Fan Ho, poet with a camera

Source: SCMP (6/20/17)
How Fan Ho, Hong Kong’s poet with a camera, found his calling – in his own words
In one of his last interviews, Fan Ho, who died a year ago today, aged 84, recalls how he rediscovered his passion for photography – and some old negatives – to finally gain the recognition and respect he longed for
BY STUART HEAVER

Tiananmen protest photos see light of day

Source: NYT (6/1/17)
Hidden Away for 28 Years, Tiananmen Protest Pictures See Light of Day
点击查看本文中文版
By LUO SILING

Protesters aboard a truck near Tiananmen Square in Beijing in May 1989. One appears to be in a police uniform. It was not unusual then for police officers to join the demonstrators. CreditDavid Chen

For nearly 28 years, David Chen hid away a treasure chest of black-and-white photographs that he took of the protest movement that erupted at Tiananmen Square in Beijing in the spring of 1989. Continue reading

TAP spring 2017

The spring 2017 issue of the Trans Asia Photography Review is now available at tapreview.org. You may need to refresh your browser to see the new contents. Addressing the theme of “Technologies”, this issue features the following articles, projects and book reviews:

Kelly M. McCormick, Ogawa Kazumasa and the Halftone Photograph: Japanese War Albums at the Turn of the Twentieth Century

Dengyan Zhou and Zhimin Shi, Photography and the Appropriation of Kodak Dye Transfer in Socialist China

Shahidul Alam, My Unseen Sister

Amandine Davre, Seeing Nuclear Issues in Daguerrotypes: An Interview with Takashi Arai

Monique Gross, Ways of Looking: Studying the Architecture of Hanoi’s Ngoc Ha Neighborhood via Drone Photography

Procheta Mukherjee Olson, More than a Collection: Photography in the Asia Art Archive

Clare Harris, Photography and Tibet, reviewed by Amy Holmes-Tagchungdarpa Continue reading

9 photographers you need to follow

Source: Time (4/17/17)
Nine Chinese Photographers You Need to Follow
By Ye Ming

The unprecedented economic boom in China since the early 1980s has also sparked an explosion of interest in photography.

Despite the government’s tightening restrictions on media, young photojournalists and documentary photographers continue to push the limit, investigating issues central of a society under constant transition. The fine arts, a market in general on the rise in recent years has offered a new voice for visual artists looking for new modes of experiment and expression.

This list features the new generation of Chinese photographers and visual artists, all under 35, who were born and raised in a time of sweeping change. As China continues to diversify and assert its influence around the globe, these artists offer a glimpse into the ever-changing country and what it means to be Chinese today.

nine-chinese-photographers-to-follow-yuyang-liu

A young man tries to stand on his head in iced Xiaoyalang Reservoir. Kashgar, Xinjiang. 2016. Yuyang Liu

Yuyang Liu 

Yuyang Liu is a young but accomplished photographer, winning the prestigious Ian Parry scholarship only a year after taking up photography professionally. Continue reading

TAP fall 2017–cfp reminder

***PROPOSAL DEADLINE IS APRIL 7***

CALL for Submissions: TAP Review Fall 2017

The fall 2017 issue of the Trans Asia Photography Review is currently open to all topics, so that the editors can become aware of, and publish, new work that might not fit a specific theme. We welcome proposals relating in any way to historical or contemporary photography in or from Asia (East Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia, West Asia and Central Asia).

Please use the following formats to submit proposals:

Article (length open). Your proposal should contain an abstract and the author’s CV. Continue reading

Beijing rooftoppers

Source: That’s Beijing (3/11/17)
The Beijing Rooftoppers Who’ll Do (Almost) Anything for the Shot
By Dominique Wong

They hang off cranes hundreds of meters above the ground, balance on the edge of skyscrapers and do backflips against the CCTV cityscape. And they capture it all to post on Instagram afterwards.

For Beijing’s urban wanderers, the city is their playground and urban exploration – the discovery of abandoned and inhabited man-made structures – gets them high. Literally. The ‘money shot’ of urban exploration photography is the rooftop shot – a photo captured from the top of buildings or other high vantage points of metropolises, an image inspiring awe, terror and, at times, criticism. Continue reading

Asiascape, 4.1-2

Special Issue Asiascape: Digital Asia – China Contributions

List members may be interested in our new special issue of Asiascape: Digital Asia, on the theme of ‘digital disruption’. The issue includes several China-related contributions, such as Pan Weixian’s study of ‘Under the Dome’ and its relevance for image capture and smog iconography, Michael Keane and Chen Ying’s article of innovation in China’s digital cultural industries, Marina Svensson’s account of how Weibo and Weixin are changing field-work experiences in China, and Jack Qiu and Lin Lin’s discussion of Foxconn’s ‘iSlavery’.

The issue also features two longer book reviews that may be relevant to list members: a discussion of Michel Hockx’s Internet Literature in China (by Heather Inwood, Margaret Hillenbrand, and Gong Haomin) and my own review of Internet, Social Media, and a Changing China (ed. by deLisle, Goldstein, and Yang).

Best wishes,

Florian Schneider <f.a.schneider@hum.leidenuniv.nl>

Ren Hang dies at 29

For an obituary in Chinese and more of Ren’s photographs, see here. Maghiel van Crevel  <M.van.Crevel@hum.leidenuniv.nl>

Source: British Journal of Photography (2/24/17)
Controversial and renowned Chinese photographer Ren Hang dies aged 29
Written by Tom Seymour

All images © Ren Hang, courtesy of Taschen

Ren Hang, one of the leading lights of the new generation of Chinese photographers, despite enduring censorship and intimidation from the authorities throughout his career, has died at the age of 29, his gallerist has confirmed.

Ren Hang was arrested many times for his sexually explicit, joyously celebratory photography. Although he was globally renowned, he never gained the recognition he deserved in his home country, in part because he was repeatedly denied the opportunity to display his work in Beijing and throughout China. Continue reading

TAP fall 2017–cfp

CALL for Submissions: TAP Review Fall 2017

The fall 2017 issue of the Trans Asia Photography Review is currently open to all topics, so that the editors can become aware of, and publish, new work that might not fit a specific theme. We welcome proposals relating in any way to historical or contemporary photography in or from Asia (East Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia, West Asia and Central Asia).

Please use the following formats to submit proposals:

Article (length open). Your proposal should contain an abstract and the author’s CV.

Curatorial project (10-15 images with introductory text). Your proposal should contain up to 5 thumbnail images in a pdf file, not to exceed 50 MB in total. Please send your images to editor@tapreview.org via www.wetransfer.com or a similar service. Images should be accompanied by a brief introduction and your CV; these may be included in the pdf or sent separately via email. Continue reading

Ren Hang’s erotic photography

Source: CNN (2/15/17)
Stark, Erotic Images of Chinese Youth Stirs Controversy
By Wilfred Chan, CNN

Ren Hang is a self-taught, Beijing-based photographer whose color-blasted, abstract erotic snapshots have recently made him one of Asia&#39;s most popular contemporary artists.

Photos: Ren Hang, Photographer

(CNN) When you look at the photographs, the first thing you notice are the naked, pale, Chinese youths — wearing nothing but blasé expressions.

You’ve entered the world of Ren Hang: a young, Beijing-based artist whose controversial compositions have won him international fame but censorship at home, despite his claims that his work has no meaning. Continue reading

Interview with Sim Chi Yin

From: Maghiel van Crevel <M.van.Crevel@hum.leidenuniv.nl>
Source: GUP Magazine (12/23/16)
A Subtle Place: An Interview with Sim Chi Yin
By Nora Uitterlinden

Singaporean photographer Sim Chi Yin is one of a few photographers based in China who works for the international media. She has lived in Beijing since 2007, capturing intimate photo stories on social issues. Earlier this year she became a full member of the prestigious VII Photo Agency. In this interview with GUP, Sim speaks about working under censorship, the joy of starting new photo projects, and how international media have not kept up with the reality of China. Continue reading

TAP (Fall 2016)

tap-fall-2016

Self and Nation: TAP Review fall issue

The Fall 2016 issue of the Trans Asia Photography Review is now available at tapreview.org. An open access online scholarly journal, the TAP Review is devoted to the study of photography from East Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia and West Asia. Our new issue is entitled Self and Nation and includes the following:

John Clark, Hamaya Hiroshi (1915-1999) and Photographic Modernism in Japan

Alison Miller, Imperial Images: The Japanese Empress Teimei in Early Twentieth-Century Newspaper Photography Continue reading

TAP Review “Technologies” issue–cfp extension

Call for Papers – Technologies – DEADLINE EXTENDED

For the spring 2017 issue of the Trans Asia Photography Review, we are seeking projects which explore the technologies of photographic image making and distribution in all regions of Asia. Our interests include early and more recent printing processes, cameras and camera-less images, contemporary social media (including the use of “selfies”), as well as earlier methods of image circulation; in short, the materials, instruments, forms, methods, media, and networks that make possible the production and reception of photographic work. We seek work on technologies utilized in the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries, in East Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia, West Asia, and Central Asia. In all cases we are especially interested in the cultural, social and political implications of the technologies under consideration.

NEW Proposal deadline: October 8, 2016. Notification of proposal acceptance by October 15, 2016. Accepted proposals must then be completed by December 15, 2016; full peer review and final decisions regarding publication will follow.

In addition to seeking work specifically related to the Technologies theme, the TAP Review maintains an ongoing “open call” for submissions on all other topics relating to photography in Asia.
Proposals may be for articles (length open), curatorial projects (10-15 images with brief text), translations (from Asian languages into English), interviews, or book/exhibition reviews (exhibitions must have a catalog). Please send proposal with accompanying CV to editor@tapreview.org.

Questions? Contact editor@tapreview.org.

The Trans Asia Photography Review is an open-access peer-reviewed online journal published by Hampshire College in collaboration with the University of Michigan Library with funding from the Five College Consortium.

Sandra Matthews
Editor, Trans-Asia Photography Review
tapreview.org

The new world of Chinese photography

Source: CNN (9/12/16)
From Tiananmen to THIS: The new world of Chinese photography
By Wilfred Chan, for CNN

Shanghai, China (CNN)Liu Heung Shing knows how to be at the right place at the right time. In 1989, that was Tiananmen.

Then a photographer for AP, he remembers how other journalists went home as the protests dragged on. “I told them not to leave,” he says. “They didn’t listen.” Continue reading

TAP Review “Technologies” issue–cfp

Call for Papers – Technologies

For the spring 2017 issue of the Trans Asia Photography Review, we are seeking projects which explore the technologies of photographic image making and distribution in all regions of Asia. Our interests include early and more recent printing processes, cameras and camera-less images, contemporary social media (including the use of “selfies”), as well as earlier methods of image circulation; in short, the materials, instruments, forms, methods, media, and networks that make possible the production and reception of photographic work. We seek work on technologies utilized in the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries, in East Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia, West Asia, and Central Asia. In all cases we are especially interested in the cultural, social and political implications of the technologies under consideration. Continue reading