Cornell Contemporary China Initiative

Hi everyone,

Cornell’s Contemporary China Initiative, a weekly lecture organized and hosted by professor Robin McNeal, is now in its third year, and has accumulated a substantial number of digitized, hour-long talks that may be useful to list members.

At the CCCI repository, there are talks by Sebastian Veg (on intellectuals in the contemporary public sphere), Magnus Fiskejö (on the show trials of Hong Kong booksellers), Paola Iovene (on the trope of ), Wendy Su (on the PRC film industry and Chinese soft power), Yiyun Li (on her book Dear Friend, migration, and language), Leta Hong Fincher (on leftover women 剩女), Carlos Rojas (on 马华文学), myself (on literary copies, prose poetry and imitation architecture) and a lot lot more. Other talks range from economics to power politics, but I’ve already gone on too long. The full archive resides here: https://vimeo.com/channels/ccci.

Enjoy!

Nick Admussen  <na347@cornell.edu>

ACCL presidential election results

Dear all,

The voting period for the election of the next ACCL president has concluded. In all, we received 177 valid votes from North America, Europe, and Asia—a number that Michelle Yeh and Xiaomei Chen (who have tabulated the votes for the past several election cycles, describe as “unprecedented” for ACCL). The vote was also unusually close, with the runner-up receiving 85 votes, and the winner receiving 92.

Please join me in congratulating Daniel Fried as the next ACCL president! His term begins immediately. I would also thank Mingwei Song for accepting the nomination, and for his many years of service to ACCL. I’m delighted that we had two such strong candidates, and such a competitive election.

Finally, I would like to thank Michelle Yeh and Xiaomei Chen for, once again, tabulating the vote. As ACCL continues to grow, this biannual task is becoming more and more time-intensive!

I hope many of you will be able to join us for the next ACCL conference in 2019!

take care,

carlos

carlos rojas
duke university

A literary award for plagiarists

Source: Sup China (11/1/17)
A literary award for plagiarists
By Jiayun Feng

“I thought this was something from the Onion at first. But I’m glad to know it is real news.”

“A well-deserved prize for such a despicable plagiarist. We need more awards of this kind in various fields.”

From Weibo (in Chinese)

On November 1, the first Firestone Literary Awards (燧石文学奖 suìshíwénxuéjiǎng) took place in Beijing. A crowd of Chinese authors showed up at the ceremony, where a list of awards was announced, including Best Short Story, Best Novel, and the one that stole the whole show — the White Lotus Award, a special prize dedicated to “awarding” plagiarized works. The phrase white lotus (白莲花 báiliánhuā) is internet slang that refers to someone, usually a woman, who pretends to be sweet and innocent while engaged in manipulation and scheming. Continue reading

Journal of Chinese Cinemas–cfp

Call for Papers: Chaotic Formats: Video, Moving Images, Cinematic Displays
Journal of Chinese Cinemas, Special Issue 2019

In postsocialist China, the boundaries between the practice of artmaking and filmmaking, and the spaces of contemporary art and cinema, have rarely been distinct. Instead, artistic practices in China are characterized by a chaos of formats, an ambivalence about presentational modes and an implicit or explicit acknowledgement of mainstream representational and presentational formats. Moving image art has become a potent analytic and practical category for art history and film scholars to examine the alternative production, exhibition and funding models that facilitate the migration of filmmakers into the spaces of art and artists into the spaces of film. In Europe and North America, this migration produced anxieties about medium specificity that were exacerbated by the introduction of digital technologies, and many of these anxieties shape the discussion around artist’s cinema and filmmaker’s art exhibitions. Such concerns, central to European and North American discussions of “crossing the black box and the white cube,” are largely absent in the Chinese context. Continue reading

ACCL presidential election–reminder

[REMINDER, deadline for voting is November 1st, at midnight]

Dear ACCL members,

As the outgoing president of the Association of Chinese and Comparative Literature (ACCL), my final task is to coordinate the election of the association’s next president. Given that the association does not have an official membership, anyone working in the field may vote. The president’s term of office is two years, and the president’s primary responsibility has traditionally been the organization and hosting of the association’s biannual conference.

I am happy to say that we have two excellent candidates for the position: Daniel Fried (Associate Professor, University of Alberta) and Mingwei Song (Associate Professor, Wellesley College). Please read their statements, below, and send your votes to (both) Prof. Michelle Yeh (mmyeh@ucdavis.edu) and Xiaomei Chen (xmchen@ucdavis.edu), who this year have once again agreed to oversee the elections. Please specify your institution and position when you vote (graduate students and independent scholars are also welcome to vote). The deadline for voting is midnight, November 1st, 2017. 

sincerely,
carlos rojas
duke university Continue reading

MLA elections (1)

Dear Colleagues and Friends,

I have been nominated by the MLA Elections Committee to run for a seat in the Delegate Assembly representing New England and Eastern Canada. If you are a MLA member, would you vote for me? Please see my campaign statement below and a forwarded email from MLA that contains the link to the voting page. Even if you are not in the New England region, you can still vote. But you can only vote for one regional delegate. So if you vote for me, then you can’t vote for a delegate in your own region and vice versa.

Here is my statement:

I am honored to be nominated to represent the region of New England and Eastern Canada in the MLA Delegate Assembly. I support the MLA’s public advocacy for the humanities. I am also excited to see that one of the MLA’s Strategic Priorities is to continue the internationalization initiative. This is the right thing to do. Such effort to expand the MLA’s global reach, however, should not be directed merely by practical benefits alone, but should be informed by a deeper understanding about the humanities’ place in the world. I firmly believe that humanists who are sensitively and skillfully attuned to multi-lingualism and regional/local differences have a particularly significant role to play in shaping the future of the world. Let us not be discouraged to think otherwise. If elected, I will advocate for a concrete and reflective assessment about the opportunities as well as challenges brought by globalization to the humanities. I will also support the endeavor to develop innovative methods to engage the public to diverse perspectives, cultures, and languages drawing upon rich materials of world humanities. To this important job I bring my teaching experience and my scholarship in Chinese fiction and film, my broad research interests in world literature and cinema, my administrative experience as the Chair of a Modern Languages and Literatures department, as well as my active involvement in MLA as a panelist, a roundtable organizer, a forum committee member, and a PMLA Advisory Committee member.

Thank you so much for your support!

Jiwei Xiao<jiweixiao@gmail.com>

MLA elections

Dear Colleagues:

It appears to be the season for elections. The Modern Language Association (MLA) annual election has just opened. I wish to encourage all of you who are members of the MLA and those thinking of joining to vote, supporting candidates who are dedicated to the cause of expanding the role of East Asian languages in the MLA. Here is a list of candidates I plan to support:

Executive Council:

Douglas Armato, Director, University of Minnesota Press.
He is a strong supporter of the publication of East Asian cultural studies.

Delegate Assembly (Professional Issues):

Davinder L. Bhowmik, Associate Professor, University of Washington.
She is a peer in Japanese studies and will help us expand our reach.

Delegate Assembly (Regional Delegates): Continue reading

ACCL presidential election-repost

Unfortunately, in cut-and-pasting, I inadvertently lopped off part of one paragraph of the ACCL election posting sent out earlier today. Please find the corrected version below.–carlos

Dear ACCL members,

As the outgoing president of the Association of Chinese and Comparative Literature (ACCL), my final task is to coordinate the election of the association’s next president. Given that the association does not have an official membership, anyone working in the field may vote. The president’s term of office is two years, and the president’s primary responsibility has traditionally been the organization and hosting of the association’s biannual conference.

I am happy to say that we have two excellent candidates for the position: Daniel Fried (Associate Professor, University of Alberta) and Mingwei Song (Associate Professor, Wellesley College). Please read their statements, below, and send your votes to (both) Prof. Michelle Yeh (mmyeh@ucdavis.edu) and Xiaomei Chen (xmchen@ucdavis.edu), who this year have once again agreed to oversee the elections. Please specify your institution and position when you vote (graduate students and independent scholars are also welcome to vote). The deadline for voting is midnight, November 1st, 2017. 

sincerely,

carlos rojas
duke university Continue reading

US-China Poetry Dialogue

Source: Notes on the Mosquito (10/24/17)
US-China Poetry Dialogue at University of Oklahoma

Xi Chuan and other Chinese and American poets are at the University of Oklahoma for the US-China Poetry Dialog, organized by Jonathan Stalling.

No automatic alt text available.

The first public events will be on the 24th at 10:30 a.m. in OU’s Bizzell Memorial Library and 7 p.m. at Fred Jones Museum of Art. There will also be a reading on the 25th in Eureka Springs, AR, at 7 p.m. at the Writers Colony at Dairy Hollow, and on the 26th in Bentonville, AR at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art at 6 p.m. Continue reading

Petition regarding East Asian Studies in Spain

I am writing you from Spain. We are celebrating the XXVth anniversary of the foundation of the Center for East Asian Studies and we have made a petition for the Spanish Ministry of Education in Change.org.

We would really appreciate if you could send it to MCLC mailing list.

This is the link

https://www.change.org/p/jorge-sainz-gonz%C3%A1lez-secretario-general-de-universidades-del-mtrio-de-educaci%C3%B3n-cultura-y-deporte-east-asian-studies-in-spain-jeopardized-by-national-academic-accreditation-agency-aneca

If possible, please include some comments after signing it, mentioning your institutional affiliation. We need the Ministry to know that there are professors from the Academia supporting this petition. If possible, please distribute it among your colleagues.

Thanks a lot for your support!

Sincerely,

Taciana Fisac Continue reading

Chinese Literature Today 6.1

Dear MCLC List members,

I am very happy to announce that Chinese Literature Today vol. 6 no. 1 is now available and can be found on the Routledge website (http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/uclt20/6/1?nav=tocList). I want to thank CLT’s readers for their patience in 2016 as CLT transitioned into a new partnership with Routledge. CLT will now reach exponentially more readers across the globe while delivering the quality of presentation and timeliness that its readers have come to expect. Dr. Zhu Ping, Associate Professor of Chinese Literature at the University of Oklahoma, will become Deputy Editor in Chief, a role that I have held since 2010. Dr. Zhu has long worked as an Associate Editor of CLT and will serve ably as the new Deputy Editor in Chief. I will now direct more of my attention to my  new role as Curator of the Chinese Literature Translation Archive at the University of Oklahoma Libraries and will become CLT’s new Deputy Executive Director. I will work with Dr. Zhu and colleagues at World Literature Today, Beijing Normal University, and Routledge to ensure that CLT readers have access to the best, most compelling literature coming out of China today.

Onward,

Jonathan Stalling <stalling@ou.edu>

Below is the TOC of #11 for your convenience.

FEATURED AUTHOR: JIA PINGWA

6 Introduction, by Jonathan Stalling
8 Ruined City, by Jia Pingwa
14 Butterfly’s Reincarnation: From Zhuang Zhidie to Lao Sheng, by Zhang Xiaoqin
18 Carrying on “Chinese Fiction” Traditions: An Interview with Jia Pingwa, by Zhang Qinghua24 The Jia Pingwa Project, by Nick Stember
29 Shaanxi Opera, by Jia Pingwa Continue reading

Free Speech and Academic Freedom signature campaign

Dear all,

Please note the signature campaign, titled “In Defence of Free Speech and Academic Freedom — Support Conscientious Scholar Professor Benny Tai” (捍衛言論及學術自由 支持良心學者戴耀廷) has been launched.  A copy of the statement is provided herein for your easy reference. Please visit this link (https://sites.google.com/site/hksaaf/academic-freedom-freedom-of-speech-ch) for details, including the names of initiators and signatories.

Please join and help spread this among your colleagues. This signature campaign targets at local and international academics only instead of students or administrative staff.

Regards,

學術自由學者聯盟
Scholars’ Alliance for Academic Freedom
(On behalf of the initiators) Continue reading

Women and Gender in China blog

MCLCers might be interested in this new blog.–Kirk

Welcome to WAGIC: Women and Gender in China
https://www.wagic.org

A dedicated space for discussing gender, sexuality and feminism(s) in China past and present.

Launched in September 2017, WAGIC is a collaborative (hopefully soon bilingual) blog project that aims to provide a dedicated and accessible space for commentary about all aspects of gender, sexuality and feminism(s) in China (incl. contested parts thereof), past and present.

Each month we publish a series of original blogs focused on a single theme. We engage with a wide range of topics relating to gender, sexuality and feminism(s) in China, past and present. We welcome submissions from academics, activists, journalists, writers and those with personal experience of these issues.

We hope this blog project will promote better understanding and awareness of the social, cultural, political and historical dynamics that underpin and inform gender, sexuality and feminism(s) in China today, and create new opportunities for international feminist and queer solidarities.

Chinese Poetry Festival 2017

Source: China Daily (9/5/17)
Poetry for all ages
By Chen Nan | China Daily

More than 30 Chinese artists, including renowned TV host Chen Duo and actor Han Tongsheng, will gather in Yichang city of Central China’s Hubei province on Sept 12 to mark one of the country’s key contributions to humanity--Chinese poetry.

The artists will recite poems in an opening gala for the fifth Chinese Poetry Festival, billed as the biggest poetry event in the country.

The event also opens with singing, dancing and instrumental performances.

The festival, which runs through Sept 17, is organized by the Ministry of Culture and the China Writers Association. It aims to celebrate the power of poetry in all its forms and will treat the public to traditional and contemporary works, along with forums and other related activities. Continue reading

Boycott petition against censoring content

Hi all, please consider signing this boycott petition I just started on Change.org calling for a boycott of peer review service to any non-China-based academic publication that censors content in China. Please also disseminate widely to colleagues and relevant institutions.

For maximum impact, when you sign, please leave the box checked for ‘Display my name and comment on this petition,’ and include your academic affiliation in the comment box for ‘Reason for signing’.

Peer Review Boycott of Academic Publications Censoring Content in China

Thanks for your support!

Charlene Makley <makleyc@reed.edu>
Professor of Anthropology
Reed College
Portland, OR USA