OSU Wexner Medical Center Emergency Department Intensive Rotation

 

Hello Everyone! My name is Rebekah Thomas, and I am a current P2 at the College of Pharmacy. I completed a rotation in the Emergency Department in the beginning of January, and I would like to share my experience with you. My background in pharmacy is primarily community, with a small amount of hospital in the mix. This was my first intensive experience in a hospital, and it was both different and exciting.

This was a 40 hours intensive rotation held over a period of 4 days. I shared this experience with one of my fellow classmates. We were paired up with a PGY2 emergency medicine resident to show us what life was like in the ED.

Our first day started with a tour of the emergency department. My preceptor showed us the divisions of the emergency room, trauma bays, MRIs/CT scanners, and pharmacy workplace. She showed us how the staff communicates via electronic workflow boards, and how they are assigned to different sections of the ED. My classmate and I met with other pharmacists, and then we began to dive into the day to day activities of an emergency department pharmacist.

Our mornings consisted of patient work ups and medication reconciliations. We sorted through patient profiles with our preceptor to identify the most pertinent information. We would first look at the reason for the patient’s visit and then look through physical exam findings, lab results, past and current conditions, and at home medications to better understand the patient’s medical status. If the patient’s at home medication list was not up to date, I would talk with the patient, update their medication list, and verify the information with their community pharmacy. Next, we would look at the medications given at the hospital and determine if they are appropriate based on the patient’s diagnosis and lab values. This allowed me to apply what I had learned in both class and lab in a real practice setting.

Throughout the rotation, our preceptor would also ask us drug information questions that required us to look through drug information resources and hospital treatment algorithms. Our goal was to assess if the prescribed therapy was appropriate or not for the diagnosis. This was a very important part of the rotation because it gave me a hands-on experience in answering drug information questions. It ultimately helped me better learn where to look for certain information in the resources I was provided.

During this rotation, I attended a trauma in which the patient was brought in by life flight. I watched how doctors, nurses, medics, technicians, and pharmacists work together to quickly asses and care for patients in critical conditions. This was amazing to witness because I was able to see how vital collaboration is to patient care.

I also spent some time with a member of the respiratory therapy (RT) team. While working with the pharmacist, I saw a broad selection of medications dispensed to patients with very different conditions. I really enjoyed spending time with RT because I learned about specific medications involved in their work such as breathing treatment medications and the use of ventilators.

This was one of my favorite experiences so far in school, and I am excited for other opportunities yet to come! I will be sharing those with you as well, so stay tuned! Have a great rest of your day!

  • Bekah

Phi Delta Chi and Greek Life in Pharmacy School

Hello again everyone!

The Spring semester is now in full swing and it’s hard to believe we’re a whole month into school already. This semester, while classes are surely keeping me busy, it’s all the extra things outside of the classroom that are really keeping my schedule jam packed. This week, I would like to give you a look into my personal favorite student organization, Phi Delta Chi, and talk about greek life in Pharmacy School as a whole. Whether you were/are in a Greek organization or undergrad, Greek Life in pharmacy school can be a great way to make friends and form lifelong professional connections too.

 

What is Greek Life in pharmacy school like?

Greek Life is very different in pharmacy school than in undergrad. For starters, we don’t have social fraternities or sororities and all of our organizations, at least at OSU, are coed. At OSU we have four greek organizations – Phi Delta Chi, Kappa Psi, Phi Lambda Sigma, and Rho Chi.

Phi Delta Chi and Kappa Psi are both professional pharmacy fraternities. Despite the name “fraternity” anyone can join either of these organizations after a candidacy process. To find out more about Kappa Psi check out the blog post all about it here. Being professional fraternities, both of these organizations balance professional events and social functions. For example you won’t find the stereotypical fraternity party hosted by Phi Delta Chi, but instead might find a networking event with a more social event afterwards.

Phi Lambda Sigma and Rho Chi are both greek honor societies. Focused on leadership and scholarship respectively, these two organizations are invitation only.

Phi Delta Chi

Phi Delta Chi (PDC) is the oldest professional pharmacy fraternity in the country. We first came to OSU in 1908 but were inactive for a few years and just came back in 2016. Being one of the newer student organizations in the college means we’re still on the smaller side but growing quickly. I am currently serving as the Worthy Chief Counselor (our formal term for president) of the Xi Chapter and couldn’t be more excited about what our chapter is doing and what we have planned.

I love PDC because of all the amazing experiences I’ve been able to have through it. One of our core values is building purpose-driven leaders. This past summer, me and three other OSU Pharmacy students joined hundreds of brothers from all over the country in Virginia Beach for our biannual Leadership Development Seminar (LDS). At LDS, not only did we learn a lot about how to be better leaders from brothers that are strong leaders in the field of pharmacy, including the past National President of APhA, but we got to meet and network with Brothers from all across the country. Even now, almost a year later, I still keep in regular contact with friends I met there that are in school in California, Texas, Tennessee, Michigan, and beyond. The network of brothers is amazing to have. I know that if I ever need a place to crash for a residency interview or tips about an area, I have Brothers I can count on.

At OSU, the Xi Chapter of PDC does all sorts of activities throughout the year. From bake sales to raise money for St. Jude to rock climbing trips to student panels to our annual Chapter Retreat in Hocking Hills, we’re always getting closer as a chapter. Our motto in PDC is “Brothers for Life” and I really do feel that the connections I’m making with brothers both at OSU and other chapters are connections that will last for life.

I hope this gives you an idea of what Greek Life in pharmacy school and more specifically Phi Delta Chi is like. As always if you have any questions just drop a comment below!

Me and part of my PDC greek family at our Autumn 2018 Initiation

Winter Fun in Columbus

Hi Everyone,

The heart of winter is upon us, and if you are anything like me, you may find yourself lacking the motivation to get out and explore Columbus when it is so cold out. However, the winter months don’t have to mean sitting at home watching Netflix—Columbus still has plenty of fun things to do! I have compiled a short list of activities to inspire you this winter!

  1. Visit The Book Loft. Located in German Village, this cozy book store has 32 different rooms of books at bargain prices. Pick up a new book (or five) with a few friends, grab a coffee or hot chocolate and enjoy a relaxing weekend morning!
  2. Speaking of coffee, the Columbus Coffee Trail is a great option to get out and explore! Columbus has one of the best coffee scenes in the Midwest and the Coffee Trail offers tons of great ideas for new places to try. Find it here http://www.cbuscoffee.com.
  3. During December, there are all sorts of fun lights and holiday festivals. Wildlights takes place at the Columbus Zoo, Franklin Park Conservatory is decked out in seasonal foliage and twinkling lights, and the Short North and German Village are decorated for the Holidays and often have holiday treats and specials.
  4. Attend a Blue Jackets game. The Columbus Blue Jackets are our professional hockey team in town, and attending games is always a great time (even if you aren’t a hockey fanatic)! Located in the Arena District there are also fun restaurants to check out before and after the game.
  5. While better known for our football team, Ohio State Men’s Basketball team is also premiere and attending games is a great way to spend an evening (or afternoon). The Nut House is the student section for basketball and does a great job of getting students excited for the game. You can also get discounted student tickets and great seats with friends!
  6. If sports aren’t your thing, check out a show in the Theater District—The Palace, The Southern, The Lincoln and The Ohio offer everything from ballet to plays to music and theater performances. If that’s not enough, the Wexner Center for the Arts also puts on frequent shows to enjoy.
  7. Get creative at the Candle Lab, Clay Cafe or Studio 614. There are plenty of paint classes, make your own candle studios and many more creative endeavors all around Columbus.

I hope this has given you some inspiration this winter! Get out an enjoy Columbus and all it has to offer with friends.

Cassie

P1 PharmD Curriculum and Study Tips

Hi everyone!

What I really appreciate about how the PharmD program at OSU teaches students is its employment of a module-based curriculum. This is a little different from how coursework was traditionally set up in undergrad, where you took multiple courses at once throughout the whole semester.  What you’re probably used to is simultaneously taking 4-5 courses a semester—which most likely differs in subject matter and having to take multiple exams in one week.

However, the module-based curriculum consists of coursework set up in blocks—where for a certain period of time, you will only focus on one class at a time consisting of weekly or bi-weekly exams. In P1 (first year), your first week starts off with a transition course that’ll be your stepping stone into integrating the professional PharmD curriculum. The next few weeks will be a course on pharmacy administration, the U.S healthcare system, and pharmacy law along with the corresponding lab and IPPE (part-time professional pharmacy experience based on coursework). The subject matter for each block of coursework varies, but essentially the same model is employed.

A normal week for a P1 student will consist of a morning portion of class starting at 8:30-11:20am and an afternoon portion from 12:30pm-3:30pm (later or earlier) every day of the week. Mondays and Wednesdays are reserved for lab and/or workshop; you are assigned a morning or afternoon lab. Wednesdays are especially unique because that is the when workshop takes place—a smaller class size to help reinforce content learned throughout the week. If you are assigned a Monday morning lab, then your afternoon can be reserved for your IPPE—which consists of geriatric and community pharmacy experiences. Having a schedule designed as such, could mean a half-day of class or no class on Mondays. Although this seems like free-time, it is wise to schedule this time to study course-work—as it can be easy to fall behind on lectures if you don’t keep up.

Keep in mind, the gaps in your schedule do not necessarily mean that you have this time to do nothing, it’s the time you should be using to study. Setting up a study schedule is really crucial to your success in the PharmD program throughout your time here—especially with the amount of content presented in a single lecture. This fast-pace nature of content presentation is a one of the key differences between coursework in undergrad and a professional program. This might sound like an exaggeration but trying to survive without a calendar or planner will be a tough. It is central to keeping track of deadlines and most importantly, making time to study. Find somewhere that works for you, sometimes all it takes to get started and to actually have a successful study session is the environment—some of my usual spots include the Health Sciences Library, Biological Sciences/ Pharmacy Library, or Starbucks near campus. It is also helpful to create a study group—everyone exhibits varying strengths in their knowledge base, which is helpful in learning content in a different manner. Also, don’t hesitate to make friends in the classes ahead of you (P2, P3) and ask for study tips for different professors.

Most importantly; with all that studying, don’t forget to take a break. Eat a snack, watch a YouTube video, whatever it takes for your mind to rest before you have to start studying again. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to contact me.

Lastly, remember to have fun! Go Bucks!

Winter Break in Columbus

 

Hi everyone!
Winter break is always something students look forward to. Its an entire month to relax, catch up with friends, celebrate the Holidays, and prepare your mind for the next semester. Over the past years I ‘ve spent break doing just that, however this year I stayed in Columbus. This was my first time staying here during break but it’s Columbus, the city is huge and theres a lot to do. Here’s a list of what I did.

Buck I Serv
I spent the first week of break participating as an advisor for Buck I Serv, our alternative break program. We spent a day as tourists in New Orleans, this was my first time ever in NOLA. We explored the French quarter and had beignets. Then we headed to Biloxi Mississippi to volunteer at the local boys and girls club and to aid in restoration of wildlife areas damage by Hurricane Katrina. This was a great experience, I met a lot of new friends, had a mini vacation in New Orleans, and got to help a community in need. I highly recommend buck I serv if you’re looking for something to do over break.

Buckeye Football
On New Year’s Day, I watched the Buckeyes beat the Huskies and win the Rose Bowl. Its always a fun time watching the team win Championships. This year was even Coach Urban Meyer’s last game, so it was a great feeling to see him go out with a win. I would have loved to actually go to the game but watching on TV was equally as entertaining. You can always count on the Buckeyes to be in a New Year’s Bowl Game. Go Bucks!

New restaurant
A New York style bagel shop called The Lox opened over break. Being a food blogger, I had to go check it out. I have no idea what a New York bagel is or how it’s different from other bagels but it was delicious. I ended up going twice. I tried their breakfast sandwich and a bagel with their beet and thyme cream cheese. There’s always new restaurants opening near campus so if you’re a foodie like me, you will always have something to do.

Back to School
I spent the last few days of break prepping for school. We had some homework due on the first day and I figured I could get my pre-lab for the first week out of the way. It was nice to be able to catch up and get ahead before the semester begins.

So this is how I spent my winter break. It may not look like much but I had a ton of fun and really enjoyed every moment of it. There’s a lot more to do here but spending 40 hours on a bus for Buck I Serv the first week had me a bit exhausted. If you ever decide to stay here for break, I’m sure you’ll find something to do that you enjoy.

 

Rivalry Week – Sports at OSU

The week of Thanksgiving is a busy time around the College of Pharmacy, with professors finishing up topics to give us an uninterrupted break and students heading home for the holiday or hosting Friendsgivings in Columbus. But beyond the frenzy of the holiday, you’ll notice a lot of signs across campus with a certain letter crossed out and a lot more people wearing scarlet and grey than usual. For those of you who aren’t familiar with Rivalry Week – every year on the Saturday after Thanksgiving, the Buckeyes play our arch rivals, the Michigan Wolverines. While OSU is definitely a big sports school, it reaches an exciting fever pitch during this week and campus is all caught up in the excitement. I am writing this post before the big game so I can’t say whether I’m celebrating or disappointed yet, but either way it will be an amazing game for sure!

While Rivalry Week is definitely the focal point of sports at OSU, there are tons of different opportunities to get involved in the sports culture while at OSU whether as a spectator or a participant. Parks Hall, where most PharmD courses are held, is right across the field from the Shoe, OSU’s massive football stadium. Many students get season tickets for football every year, and there are multiple seating groups of pharmacy students cheering on the Buckeyes at every game. Even though I’m not a big football fan, game days are very exciting and all of campus gets into the fun. (Just hope that you don’t have to drive anywhere during a home game!)

If you’re more of a competitor than a spectator, Intramural sports are a great way to stay active and take a break from studying. Some student organizations will make teams to compete in everything from the traditional sports like baseball to the more quirky ones like battleship (played in canoes in a pool where you try and sink your opponents boats while staying afloat) or the midwestern favorite, corn hole.

Beyond campus, Columbus has a lot of great local sports teams to check out as well. Whether you’re a hockey fan and wanna check out a Blue Jackets game or into soccer and get tickets to the Crew, there are plenty of opportunities for either. The Columbus Clippers, our minor league baseball team, even has Dime a Dog nights that a lot of students love to check out for cheap food and great company.

Even as someone who isn’t huge into sports, I’ve thoroughly enjoyed the sports scene both on and off campus in Columbus and definitely encourage you to take part  if you come to OSU!

CHS Hours and Giving Back to the Community

Hi Everyone!

 

I hope you are all excited for Thanksgiving Break! In the spirit of thankfulness, I wanted to talk about some of the many opportunities that College of Pharmacy members give back to the Columbus community.

 

As students at the College we are required to do a minimum number of community health service hours every year (but are encouraged to go above and beyond that minimum number). P1s are expected to do 10 hours, P2s 20 hours, P3s 30 hours, and P4s 10 hours. So, what constitutes a community health service event? Any event that provides education or health benefit to a community member (think dispensing at a free clinic or a blood pressure screening) AND is supervised by a licensed pharmacist. These are also wonderful learning opportunities you are able to apply knowledge from the classroom to patient care and counseling.

 

Spotlighting Some CHS Opportunities:

 

  • Physicians Care Connection: This is an interprofessional free clinic run on Monday nights out of the Columbus Public Health Department. Students help dispense medications off a small formulary and then counsel every single patient that gets a medication at the clinic.
  • New Life: This is an interprofessional free clinic run on Sunday mornings out of a nearby Methodist church that includes physicians, medical students and nurses. Students help dispense small supplies of medications, primarily for blood pressure and pain. They provide drug information, help write prescriptions and provide information on other places patients can get access to free medications around Columbus.
  • Katy’s Kids: Work with local elementary schools and College Mentor for Kids to teach kids about medication safety. There are 10 stations that kids can go through including Candy vs. Medicine, Poison Control, Counting Pills, Amoxicillin Reconstitution, and Medication Cabinet, and pharmacy students volunteer at one station to run.
  • Columbus Free Clinic: This is an interprofessional free clinic run out of a Family Medicine Clinic on High Street. It is a collaboration with the College of Medicine, Social work and Nursing, and all Pharmacist volunteers are Ohio State Wexner Medical Center Residents. Students can either participate as a dispensing or ambulatory volunteer. Dispensing volunteers help with data entry, dispensing and patient counseling. Ambulatory volunteers participate in patient interviews, chronic care monitoring and evaluation, and medication adjustment and prescription writing.
  • Faith Mission: This is an interprofessional free clinic on Thursday nights where pharmacy volunteers help gather information from patients including a list of medications (RX, OTC, supplements), and any other pertinent information. Volunteers also fill prescriptions and counsel patients on their medications.
  • Charitable Pharmacy: Charitable Pharmacy is run Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays whose mission is to provide affordable and appropriate pharmacy services and coordinate access to health care for patients living at or below 200% of the federal poverty level, are uninsured or underinsured. Volunteers help with filling and inventory and can shadow APPE students during patient encounters.

 

Though this is just a list of some of the opportunities, I hope it provides you with a little more insight into some of the ways our students give back at the College!

Cassie Rush

Preparing for APPE’s

Hi everyone!

I am writing to you all today to talk about preparing for your APPE year. APPE stands for Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience, and it is the final year of pharmacy school. APPE’s allow us experience nine one-month rotations in different settings to 1)  make sure that we are well-rounded, and prepared to sit for the NAPLEX and 2) help us determine which area of pharmacy we might want to pursue upon graduation. Whether that means a residency, fellowship or preparing to transition into a full-time position somewhere, your APPE’s are the best way to integrate all of the knowledge you’ve learned in your didactic curriculum into real-world experiences with real patients! Ohio State offers some really wonderful rotations, too!

One of the very first things I did to prepare for my applications was polishing up my CV.  Liz Trolli and the fantastic staff in Career Services are excellent resources for reviewing CV’s! Once the rotations were made available to us through Dr. Legg, I was able to see the application based rotations that were being offered. For those of you who do not know, Liz Trolli is the Program Manager for all of our Experiential education, and Dr. Legg is the Director of Experiential Education. Liz helps make sure that our IPPE’s are assigned to us in a way that works with our school schedule, and she also helps guide us with other important things that we need to have completed each year, like community health service hours and making sure that we submit proper documentation and forms for various things. Essentially, she ensures that we have everything completed before we can begin our APPE’s. Dr. Legg is the professor that is in charge of our entire APPE application process. She meets with every single student (often more than once) to discuss their interests to help ensure that they get rotations that will be of interest to them. She is also a great person to talk about rotations with, as she is very knowledgeable and knows a lot of the preceptors in the area, so she can give a lot of insight to different rotations.

I began working on my Letters of Intent for those applications I wanted to apply to so I could have those done fairly early. There are other rotations available that are not application based, and those get ranked in PharmAcademic. (All of this will be explained during the first few weeks of your P3 year, so don’t worry!)

As of right now, the ACPE requires that we complete two hospital rotations, two community rotations, and one ambulatory care rotation. The other four rotations are considered elective rotations, and you are able to tailor those to your individual interests!

To be honest, it’s a little stressful and overwhelming to think about these rotations, as they begin to mark the end of my pharmacy school career. To hopefully make this experience a little less stressful for you all, I have some pieces of advice:

  1. Keep  your CV up to date! This means updating your CV after every rotation and volunteer experience throughout pharmacy school. You will be thankful you did!
  2. Start a list of the various rotations you might be interested in. Do they require an application? When are they due? Keeping track of all of these things will help deadlines from creeping up on you!
  3. Decide if you want to travel out of town/out of state/out of the country for your APPE’s. There are many rotations located outside of Columbus and in various states. They are excellent opportunities, so it’s a good idea to look into all of them to see if they might be of interest to you!
  4. Double, triple check your application, LOI’s and CV! Have friends, family and faculty read over your materials before submission.
  5. Don’t be afraid to put yourself out there and apply for a unique rotation. For example, Ohio State has a great nuclear pharmacy rotation, which is something not a lot of students have exposure with. This is your chance to find out what you really like (if you don’t know already)!

I am excited that I am able to rank rotations and find really interesting electives. Pharmacy is such a cool profession in the sense that it is extremely multi-faceted: there are so many different practice settings that a pharmacist can immerse themselves in!

As always, if you have any questions, don’t hesitate to reach out to me!

Ashley

Commuting to Parks Hall

Hi everyone!

 

As an ambassador, a question that we often receive is about commuting to campus. For those students who commute, it can be a challenge to know how to get to campus or where to park on campus. For students living at University Village, a shuttle is accessible using their residence ID. The shuttle runs Monday-Friday 7am- 7pm during the daytime schedule, 7pm-10pm during the evening schedule—every 30 minutes, and Saturday-Sunday  10am-5pm.

 

For students that commuting from elsewhere, there are parking permits available. A popular selection is the Student C-Central Campus surface lot parking permit for graduate-level students. This is an annual permit, eligible from Aug 1- July 31st, currently priced at $363.96—with a monthly proration of $30.33. Most students with the C-lot pass park at the stadium, with off-peak access to other spaces. The stadium Is about a 8-10 minute walk to Parks Hall.

 

Another permit option is the CXC- Buckeye Lot Surface Parking permit. Similar to the Central Campus permit, the buckeye lot permit is an annual pass from Aug 1- July 31st currently priced at $128.28—with a monthly proration of $10.69. In addition, the buckeye lot also offers off-peak access to other spaces. The buckeye lot Is further, but campus buses are available from the lot to Parks Hall. There are more options available, but these are the most common among pharmacy students.

 

 

Best Coffee Shops near Campus

As the weather gets colder and final exams inch closer, coffee becomes a huge part of my day. I always need a quick dose of caffeine to get myself going in the morning. Lucky for us, Columbus is coffee central. There are several shops in town and they’re all great. Columbus even has it’s very own coffee trail! As an avid coffee lover, I have made my way through the trail, and I highly recommend trying it, its loads of fun. Below you will find 3 of my favorite stops along the trail — all close to campus, and easy to find! If you haven’t visited all 3 yet, I hope that I can convince you to do so soon.

1) Fox in the Snow Café (1031 N. 4th St)
Fox in the snow specializes in handcrafted coffee drinks and pastries. My personal favorite is the mocha, it always comes with some cool latte art and tastes amazing as well. During the fall their hot apple cider is the best in town. When it comes to the baked goods, it is hard to decide on just one pastry because they are all delicious. You simply can’t go wrong.

2) Stauf’s Coffee Roasters (Grandview or Grant Ave)
Stauf’s is an awesome shop, and there are several locations throughout Columbus. They serve a vast array of coffees, as well as some specialty drinks and teas. A big added bonus, is that they have wifi and tables for studying, so it’s the perfect place to when you need to hit the books.

3) Boston Stoker (771 Neil Ave)
Boston Stoker is the smallest of the 3, but they still serve some great coffee. I personally enjoy their cold brew. It’s one of the few places I am willing to drink black coffee, because it tastes that good here. This coffee house also has a few tables, and can be a place to study if you’re looking for somewhere new.