AAP 2019–cfp

Dear all,

AAP (Association for Asian Performance) invites session proposals and/or individual paper proposals that explore the 2019 ATHE (Association for Theatre in Higher Education) theme, “Scene Changes: Performing, Teaching, and Working through the Transition”.

Conference Dates and Location
AUGUST 7-11, 2019
Orlando, Florida

Session Proposal Submission Due Date: Nov 1, 2018.  Session proposals must be submitted online using the ATHE webpage (https://www.athe.org/page/19conf_home).

Individual Paper Submission Due Date: Oct 20, 2018. For individual papers, please email your proposals (max. 250 words) to Dr. Man HE mh11@williams.edu

For more details, please refer to the CFP (PDF).

Please contact Man HE at mh11@williams.edu if you have any questions or concerns regarding the application process.

Best, Man He

2019 Berkeley-Stanford Grad Conference–cfp

Call for Proposals for the 10th annual Berkeley-Stanford Graduate Student Conference in Modern Chinese Humanities, 2019

Currently enrolled graduate students are invited to submit paper proposals for the Berkeley-Stanford Graduate Student Conference in Modern Chinese Humanities, to be held April 12-13, 2019
at Stanford University.
Conference registration is free. Presenters will be provided with shared lodging, Friday dinner, and Saturday lunch. There is limited partial funding assistance for those who cannot find their own funding.

Proposals/bios due: November 16, 2018 (5:00 p.m. Pacific Standard Time)

Application Instructions:

To apply please upload your abstract and a short bio (not a full CV) as a one-page document.  For the abstract, include: Author Name, Main Title, Subtitle (optional), Keywords, and Abstract.  The short bio must be no more than one quarter of a page. Please follow the link to apply: https://ceas.stanford.edu/conferences/2019-berkeley-stanford-graduate-student-conference-modern-chinese-humanities Continue reading

Sinophone Musical Worlds–call for contributions

Call for contributions China Perspectives / Perspectives chinoises
Sinophone Musical Worlds and their Publics
Guest editor: Dr Nathanel Amar, postdoctoral Fellow in the Humanities at the University of Hong Kong

Download PDF File here:  Call for abstracts CP China musical worlds

http://www.cefc.com.hk/china-perspectives/submissions/call-sinophone-musical-worlds-publics/

Recent success of Chinese reality television singing competitions broadcasted on national television or streamed directly on the internet, has shown the extent of musical genres represented in the Chinese world, from pop to folk via hip-hop or rock ’n’ roll. The popularity of new musical styles up to then considered as deviant as well as the recent attempts of the State to intervene directly on musical contents, tend to blur the distinctions between “mainstream” (流行) music, “popular” (民间) music as non-official, “underground” (地下) music or even “alternative” (另类) music. This call for papers aims at promoting a better understanding of the transformations of Chinese “musical worlds”, in the sense that Becker gave to “art worlds”, which stresses the role of cooperation and interactions between the different actors of the artistic sphere. As Becker wrote, “all artistic work, like all human activity, involves the joint activity of a number, often a large number, of people. Through their cooperation, the artwork we eventually see or hear comes to be and continues to be. The work always shows signs of that cooperation” (Becker, 2008: 1). We thus welcome contributions which take into consideration the necessary cooperation between individuals, allowing the constitution of musical worlds. Continue reading

Sinophone Musical Worlds–call for contributions

Call for contributions China Perspectives / Perspectives chinoises
Sinophone Musical Worlds and their Publics
Guest editor: Dr Nathanel Amar, postdoctoral Fellow in the Humanities at the University of Hong Kong

Download PDF File here:  Call for abstracts CP China musical worlds

http://www.cefc.com.hk/china-perspectives/submissions/call-sinophone-musical-worlds-publics/

Recent success of Chinese reality television singing competitions broadcasted on national television or streamed directly on the internet, has shown the extent of musical genres represented in the Chinese world, from pop to folk via hip-hop or rock ’n’ roll. The popularity of new musical styles up to then considered as deviant as well as the recent attempts of the State to intervene directly on musical contents, tend to blur the distinctions between “mainstream” (流行) music, “popular” (民间) music as non-official, “underground” (地下) music or even “alternative” (另类) music. This call for papers aims at promoting a better understanding of the transformations of Chinese “musical worlds”, in the sense that Becker gave to “art worlds”, which stresses the role of cooperation and interactions between the different actors of the artistic sphere. As Becker wrote, “all artistic work, like all human activity, involves the joint activity of a number, often a large number, of people. Through their cooperation, the artwork we eventually see or hear comes to be and continues to be. The work always shows signs of that cooperation” (Becker, 2008: 1). We thus welcome contributions which take into consideration the necessary cooperation between individuals, allowing the constitution of musical worlds. Continue reading

Pirates in World Literature–acla cfp

CFP: Pirates in World Literature (ACLA 2019)

The image of the pirate resonates universally across cultures and periods. Taking the pirate’s broad cultural relevance as its starting point, this seminar explores piracy’s representation in the early modern world. Works such as Claire Jowitt’s The Culture of Piracy(2010)  and Lauren Benton’s A Search for Sovereignty (2010)  argue for the importance of piracy to the study of early modern European transatlantic empires, highlighting piracy’s role in the consolidation of British national and imperial identity and the formation of early modern notions of sovereignty. East Asian historian Peter Shapinsky in Lords of the Sea (2005) considers pirates as cultural intermediaries, emphasizing pirates’ desire to remain autonomous by positioning themselves between land-based powers. In addition to exploring piracy’s relationship to early modern global politics, recent studies have reframed piracy’s relationship to literary history. Key interventions by Margaret Cohen in The Novel and the Sea (2010) and Gretchen Woertendyke in Hemispheric Regionalism (2016) have offered revisionist histories of the novel and romance forms by shifting the analytical focus from the land to the sea. These interventions demonstrate the dynamics of recent oceanic, trans-oceanic, and hemispheric turns in literary and cultural studies. Continue reading

Queer Pop in post-2000 China–cfp

CFP: “Queer Pop in Post-2000 China” in a Special Issue of Feminist Media Studies

Feminist Media StudiesSince the 2000s, China’s media industrialization and cultural globalization have encouraged a burgeoning “queer pop”——that is, a soaring proliferation of non-normatively gendered and/or sexualized narratives and performances, cultural productions and inventions, artistic expressions and gestures, and social relations and kinship systems in China’s media, cultural, and creative industries and spaces. In the meantime, digital production and cyber distribution technologies, social networking sites (both online and offline), and cellular phone applications available to self-identified LGBTQ groups have become increasingly accessible and diversified. In the parallel off-screen public space, China has also witnessed several waves of LGBTQ and feminist sociopolitical movements, following the decriminalization and depathologization of homosexuality in 1997 and 2001 respectively. Some queer and feminist movements were significantly shaped by transnational queer and feminist currents, such as the most recent #MeToo anti-sexual harassment movement at China-based universities. Continue reading

Poetic Materiality Today–ACLA cfp

ACLA CFP: Poetic Materiality Today

The American Comparative Literature Association’s 2019 Annual Meeting will take place at Georgetown University in Washington, DC, March 7th-10th, 2019. We’ve proposed the following seminar:

In 2014, a poem titled “Crossing Over Half of China to Sleep with You” by Yu Xiuhua went viral online in China. Written by a rural woman with cerebral palsy and initially published on her blog, the poem represents a recent generation of poetic work that has developed around transformations in what a poem is physically and how readers encounter it. These poems are not always demonstrably globalized or translingual, but similar changes seem to be happening in poetry scenes, both popular and avant-garde, in many different places. Continue reading

Modern East Asian Translation and Intertextuality–cfp

ACLA 2019 (March 7-10) at Georgetown University. Cfp for seminar entitled “Modern East Asia and the World: Translation and Intertextuality” (https://www.acla.org/modern-east-asia-and-world-translation-and-intertextuality):

In his introduction to the recent New Literary History of Modern China (2017), David Der-wei Wang outlines the importance of global circulation, travel, and transculturation in the story of modern Chinese literature. Indra Levy (2006) and Chris Hill (2008) have made similar observations in the case of modern Japanese literature. The late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in East Asia saw a flurry of translation and imitation of Western literary, philosophical, and scientific writing. In nineteenth-century Japan, writers and intellectuals joined the national effort to translate ideas from Europe, including theories of literature and genres of literary expression. Chinese writers and intellectuals followed suit, prompted by military defeats at the hands of Western nations and Japan. For Chinese and Japanese luminaries of this period, rejuvenating cultural production according to Western models was a critical means of reinvigorating society and redefining national standing amongst hegemonic world powers. As a result, writing in East Asia became increasingly intertextual as literary language transformed to absorb, adopt, and innovate upon literary genres and styles from around the world. By the mid-twentieth century, new manifestations of ideological exchange and geopolitical conflict engendered new iterations in East Asian literary form; postwar and post-socialist modernity opened yet another chapter on East Asian literature, film, and media and their global underpinnings.

This seminar undertakes the crucial project of examining how the agents of modern literature in East Asia reached across borders for aesthetic raw material that they reshaped according to the literary or political demands of each new era. How did writers make use of translated texts and ideas to suit their own cultural purposes? What theories or case studies of translation arise from the global circulation of ideas and persons in this period? And how does intertextuality allow a text to make its entrance into world literature? We invite papers that raise similar questions while offering new ways to think about translation and intertextuality in a modern East Asian context.

Keru Cai <kerucai@berkeley.edu>

Master-Student Relationships–cfp

Call for Papers
American Comparative Literature Association
March 7-10, 2019, Georgetown University
The Master’s Voice: Literary Portrayals of Student-Teacher Conversations

This interdisciplinary panel explores both fictional and non-fictional literary accounts of discussions between masters and disciples. Studying texts from a broad range of historical periods, geographical regions, and literary genres, we will analyze both fictional descriptions and purportedly faithful transcriptions of these oral conversations. What motivates poets, playwrights, novelists and most importantly students to record or imagine these dialogues? What roles do trust, empathy, fellowship, seduction, and rebellion play in the creation and reception of such texts? And how does the act of writing itself distort or subvert a teacher’s legacy even while preserving and transmitting it?

Paper Abstracts of no more than 1500 characters must be submitted through the ACLA submissions portal by Thursday, September 20, 2018 at 9 a.m. EST.

Questions? Email Rivi Handler-Spitz: rhandlerspitz@macalester.edu

https://www.acla.org/master%E2%80%99s-voice-literary-portrayals-teacher-student-conversations

Memory and Media graduate conference–cfp

CALL FOR PAPERS
Memory and Media: Graduate Conference for Chinese Studies The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio November 17th, 2018

Over the last three decades, memory studies have inspired scholars in both modern and premodern Chinese fields to explore interdisciplinary approaches to history, tradition, canonization, identity formation, and more. The convergence of memory and Chinese studies brings new vantage points, as well as questions and challenges. How can critical concepts from memory theories be productively appropriated or even revised for the purpose of Chinese studies? Conversely, how can case studies on China refine and broaden our understanding about memory in the larger field of humanities?

The study of memory is almost unthinkable without examining the medium, or the various media, through which the memory is communicated. At both individual level and collective level, memory may be embodied and mediated through texts, objects, oral narratives, music, visual arts, rituals, bodily performances, and so forth. As Astrid Erll has pointed out, “each of these media has its specific way of remembering and will leave its trace on the memory it creates.” The dynamic interplay between memory and media helps us conceptualize memory as not just a product, but a process. Continue reading

Western Critical Theory and Chinese Literary Scholarship–cfp

Call for Papers: International Conference on “Western Critical Theory and Chinese Literary Scholarship”

The Centre for Humanities Research and the Department of Chinese, Lingnan University (Hong Kong) plan to hold an international conference “Western Literary Theory and Chinese Literary Scholarship” on Lingnan University campus, 23-24 May 2019.

The conference invites proposals for individual papers or panels that initiate in-depth dialogues between Western and Chinese literary theories. The dialogues should illuminate the unique features of each as well as their shared insights into issues of universal interest from comparative perspectives. We welcome papers that evaluate the application of Western critical theories to the studies of modern and premodern Chinese literature. We will also consider original essays introducing latest Western critical theories that may throw new light on intrinsic and/or extrinsic aspects of Chinese poetry, fiction, drama and other genres. Continue reading

ACCL 2019–cfp

ACCL 2019 Biennial Conference “Airing the States” CFP

The Association of Chinese and Comparative Literature (ACCL) invites paper and panel proposals for its 2019 biennial conference, to be held between July 17 and 19, 2019 on the campus of Hunan Normal University in Changsha, China.

The ACCL, dedicated to the study of literary relations between China and the rest of the world, has been an active and ever-growing scholarly association for almost three decades.  Our biennial conference is our primary venue for the discussion of Chinese and world literatures among scholars from around the world.

Our conference theme for 2019 will be “Airing the States”.  Since the earliest Confucianizing exegeses of the Classic of Poetry’s “Airs of the States”, inter-regional comparison of Sinophone literatures has been a foundational reminder of the complex polyphony of what, to the outside world, has often seemed a monolithic tradition.  Although we are a very long way from the world of the Zhou Dynasty, recent research trends in our field reflect an interest in how the geography of literary exchange is not simply that between nation and world, but also within intranational regions, or across international regions.  Modern literature’s central role in airing the aspirations of the nation-state has been long understood; how does literature of any period also air notions of region which must be understood as part of literary comparison?  Are cross-cutting identities of gender, class, or ethnicity ever aired in a comparable rhetoric of regionalism?  Or, in our age of resurgent national consciousness, must we air out our previous conceptions of the regionalizing state of literary comparison? Continue reading

Graduate Workshop on China in the Urban Age 2019–call

China’s environmental challenge and eco-civilisation: a multidisciplinary approach to the Anthropocene 

Call for Applications: The 2019 Graduate Workshop on China in the Urban Age

The University of Sydney is organising the inaugural graduate workshop of the China Studies Centre’s recently launched multidisciplinary research program on China in the Urban Age. It will be devoted to “China’s Environmental Challenge and Eco-civilisation: a multidisciplinary approach to the Anthropocene”, and held in Sydney between 14-18 January 2019. The deadline for applications is 8 October. This is an initiative of the China Studies Centre and the Planetary Health Platform at the University of Sydney. Continue reading

Inter-Asian Translations of Early Modern Writings in Plain Chinese–cfp

CFP: Inter-Asian Translations of Early Modern Writings in Plain Chinese (abstract by November 15, 2018)
A Special Issue for Frontiers of Literary Studies in China
Co-edited by Li Guo and Patricia Sieber

This special issue brings together translation studies, the history of the book, and the history of Chinese vernacular texts as world literature in dynastic East Asia.  We seek to address translation as a multivalent and rich continuum, including activities of annotation, adaptation, rewriting, and transcreation, within dynastic China as well as in premodern Asian countries engaged in dynamic and complex dialogues with Chinese textual traditions. We also seek to address the circulation and receptions of such translations as well as reflections on methodologies of translation for such textual practices more generally. The special issue invites articles that negotiate and explore the dynamic and nuanced differences and spaces of innovative interpretations created through shifting discursive structures, linguistic and social registers, reconfigurations of the hierarchies of annotation, original text, and paratexts, as well as contextualization through translations of voice, gendered statements, paratextual materials and thematic expressions. We welcome contributions on how translations of early modern narratives reconfigured genre characteristics and linguistic perceptions of Chinese vernacular narratives, and how such adaptations through translation inspired new generic expressions in other Asian languages. We want to explore how translations of early modern vernacular texts provide insights on cross-cultural literary contact and shape social and cultural impacts with early modern East Asia, and how early modern translators re-envision and construct non-native readerships through annotation, supplementation, and innovation. Continue reading

Logic Magazine–cfp

Call for Pitches: Logic Magazine (print) on Tech in China

Logic is a magazine about technology and society that publishes three times per year. We’re trying to ask the right questions about how technology works, and whom it works for.

The “world’s factory” has long been patronized as a place of copying, rather than creativity. But in fact, since its founding, the People’s Republic has been driven by dreams of rapid innovation, with engineers turned politicians drafting policy at Beidaihe. Apps in China now operate at scales American entrepreneurs only dream of. Our bilingual China issue will explore the situation on the ground, from Shandong villages whose inhabitants all work for Alibaba to biometrics surveillance of large swathes of the population. Tracing trans-Pacific flows of data and labor, we will sketch the new global map that Chinese tech is drawing. Continue reading