Sinophone Literature across the Strait–cfp

Call for Papers: Workshop Sinophone Literature across the Strait (China and Taiwan from the 19th Century to the Contemporary Ages)
https://acrossthestraitromatre.wordpress.com
Dates: November 7th- 8th,  2019
Venue: Roma Tre University, Department of Foreign Languages, Literatures and Cultures, Via del Valco di San Paolo 19 (Google Maps)

The workshop addresses PhD students and postdoc research fellows exploring the field of modern and contemporary Sinophone Literature, and intends to promote a positive exchange among scholars. Each participant will introduce his/her research project, which will be followed by a group discussion. By contributing to the global debate on Sinophone Studies, the workshop aims at implementing a transnational and transcultural approach. Within the field of Sinophone Literature, participants’ papers can investigate the following topics:

  • Tradition and modernity
  • Chineseness and otherness
  • Realism and related literary practices
  • Fiction, fantasy and science-fiction
  • Memory, identity and territory
  • Introduction, translation and reception of foreign literary movements and authors

Continue reading

Indiescape HK and the Post-Handover Film World–cfp

Ex-position Feature Topic Call for Papers
(Guest Editor: Kenny Kwok Kwan Ng, Hong Kong Baptist University)
Publication Date: December 2019 (Issue No. 42)
Submission Deadline: July 1, 2019

“Independent cinema” in Hong Kong has gained much currency both in academia and in film production and reception circles since the 1997 handover. Despite the fact that the term itself is frequently invoked in critical discourse and film festival programming, the meanings and contours of independent cinema as it is practiced in Hong Kong remain a matter of debate, except for the general consensus that being “independent” in moviemaking confers a disposition of distancing from the mainstream film industry in terms of styles, genres, modes of production and exhibition, financing, or public reception. Independent filmmakers can be bona fide auteurs who have greater control over the subject matter and stylistic choices of their works compared with their mainstream counterparts. Still, creative autonomy is never absolute and always comes with a cost. Filmmakers have to play by the rules of the emerging habitus of independent cinema, while the dynamic and ambivalent exchanges between independent and mainstream cinema are constantly at play in Hong Kong when an independent filmmaker (or film) enters mainstream production and circulation. Continue reading

Games and Play in China–cfp

Dear all,

A friendly reminder that the abstracts for the edited volume “Games and Play in China from the Early Modern to the Contemporary” are due by May 15, 2019. Interested authors, please submit chapter proposals of 500-750 words to Douglas Eyman <deyman@gmu.edu>, Hongmei Sun <shongmei@gmu.edu>, and Li Guo <li.guo@usu.edu>. Please see the following for details.

CFP: Games and Play in China from the Early Modern to the Contemporary
Editors: Douglas Eyman, Li Guo, and Hongmei Sun

The editors of this volume invite submission of chapters that address the ‘cultural rhetorics of gaming’ – that is, the ways in which games inhabit, represent, disrupt, or transform cultural and social practices in specific contexts. Scholarship on games and gaming has proliferated across a number of fields, including game studies, rhetoric and writing, translation studies, and education, among others. Gaming is fast becoming a nearly ubiquitous activity with global reach (particularly digital gaming – but not just limited to online activity, as increased sales of board games and role-playing games attest). The central argument in this collection is that games operate as cultural agents specific to their temporal and ecological contexts. Games are connected to the times in which they were invented, and represent the cultural functions of that time, but also continue beyond the moment of origination and connect past concerns to those in the present. Changes in the context of games – transcultural transformation – can demonstrate relationships between and among disparate cultures, as represented through game adaptations. In a similar vein, games also interact with other media, including literature and film, in ways that convey cultural value. Continue reading

Reading and Circulation of Texts after Censorship–cfp

I am circulating this CFP on behalf of the organizers, who are eager to see proposals on China-related topics enter the conversation.–Sebastian Veg<veg@ehess.fr>

NIHIL OBSTAT: Reading and Circulation of Texts After Censorship
NYU Global Studies Center, Prague: 17-19 October 2019
www.hsozkult.de/event/id/termine-39576

Literary scholars, sociologists, and historians have long explored the processes and ideology of censorship as well as the histories of the censors themselves. Pre-publication censorship practices and the institutions of church and state that foster them have dominated the field of study. Fewer efforts have taken texts after the fact of censorship or have detailed their further intellectual, cultural, and social trajectories. But as Deleuze wrote in Negotiations (1995), “Repressive forces don’t stop people expressing themselves, but rather force them to express themselves.” While censorship takes various forms, many of them violent, it has tended toward failure, and historically the experience of censorship amongst groups as disparate as 17th century Puritans and 20th century Lithuanian poets is often deeply instructive in the means of subversion, publication, and dissemination. Censorship has informed collecting practices, as with Thomas James, who used the Catholic Index Librorum Prohibitorum to dictate the acquisitions policy of the Bodleian library from the late 16th century onward. Censorship creates new relationships between people and places because it is enforced differently from country to country, even from building to building; for example, in 1984 when the police raided Gay’s the Word bookshop in London to confiscate “obscene” imported books by Oscar Wilde, Tennessee Williams, Kate Millet, and Jean-Paul Sartre, the same titles remained available for loan at Senate House Library a few streets away, and UK publishers continued to publish the same authors unpunished. In the spirit of these examples, this conference seeks to foster an interdisciplinary conversation broaching a larger number of underexplored issues that begin only after the moment of censorship—the excess of argument, collaboration, revision, and in many cases, creative thinking, that are given shape by the experience of suppression.

We are pleased to announce that Hannah Marcus (History of Science, Harvard University) and Gisèle Sapiro (Sociology, Centre national de la recherche scientifique / École des hautes études en sciences sociales) will deliver respective keynote addresses each evening of the conference

This conference aims to be as broad as possible in its geographical, historical, and disciplinary range. The organizers welcome applications from anthropologists, bibliographers, classics scholars, comparative literature scholars, gender studies scholars, historians, philosophers, sociologists, and those within allied fields, including library and information sciences and the publishing industry. The working language of the conference will be English, but participants are naturally encouraged to present research completed in any language(s). The goal of the conference will be to publish the proceedings in a collective volume.

Applications should consist of a title, three-hundred word proposal, and one-page CV, due on May 31, 2019. Accommodations will be available for participants and some funds may be possible for travel assistance within continental Europe.

Possible topics include:

  • The reception history of expurgated, bowderlized, and censored texts
  • The social history of reading censored and samizdat editions
  • The impact of ‘market censorship’ on the rise of small, independent or clandestine publishing establishments.
  • Religious communities formed around mutual practices of censorship
  • The history of translation vis-à-vis censored texts
  • Publishing within colonized spaces
  • Canonical texts’ reception vis-à-vis censored editions
  • Strategies for circumventing censorship, i.e. scribal publication and xerography
  • Scientific and medical pedagogical traditions employing censored texts
  • Teaching censored texts: period pedagogy and teaching practices today
  • The contingencies of space and geography in censorship practices and the international circulation of censored texts
  • ‘Asymmetric’ publication or the coordination of censored and uncensored editions
  • The changing status of texts from uncensored to censors, and the inconsistent enforcement of banned items
  • Textual histories of self-censored texts and later full republication
  • Reversing censorship
  • Bibliographical challenges in book description
  • Publishing, marketing, and openly advertising censored texts
  • Hermeneutic and exegetical concerns facing censored or expurgated texts
  • Classical scholarship built upon expurgated texts and embedded polemical citations

In order to apply, please send the materials detailed above to Brooke Palmieri and John Raimo by May 31, 2019: bspalmieri@gmail.com and john.raimo@nyu.edu.

Kontakt

John Raimo, NYU Department of History, KJC Center, 53 Washington Square South 4E, New York, NY 10012
john.raimo@nyu.edu

Cantonese Connection workshop

Cantonese Connection: Periodical Studies in the Age of Digitalization

Periodicals played a major role in modern Chinese history: from propagating revolutionary ideas to promoting popular culture; with digitalization the studies of this otherwise too massive and ephemeral kind of literature have become more accessible than ever. “Cantonese Connection”, therefore, is a workshop bringing together local and overseas scholars to discuss various periodicals in this context, with a specific focus on the Cantonese-speaking area, including Guangzhou, Hong Kong and Macau.

The workshop is delighted to have Prof. Poshek Fu to give a keynote speech on “Chinese Student Weekly, Asia Foundation, and Hong Kong’s Cultural Cold War”.

Date :    17th -18th May 2019 (Friday – Saturday)
Venue:  Lee Ping Yuen Chamber (D801), 8/F, Lee Quo Wei Academic Building (Block D),The Hang Seng University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Time:    (Day 1) 09:30-17:45;  (Day 2) 09:30-12:55

Programme available at https://cgcs.hsu.edu.hk/2019-05-17-18cantonese-connection-periodical-studies-in-the-age-of-digitalization/

Posted by: Nga Li Lam <lamngali@gmail.com>

Journal of Cinema and Media Studies call for translations

The Journal of Cinema and Media Studies is now accepting proposals for translations to be published in 2020. Please find the details below.

Best,

Hongwei Thorn Chen <thorn.chen@gmail.com.

Call for Translations

The Journal for Cinema and Media Studies publishes translations of outstanding scholarly and creative work. The originals may be in any language and come from any period or geographic region. We welcome two types of proposals: (1) a single text such as a journal article, book chapter, or self-contained section of a book that focuses on a particular topic in a unified, coherent way; and (2) a group of smaller texts that are linked thematically, geographically, or otherwise.The total word count of the introduction and translated text(s) should be between 8,000 and 10,000 words in English. One grant-in-aid of $1,000 will be paid to the translator(s) for copyright clearance and as honoraria. Proposals to translate one’s own work will not be considered.SCMS members are invited submit proposals, prepared in accordance with the Chicago Style Manual, with the following: Continue reading

May Fourth @100

May Fourth @ 100: China and the World, 1919-2019
April 12-13, 2019
Sponsored by: The Chiang Ching-Kuo Foundation, Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations at Harvard University, Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies at Harvard University, Harvard University Asia Center, and Harvard-Yenching Institute

THIS EVENT IS OPEN TO THE PUBLIC AND FURTHER DETAILS CAN BE FOUND HERE

THE EVENT WILL TAKE PLACE AT 1730 CAMBRIDGE STREET, CAMBRIDGE, MA, 02138, IN THE TSAI AUDITORIUM OF THE CGIS-SOUTH BUILDING AT HARVARD UNIVERSITY

April 12, 2019

9:30 Welcoming + Opening Remarks
David Wang, Michael Szonyi

9:40-10:40 Keynote Speech
Rudolf Wagner: Reconstructing May Fourth: The Role of Communication, Propaganda, and International Actors
Introduced by Ge Zhaoguang Continue reading

Thirty Years since Tiananmen conference

The conference “Thirty Years since Tiananmen Square Massacre: Struggle for Democracy in China” will be held at the University of Westminster in London on 18 April, which will mark the day when students gathered in Tiananmen Square and delivered their Seven Demands to the National People’s Congress thirty years ago.

This event will bring together academics and activists researching on China to explore topics including the struggle for democracy in China as a rising global power, the significance of 1989 pro-democracy protests and the state crackdown against it, the legacy of 1989 for contemporary democratic (im)possibilities in China, the struggle between demands for rights and state focus on order and stability, and contemporary challenges in mainland China as well as contested lands that are homeland of Uyghurs and Tibetans.

The details of the event can be found here: https://www.westminster.ac.uk/events/thirty-years-since-tiananmen-square-massacre-struggle-for-democracy-in-china

Shao Jiang <thomasshao@gmail.com>

MCAA 2019–cfp

Dear Asianists,

The 68th Midwest Conference on Asian Affairs (MCAA) Annual Meeting will be held at Michigan State University from October 4 – 6, 2019

The MCAA seeks to promote Asian Studies at the university, secondary, and primary levels encouraging scholarly interchange between Asianists in the Midwest as well as with those from other parts of the country and the world. Scholars and students from all regions are invited to participate.

We are now soliciting panels, roundtables, and individual papers in all fields dealing with China and Inner Asia, Northeast Asia, South Asia, and Southeast Asia, the Asian Diaspora, and topical and comparative panels. Faculty, graduate, and undergraduate students, as well as independent scholars, are encouraged to share their work and attend the conference. If you are interested, please submit a paper proposal on the Midwest Conference on Asian Affairs website by May 11, 2019 at 11:59 p.m.

For questions about the call for papers please contact our Program Chair Aminda Smith at amsmith@msu.edu.

Best regards,

MCAA Planning Committee
Asian Studies Center/International Studies and Programs
Michigan State University
427 N. Shaw Lane, Room 301
East Lansing MI 48824-1035
Tel: 517-353-1680
Fax: 517-432-2659
Email: asiansc@msu.edu
Web: http://asia.isp.msu.edu

Workshop on languages and scripts

Workshop on Languages and Scripts in China, Columbia University (April 19)

“Languages and Scripts in China: New Directions in Information and Communications History” will be held at Columbia University on Friday, April 19. Please see the attached poster for more information. For access to papers, please RSVP Ulug Kuzuoglu (uk2123@columbia.edu).

Full schedule may be found at http://languagesandscriptsinchina.wordpress.com

Download the poster here: Scripts-Poster-Final3-1ksfwdw-1a7hg

Ulug Kuzuoglu <ulugkuzuoglu@gmail.com>

Aesthetics of Embodiment conference

“Aesthetics of Embodiment: Drama, Ritual, and Food in Traditional Sinitic Culture.” The conference will be held at Arizona State University Tempe Campus: West Hall 135 from 8:30am-5:30pm on April 12 and at Heritage Room at University Club from 8:30-5:30pm on April 13, 2019.

This is a conference in honor of Professor Stephen H. West, an occasion for colleagues, friends, and students to celebrate his achievements and contributions to the field of East Asian studies. The conference is generously funded by Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation for International Scholarly Exchange, with contributions from the University of California, Berkeley; Arizona State University; University of California, Davis; and Ohio State University.

For the conference website, see https://silc.asu.edu/content/drf-program-schedule Continue reading

Sinophone Humanities in Southeast Asia

Sinophone Humanities in Southeast Asia: An International Workshop
Date: Apr 11, 2019
Location: Harvard University, 2 Divinity Ave, Common Room

SCHEDULE 

10.15am – 10.30am | Welcome Remarks

10.30am – 12pm | Panel A: The Geopolitics of Southeast Asian Space, Memory and History
Chair: Huang Ying-che (Aichi University)

Ko Chia-cian (National Taiwan University): 漢詩世界裡的華夷風

Tee Kim Tong (National Sun Yat-sen University): 馬華文學、吉隆坡與文學/記憶現場

Liew Zhou Hau (Harvard University): Staging Resettlement: The Re-engineering of Rural History and the Replanting of Nanyang Memories

Jessica Tan (Harvard University): Caught between Homelands: The “Return” of the Wild Goose Wang Xiaoping Continue reading

KFLC 2019

Dear Friends,

We are very excited about the upcoming KFLC: the Languages, Literatures, and Cultures conference, with Professors Karen Thornber and Ronald Suleski serving as Keynote Speakers, to be held from next Thursday afternoon to Friday afternoon, April 11 to 12, in Lexington Kentucky. Please see the full program below. We have some thirty participants from Britain, China, New Zealand, and the United States, the Keynote Lectures will be from Noon to 2 pm on Friday April 12, lunch buffet provided on Friday, all welcome!

Warmly,
Liang Luo, University of Kentucky

Thursday, April 11, 2019 – 2:30pm to 5:00pm

Formation and Transformation of the “International” in 20th Century Asia  
Patterson Office Tower, 18th Floor, Room H
Thursday, April 11, 2019 – 2:30pm to 5:00pm
Organized by: Masamichi Inoue, University of Kentucky
Chaired by: Liang Luo, University of Kentucky

2:30 Women’s Resilience Reflected in Geling Yan’s Works: A Feminist Study
Xiaoyang Li, University of Canterbury

3:00 The Legacies of Joris Ivens in Mid-twentieth-century China and Beyond 

Liang Luo, University of Kentucky

3:30 Coffee Break

4:00 Regimes of Nuclear Nonproliferation in East Asia: Treaty Frameworks and U.S. Intervention
Chris Junwon Lee, Independent Scholar

4:30 Private Contacts and National Feelings: Lau Shaw and America
Guimei Wang, Jilin University, China Continue reading

Hong Kong Studies–cfp

HONG KONG STUDIES—Issue 5 (Spring 2020) Call for Papers—Gender and Sexuality on Hong Kong Screens

The first bilingual and interdisciplinary academic journal on Hong Kong, Hong Kong Studies (Chinese University Press), is now accepting articles for a special issue, Gender and Sexuality on Hong Kong Screens, curated with Professor Gina Marchetti (HKU) and scheduled for publication in Spring 2020.

Hong Kong cinema opens up a “pivotal place as a public platform for the consideration of Chinese identity, sexual orientation, and gender roles in the digital age,” write the editors of Hong Kong Screenscapes (HKU Press, 2011). Taking this as a point of departure and broadening the scope to discussions of different genders and sexualities, this issue solicits research articles that explore the following topics and more in Hong Kong films: the representation of genders and sexual identities (e.g. gender equality, gender activism, women’s rights, masculinity, the LGBTQIA+ community, non-binary and trans representations), intersectionality between gender and other critical concepts, transnational and multilingual comparisons with other contexts in terms of gender and sexuality, and gender politics in Hong Kong, China and Taiwan. Continue reading

Games and Play in China–cfp

I’m reposting this cfp because email addresses were missing from the original post.–Kirk

CFP: Games and Play in China from the Premodern to the Contemporary(Edited Collection)
Editors: Douglas Eyman, Li Guo, and Hongmei Sun
Target Publication Date:  Winter 2020

The editors of this volume invite submission of chapters that address the ‘cultural rhetorics of gaming’ – that is, the ways in which games inhabit, represent, disrupt, or transform cultural and social practices in specific contexts. Scholarship on games and gaming has proliferated across a number of fields, including game studies, rhetoric and writing, translation studies, and education, among others. Gaming is fast becoming a nearly ubiquitous activity with global reach (particularly digital gaming – but not just limited to online activity, as increased sales of board games and role-playing games attest). The central argument in this collection is that games operate as cultural agents specific to their temporal and ecological contexts.  Games are connected to the times in which they were invented, and represent the cultural functions of that time, but also continue beyond the moment of origination and connect past concerns to those in the present. Changes in the context of games – transcultural transformation – can demonstrate relationships between and among disparate cultures, as represented through game adaptations. In a similar vein, games also interact with other media, including literature and film, in ways that convey cultural value. Continue reading