Building responsible and resilient supply chains

Supply chains have become global and highly complex. Building and maintaining a resilient supply chain is a key success factor for businesses operating in a fast-changing world.connected-globe-rgb-international

EY Climate Change and Sustainability Services (CCaSS) collaborated with the UN Global Compact on the study in an effort to better understand how companies are managing their supply chains in ways that support the objectives of the United Nations 2030 Agenda and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).  The UN Global Compact is the world’s largest sustainability initiative and EY has been a participant since 2009.

The report draws on business inputs across geographies, sectors and business models. CCaSS and Advisory Supply Chain and Operations professionals interviewed 70 clients globally to explore how they are embedding sustainability in their supply chains by managing risks and adopting new commitments around human rights, the environment and the well-being of communities in which they operate.

Overall, the study indicates that by improving environmental, social and governance (ESG) performance throughout the supply chain, companies can enhance processes, reduce costs, increase productivity, innovate, differentiate and improve societal outcomes.

Conclusions explored in the report include:

  • Companies are on a continuum from managing risks through creating shared value with stakeholders to achieving differentiation for their products or services;
  • Leaders are achieving competitive advantage in the supply chain through increased collaboration, technology innovation, greater efficiency and supplier diversity;
  • Mature supply chain models integrate buying and sourcing practices with product design and development to enhance sustainability results tied to their manufacturing and service delivery;
  • Currently, only a small percentage of companies have achieved leadership maturity levels that can lead to shared value with suppliers, enable suppliers to operate as an extension of the business and engage in meaningful, collaborative dialogue.

Based on interviews we identified several actions companies can take to further embed sustainability in their supply chains:

  • Assess materiality, to focus on the most pressing issues, taking UN Global Compact principles into consideration
  • Align resources, structures and processes to focus on supply chain sustainability across the organization
  • Train management and suppliers on market practices
  • Invest in diverse and inclusive supply chain partners
  • Stretch existing sustainability goals beyond direct operations, to include tiers of the supply chain
  • Deploy technology to increase accountability and transparency
  • Leverage buying power and influence to trigger shifts toward supply chain sustainability
  • Disclose supply chain information, beyond stand-alone sustainability reporting mechanisms

This post was written and published by EY, one The Risk Institute’s founding members, in August 2016. To view the original article or download detailed study findings, click here. 

From Risk to Resilience: Find (& Overcome) Your Company’s Weakest Link

resilient bud

Don’t fall through the cracks — grow through them.

In an interconnected, volatile, global economy, supply chains have become increasingly vulnerable. Disruptions — even minor shipment delays — can cause significant financial losses for companies and substantially impact shareholder value. Globalization has made anticipating disruptions and managing them when they do occur more challenging. The potential risks of disruptions are often hidden, and the potential impacts may not be understood, which often results in black swan events – events that can only be fully understood after the fact.

Over the last seven years, researchers at The Ohio State University have been exploring the concept of enterprise resilience, i.e. how companies can prosper in the face of turbulent change by being able to recognize, understand, and compensate for vulnerabilities.

The result is the SCRAM (supply chain resilience assessment and management) framework, which enables a business to identify and prioritize the supply chain vulnerabilities it faces, as well as the capabilities it should strengthen to offset those vulnerabilities.

Six Vulnerabilities You Need to Know About

Every business has its vulnerabilities, and most of the time those vulnerabilities are inherent to the business and difficult to avoid, but by recognizing them, you’ll be better equipped to deal with disruptions as they happen.

1. Turbulence

Definition: Environment characterized by frequent changes in external factors beyond the company’s control

Examples: Unpredictability in demand, fluctuations in currencies and prices, geopolitical disruptions, natural disasters, technology failures, pandemics

2. Deliberate threats

Definition: Intentional attacks aimed at disrupting operations or causing human or financial harm

Examples: Terrorism and sabotage, piracy and theft, labor disputes, special interest groups, industrial espionage, product liability

3. External pressures

Definition: Influences, not specifically targeting the company, that create business constraints or barriers

Examples: Competitive innovation, government regulations, price pressures, corporate responsibility, social/cultural issues, environmental, health and safety concerns

4. Resource limits

Definition: Constraints on output based upon availability of the factors of production

Examples: Raw material availability, utilities availability, human resources, natural resources

5. Sensitivity

Definition: Importance of carefully controlled conditions for product and process integrity

Examples: Restricted Materials, supply purity, stringency of manufacturing, fragility of handling, complexity of operations, reliability of equipment, safety hazards, visibility of disruption to stakeholders, symbolic profile of brand, customer requirements for quality

6. Connectivity

Definition: Degree of interdependence and reliance on outside entities

Examples: Scale and extent of supply network, import/export channels, reliance on specialty sources, reliance on information flow, degree of outsourcing

So in the face of all these disruptions, what’s the answer?

Answer: resilience.

Resilience is the capacity of an enterprise to survive, adapt and grow in the face of turbulent change.

Resilience means improving the adaptability of global supply chains, collaborating with stakeholders and leveraging information technology to assure continuity, even in the face of catastrophic disruptions.

Resilience goes beyond mitigating risk; it enables a business to gain competitive advantage by learning how to deal with disruptions more effectively than its competitors and possibly even using those disruptions to its advantage.

Resilient systems don’t fail in the face of disturbances; rather, they adapt.

 

Article adapted from “From Risk to Resilience: Learning to Deal with Disruption,” by Joseph Fiksel, Mikaella Polyviou, Keely L. Croxton, and Timothy J. Pettit.

The Risk Institute at The Ohio State University’s Fisher College of Business exists to bridge the gap between academia and corporate America. By combining the latest research with the real-world expertise of America’s most forward-thinking companies, the Risk Institute isn’t just reporting risk management’s current trends — it’s creating tomorrow’s best practices.

Leveraging Cross Sector Collaboration for Enhanced Risk Management

Keith Goad

By  Keith Goad
Associate Vice President, Office of Corporate Strategy
Nationwide

 


In the 21st century global economy, continuing education is critical for the professional that deals with risk in order to maintain an effective leadership position. In some fields, for example accounting, you are required to take ongoing education so as to keep a current CPA license. You could make the argument that accounting changes very little over time and is very episodic when it does. For a risk practitioner it is the opposite: the landscape is constantly changing for organizations.

Because of this ever-changing risk landscape and the evolving approaches to risk management Nationwide took great interest in supporting the formation of The Risk Institute at The Ohio State University Fisher College of Business.

Daily, Nationwide helps our members manage and mitigate the diverse risks they face. When you look at risks businesses face, there is a tendency to focus solely on the traditional risk of their industry sector. Increasingly we are seeing that risk is evolving and that there are commonalities of risk among different business sectors. For example, all organizations face risks related to cyber security, reputation, catastrophic disruption, and some form of supply chain disruption.

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Digital Disruption – January 2016

Among this myriad of risks facing organizations, The Risk Institute provides opportunities through executive education sessions and conferences for business professionals to think through risk and bounce ideas off one another. What makes The Risk Institute’s approach unique is that they focus on current and emerging risks from the perspective of different industries and backgrounds. The diversity of the types of businesses that are involved in this venture as well as their size allows for a richness of perspective through the exchange of ideas and information.

If, as an organization, you are stuck in a silo of where your company operates, you may totally miss new or emerging risks that another company may have already dealt with or on which there is already a perspective. They may not be a business or sector competitor, and may in fact be from a different industry, but their experience can help you gain an advantage by seeing how they would handle a similar situation and allow you to adopt proven best practices.

In terms of continuing education in the area of risk management, it may be difficult to find training courses for the practitioner or the leader of a company. The Risk Institute is filling this critical void.

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Risk Modeling: The Past & The Future – March 2016

The differentiator is that The Risk Institute isn’t entirely focused on providing insight to the C-suite where the knowledge goes back to the company and might stay at that level. It is important that you have practitioners at different levels in a company who have the same opportunity to learn and understand along these dimensions, which truly embeds this approach and understanding within the culture of the organization. For the C-suite executive, events like the annual conference offer a comprehensive exchange of ideas. The Risk Executive Education Series is focused on those more on the front lines of managing the risk, and provides insight on emerging risks and proven strategies.

For any company that seeks to learn about and respond to our changing business landscape, the opportunity to take advantage of The Risk Institute is a gift.


The Risk Institute thanks Nationwide, a founding member, for their ongoing support.  To find out more about programs and events at The Risk Institute (including executive education), or how your company can become involved, visit The Risk Institute website.

Brexit’s Anticipated Impact on U.S. Middle Market Businesses

Risk Institute Portraits Fisher Hall - Third Floor Feb-02-2016 Photo by Jay LaPrete ©2016 Jay LaPrete

By  Philip S. Renaud II, MS, CPCU
Executive Director, The Risk Institute
The Ohio State University Fisher College of Business

 


Despite the clear vote by British voters to exit the EU, the impact of the vote on both Britain and the European Union is anything but clear. Policymakers are now required to focus attention on some very uncertain and unsettling repercussions.

In what is very likely the earliest data anywhere about the impact of Brexit on U.S. companies, the National Center for the Middle Market at The Ohio State University Fisher College of Business, has just released the results of its survey studying the impact of Brexit on companies within the Middle Market segment. The results have indicated the following:

  • About half of middle market companies say Brexit would have little or no impact on their business.
  • The other half, however feel that they will be impacted. One in eight companies foresee an extremely significant impact.
  • Manufacturers will be impacted more than the market as a whole.
  • Approximately 28% of Middle Market companies say they will reduce investment in the U.K., while approximately 21% will reduce investment elsewhere in the E.U.
  • Much of that money will remain in the U.S., with approximately 26% say they will increase investment in the homeland. Likewise, Asia may also be a direct beneficiary of investment.
  • The study also revealed that an impact on sales and procurement may be seen. Companies have indicated that they will purchase less from Britain given the reduction in British Sterling.
  • An expectation also may exist that increased “red tape” may be an indirect result of Brexit. Questions remain about any changes to customs, tariff on imported goods, quota restrictions, etc., as well as overall changes in import/export trade regulation in the short and longer term.

The complete study can be found at https://go.osu.edu/BrexitMidMarket.

NCMM Brexit Survey 2016

We are appreciative of our partnership with the National Center for the Middle Market and for their foresight and timing in issuing this informative finding.


The Risk Institute at The Ohio State University Fisher College of Business brings together practitioners and researchers to engage in risk-centered conversations and to exchange ideas and strategies on integrated risk management.  Visit The Risk Institute website for more information about how you can join the conversation about enterprise risk management.

Zika – Can We Predict the Next Outbreak? (Pt 2)

Risk Institute Portraits Fisher Hall - Third Floor Feb-02-2016 Photo by Jay LaPrete ©2016 Jay LaPrete

By  Philip S. Renaud II, MS, CPCU
Executive Director, The Risk Institute
The Ohio State University Fisher College of Business

 


With regard to the Zika virus, The World Health Organization (WHO) and other health organizations have called for top level meetings to address the virus and its worldwide impact. The WHO has recently warned that the virus could potentially spread to every country in the Americas.

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Aedes aegypti

We need not think beyond the last few years where we saw SARS (2003), Influenza H1N1 (2009) or Chikungunya (2014) to understand that there is a great need for businesses to think about proper planning and dealing with the potential impact upon business and society. Central to risk mitigation is learning as much as possible about Zika and its potential impact to your organization.

On June 13, 2016, The Risk Institute at The Ohio State University Fisher School of Business brought together a group of professionals representing a diverse assortment of job responsibilities and

industries to discuss the impending Zika virus and pandemic planning from an enterprise perspective. The discussion centered on four topics:

  • Evolutionary Ecology and Viruses
  • Pathogens and Pandemics: Emerging Viruses including Zika
  • Pandemic Planning
  • Learning from Pandemic Events: From SARS to Zika

Conversation was energetic as we explored the factors that are driving emerging infectious disease including host shifting, the emergence of drug resistant pathogens, and insect/tick pathogens combined with rapid population growth.  This, coupled with greater urbanization, increased global travel and global climate change, creates an environment where we will most likely see an increase in emerging infectious diseases.

With this information present and the summer months now upon us, companies need to focus on mitigating the risk of Zika within the workplace. Does your company have employees in infected regions? Do you have employees that travel to infected regions? Do you have the correct information to inform employees about how to limit the spread and contraction of the disease? Employers also will need to be flexible and prepare to possibly to delay trips to infected areas, hold virtual meetings, etc.

Global Air Travel Kilpatrick and Randolph

To the extent that your organization has developed a business continuity plan, risk managers must ask if the plan is sufficient to deal with a pandemic threat in addition to the more traditional exposures present. Once you are comfortable that the plan is robust enough, it will need to be tested to respond to geographic specific exposure that could have wider impact upon the business and it customers.

Nancy Green from Aon pointed out that organizations should also conduct a review of their insurance portfolio. For example, within the firm’s property coverage, does the coverage extend to the cost of sanitizing and testing? What about the cost of evacuation of an insured property? How about the resulting loss of income from the closure of a hotel (if your business includes that exposure) during sanitization, or loss of guests due to identification of the virus at the insured premises.  What about contingent business interruption or extra expense due to the closure of a key facility of a key customer or supplier.  Green also stressed the importance of making considerations for Worker’s Compensation and Liability claims, as well as reviewing your company’s health insurance coverage. All valid and very important checks and balances to consider as we think through the enterprise-wide impact on an organization.

Our session also focused on valuable lessons  learned from past events and how they can be used to provide valuable insight for the present and future. As put forth by Tom Hopkins of Sherwin-Williams, key to his organization dealing with previous pandemics were:

  • Identification of all relevant stakeholders
  • Develop both plans and processes to address issues
  • Identify resources needed locally and globally
  • Think global, act local
  • Have communication platform in place, and stress test it in non-critical situations
  • Have senior management alignment in place to enact a “Analysis & Action Now, Evaluation Later” methodology
  • Get comfortable with ambiguity

The Risk Institute is thankful for the informed leadership of our session experts, Professor Steve Rissing (Department of Evolution, Ecology and Organismal Biology, The Ohio State University), Julie E. Mangino MD, FSHEA (Professor of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, The Ohio State University and Medical Director, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, OSU Wexner Medical Center), Nancy Green CPCU, ARM (Executive Vice President, Aon Risk Solutions) and Thomas E. Hopkins, (Retired SVP Human Resources, The Sherwin–Williams Company).

The session provided thought provoking ideas and advanced The Risk Institute’s unique role in uniting industry thought leaders, academics and highly respected practitioners in an ongoing dialog to advance the understanding and evolution of risk management. The Risk Institute’s conversation about risk management is open and collaborative with its relevance across all industries and its potential for competitiveness and growth.


On June 13, 2016, The Risk Institute at The Ohio State University Fisher College of Business presented the first session of its 2016-2017 Executive Education Risk Series, Zika – Can We Predict the Next Pandemic Outbreak? For more information on this and future events, please visit http://go.osu.edu/Zika-u-osu.

 

Bridging the Gap Between Research and Practice

Risk Institute Portraits Fisher Hall - Third Floor Feb-02-2016 Photo by Jay LaPrete ©2016 Jay LaPreteIsil Erel
Academic Director, The Risk Institute
Professor of Finance
The Ohio State University Fisher College of Business

 


One of the primary functions of The Risk Institute at The Ohio State University Fisher College of Business is to serve as a conduit between academic research and practitioners of risk management.  New research insights, the advancement of theory, and top-tier empirical studies are at the foundation of our mission, but we also want to see the utilization and implementation of our research findings.

We often reference that The Risk Institute exists at the intersection of academia and practice of risk management. It is at this intersection where we facilitate the translation of academic research into practical application. The challenge most busy industry practitioners face is that high level research is written in the unique language of academia and their busy schedules don’t afford them the discretionary time to tackle a lengthy thesis of academic research on the off chance it might contain a relevant insight or two.

risk3TwitterThe Risk Institute is meeting the need by bridging the gap with The Risk Institute Research Translation Series – a curated collection of insightful one-page practitioner focused translations of relevant research topics. Written from the perspective of a practitioner for a practitioner this one page overview goes beyond an executive summary and focuses on the substantive insight of the research in a concise and efficient manner. A practitioner can supplement their knowledge of the latest research in a matter of minutes. Should a topic resonate, the opportunity exists for more in depth reading as well as engaging the researchers through The Risk Institute.

New translations will be coming online and I encourage you to frequently consult our digital library for new offerings. Of particular note will be the translations from each of our academic grants for research from last year, which will be available later this summer.

Risk is an ever-evolving field and we are confident that The Risk Institute can play a vital role with these translations in advancing the knowledge base and practice of enterprise risk management.


The Risk Institute at The Ohio State University Fisher College of Business brings together practitioners and researchers to engage in risk – centered conversations and to exchange ideas and strategies on integrated risk management. Through the collaboration of faculty, students and risk management professionals, The Risk Institute addresses risk at a broad cross section of industries and is dedicated to developing leading – edge approaches to risk management.

 

The Risk Institute at The Ohio State University Releases its Second Annual Survey on Integrated Risk Management

Risk Institute Portraits Fisher Hall - Third Floor Feb-02-2016 Photo by Jay LaPrete ©2016 Jay LaPreteIsil Erel
Academic Director, The Risk Institute
Professor of Finance
The Ohio State University Fisher College of BusinessRisk Institute Portraits Fisher Hall - Third Floor Feb-02-2016 Photo by Jay LaPrete ©2016 Jay LaPrete

 

Philip S. Renaud II, MS, CPCU
Executive Director, The Risk Institute
The Ohio State University Fisher College of Business


On June 1, 2016, The Risk Institute at The Ohio State University Fisher School of Business unveiled findings from its second Annual Survey on Integrated Risk Management. The research initiative focuses on how U.S. companies view the role of risk management, how it is structured and the ways it is integrated to support business decisions. Senior leadership from more than 530 financial (23 percent) and non-financial (77 percent) companies both public and private were surveyed for the report.

This year’s survey has demonstrated that risk management continues to evolve and firms are creating holistic and organization wide risk management functions. The survey highlights how integrating risk management plays a key role in a firm’s ability to remain competitive and create sustainable value in the current business and economic climate.  

Respondents of the survey deliver insights across five key areas:

  • Organizational structure and tone at the top
    • Firms are moving toward a more centralized approach to risk management, as it is a source of both growth and value. In fact, half of the firms surveyed shared that senior leadership is allocating more funds for external and internal resources.
  • How risk management is integrated into business processes
    • To effectively integrate risk management into business decisions, firms must recognize business processes. The three leading processes reported by survey participants were:
      • Compliance
      • Strategic Planning
      • Operational Business Planning and Management
  • The scope of risk management
    • The survey highlighted that to limit risk taking by employees in financial and non-financial firms, management extensively takes steps to limit sales at risk (or similarly cash flow at risk). They also require use of financial instruments (e.g. derivatives) as hedges rather than speculative tools, set size limits on projects permissible without limits, and use financial hurdle rates to adjust for risk.
  • Risk management process
    • While many respondents believe risk management is integrated across the firm, they also report that only a subset of business functions are actively involved in identifying, measuring and managing major risks.
  • Disruption
    • Approximately 80 percent of firms participating did not experience a disruptive event in the last year. If they did, most reported that the disruptions were related to regulations, cyber theft of confidential information and or systems failure.

The Risk Institute is excited to continue to participate in the conversation around the evolution of risk management within business, from an integrated perspective of academia and practice. Stay tuned as we dig deeper into the survey results in future posts, and feel free to contact us to continue the conversation or explore ways to engage with us on this mission.


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Zika – Can We Predict the Next Pandemic Outbreak? (Pt 1)

Risk Institute Portraits Fisher Hall - Third Floor Feb-02-2016 Photo by Jay LaPrete ©2016 Jay LaPrete

By  Philip S. Renaud II, MS, CPCU
Executive Director, The Risk Institute
The Ohio State University Fisher College of Business

 


The World Health Organization (WHO) and other health organizations have called for top level meetings to address the Zika virus and its worldwide impact. Researchers first discovered the virus nearly 70 years ago. Very few cases were reported until 2007 when an outbreak on Yap Island in Micronesia infected nearly 70% of the population ages three years and older. The WHO has warned that the virus could potentially spread to every country in the Americas.

Companies need to focus on how they can mitigate the risk of Zika within the workplace. Does your company have employees in infected regions?

http://www.paho.org/hq/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=11554&Itemid=41715&lang=en

Image courtesy of Pan American Health Organization and WHO. Click for more info.

Do you have employees that travel to infected regions? Central to risk mitigation for any employer is to learn as much as possible about Zika and its potential impact to your organization.  Employers need to be flexible. Consideration should be given to delaying trips to infected areas, holding virtual meetings, etc.

An organization’s business continuity plans will need to be tested to respond to geographic specific exposure that could have wider impact upon the business and it customers.

On June 13th, The Risk Institute will host guest speakers, Julie E. Mangino MD, FSHEA (Division of Infectious Diseases, The Ohio State University, and Department of Epidemiology, OSUWMC), Professor Steve Rissing (Department of Evolution, Ecology and Organismal Biology, The Ohio State University), Nancy Green CPCU, ARM (Executive VP, Aon Risk Solutions) and Thomas E. Hopkins (Sr. VP Human Resources (retired), The Sherwin–Williams Company) will collaborate to provide insight into:

  • How evolutionary biology provides a road map into eruptions of Zika and other similar viruses.
  • The facts about the spread of the Zika virus and how to mitigate the fear factor.
  • The facts about prevention, treatment and links to specific birth defects.
  • How to prepare your business for Zika and other pandemic viruses, including business travel concerns.

This first session of our 2016-2017 Executive Education Risk Series will emphasize how to proactively use risk management to balance the risks related to Zika and wider pandemic planning in order to meet business goals and enhance business performance.

The session will provide thought provoking ideas and advance The Risk Institute’s unique role in uniting industry thought leaders, academics and highly respected practitioners in an ongoing dialog to advance the understanding and evolution of risk management. The Risk Institute’s conversation about risk management is open and collaborative with its relevance across all industries and its potential for competitiveness and growth.

 


On June 13, 2016, The Risk Institute at The Ohio State University Fisher College of Business will present the first session of its 2016-2017 Executive Education Risk Series, Zika – Can We Predict the Next Pandemic Outbreak? For more information, or to register, please visit http://go.osu.edu/Zika-u-osu.

 

Managing Your Talent Pipeline and Succession Planning

Risk Institute Portraits Fisher Hall - Third Floor Feb-02-2016 Photo by Jay LaPrete ©2016 Jay LaPretePhilip S. Renaud II, MS, CPCU
Executive Director, The Risk Institute
The Ohio State University Fisher College of Business

 

 


On May 12, 2016, The Risk Institute at The Ohio State University Fisher College of Business held, as the final session  of its 2015-2016 Executive Education series, The Talent War: Managing the Talent Pipeline and Succession Planning. The session was very well attended with participants from a cross section of industry sectors.

All industry sectors from retail to manufacturing regularly face the challenge of recruiting, selecting, on-boarding developing and maximizing talent. More and more sectors are reporting significant challenges in recruiting and retaining good talent.

Whether caused by rapid advances in technology and skills, changing workplace perceptions of millennials, or pending retirement of the “boomer” generation, businesses are facing a new and complicated set of dynamics

Session leaders, Anthony J. Rucci (The Ohio State University Fisher College of Business), Levi Segal, (Aon Hewitt) and Yvonne Kalucis (MXD Group) collaborated to provide insights into understanding the changing, complex alignment of talent management to general business strategy. The session emphasized how to proactively use risk management to balance the risks related to talent management in order to meet business goals and enhance business performance.

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Professor Rucci’s presentation included very interesting points on:

  • The intangible value chain (predicting performance risk with intangibles)
  • Employee “commitment” as a key risk indicator
  • CEO challenges and strategic talent management
  • Organization capabilities risk measurement and audit

Professor Rucci was followed by Levi Segal, who spoke on Strategic Performance Management: Can You Afford to NOT Get This Right? Segal raised some thought provoking questions that included:

  • Are you competing for top talent with more industries than before?
  • Are we incenting the right behavior?
  • How much economic value do high performers add versus the rest?
  • Are you ready to manage and pay for performance in an age of less pay, decreased flexibility and greater regulation?

Finally, Yvonne Kalucis presented on Strategic Talent from the practitioner perspective. The presentation highlighted unique characteristics of strategic positions within an organization. Defining characteristics of strategic positions typically are:

  • Usually <20% of organization
  • Hold disproportionate importance to a company’s ability to execute its strategy
  • Wide variability in the quality of the work displayed among team members in the position

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The session provided thought provoking ideas and advanced The Risk Institute’s unique role in uniting industry thought leaders, academics and highly respected practitioners in an ongoing dialog to advance the understanding and evolution of risk management. The Risk Institute’s conversation about risk management is open and collaborative with its relevance across all industries and its potential for competitiveness and growth.


For more information about upcoming events, our students, partners or research, visit our website: fisher.osu.edu/centers/risk.

The Talent War: Managing the Talent Pipeline and Succession Planning

Risk Institute Portraits Fisher Hall - Third Floor Feb-02-2016 Photo by Jay LaPrete ©2016 Jay LaPrete

By  Philip S. Renaud II, MS, CPCU
Executive Director, The Risk Institute
The Ohio State University Fisher College of Business

 


On May 12, 2016, The Risk Institute at The Ohio State University Fisher College of Business will be presenting the final session of its 2015-2016 Executive Education series, The Talent War: Managing the Talent Pipeline and Succession Planning.

All industry sectors from retail to manufacturing regularly face the challenge of recruiting, selecting, onboarding developing and maximizing talent. More and more sectors are reporting significant challenges in recruiting and retaining good talent. Whether caused by rapid advances in technology and skills, changing workplace perceptions of millennials, or pending retirement of the “boomer” generation, businesses are facing a new and complicated set of dynamics.

Session leaders, Anthony J. Rucci (The Ohio State University Fisher College of Business) and Yvonne Kalucis (MXD Group) will collaborate to provide insights intoRiskInstitute_block understanding the changing, complex alignment of talent management to general business strategy. The session will emphasize how to proactively use risk management to balance the risks related to talent management in order to meet business goals and enhance business performance.

The session will provide thought provoking ideas and advance The Risk Institute’s unique role in uniting industry thought leaders, academics and highly respected practitioners in an ongoing dialog to advance the understanding and evolution of risk management. The Risk Institute’s conversation about risk management is open and collaborative with its relevance across all industries and its potential for competitiveness and growth.


The Risk Institute Executive Education Series will complete it’s 2015-2016 season on May 12, 2016 with The Talent War – Managing the Talent Pipeline and Succession Planning, a half-day course for executives. For more information, or to sign up for the session, visit FISHER.OSU.EDU/RISK