CME Webcast Teaches on Immunosuppressant Medications

OSUWexnerbloglogo2014 CME Webcast Teaches on Immunosuppressant Medications. More and more, primary care physicians and hospitalists are finding themselves taking care of patients who have been started on immunosuppressant medication a transplant physician, rheumatologist, nephrologist, or pulmonologist. On this CME webcast, we’re going to tell you what you need to know about these medications, their side effects, and their complications. Let me introduce our guests. Dr. Brian Keller is a lung transplant pulmonologist and Assistant Professor Internal Medicine at The Ohio State University. And Pamela Burcham is a lung transplant specialty pharmacist from the OSU Wexner Medical Center.

View a video introduction of this webcast

What you’ll learn in this webcast

As a result of this educational activity, webcast participants will be able to: DISCUSS indications for immunosuppressive therapies; and DESCRIBE prophylaxis immunization, and pregnancy considerations for patients on Immunosuppressive therapy; UNDERSTAND the indications for individual immunosuppressants; and DESCRIBE the common adverse effects and monitoring parameters of the immunosuppressive medications.

You’ll also learn about the following:

  • Common indications for immunosuppressant medications
  • Commonly used immunosuppressant medications
  • Food safety for patients taking immunosuppressant medications
  • Pneumocystis jiroveci clinical presentation
  • Indications for TNF inhibitors
  • Infection risk of TNF inhibitors
  • Management of immunosuppressants in the perioperative period
  • Travel safety when taking an immunosuppressant
  • Bone health and corticosteroids
  • Eye health and corticosteroids
  • Monitoring for methotrexate-induced hepatotoxicity
  • Thiopurine methylytransferase
  • Cyclophosphamide

You can find this and many other MedNet21 programs on the OSU – CCME website.

Call our MedNet21 Program Manager at 614.293.3473 for more details about subscribing to MedNet21 as a hospital or as an individual. You can also e-mail him at derrick.freeman@osumc.edu.

CME Webcast Provides Demos of Medical Apps

OSUWexnerbloglogo2014 CME Webcast Provides Demos of Medical Apps. Currently, there’s more than one and a half million different apps out there and worldwide since 2009, there have been 225 billion app downloads. Many of these apps can make your jobs as physicians and healthcare providers remarkably better. But they come out so fast that it can be hard to keep up with which ones are the most useful. So on this CME webcast, we’ve asked 9 of the most tech-savy physicians here at the Ohio State University, “What’s on your phone?”. And today, they’re each going to tell us and show us some of their favorite medical apps. Most of these apps are free to download but some do require purchase. Here at Ohio State, we have an institutional license for some of the more expensive apps so as OSU physicians we can use them without charge; you should check with your own hospital to see if it has similar institutional licenses for apps that come with a high sticker price.

View a video introduction of this webcast

What you’ll learn in this webcast

As a result of this educational activity, webcast participants will be able to: BECOME familiar with the spectrum of medical apps for smartphones and tablet devices; and LEARN how to navigate commonly used medical apps.

You’ll also learn about the following:

  • MedCalc
  • Hopkin’s Antibiotic Guide
  • ASCVD Risk Estimator
  • Haiku & Canto
  • New England Journal of Medicine This Week
  • Qx Read
  • NIH Stroke Scale
  • UpToDate
  • DynaMed
  • Epocrates
  • Shots Immunization
  • Medscape
  • GoodRx

You can find this and many other MedNet21 programs on the OSU – CCME website.

Call our MedNet21 Program Manager at 614.293.3473 for more details about subscribing to MedNet21 as a hospital or as an individual. You can also e-mail him at derrick.freeman@osumc.edu.

CME Webcast Teaches Viewers About Pneumonia

OSUWexnerbloglogo2014CME Webcast Teaches Viewers About Pneumonia. Pneumonia continues to be a plague on the human race. Each year in our country, 5.6 million people get pneumonia. It is the second most common reason for admission to the hospital and the 6th most common cause of death. Overall, it costs us nearly 20 billion dollars every year. On this CME Webcast, we’re going to re-examine pneumonia: what causes it, which patients need to be admitted to the hospital, how to treat it, and how to prevent it. Joining our Moderator, Dr. Jim Allen, is general internist and Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine, Dr. Jodi Grandominico. Also joining them is pulmonary and critical care specialist and also Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine, Dr. Sarah Tapyrik.

View a video introduction of this webcast

What you’ll learn in this webcast

As a result of this educational activity, webcast participants will be able to: DESCRIBE appropriate treatment for CAD; DEFINE the different types of pneumonia that can occur in or around a healthcare setting; and OUTLINE most common organisms, or groups of organisms, that commonly infect patients in the hospital and best treatment strategies.

You’ll also learn about the following:

  • Hospital-acquired versus community-acquired pneumonia
  • Pneumococcal vaccines and insurance coverage
  • The relationship between influenza and bacterial pneumonia
  • When you should order a bronchoscopy
  • Common pneumonia mimics
  • Duration of antibiotics for pneumonia
  • Mycoplasma and Chlamydia pneumonia

You can find this and many other MedNet21 programs on the OSU – CCME website.

Call our MedNet21 Program Manager at 614.293.3473 for more details about subscribing to MedNet21 as a hospital or as an individual. You can also e-mail him at derrick.freeman@osumc.edu.

New Developments in Lung Cancer Treatment

OSUWexnerbloglogo2014 New Developments in Lung Cancer Treatment. Lung cancer now accounts for 14% of all cancers but it is the most common cause of cancer death, In fact, more people die each year from lung cancer than from colon cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer combined. The 5-year survival rate of lung cancer is only 18% but the good news is that we have a lot of new medications that are giving patients with lung cancer longer and better lives. On our CME webcast, to discuss new treatments in lung cancer, are two of Ohio State’s experts in the management of lung cancer. Joining our moderator, Dr. Jim Allen, we have Dr. Greg Otterson who is a Professor of Internal Medicine from the Division of Medical Oncology and Dr. Erin Bertino, an Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine, also from the Division of Medical Oncology.

View a video introduction of this webcast

What you’ll learn in this webcast

As a result of this educational activity, webcast participants will be able to: GAIN an understanding of the importance of genomic testing in the initial workup of patients with lung cancer. EXPLAIN the evolving role of immune mediated therapy in lung cancer; RECOGNIZE the clinical benefit for patients receiving targeted therapies; and DESCRIBE the patient characteristics commonly associated with actionable mutations in lung cancer.

You’ll also learn about the following:

  • The most fatal of all common cancers
  • Evolving chemotherapy treatment of lung cancer
  • Sub-classifying adenocarcinomas
  • Squamous cell lung cancer treatment
  • Large cell undifferentiated lung cancer

You can find this and many other MedNet21 programs on the OSU – CCME website.

Call our MedNet21 Program Manager at 614.293.3473 for more details about subscribing to MedNet21 as a hospital or as an individual. You can also e-mail him at derrick.freeman@osumc.edu.

On-line Education for Managing Asthma for Children and Adults

OSUWexnerbloglogo2014 On-line Education for Managing Asthma for Children and Adults. The first asthma inhalers were marketed in 1956 and contained epinephrine and isoprenaline. We now have much better medications to put into inhalers but it is still a big business, for example, just one of the 3 brands of albuterol inhalers had more than one billion dollars in sales last year. On this CME webcast, we’re going to update you on asthma. First, to tell you about asthma in adults is Associate Professor of Internal Medicine and the Fellowship Director for adult pulmonary at Ohio State, Dr. Jennifer McCallister. Then, to tell you about asthma in children is Associate Professor of Pediatrics and the Fellowship Director for pediatric pulmonary at Ohio State and Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Dr. Elizabeth Allen.

View a video introduction of this webcast

What you’ll learn in this webcast

As a result of this educational activity, webcast participants will be able to: SELECT age appropriate “step-up” therapies for children with uncontrolled asthma; INSTRUCT all asthma patients on appropriate steps to take during an asthma flare; USE the domains of impairment and risk to characterize asthma severity and control; and DESCRIBE commonly available tools to objectively characterize asthma control

You’ll also learn about the following:

  • Asthma signs and symptoms
  • Pathophysiology of asthma
  • Allergy testing and asthma
  • Adult-onset asthma
  • Inhaled medication delivery in younger children
  • When you should refer asthmatic children to the pediatric asthma specialist
  • Management of acute exacerbations of asthma
  • Asthma during pregnancy
  • Common asthma mimics in children
  • The role of the school nurse in the management of childhood asthma
  • Choosing among different steroid and steroid/LABA inhalers
  • Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis
  • Asthma medication de-escalation

You can find this and many other MedNet21 programs on the OSU – CCME website.

Call our MedNet21 Program Manager at 614.293.3473 for more details about subscribing to MedNet21 as a hospital or as an individual. You can also e-mail him at derrick.freeman@osumc.edu.