CME Webcast Teaches on Antibiotic Stewardship

OSUWexnerbloglogo2014 CME Webcast Teaches on Antibiotic Stewardship. It seems that as fast as we invent new antibiotics, the bacteria are even faster at developing resistance to those antibiotics. And although we need new antibiotics, we also need to be more prudent in how we use the antibiotics that we already have, in order to minimize development of bacterial resistance. On this CME webcast, we’re going to hear about how hospitals can slow the development of bacterial antibiotic resistance and thus keep patients safer and keep their infections more treatable. Joining on moderator in the studio is Professor of Internal Medicine and the Medical Director of the Antimicrobial Stewardship Program at The Ohio State University, Dr. Kurt Stevenson.

View a video introduction of this webcast

What you’ll learn in this webcast

As a result of this educational activity, webcast participants will be able to: REVIEW the basics of antimicrobial resistance in the context of antimicrobial stewardship and explain why antimicrobial stewardship is critically important in our current climate; OUTLINE an overview of antimicrobial stewardship principles and discuss measures to avoid development of antimicrobial resistance; and DISCUSS examples of antimicrobial stewardship interventions and tools for clinicians.

You’ll also learn about the following:

  • Drug resistant bacteria
  • How to reduce antibiotic resistance
  • The Antimicrobial Stewardship Program at the OSU Wexner Medical Center
  • Antimicrobial stewardship in the ambulatory setting

You can find this and many other MedNet21 programs on the OSU – CCME website.

Call our MedNet21 Program Manager at 614.293.3473 for more details about subscribing to MedNet21 as a hospital or as an individual. You can also e-mail him at derrick.freeman@osumc.edu.

On-line CME Webcast Educates On Fall Prevention in Older Adults

OSUWexnerbloglogo2014 On-line CME Webcast Educates On Fall Prevention in Older Adults. One of the challenges of being a bipedal species is that we have a higher center of gravity than most animals. And so we can fall easier and when we do, our bodies can pick up relatively more momentum before hitting ground. The result is that every year, millions of Americans suffer a fall and one out of five falls results in serious injury. Total costs: 31 billion dollars a year. On this CME webcast, we’re going to take a look at falls, their risk factors, their medical effects, and what we can do to help prevent our patients from falling. Joining our moderator in the studio is Assistant Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Dr. Joseph Rosenthal and also, physical therapist and the clinical manager for the programming of falls prevention, ReNea Owens.

View a video introduction of this webcast

What you’ll learn in this webcast

As a result of this educational activity, webcast participants will be able to: DISCUSS risk factors for falling; DISCUSS interventions and resources available; INTRODUCE evidenced-based tests and screening measures to identify fall risk; and INTRODUCE evidenced-based tests and screening measures to identify fall risk.

You’ll also learn about the following:

  • The demographics of falls in older adults
  • Fall risk assessment
  • Prescribing walkers and canes
  • When to consult the physical medicine physician
  • First steps when you discover one of your patients is falling
  • The role of physical therapy versus occupational therapy

You can find this and many other MedNet21 programs on the OSU – CCME website.
Call our MedNet21 Program Manager at 614.293.3473 for more details about subscribing to MedNet21 as a hospital or as an individual. You can also e-mail him at derrick.freeman@osumc.edu.