars to prepare for this program. The biggest take aways were the gains she made in leadership, she was able to discover her own leadership style while getting to know the other 20 participants. Diversity was also a large topic. They learned both about diversity in the US and about Brazil as a whole. They traveled to a Mosque, talked to veterans, discussed the LGBT community. Every year these experiences change. After her amazing six weeks in Brazil the participants had the opportunity to travel to DC, the US capital, the following spring break in order to compare the US and Brazilian Governments and agencies. Grace was also able to network with the US EPA during her time in DC.

Internship: Marathon Petroleum Company
Location: Findley, Ohio and Texas City, Texas
When: Summer 2013 and Summer 2014.

11053168_10206974658354553_7098224952269460108_nGrace also had the amazing experience to work for Marathon for two summers as an intern. This position required skills and had a high level of responsibility. Grace said this was a good job experience and that the company respected her as they taught her about environmental policy and the refining process.  Grace worked on organizing large amounts of data in the Finley Ohio location, mainly product tank data, and documents for the company. A typical day consisted of a morning meeting with her mentor, some desk work, making documents, etc. She also was able to work on the main project figures looking to figure out how to best deal with algae   booms in retention ponds at a pipeline terminal. For this she researched aeration mechanisms, manual removal, and chemical options.

During her time in the Texas refinery, Grace worked on the computer and researched on how to create policy documents for the refinery to use. Some examples include, PPR Permit by rule for a sand blazing facility, which is for an EPA permit for smaller areas that need to meet standards. Grace also went out into the refinery to sniff the sulfur units to see how much sulfur was escaping from the machinery. She would Communicate with the facilities monitoring team at meetings regarding her results. Grace Highlighted that there is a lot of environmental work in large companies, such as Marathon, because of the strict environmental protections that are in place along with the fact that most companies like this are investing a lot of time and money to be sustainable and environmentally friendly. Her biggest take away: “You learn so much on the job, work isn’t always easy, but it is attainable. It takes the effort to see results”.

Grace has recently graduated from The Ohio State University and plans to go right into work with Marathon as a Health, Environmental, and Safely Professional at one of the refineries. This large company has opened many doors for her and has given her the real work skills that make her a very large competitor in the job field.
Apply Online at : https://jobs.marathonpetroleum.com/content/students/

Internship Spotlight: Ben Rubinoff

Major: Environmental Science, Honors Program                                                   Graduation: May 2016Ben1

Internship: Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) in the Benthic Ecology Laboratory, Summer 2014

While I may love Ohio State, my heart is on the coast. While I grew up in Cincinnati, family vacations and trips to the Newport Aquarium resulted in a passion for marine life. I have carried this passion with me since when I was first able to say the word “water”. As a result, I have firm career goals that involve marine research. Although Ohio State doesn’t offer a marine biology major, I have been able to get involved in cutting-edge aquatic research, getting my feet wet in science since my freshman year. While I am thankful for my education in Columbus, I am especially grateful for an internship I participated in. In the summer of 2014, I interned for the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) in the Benthic Ecology Laboratory under the direction of Dr. Richard Osman and Dean Janiak.

Ben2My project investigated how infaunal invertebrate communities vary by habitat type in the Rhode River, a sub-estuary of the Chesapeake Bay. I was in charge of creating a biodiversity sampling protocol of soft-sediment communities for a global Smithsonian-funded research initiative called MarineGEO. I applied a habitat-based sampling design, randomly sampling habitats based on proportions. Dean and I performed a “bioblitz” style approach, taking 153 samples over the course of 3 days. Over the rest of the summer, we sorted all 153 samples and I identified more than 18,000 individuals to species level, encompassing roughly 1/3 of the samples. After identifying a subse
t of the samples, I used PRIMER, SigmaPlot, and Excel to statistically analyze differences in community composition.

Ben3This internship allowed me to develop laboratory skills such as microscopy, taxonomic identification, and sample preservation/processing. Even though most of my time (45 hours a week) was spent looking under a microscope, I was oddly comforted and happy with this tediousness. As a result, this experience confirmed my love for research and marine science. The project also increased my proficiency in the use of various statistical analysis software and GIS programs (Google Earth). Overall, my internship at SERC gave me an opportunity to see a research project through from start to finish, allowing me to present at conferences and hopefully publish my research. My work for the project is ongoing—I am currently working on writing/publishing. Stay tuned for more information on my summer research!

Internship Spotlight: Jamie Westhoven

Major: Environment, Economy, Development and Sustainability (EEDS)jamie   Specialization: Sustainability and Business     Graduation: May 2015

Internship: Ohio Interfaith Power and Light. Columbus, Ohio                                       September 2014-December 2014                 Click Here For More Information

I heard of the Sustainability Intern position with Ohio Interfaith Power and Light through The School of Environment and Natural Resources. Immediately, I knew it was something I wanted to pursue. This program pairs a student intern with a host community who is interested in adopting more sustainable practices. In my case, I was paired with a large Lutheran Church located in Dublin, Ohio. After running an energy audit, I worked with the building manager to analyze the audit report, develop a green business plan, and find funding to implement new energy conservation measures. In addition, I worked to create an photoeducation and outreach program to educate the local community. We discussed many important topics such as: energy conservation, global warming, carbon footprint, recycling, pollution, and GHG emissions. Overall, this was an excellent experience. I got to apply the knowledge I have learned through the EEDS program in a real world setting while making a huge impact on my host community.

 

Internship Spotlight: Alissa Finke

Major: Environmental Science  Specialization: Ecosystem Restoration Graduation: May 2016

Internship: Conservation Department Intern at The Holden Arboretum, May 5th- August 22nd 2014                    Click Here to learn more

I started applying for internships in January 2014 and I thought I would never be hired. Thankfully I stumbled upon the Holden’s website and their advertisement for interns. I was so excited! This position was everything I was looking for. I would work outside everyday and learn about conservation. My typical day consisted of numerous tasks, primarily removing invasive species. We managed for about ten invasive species while I was there over the summer. We hand picked, cut down, or sprayed the invasive depending on how each plant was managed. Our primary target was hand picking and carrying out Garlic Mustard and spraying the seedlings with a biodegradable herbicide.

I also participated in several wetland delineation’s, trail mapping, and restoration maintenance within The Holden Arboretum’s 3,000 acres of natural area. This was a great learning experience because I was able to learn about and use the Ohio Rapid Assessment Method for Wetlands (ORAM), and exspose myself to different types of wetlands in Ohio. I most enjoyed my direct involvement with developing a Rapid Upland Forest Assessment and my work with invasive worm monitoring. I gained skills regarding basic GPS and GIS technology and plant identification. I loved it! (Welcome to my office!)