Ren Hang’s erotic photography

Source: CNN (2/15/17)
Stark, Erotic Images of Chinese Youth Stirs Controversy
By Wilfred Chan, CNN

Ren Hang is a self-taught, Beijing-based photographer whose color-blasted, abstract erotic snapshots have recently made him one of Asia's most popular contemporary artists.

Photos: Ren Hang, Photographer

(CNN) When you look at the photographs, the first thing you notice are the naked, pale, Chinese youths — wearing nothing but blasé expressions.

You’ve entered the world of Ren Hang: a young, Beijing-based artist whose controversial compositions have won him international fame but censorship at home, despite his claims that his work has no meaning. Continue reading

Interview with Sim Chi Yin

From: Maghiel van Crevel <M.van.Crevel@hum.leidenuniv.nl>
Source: GUP Magazine (12/23/16)
A Subtle Place: An Interview with Sim Chi Yin
By Nora Uitterlinden

Singaporean photographer Sim Chi Yin is one of a few photographers based in China who works for the international media. She has lived in Beijing since 2007, capturing intimate photo stories on social issues. Earlier this year she became a full member of the prestigious VII Photo Agency. In this interview with GUP, Sim speaks about working under censorship, the joy of starting new photo projects, and how international media have not kept up with the reality of China. Continue reading

TAP (Fall 2016)

tap-fall-2016

Self and Nation: TAP Review fall issue

The Fall 2016 issue of the Trans Asia Photography Review is now available at tapreview.org. An open access online scholarly journal, the TAP Review is devoted to the study of photography from East Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia and West Asia. Our new issue is entitled Self and Nation and includes the following:

John Clark, Hamaya Hiroshi (1915-1999) and Photographic Modernism in Japan

Alison Miller, Imperial Images: The Japanese Empress Teimei in Early Twentieth-Century Newspaper Photography Continue reading

TAP Review “Technologies” issue–cfp extension

Call for Papers – Technologies – DEADLINE EXTENDED

For the spring 2017 issue of the Trans Asia Photography Review, we are seeking projects which explore the technologies of photographic image making and distribution in all regions of Asia. Our interests include early and more recent printing processes, cameras and camera-less images, contemporary social media (including the use of “selfies”), as well as earlier methods of image circulation; in short, the materials, instruments, forms, methods, media, and networks that make possible the production and reception of photographic work. We seek work on technologies utilized in the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries, in East Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia, West Asia, and Central Asia. In all cases we are especially interested in the cultural, social and political implications of the technologies under consideration.

NEW Proposal deadline: October 8, 2016. Notification of proposal acceptance by October 15, 2016. Accepted proposals must then be completed by December 15, 2016; full peer review and final decisions regarding publication will follow.

In addition to seeking work specifically related to the Technologies theme, the TAP Review maintains an ongoing “open call” for submissions on all other topics relating to photography in Asia.
Proposals may be for articles (length open), curatorial projects (10-15 images with brief text), translations (from Asian languages into English), interviews, or book/exhibition reviews (exhibitions must have a catalog). Please send proposal with accompanying CV to editor@tapreview.org.

Questions? Contact editor@tapreview.org.

The Trans Asia Photography Review is an open-access peer-reviewed online journal published by Hampshire College in collaboration with the University of Michigan Library with funding from the Five College Consortium.

Sandra Matthews
Editor, Trans-Asia Photography Review
tapreview.org

The new world of Chinese photography

Source: CNN (9/12/16)
From Tiananmen to THIS: The new world of Chinese photography
By Wilfred Chan, for CNN

Shanghai, China (CNN)Liu Heung Shing knows how to be at the right place at the right time. In 1989, that was Tiananmen.

Then a photographer for AP, he remembers how other journalists went home as the protests dragged on. “I told them not to leave,” he says. “They didn’t listen.” Continue reading

TAP Review “Technologies” issue–cfp

Call for Papers – Technologies

For the spring 2017 issue of the Trans Asia Photography Review, we are seeking projects which explore the technologies of photographic image making and distribution in all regions of Asia. Our interests include early and more recent printing processes, cameras and camera-less images, contemporary social media (including the use of “selfies”), as well as earlier methods of image circulation; in short, the materials, instruments, forms, methods, media, and networks that make possible the production and reception of photographic work. We seek work on technologies utilized in the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries, in East Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia, West Asia, and Central Asia. In all cases we are especially interested in the cultural, social and political implications of the technologies under consideration. Continue reading

Travels in Southwest China, 1899-1917

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CrossAsia at Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin launched an online photo exhibition “Travels in Southwest China, 1899-1917” which presents photographs from the Fritz and Hedwig Weiss Archive. The archive, containing photographs and documents, was donated by Tamara Wyss, granddaughter of Fritz and Hedwig Weiss, to Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin in spring 2016. Fritz Weiss was German consul in China and Hedwig Weiss-Sonnenburg was a travel writer and the author of children’s books. They lived in Southwest China during the years between the end of the Qing dynasty and China’s entry into the First World War. In the exhibition we present a selection of the photographs from the Weiss archive. The pictures show landscapes, people and their life in secluded mountainous areas, river valleys and minority areas, travelling by ship and on land, and they document the daily lives of Fritz and Hedwig in cities such as Chongqing and Chengdu. Continue reading

HK student faces criticism over photo

Source: Ejinsight (7/14/16)
HK student faces criticism in China over award-winning photo

Jimmi Ho's award-winning picture of a university dormitory building has sparked intense discussion in online forums on the mainland. Photo: travel.nationalgeographic.com

Jimmi Ho’s award-winning picture of a university dormitory building has sparked intense discussion in online forums on the mainland. Photo: travel.nationalgeographic.com

A Hong Kong student’s award-winning snapshot of a university dormitory building in Guangzhou has sparked heated discussions in online forums, with mainland citizens taking offense at the picture’s original caption.

Jimmi Ho Wing-ka’s photo, titled Silenced, was captured last year at South China Normal University, showing a highly dense dormitory with clothes hanging outside the rooms.

The picture won the second place in the city categories in the 2016 National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest. Continue reading

Technologies, TAP–cfp

Call for Papers – Technologies

For the spring 2017 issue of the Trans Asia Photography Review, we are seeking projects which explore the technologies of photographic image making and distribution in all regions of Asia. Our interests include early and more recent printing processes, cameras and camera-less images, contemporary social media (including the use of “selfies”), as well as earlier methods of image circulation; in short, the materials, instruments, forms, methods, media, and networks that make possible the production and reception of photographic work. We seek work on technologies utilized in the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries, in East Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia, West Asia, and Central Asia. In all cases we are especially interested in the cultural, social and political implications of the technologies under consideration.

Proposal deadline: October 1, 2016. Notification of proposal acceptance by October 15, 2016. Accepted proposals must then be completed by December 15, 2016; full peer review and final decisions regarding publication will follow.

In addition to seeking work specifically related to the Technologies theme, the TAP Review maintains an ongoing “open call” for submissions on all other topics relating to photography in Asia.
Proposals may be for articles (length open), curatorial projects (10-15 images with brief text), translations (from Asian languages into English), interviews, or book/exhibition reviews (exhibitions must have a catalog). Please send proposal with accompanying CV to editor@tapreview.org.

Questions? Contact editor@tapreview.org.

The Trans Asia Photography Review is an open-access peer-reviewed online journal published by Hampshire College in collaboration with the University of Michigan Library with funding from the Five College Consortium.

Sandra Matthews
Editor, Trans-Asia Photography Review
tapreview.org

Eyes on China

Source: Sinosphere, NYT (2/3/16)
Eyes on China’: Illuminating Life Across a Changing Country
By EDWARD WONG

slideshow

BEIJING — Two photographers living in China, Kevin Frayer of Getty Images and Fred Dufour of Agence France-Presse, set up a collective Instagram account in June that displays photographs and short videos taken across China. They called it “Eyes on China.”

The aim was to provide an informal outlet and organizing point for many of the professional photographers, both Chinese and foreign, working in the country. The account now has 34 photographers, 18 of them Chinese and 16 foreign. A couple are video journalists. Continue reading

Everyday Life in Mao’s China

Source: LA Review of Books, China Blog (1/27/16)
EVERYDAY LIFE IN MAO’S CHINA: A Q&A WITH HISTORIAN COVELL MEYSKENS
By Tong Lam

新华社照片,北京,2014年3月6日 老百姓是怎样关注两会的 全国两会的召开既是国家政治生活中的大事,也与百姓生活息息相关。这组照片呈现了不同年代的群众对两会关注的场景,从中我们既可看到生活环境和社会环境的变迁,也能看到传媒技术的进步使得两会离人们越来越近。 1954年9月15日至28日,第一届全国人民代表大会第一次会议在北京召开。图为北京郊区农民收听会议实况转播的情形。   新华社记者 张瑞华 摄

In addition to teaching at the US Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California, historian Covell Meyskens also curates Everyday Life in Mao’s China, a website filled with photographs and other images from 20th-century China. In this interview, Meyskens discusses the project with historian, photographer, and regular China Blog contributor Tong Lam.

TONG LAM: I noticed that you have been posting a lot of old PRC photographs on your blog. Could you tell us more about this project? What are your goals?

COVELL MEYSKENS: In the early 20th century, Paul Valery predicted that one day in the not too distant future, it would be possible for someone to access information from all over the world without having to travel anywhere. With the arrival of the digital age, this prediction has become our reality. The possibilities that this condition has opened up for contemporary scholarship are truly exciting. A few months ago, I began my first venture into this realm, when I created the website Everyday Life in Mao’s China.The website came about largely by accident. Over the past few years, I had collected a number of digital photos of the Maoist period, but I had not made much of them, except as illustrations in my dissertation. Then, last fall, I began to show some in my courses to spur discussions. A few lively class sessions later, I realized how useful it would be to have a website where people could access all sorts of images of China under Mao.So, as a public service, I founded a website on life in Mao’s China and started posting photos and paintings from roughly the 1930s to the 1980s. I have chosen this broader timeframe in order to encompass China’s transition both into and out of socialism. So that people can more readily locate images about certain topics, I am careful to appropriately categorize all postings. I also try as much as possible to include their date and location. Continue reading

Ding Ling photo?

I’m posting this question on behalf of someone off-list. He’d like to know where the famous photo of Ding Ling below (click the subject line above to view it on the blog post) was first published. The date on the photo is 1933, so it must have been disseminated around the time of Ding Ling’s “disappearance” in Shanghai (i.e., when she was arrested by the Guomindang). We’d be grateful for your help. Also, if any knows where to find a high resolution, publication quality version of the image, that information would be useful as well.

Kirk

republican-lit-ding-ling-1etkgff

TAP fall 2015

The Fall 2015 issue of the Trans Asia Photography Review, entitled Composite Realities: The Art of Photographic Manipulation in Asia, is now available online at tapreview.org. You may need to refresh your browser to see the new contents. This issue is guest edited by Claire Roberts and Yi Gu, two important scholars writing about the histories of photography in China.

Essays and Conversations:

CHEN Shuxia, Manipulation as Art: Photographs by Xu Zhuo, 1979–1981

GAO Chu and WANG Shuo, Photographic Manipulation in China: A Conversation between Fu Yu and Gao Chu

JIANG Jiehong, The ‘China Dream’ Reimagined: Contemporary Photography in China

Mia Linxing LIU, The “Emulative” Portraits: Lang Jingshan’s Photography of Zhang Daqian

LEE Wing Ki, Xi Jinping at the “Occupy” Sites: Derivative Works and Participatory Propaganda from Hong Kong’s Umbrella Movement (2014)

Claire ROBERTS, translator, Excerpt from Coming to the Village to Take Photos, by Wang Yong Continue reading

John Thomson photography exhibits

macao_catalogueTwo exhibits of the photographs of John Thomson are opening soon in Paris. One exhibit, of Thomson’s Taiwan photographs, will be held at the Maison de la China and opens in late September. The other, of Thomson’s China photographs, will be held at the Fondation Taylor beginning at the end of October. For those interested, you can download the 15-page press kit here:

http://u.osu.edu/mclc/files/2015/09/0903-pk-1h2ev32.pdf

For further information, in French, on the exhibits and on John Thomson, click here:

http://blog.causeur.fr/verasu/

For information on Thomson in English, check out this site:

http://wellcomelibrary.org/collections/digital-collections/john-thomson-photographs/

Kirk

TAP Review, spring 2016–cfp

****** The proposal deadline for the spring issue is September 1st! ******

CALL for Submissions: TAP Review Spring 2016

The spring 2016 issue of the Trans Asia Photography Review will be open to all topics, so that the editors can become aware of, and publish, new work that might not fit a specific theme. We welcome proposals relating in any way to historical or contemporary photography in or from Asia. We are also taking this opportunity to broaden our base in two ways. For the first time, we invite artists to submit their photo-based work directly (see guidelines below). And we are expanding our geographic base beyond Northeast, Southeast, and South Asia to include Central Asia and West Asia. Continue reading