Chinese masculinity lecture

“Chinese Masculinity Ideals in a Globalized World”
Keynote Lecture by Prof. Kam Louie 
at the University of San Francisco Center for Asia Pacific Studies
Thursday, Nov. 3, 2016, 4:30 p.m.
University of San Francisco, McLaren 252
Free and Open to the Public

To register:

https://www.usfca.edu/event/2016-11-03-1630/chinese-masculinity-ideals-globalized-world Continue reading

Voice of Burmese Poetry: ko ko thett

This is a bit outside the “China” focus of our list, but it’s a special event that we would like to advertise as broadly as possible. If you are in the neighborhood, please try to attend.–Kirk

cover-of-poems-by-ko-ko-thett

Voice of Burmese Poetry: ko ko thett

The Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures and the East Asian Studies Center at The Ohio State University present a public talk and performance by ko ko thett, internationally known Burmese poet, on Monday, October 17 from 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in Postle Hall, Room 1184 (305 W. 12th Ave., Columbus, Ohio).

ko ko thett, author of The Burden of Being Burmese and co-editor of Bones Will Crow, the first volume of contemporary Burmese poetry in English translation, will introduce currents in Burmese poetry and perform poetry in Burmese and English. The reading will include an overview of poetry in Myanmar today. Introduction by Professor Mark Bender, Chair, DEALL.

This event is free and open to the public. For additional information, visit the EASC website.

Jimi 幾米 in San Fancisco

Jimi 幾米 in San Francisco, October 20-22

https-cdn-evbuc-com-images-22783890-70607707223-1-original

Dear list members,

Jimi 幾米 (Jimmy Liao), the well-known Taiwanese illustrator and author of books for children and young adults, will be in San Francisco for a series of events in late October. Organized by the Chinese Program at San Francisco State University (SFSU) in co-operation with the Center for Asia Pacific Studies at the University of San Francisco (USF) and a number of other partners, the event series features a public multi-media reading and book signing at SFSU on Saturday, October 22, and a screening of Starry Starry Night (星空) and Q&A with Jimi at USF on Thursday, October 20. Both events are free and open to the public, but registration via Eventbrite is required as seats are limited.

To sign up for the Saturday event A DREAMY AFTERNOON: JIMI AT SF STATE 夢幻午後:幾米在州大, click here:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/a-dreamy-afternoon-jimi-sf-state-tickets-26768786160?aff=fbc Continue reading

Shakespeare and Tang Xianzu

University of Leeds news and media call (For immediate release: 01/06/16)
Global theatre collaboration celebrates Shakespeare and his Chinese counterpart

This year marks not only 400 years since the death of Shakespeare, but also that of the great Ming dynasty playwright Tang Xianzu.

dreamingWilliam Shakespeare and Tang Xianzu: Celebrating a 400 Year Legacy, is a unique global collaboration organised by the University of Leeds to create a new stage production to commemorate both anniversaries, featuring university students from both the UK and China.

Working around the common theme of dreams, students in Beijing and Yorkshire have been simultaneously rehearsing on opposite sides of the globe and will come together this summer for back-to-back performances of contemporary adaptions of A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Tang’s Nanke-ji (A Dream Under the Southern Bough) in Leeds (where it will premiere in late July), at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, and major cities in China including Fuzhou – Tang’s birthplace.

This event will be a chance to see an open rehearsal for the Yorkshire half of the performance, with UK students preparing DREAMING Under the Southern Bough, an adaption of Tang Xianzu’s play. Continue reading

Yang Jiang lecture

Yang Jiang Lecture at the Chinese Literature Translation Archive at the University of Oklahoma Library

Last year the University of Oklahoma Chinese Literature Translation Archive (https://libraries.ou.edu/content/cltarchive)  hosted its first visiting scholar lecture on the topic of Howard Goldblatt’s translation of Yang Jiang’s short novel” Six Chapters from My Life Down Under.” The talk by Helen Xu of Nanjing Normal University reveals just a taste of what is possible when scholars have access to the papers of translators. The Archive (which has collected the papers of Howard Goldblatt and Wolfgang Kubin and includes significant portion of Wai-lim Yip’s papers) will soon officially announce its latest major acquisition: the scholarly library of Arthur Waley. Here is a link to Professor Xu’s lecture hosted on Youku with subtitles:

http://v.youku.com/v_show/id_XMTM1NzEwNzc3Ng==.html?from=y1.7-1.2

Jonathan Stalling <stalling@ou.edu>

Chinese Studies Research Group, Feb. 6

Yesterday, when I posted the message below I inadvertently put the incorrect date of Feb. 2 in the subject line. It should have read Feb. 6. Here’s the posting again in full.–Kirk

Please join us on Saturday, February 6, 2016, for the next meeting of the Chinese Studies Research Group (San Francisco Bay Area).  This group is designed to create a sense of community among scholars of Chinese Studies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Our meetings are an opportunity to hear and discuss interesting research in progress from one faculty member and one doctoral candidate and to network with people with similar interests.

Saturday, February 6, 2016, 10:00 a.m. -12:30 p.m., University of San Francisco, University Center 402/403 (UC 402/403)

Faculty Presentation

Chia-ju Chang (張嘉如), Ph.D., Kiriyama Professor for Asia Pacific Studies, USF Center for Asia Pacific Studies (Spring 2016); Associate Professor of Chinese, Modern Languages and Literatures, Brooklyn College, The City College of New York

Slow Violence and its Effect: Cinematic Micro-shock and Scott Chi’s Poisoned Sky

After defining what slow violence is, Rob Nixon asks, “How can we devise arresting stories, images, and symbols that capture the pervasive but elusive effects of slow violence?” In this talk, I turn to “strange weather” as an example of slow violence and examine the cinematic representation of its psychological impact using Scott Chi’s Poisoned Sky as a case study to show how a “micro-shock” approach can best capture the invisible traumatic affect the heavily poisoned sky exacts on the people. Continue reading

Chinese Studies Research Group, Feb. 6

Please join us on Saturday, February 6, 2016, for the next meeting of the Chinese Studies Research Group (San Francisco Bay Area).  This group is designed to create a sense of community among scholars of Chinese Studies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Our meetings are an opportunity to hear and discuss interesting research in progress from one faculty member and one doctoral candidate and to network with people with similar interests.

Saturday, February 6, 2016, 10:00 a.m. -12:30 p.m., University of San Francisco, University Center 402/403 (UC 402/403)

Faculty Presentation

Chia-ju Chang (張嘉如), Ph.D., Kiriyama Professor for Asia Pacific Studies, USF Center for Asia Pacific Studies (Spring 2016); Associate Professor of Chinese, Modern Languages and Literatures, Brooklyn College, The City College of New York

Slow Violence and its Effect: Cinematic Micro-shock and Scott Chi’s Poisoned Sky

After defining what slow violence is, Rob Nixon asks, “How can we devise arresting stories, images, and symbols that capture the pervasive but elusive effects of slow violence?” In this talk, I turn to “strange weather” as an example of slow violence and examine the cinematic representation of its psychological impact using Scott Chi’s Poisoned Sky as a case study to show how a “micro-shock” approach can best capture the invisible traumatic affect the heavily poisoned sky exacts on the people. Continue reading

Four Short Stories from China event

“That Damned Thing She Said”: 4 short stories from China
Wanderlust: Great Literature from Around the World
Read Paper Republic in partnership with Free Word
Mon 14 Mar 2016, 6:45pm
Free Word Lecture Theatre
https://www.freewordcentre.com/info/visiting-us/

With International Women’s Day (8 March) in mind, Read Paper Republic has selected 4 short stories from China that focus on highly-charged issues such as sexual freedom, political disappearances, “left-over” women, and compromising situations. A woman trapped in a loveless marriage has an awkward, but ultimately empowering, one-night stand. A wife comes home to find her husband has disappeared, or rather “been disappeared”. The colleagues of a career woman apply their engineering expertise to the intractable problem of finding her a worthy husband. A young woman refuses to sleep with her boss, with catastrophic consequences for her family. Continue reading