Harvey Miller uses new mobility data to understand cities and transportation

I was interviewed by Prof. David Staley for the Ohio State University Voices of Excellence from Arts and Sciences podcast: we talk about GIS, sustainable transportation, mobility data and time geography.

Check it out:

Harvey Miller uses new mobility data to understand cities and transportation

CURA is hiring an Outreach Coordinator!

The Center for Urban and Regional Analysis (CURA) is looking for an organized, self-motivated person with excellent communication skills and a solid knowledge of GIS technologies to be our next Outreach Coordinator.  This person will help chart the course of CURA by forging relationships with representatives from local and state government and community organizations as well as university faculty, staff, and students, and working with these individuals to develop mutual research goals and projects.  The Outreach Coordinator promotes GIS and data science on campus and advances the urban mission of The Ohio State University, in part, through the following activities:

  • Organizing and participating in regular meetings with government, community, and university stakeholders
  • Conducting GIS training workshops
  • Promoting GIS resources available to campus users
  • Managing CURA’s presence on social media and the web
  • Planning and hosting CURA’s bi-annual guest speaker series
  • Providing administrative support for CURA project teams

If this sounds interesting to you, click on the link below to get more information and start the application process.  We look forward to hearing from you! Or perhaps you know of a friend who would be perfect for the job.

https://www.jobsatosu.com/postings/90905

Mesogeography Social physics, GIScience and the quest for geographic knowledge

New publication: Miller, H.J.Mesogeography: Social physics, GIScience and the quest for geographic knowledge,” Progress in Human Geography, 42, 600-609.

Abstract: The 20th century witnessed the rise of social physics: the application of models and techniques developed for physical processes to social phenomena. Social physics left an enduring legacy in human geography via its stepchildren, spatial analysis and GIS, shifting geography from microgeography (description-seeking) and towards macrogeography (law-seeking). Social physics is back in the 21st century, and its renaissance with a concurrent rise in computational and data-driven approaches to science and policy raises a wide range of concerns, including the claim that this is just macrogeography writ large: a single-minded pursuit of social laws at the cost of treating people as particles and spatial context as abstract and sterile. I argue that this time is different: a more sophisticated social physics, spatial analysis and GIScience are emerging that emphasize heterogeneity and spatial context as key drivers of interesting behavior. I also argue that new social physics suggests another path to geographic knowledge somewhere in the middle: mesogeography – a focus on how processes evolve in spatial context. I discuss GIScience techniques and approaches that can facilitate the quest for mesogeographic knowledge.

Keywords: GIScience, social physics, spatial analysis, spatial context, spatial heterogeneity