Teaching Global Community in an Age of Anti-Immigration

PODCAST: Teaching Global Community in An Age of Anti-Immigration, with Eileen Chengyin Chow

Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/fairbank-center/teaching-global-community-in-an-age-of-anti-immigration-with-eileen-chow

iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/teaching-global-community-in-age-anti-immigration-eileen/id1255938359?i=1000390848201&mt=2

What role is there for storytelling and roleplay in teaching about Chinatowns and Chinese diasporas?

The “Harvard on China” podcast talks to Eileen Chengyin Chow, Professor in Duke University’s Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies and Co-Director of Duke’s Story Lab, director of the Shewo Institute of Chinese Journalism at Shih Hsin University, and Harvard alum. She is the author of the forthcoming “Chinatown States of Mind,” as well as the co-translator with Carlos Rojas of Yu Hua’s two-volume novel “Brothers” and the co-editor of the “Oxford Handbook of Chinese Cinemas.”

The “Harvard on China” podcast is hosted by James Evans at Harvard’s Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies.

You can subscribe to the “Harvard on China” podcast on iTunes, or listen on Soundcloud, Stitcher, and other podcast apps.

Dirlik lecture on the rise of China

Source: Boundary 2 Online Community (7/30/17)
Arif Dirlik: The Rise of China and the End of the World As We Know It
By boundary2

On February 27, 2016, longstanding boundary 2 board member Arif Dirlik gave his final lecture at the University of British Columbia. The talk, The Rise of China and the End of the World As We Know Itis available in full on the UBC Library’s website.

Interview with Wang Hui

The Role of Intellectuals in China’s History, an Interview with Wang Hui

Harvard’s Peter Bol and Yu Wen interview visiting professor Wang Hui to discuss the changing role of intellectuals in China’s history. By tracing discourse on Chinese intellectuals back to Neo-Confucian debates in the Song Dynasty, Wang Hui examines intellectual history over the longue durée, as discussed in his four-volume work,The Rise of Modern Chinese Thought《現代中國思想的興起》(2004–2009).

Watch the full interview on the Fairbank Center’s YouTube page:

Peter Bol is Vice Provost for Advances in Learning and the Charles H. Carswell Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations at Harvard University.

Wang Hui is a Visiting Professor in East Asian Languages and Civilizations at the Harvard-Yenching Institue, and Professor of literature and history at Tsinghua University.

Yu Wen is a Ph.D. student in history at Harvard University.

This interview was produced by ChinaX and the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies at Harvard University.

 

Chinese Studies Research Group 4/22

Please join us for the final meeting of the academic year for the Chinese Studies Research Group (San Francisco Bay Area).

This group is designed to create a sense of community among Chinese Studies scholars in the San Francisco Bay Area. Our meetings are an opportunity to hear and discuss interesting research in progress (typically from one faculty member and one doctoral candidate) and to network with people with similar interests.

Date: Saturday, April 22, 2017
Time: 10:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Location: University of San Francisco, Malloy Hall (MH 405) – Telepresence Conference Room (Please note that this is a new meeting location on campus for the group)

Presentations:

Ethnic Branding and the Politics of (In)Visibility in Late-Socialist Southwest China
Yu Luo, Postdoctoral Fellow, Center for Chinese Studies, University of California Berkeley

Eunuchs and Opium during the Qing and Republican Periods
Melissa S. Dale, Executive Director & Assistant Professor, Center for Asia Pacific Studies, University of San Francisco Continue reading

Theater, Art, and the CR talks

Theater, Art, and the Cultural Revolution: A Presentation featuring Zheng Shengtian and Chen Xiaomei
Wednesday, March 29, 6:30-8:00pm
China Institute
40 Rector Street, 2nd Floor, New York, NY 10006

Tickets $5 each, please Register Here

Beginning in 1966, China’s Great Proletariat Cultural Revolution was a mass movement that shook the foundations of Modern China to its core. The movement’s ubiquitous presence disrupted all aspects of Chinese society, and has had a lasting impact on Chinese culture that continues until today. Continue reading

Chinese Studies Research Group, 3/4

Please join us for the 2nd meeting of the academic year for the Chinese Studies Research Group (San Francisco Bay Area).

This group is designed to create a sense of community among Chinese Studies scholars in the San Francisco Bay Area. Our meetings are an opportunity to hear and discuss interesting research in progress (typically from one faculty member and one doctoral candidate) and to network with people with similar interests.

Date: Saturday, March 4, 2017
Time: 10:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Location: University of San Francisco, Fromm Hall, Maier Room

Blogging in A Heritage Language: Epistemic Stance and Identity Positioning of Chinese Heritage Language Learners 
Yang Xiao-Desai, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, San Francisco State University

A Re-examination of He Zhu’s 1096 Restored Poem of Being Moved and Lodging the Feelings in Words
Stuart Sargent, Independent Scholar Continue reading

5th Newman Festival

The University of Oklahoma is hosting the 5th Newman Festival March 2-3, 2017. All listed events are free and open to the public.

THURSDAY, MARCH 2

2:30–4pm   Salon on Chinese Literature, in Chinese 

Featuring Newman laureate Wang Anyi, scholars Dai Jinhua and Wang Ban, and translator Andrea Lingenfelter; moderated by Ping Zhu

(Reception 2-2:30pm)

Bizzell Memorial Library, Fourth Floor, West

7–9pm   Poetry reading by Taiwanese poet Ye Mimi and her translator Steve Bradbury

Featuring His Days Go By the Way Her Years: Poems by Ye Mimi

Mainsite Art Gallery, 122 E Main St, Norman, OK Continue reading

Paper Republic events in London

Three (yes, that’s 3!) Paper Republic events in London in December

Tuesday December 6th: Poetry Translation Centre – Translation Workshop 

Venue: Free Word Centre

Dave Haysom will be introducing raw crib translations of works by the poet Yu Youyou, before Clare Pollard workshops them into the stuff of poetry.

Monday December 12th: Dragonworld – Speed bookclubbing

Venue: Free Word Centre

Following our sell-out speed-book clubbing event in March, Read Paper Republic is delighted to be partnering with Free Word for a follow-up event with a fantastical flavour:

A police officer investigating a brutal murder interrogates his chief suspect, but the details of the crime itself are constantly shifting. A woman hopes a knight in shining armour will offer her an escape from the road she seems destined to pace forever. A dispute between two witnesses to a killing results in a fatal duel. A teenage gamer must find a way to deal with the concrete-hungry dragons that are somehow taking over his town. Continue reading

Chinese Studies Research Group, Nov. 12 meeting

Please join us for the first meeting of the academic year for the Chinese Studies Research Group (San Francisco Bay Area).

This group is designed to create a sense of community among Chinese Studies scholars in the San Francisco Bay Area. Our meetings are an opportunity to hear and discuss interesting research in progress from one faculty member and one doctoral candidate and to network with people with similar interests.

Date: Saturday, November 12, 2016 Time: 10:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Location: University of San Francisco, Fromm Hall, Maier Room

Presentations:

Painted in Oil, Composed in Ink: Late Imperial Chinese Literati Poems on Western-Style Oil Paintings
Frederik H. Green, Assistant Professor, Modern Languages and Literature;
Assistant Director, Chinese Flagship Program, San Francisco State University

What’s “love” got to do with it?: “patriotic piety” and Chinese-Muslim nationalism
Lesley Turnbull, Kiriyama Fellow, Center for Asia Pacific Studies, University of San Francisco Continue reading

Chinese masculinity lecture

“Chinese Masculinity Ideals in a Globalized World”
Keynote Lecture by Prof. Kam Louie 
at the University of San Francisco Center for Asia Pacific Studies
Thursday, Nov. 3, 2016, 4:30 p.m.
University of San Francisco, McLaren 252
Free and Open to the Public

To register:

https://www.usfca.edu/event/2016-11-03-1630/chinese-masculinity-ideals-globalized-world Continue reading

Voice of Burmese Poetry: ko ko thett

This is a bit outside the “China” focus of our list, but it’s a special event that we would like to advertise as broadly as possible. If you are in the neighborhood, please try to attend.–Kirk

cover-of-poems-by-ko-ko-thett

Voice of Burmese Poetry: ko ko thett

The Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures and the East Asian Studies Center at The Ohio State University present a public talk and performance by ko ko thett, internationally known Burmese poet, on Monday, October 17 from 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in Postle Hall, Room 1184 (305 W. 12th Ave., Columbus, Ohio).

ko ko thett, author of The Burden of Being Burmese and co-editor of Bones Will Crow, the first volume of contemporary Burmese poetry in English translation, will introduce currents in Burmese poetry and perform poetry in Burmese and English. The reading will include an overview of poetry in Myanmar today. Introduction by Professor Mark Bender, Chair, DEALL.

This event is free and open to the public. For additional information, visit the EASC website.

Jimi 幾米 in San Fancisco

Jimi 幾米 in San Francisco, October 20-22

https-cdn-evbuc-com-images-22783890-70607707223-1-original

Dear list members,

Jimi 幾米 (Jimmy Liao), the well-known Taiwanese illustrator and author of books for children and young adults, will be in San Francisco for a series of events in late October. Organized by the Chinese Program at San Francisco State University (SFSU) in co-operation with the Center for Asia Pacific Studies at the University of San Francisco (USF) and a number of other partners, the event series features a public multi-media reading and book signing at SFSU on Saturday, October 22, and a screening of Starry Starry Night (星空) and Q&A with Jimi at USF on Thursday, October 20. Both events are free and open to the public, but registration via Eventbrite is required as seats are limited.

To sign up for the Saturday event A DREAMY AFTERNOON: JIMI AT SF STATE 夢幻午後:幾米在州大, click here:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/a-dreamy-afternoon-jimi-sf-state-tickets-26768786160?aff=fbc Continue reading

Shakespeare and Tang Xianzu

University of Leeds news and media call (For immediate release: 01/06/16)
Global theatre collaboration celebrates Shakespeare and his Chinese counterpart

This year marks not only 400 years since the death of Shakespeare, but also that of the great Ming dynasty playwright Tang Xianzu.

dreamingWilliam Shakespeare and Tang Xianzu: Celebrating a 400 Year Legacy, is a unique global collaboration organised by the University of Leeds to create a new stage production to commemorate both anniversaries, featuring university students from both the UK and China.

Working around the common theme of dreams, students in Beijing and Yorkshire have been simultaneously rehearsing on opposite sides of the globe and will come together this summer for back-to-back performances of contemporary adaptions of A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Tang’s Nanke-ji (A Dream Under the Southern Bough) in Leeds (where it will premiere in late July), at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, and major cities in China including Fuzhou – Tang’s birthplace.

This event will be a chance to see an open rehearsal for the Yorkshire half of the performance, with UK students preparing DREAMING Under the Southern Bough, an adaption of Tang Xianzu’s play. Continue reading

Yang Jiang lecture

Yang Jiang Lecture at the Chinese Literature Translation Archive at the University of Oklahoma Library

Last year the University of Oklahoma Chinese Literature Translation Archive (https://libraries.ou.edu/content/cltarchive)  hosted its first visiting scholar lecture on the topic of Howard Goldblatt’s translation of Yang Jiang’s short novel” Six Chapters from My Life Down Under.” The talk by Helen Xu of Nanjing Normal University reveals just a taste of what is possible when scholars have access to the papers of translators. The Archive (which has collected the papers of Howard Goldblatt and Wolfgang Kubin and includes significant portion of Wai-lim Yip’s papers) will soon officially announce its latest major acquisition: the scholarly library of Arthur Waley. Here is a link to Professor Xu’s lecture hosted on Youku with subtitles:

http://v.youku.com/v_show/id_XMTM1NzEwNzc3Ng==.html?from=y1.7-1.2

Jonathan Stalling <stalling@ou.edu>

Chinese Studies Research Group, Feb. 6

Yesterday, when I posted the message below I inadvertently put the incorrect date of Feb. 2 in the subject line. It should have read Feb. 6. Here’s the posting again in full.–Kirk

Please join us on Saturday, February 6, 2016, for the next meeting of the Chinese Studies Research Group (San Francisco Bay Area).  This group is designed to create a sense of community among scholars of Chinese Studies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Our meetings are an opportunity to hear and discuss interesting research in progress from one faculty member and one doctoral candidate and to network with people with similar interests.

Saturday, February 6, 2016, 10:00 a.m. -12:30 p.m., University of San Francisco, University Center 402/403 (UC 402/403)

Faculty Presentation

Chia-ju Chang (張嘉如), Ph.D., Kiriyama Professor for Asia Pacific Studies, USF Center for Asia Pacific Studies (Spring 2016); Associate Professor of Chinese, Modern Languages and Literatures, Brooklyn College, The City College of New York

Slow Violence and its Effect: Cinematic Micro-shock and Scott Chi’s Poisoned Sky

After defining what slow violence is, Rob Nixon asks, “How can we devise arresting stories, images, and symbols that capture the pervasive but elusive effects of slow violence?” In this talk, I turn to “strange weather” as an example of slow violence and examine the cinematic representation of its psychological impact using Scott Chi’s Poisoned Sky as a case study to show how a “micro-shock” approach can best capture the invisible traumatic affect the heavily poisoned sky exacts on the people. Continue reading