USC Grad Symposium–cfp reminder

Reminder: USC Grad Student Symposium CFP
Resistance Reimagined: East Asian Languages and Cultures Graduate Student Symposium – CFP
University of Southern California
September 29, 2018
Proposal Submission Deadline: May 1, 2018

The Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures and Graduates Studying East Asia at the University of Southern California invite graduate students conducting research in all disciplines related to East Asia to submit abstracts for our 2018 symposium, “Resistance Reimagined,” to take place September 29, 2018. This conference aims to investigate and formulate new theorizations of resistance as well as rethink how communities and individuals construct narratives to reimagine social and political changes in the context of East Asia. The topic can be interpreted widely in relation to various fields, including but not limited to cinema and media studies, gender studies, history, linguistics, literature, religion, and visual studies.

Topics can include but are not limited to:

  • Methods and practices that initiate or imagine resistance;
  • Representation of marginal communities or intersectional identities;
  • Strategies or modes of resistance movements and activism efforts;
  • Pedagogies of resistance in East Asian studies.

Continue reading

Contacts, Collisions, Conjunctions

International Conference: Contacts, Collisions, Conjunctions: May 9-10, 2018, HKU

The Society of Fellows in the Humanities at the University of Hong Kong invites you to their Inaugural Annual Conference: Contacts, Collisions, Conjunctions, to be held on May 9-10, 2018. We are delighted to welcome our keynote speakers: Joseph Auner (Tufts University), Rey Chow (Duke University), François Cusset (University of Nanterre) andLeela Gandhi (Brown University)​.

Please join us in Room 4.36, Faculty of Arts, Run Run Shaw Tower, Centennial Campus, HKU. All are  welcome.

Please register using the following link: https://hkuems1.hku.hk/hkuems/ec_regform.aspx?guest=Y&ueid=55707

Conference program (https://sofhku.com/2018/04/13/annual-conference-program-contacts-collisions-conjunctions-may-9-10/): Continue reading

KFLC china-related program

Dear List Members,

The 71st annual KFLC conference is taking place on the campus of the University of Kentucky in the next couple of days, from April 19th to 21st.

Please check out the following program for the East Asian Studies sessions and join us if you are able!

Thursday, April 19, 2018 – 9:00am to 12:00pm
From Mao to Now
Patterson Office Tower, 18th Floor, Room A
Thursday, April 19, 2018 – 9:00am to 12:00pm
Organized by: Liang Luo, University of Kentucky ; Masamichi Inoue, University of Kentucky
Chaired by: Melody Yunzi Li, Transylvania University

9:00: Things Lost and Found in Digitally Performing “The Legend of the White Snake”
Liang Luo, University of Kentucky
9:30: Young Taiwan and the Spirit of Protest: National Identity and Political Action Among Taiwanese College Students
Bridget Nicholas, University of Kentucky
10:00: Marginalized Female Characters in Geling Yan’s Novels
Xiaoyang Li, University of Canterbury
10:30: Coffee Break
11:00: Running Away From Mao-ti in Contemporary China
Miao Dou, Washington University in St. Louis
11:30: Home-Building in Mao-Era—The Dialectic between Politics and Family in Yan Geling’s The Criminal Lu Yanshi
Melody Yunzi Li, Transylvania University Continue reading

Posthumanism in Modern Chinese Culture–cfp reminder

Call for Papers: Posthumanism in Modern Chinese Culture
September 29th-30th, 2018, University of New Hampshire

Keynote Speaker: Xudong Zhang (Professor of Comparative Literature and East Asian Studies, New York University)

As with other modern cultures, China in the 20th and 21st century faces the fundamental challenge of re-defining what it means to be human under the changed historical situation. Humanism has unsurprisingly gained wide currency along the way. Humanist discourse not only played a crucial part in launching the New Culture Movement in early 20th century and in re-orienting the intellectual culture in the post-Mao era of 1980s, it also functions as a general underlying principle for many cultural productions and intellectual discussions in modern China.

On the other hand, however, the re-definition of the human has also taken a direction that might be characterized as a posthumanist approach, in the sense that it questions the rationalist premise of humanism and challenges the humanist division between human and animal, and between nature and culture. Posthumanism has never acquired the same level of discursive coherence and prominence as humanism, and sometimes even expresses itself in humanist terms. Despite this fact, however, it has nevertheless persisted as a significant intellectual trend, finding its spokesman in some of the most prominent modern Chinese minds, including Lu Xun. With the rapidly changing social and technological conditions in recent years, in particular, posthumanism has come to assume an increasingly important role in contemporary Chinese culture. Continue reading

Orientalism Forty Years on–cfp

HONG KONG STUDIES—Issue 3 (Spring 2019) Call for Papers—Special Section on Orientalism Forty Years on; and General Research Papers

The first bilingual and interdisciplinary academic journal on Hong Kong, Hong Kong Studies (Chinese University Press), is now accepting articles for Issue 3 (scheduled for publication in Spring 2019), which will comprise both general research articles on Hong Kong and a special section on Edward Said’s Orientalism. Continue reading

Taiwan Studies Workshop–cfp reminder

CALL FOR PAPERS: TAIWAN STUDIES WORKSHOP
sponsored by Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation for International Scholarly Exchange and Harvard University
DATE: October 12-13, 2018
PLACE: University of California, Davis
ELIGIBILITY: Assistant professors, PhD students, and independent scholars in North America and Europe
THEME:“Ecologizing Taiwan: Nature, Society, Culture”

Inspired by Felix Guattari’s Three Ecologies, this workshop extends the definition of ecology to encompass social relations and human subjectivity, as well as environmental concerns. With Taiwan as the focus either in itself or within a comparative framework, papers are invited to examine the human, non-human, and post-human Sinosphere as well as the earth. Other topics that study Taiwan from humanistic or social scientific perspectives are welcome too. 

FUNDING: Funding for economy-class airfares and hotel accommodations for two nights will be provided for speakers.

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: May 1, 2018. Please send the title of the paper and an abstract of 100-120 words to: David Der-wei Wang at dwang@fas.harvard.edu and Michelle Yeh at mmyeh@ucdavis.edu.

INVITATIONS will be sent out by May 31, 2018.

Rethinking Media History in East Asia

East Asian Media Studies Forum at the University of Texas, Austin
Becoming-media: Rethinking Media History in East Asia and Beyond
April 26-27, 2018
The Department of Asian Studies & The Center for East Asian Studies, The University of Texas, Austin
Organizers and Conveners:  Xuefeng Feng, Jia Liu, and Caitlin McClune

The theme “becoming-media,” borrowed from Joseph Vogl, indicates our hope to initiate a conversation among a variety of theories and approaches in media studies, and by doing so to combine analysis of media content, representation, and semantics with an investigation into the techno-discursive, or material-discursive, aspects of media. In this light, the theme “becoming-media,” on the one hand, embraces historical, contingent, and local events that transform mundane objects into forms of media starting to select, store, and process relevant data and to generating meanings. On the other hand, it pays considerable attention to the epistemological structure of media that enables conditions of meanings and representations in the first place. Continue reading

May 4th: History in Motion-cfp

International Conference
4 May 1919: History in Motion
A Political, Social and Cultural Look at a Turning Point in the History of Modern China
Université de Mons, Belgium
2 – 4 May 2019

Jointly organized by:
Université de Mons (UMONS), Faculty of Translation and Interpretation (FTI-EII) and School of Human and Social Sciences (ESHS)
Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Maison des Sciences Humaines, East Asian Studies (EASt)

Organizing Committee:
Kevin HENRY (UMONS), Vanessa FRANGVILLE (ULB), Serge DERUETTE (UMONS), Gwennaël GAFFRIC (ULB), Coraline JORTAY (ULB), Guoxian ZHANG (UMONS)

In January 1919, after four years of bloody conflict which had spread round the globe, the victors of the First World War gathered in Versailles to sign a document that would send the German, Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman Empires into oblivion, effectively drawing the borders of a new world. By joining forces with the Allies against Germany in 1917, the young Republic of China had hoped to reassert its sovereignty over those portions of its territory (Qingdao and Jiaozhou Bay, Yantai) that had been placed under German rule twenty years earlier. Unfortunately for China, the Treaty of Versailles attributed those territories to Japan, which, at the time, was also a member of the coalition against the central empires and which had demanded those territories as early as 1915 (Twenty-One Demands). Outraged by what they considered a betrayal – especially since the Chinese government was suspected of having offered the territories up in exchange for the promise of a loan from Japan – three thousand students gathered on 4 May 1919 in Peking before the Tiananmen to express their discontent and their anger towards the pro-Japanese officials. Very rapidly, in spite of the warlords’ attempts to intervene, the nationalist wave, accompanied by social movements, swept over Shanghai paralysing the entire Chinese economy. The movement succeeded in convincing the government to refuse to sign the Treaty of Versailles in June, a decision that, ultimately, had little effect on the Japanese presence in China. Despite this, the student demonstrations marked the emergence of a veritable political consciousness among the Chinese population, who had seen their power usurped in 1912, after the Republican Revolution, by the autocratic interim president, Yuan Shikai. In particular, the movement served as a soapbox for a plurality of political doctrines, including the left. In fact, the Communist Party of China was founded in 1921 by intellectuals (Chen Duxiu and Li Dazhao) who had actively participated in the May 4th events. Continue reading

Writing Chinese Translation History–cfp

“Writing Chinese Translation History”
The Eighth Young Researchers’ Conference on Chinese Translation Studies
Call for Papers
Extension of Submission Deadline

The deadline for abstract submission for “Writing Chinese Translation History: The Eighth Young Researchers’ Conference on Chinese Translation Studies” has been extended to 15 April, 2018. We warmly invite you to submit your abstract with the application form to translationhistory@cuhk.edu.hk. Please find below the information of the Call of Papers.

With the aim to encourage young scholars to actively participate in Chinese translation studies and strengthen academic exchange, the Research Centre for Translation (RCT) of The Chinese University of Hong Kong has organised the biennial Young Researchers’ Conference on Chinese Translation Studies since 2004. Continue reading

Chinese Ecologies

Chinese Ecologies
An International Symposium on the Environment and Indigeneity
Harvard University
April 6-7, 2018

Schedule

April 6
Tsai Auditorium, CGIS-South, 1730 Cambridge Street)

13:00-13:10 Welcome Remarks

13:10-14:25 Panel 1: Articulating the Polemics of the Anthropocene
Chair: Karen Thornber (Harvard University)

Haiyan Lee (Stanford University)
Through Thick and Thin: The Romance of the Species in the Anthropocene

Christopher Coggins (Bard College at Simon’s Rock)
Rethinking “Environment” and “Indigenous:” the Persistence of Imperial Indigeneity

Qilin Long (Guangzhou University)
Ecological Disaster and the Writing Style of Chinese Contemporary Literature in the New Century Continue reading

Taiwan Studies Workshop–cfp

CALL FOR PAPERS: TAIWAN STUDIES WORKSHOP
sponsored by Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation for International Scholarly Exchange
Harvard University
DATE: October 12-13, 2018
PLACE:  University of California, Davis
ELIGIBILITY: Assistant professors, PhD students, and independent scholars in North America and Europe
THEME: “Ecologizing Taiwan: Nature, Society, Culture”

Inspired by Felix Guattari’s Three Ecologies, this workshop extends the definition of ecology to encompass social relations and human subjectivity, as well as environmental concerns. With Taiwan as the focus either in itself or within a comparative framework, papers are invited to examine the human, non-human, and post-human Sinosphere as well as the earth. Other topics that study Taiwan from humanistic or social scientific perspectives are welcome too. 

FUNDING: Funding for economy-class airfares and hotel accommodations for two nights will be provided for speakers.

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: May 1, 2018. Please send the title of the paper and an abstract of 100-120 words to: David Der-wei Wang at dwang@fas.harvard.edu and Michelle Yeh at mmyeh@ucdavis.edu.

INVITATIONS will be sent out by May 31, 2018.

USC grad student symposium–cfp

Resistance Reimagined: East Asian Languages and Cultures Graduate Student Symposium – CFP
University of Southern California
September 29, 2018
Proposal Submission Deadline: May 1, 2018

The Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures and Graduates Studying East Asia at the University of Southern California invite graduate students conducting research in all disciplines related to East Asia to submit abstracts for our 2018 symposium, “Resistance Reimagined,” to take place September 29, 2018. This conference aims to investigate and formulate new theorizations of resistance as well as rethink how communities and individuals construct narratives to reimagine social and political changes in the context of East Asia. The topic can be interpreted widely in relation to various fields, including but not limited to cinema and media studies, gender studies, history, linguistics, literature, religion, and visual studies. Continue reading

Berkeley-Stanford grad conference

Berkeley-Stanford Graduate Student Conference in Modern Chinese Humanities
Friday, April 13 – 1:00pm– Saturday, April 14 – 5:00pm, 2018
1995 UNIVERSITY AVE, ROOM 510A, BERKELEY, CA 94704

Friday, April 13, 2018

1:10 pm – 2:40 pm Panel 1 Sounding Subjectivity: Techniques of Mediation in Eras of Change 

Chuan XU (Columbia University), The Hooligan’s Soundscapes: Politics of Cassette Tapes in Early 1980s China
Ling KANG (Washington University in St. Louis), The Rhythm of Revolution: The Poetic “Voice” in the 1930s Chinese Leftist Lyricism
Zihao LIN (Free University of Berlin), Writing Down Our Happiness and Dream. State, Narrative, and Chinese Deaf Identity in the Making   Continue reading

Sinophone meets Francophonie

Dear colleagues,

the Institute of Asian and African Studies at the Humboldt University of Berlin will host an international conference entitled “Sinophone meets Francophonie: Concepts and controversies”. The conference will take place from April 12-14, 2018. A description of the key objectives and the conference program can be found here.

Guests are welcome! There is no formal registration, but prior notification by e-mail would be appreciated (to henning.kloeter@hu-berlin.de).

Regards,
Henning Klöter <henning.kloeter@hu-berlin.de>

Literary Fantasy and Its Discontents–cfp

Dear Colleagues,

The English department at Taipei Tech (National Taipei University of Technology) will be hosting the interdisciplinary conference, Literary Fantasy and its Discontents on November 23–24, 2018, with companion cultural events on November 22. (We can also organize a turkey dinner for Americans if there is interest.) As part of this conference, we plan to organize several panels that address how literary fantasies have been celebrated, used, criticized, or abused in Asia. We are also interested in explorations of the reception history of Western fantasies in the East and Eastern fantasies in the West. Keynote speakers are Marysa Demoor (Marketing the Author) and Ackbar Abbas (Hong Kong: Culture and the Politics of Disappearance).

We hope to have a broad cross-section of papers (in English) that consider fantasy in its many forms: both as a (frequently politicized) literary genre or mode and in the word fantasy’s broader meanings of delusion, unconscious wish, or falsehood. How do fantasies assist in the formation of national identities? How do they impact the narratives––be they harmful or beneficial––that nations and people groups tell themselves about their origins, their capabilities, and their future? How do reader responses to the fantastic in literature differ from responses to texts that are predominantly mimetic, and how do these differences condition reception history? How has the fantastic been used in reform movements and the rhetoric of reaction? What are the ethics of literary fantasies (or the fantastic mode), and how have they been applied? Continue reading