Harvey Miller uses new mobility data to understand cities and transportation

I was interviewed by Prof. David Staley for the Ohio State University Voices of Excellence from Arts and Sciences podcast: we talk about GIS, sustainable transportation, mobility data and time geography.

Check it out:

Harvey Miller uses new mobility data to understand cities and transportation

Accessibility planning in American metropolitan areas: Are we there yet?

Proffitt, D., Bartholomew, K., Ewing, R. and Miller, H.J. (2019) “Accessibility planning in American metropolitan areas: Are we there yet?Urban Studies, 56, 167-192.

Abstract.  Transportation-planning researchers have long argued that the end goal of a transportation system is increasing accessibility, or opportunities for individuals to meet their daily needs, but that US practice tends to focus on increasing mobility, or opportunities to travel farther and faster. This study finds evidence that the gap between theory and practice may be closing when it comes to accessibility, but that significant barriers still exist to the wider adoption of the accessibility paradigm among metropolitan planning organisations, the main entities responsible for regional transportation planning in the USA. We measure this gap by creating an accessibility index based on content analysis of a nationally representative sample of 42 US regional transportation plans (RTPs). We then use regression-tree analysis to determine the characteristics of metropolitan areas that are most likely to employ accessibility concepts. Finally, we identify barriers to a wider adoption of the accessibility paradigm. Most RTPs include accessibility-related goals, but few define the term or use accessibility-oriented performance measures. The lack of clarity on accessibility leaves vehicle speed as the fundamental criterion for success in most plans. Our analysis finds that MPOs serving large regions with high per capita income are the most likely to produce plans that focus on accessibility. We argue that such places produce more accessibility-oriented RTPs because they have greater planning capacity and recommend changes to federal planning guidelines that could speed the adoption of the accessibility paradigm in RTPs.

CURA is hiring an Outreach Coordinator!

The Center for Urban and Regional Analysis (CURA) is looking for an organized, self-motivated person with excellent communication skills and a solid knowledge of GIS technologies to be our next Outreach Coordinator.  This person will help chart the course of CURA by forging relationships with representatives from local and state government and community organizations as well as university faculty, staff, and students, and working with these individuals to develop mutual research goals and projects.  The Outreach Coordinator promotes GIS and data science on campus and advances the urban mission of The Ohio State University, in part, through the following activities:

  • Organizing and participating in regular meetings with government, community, and university stakeholders
  • Conducting GIS training workshops
  • Promoting GIS resources available to campus users
  • Managing CURA’s presence on social media and the web
  • Planning and hosting CURA’s bi-annual guest speaker series
  • Providing administrative support for CURA project teams

If this sounds interesting to you, click on the link below to get more information and start the application process.  We look forward to hearing from you! Or perhaps you know of a friend who would be perfect for the job.

https://www.jobsatosu.com/postings/90905