Translations by Collections

Genre

| General | Fiction | Poetry | Drama | Essay | Literary Criticism |

Theme

| Wounds | Obscure Poetry | Realism | Roots-Nativist | Reportage | Taiwan |
| Hong Kong | Minorities | Women Writers | Dissent | Avant-garde | Memoirs |
| Popular | Chinese-American | Same-Sex Lit. | Science Fiction


Genre Collections


General

Chinese Stories of the Twentieth Century. Ed./tr. Zhihua Fang. New York: Garland Publishing, 1995.

[Stories by: Lu Xun, Xu Dishan, Liu Xinwu, Gao Xiaosheng, Tie Ning, and Wang Zengqi]

Contemporary Chinese Literature: An Anthology of Post-Mao Fiction and Poetry. Ed. Michael Duke. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1985.

Columbia Anthology of Modern Chinese Literature. Eds. Joseph Lau and Howard Goldblatt. NY: Columbia University Press, 1995

The Fontana Collection of Modern Chinese Writing. Ed. Christine Liao. Melbourne: Fontana/Collins in association with the Chinese Literature Pub. House of Beijing, 1983

[Contents: “At middle age,” by Shen Rong; “Pages from a factory secretary’s diary,” Jiang Zilong, “The stranger,” by Zhang Lin; “A spate of visitors,” by Wang Meng; “The story of a living Buddha,” by Malqinhu; “Hansuai, the living ghost,” by Bai Honghu and Yang Zhao; “Two brigade leaders,” by Ji Xuepei; “In vino veritas,” by Sun Yuchun; “The moon on the south lake,” by Liu Fudao; “A poster,” by Li Huiwen; Poems by Ai Qing, Shu Ting, and Huang Yongyu]

Furrows, Peasants, Intellectuals, and the State: Stories and Histories from Modern China. Ed. Helen Siu. Stanford: Stanford Press, 1990.

Literature of the People’s Republic of China. Ed. Hsu Kai-yu. Bloomington: IUP, 1980.

Modern Literature from China. Eds. Walter J. Meserve and Ruth L. Meserve. NY: New York UP, 1974. [from Lu Xun to Mao; short fiction, poetry, drama, essays]

On Freedom. Eds. Franks Steward and Fiona Sze-Lorrain. Special issue of Manoa 24, 2 (2012).

[Abstract: The various meanings of freedom are difficult to explain in the discursive language of theory and philosophy. But authors of fiction, poetry, and other narrative forms–using metaphor, parable, and figurative speech–are often at home with what is difficult and too subtle for reason alone. Residing in countries throughout Asia and North America, the authors in On Freedom help us understand the need for cultural, spiritual, and intellectual freedoms in order to have a life that is fully realized. Essays in On Freedom are by Japanese writer Mutsuo Takahashi, Tibetan Woeser Tsering, and American Phil Choi. Drama is by American writer Catherine Filloux. Fiction is by Chinese writers A Yi and Zhang Yihe; South Asian Sukrita Paul Kumar; Americans Quan Barry and Andrew Lam; Canadian Susan Musgrave; American Thersa Matsuura, now living in Japan; and Filipino Jose Y. Dalisay Jr. Poetry is by Chinese writer Chen Dongdong; Burmese Khin Aung Aye, Thitsar Ni, and Tin Moe; and Americans W. S. Di Piero, Tess Gallagher, Melissa Kwasny, and Naomi Long.]

The Pearl Jacket and Other Stories: Flash Fiction from Contemporary China. Ed. Shouhua Qi. Stonebridge Press, 2008. [MCLC Resource Center review by Jennifer Feeley]

[Abstract: Hugely popular in China, flash fiction is poised to be the most exciting new development in contemporary Chinese literature in a decade. Integrating both vernacular and contemporary styles while embracing new technologies such as text messaging (SMS) and blogging, contemporary Chinese flash fiction represents the voice of a civilization at the brink of a startling and unprecedented transformation. This collection features 120 short-short stories (from 100 to 300 words each), written by some of China’s most dynamic and versatile authors. Dong Rui’s The Pearl Jacket offers a glimpse of the real and surreal in human evolution, Chen Qiyou’s Butterfly Forever brings an ancient Chinese literary motif into a startling modern context, while Liu Jianchao’s Concerned Departments mocks the staggering complexity of life in the new urban China. Traditional, experimental, and avant-garde, The Pearl Jacket and Other Stories will reinvigorate the position of young Chinese writers as a major presence in contemporary literature. Their voices breathe new energy into modern Chinese literature, leaving the literary and societal stagnation of the Cultural Revolution behind as a distant memory.]

Selected Works by Members of China PEN Centre of Shanghai. Shanghai: Shanghai Translation Pub. House, 1991.

Trees on the Mountain: An Anthology of New Chinese Writing. Ed. Stephen Soong and John Minford. HK: Renditions, 1984.


Fiction

Best Chinese Short Stories, 1949-1989. Beijing: Chinese Literature Press, 1989.

China: A Traverler’s Literary Companion. Ed. Kirk A. Denton. Berkeley: Whereabouts Press, 2008.

“China Today.” Special issue of Nimrod 29, 2 (Spring/Summer 1986).

The Chinese Western: Short Fiction From Today’s China. Ed. Zhu Hong. NY: Ballantine, 1988.

Chutzpah! New Voices from China. Eds Ou Ning and Austin Woerner. Norman: Oklahoma University Press, 2015.

[Abstract: To Westerners China has often seemed a monolith, speaking with one voice—whether that of an ancient dynasty, a socialist state, or an economic powerhouse. Chutzpah! New Voices from China shatters this illusion, giving Western readers a rare chance to listen to the brilliant polyphony of Chinese fiction today. Here, in the realms of realism and fantasy, and portraying worlds lyrical, gritty, or wildly avant-garde, sixteen selections—three of which are nonfiction—by up-and-coming Chinese writers take readers from the suburbs of Nanjing to the mountains of Xinjiang Province, from London’s Chinatown to a universe seemingly sprung from a video game. In these stories one may encounter a sweet, lonely fabric store owner or a lesbian housecleaner, a posse of shit-talking vo-tech students or a human hive-mind. A jeep-driving swordsman girds himself for battle by reading Borges and Nabokov. A Beijing-raised Kazakh boy hunts for his lost heritage. A teenager plots revenge on the bureaucrat responsible for demolishing his home. A starving child falls in love with a water spirit.]

Contemporary Chinese Short Stories. Ed. Zhao Jingshen. 2 vols. Shanghai: Beixin shuju, 1946.

[Contents: “The cross,” by Guo Moruo; “Suicide,” by Mao Dun; “A man must have a son,” by Ye Shaojun; “The florist,” by Yu Pingbo; “The first home party,” by Bing Xin; “Hsiao-hsiao,” by Shen Congwen; ” Pai tzu,” by Shen Congwen.–v. 2. “A hermit at large,” by Lu Xun; “Looking back to the past,” by Lu Xun; “Wistaria and doddar,” by Yu Dafu; “Slave mother,” by Rou Shi; “Aboard the S.S. Dairen Maru,” by Tian Jun; “The conversion,” by Xiao Qian).

Contemporary Chinese Short Stories. Eds. Chia-Hua Yuan and Robert Payne. NY: Transatlantic Arts, 1946; or London, New York, N. Carrington, 1946.

Contemporary Chinese Short Stories. Beijing: Panda Books, 1983.

Contemporary Chinese Stories. Tr. Chi-chen Wang. Wesport, CT: Greenwood, 1944; NY: Columbia UP, 1944.

[Works by: Zhang Tianyi, Mao Dun, Lao She, Lu Xun, Ye Shengtao, Ba Jin, Ling Shuhua, Feng Wenbing, Yang Zhensheng, and Lao Xiang]

Contemporary Chinese Fiction: Four Short Stories, introduced and annotated for the student of Chinese. Ed. Neal Robbins; with assistance from David Kay and contributions from Rose Hsiu-li Yuan and K.C. Wong. New Haven: Far Eastern Publications, Yale University, 1986.

Le fox-trot de Shanghai et autres novelles chinoises. Trs/eds. Isabelle Rabut and Angel Pino. Paris: Albin Michel, 1996.

[Stories by: Jing pai writers–Fei Ming, Shen Congwen, Lin Huiyin, Ling Shuhua, and Xiao Qian–and Hai pai writers–Mu Shiying, Liu Na’ou, Xu Xu, Shi Zhecun, and Ye Lingfeng]

Fragrant Weeds: Chinese Short Stories Once Labelled as Poisonous Weeds. Ed. W.J.F. Jenner. HK: Joint Publishing, 1983.

Genesis of a Revolution: An Anthology of Modern Chinese Short Stories. Singapore: Heinemann Educational Books, 1979.

I Knew All Along and Other Stories. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1960.

[Stories by: Ma Feng, Wang Wenshi, Gao Fengge, Shen Yaozhong, Du Pengcheng, Lu Junzhao, Hu Wenjun, Xia Hong, Wang Yuanqian, Ru Zhijuan, Liu Baiyu, Liu Gei, A. Wufulli]

Literatur und Politik in der Volksrepublik China. Ed. Rudolf G. Wagner. Frankfurt: Suhrkamp., l983.

[Translations of: Zheng Yi, “Red Acorn”; Ru Zhijuan, “Path through the steppe”; Ye Wenfu, “General, not like this”; Sha Yexin/Li Shoucheng/Yao Mingde, “If I were truly”; Liu Binyan, “Among humans and demons”; Wang Meng: “The loyal heart”]

Living China Ed. Edgar Snow. NY: Reynal and Hitchcock, 1937 [One of the first anthologies of English translations of modern Chinese literature].

Loud Sparrows: Contemporary Chinese Short-Shorts. Trs. Aili Mu, Julie Chiu, and Howard Goldblatt. NY: Columbia UP, 2006.

Mao’s Harvest: Voices from China’s New Generation. Ed. Helen Siu and Zelda Stern. Oxford UP, 1983.

Modern Chinese Stories. Ed. K.M. Panikkar. 1953.

Modern Chinese Stories and Novellas, 1919-1949. Ed. C.T. Hsia, et. al. New York: Columbia University Press, 1981.

Modern Literature From China. Walter Meserve, ed. New York: NYU Press, 1974.

The Mystified Boat and Other New Stories from China. Eds. Frank Stewart and Herbert J. Batt. Special issue of Manoa: A Pacific Journal of International Writing 15, 2 (Winter 2003). Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press.

New Penguin Parallel Text Short Stories in Chinese. Ed. John Balcolm. NY: Penguin Books, 2013.

The Pearl Jacket and Other Stories: Flash Fiction from Contemporary China. Edited and Translated by Shouhua Qi. Berkeley, CA: Stone Bridge Press, 2008. [MCLC Resource Center review by Jennifer Feeley]

[Abstract: Hugely popular in China, flash fiction is poised to be the most exciting new development in contemporary Chinese literature in a decade. Integrating both vernacular and contemporary styles while embracing new technologies such as text messaging (SMS) and blogging, contemporary Chinese flash fiction represents the voice of a civilization at the brink of a startling and unprecedented transformation. This collection features 120 short-short stories (from 100 to 300 words each), written by some of China’s most dynamic and versatile authors. Dong Rui’s The Pearl Jacket offers a glimpse of the real and surreal in human evolution, Chen Qiyou’s Butterfly Forever brings an ancient Chinese literary motif into a startling modern context, while Liu Jianchao’s Concerned Departments mocks the staggering complexity of life in the new urban China. Traditional, experimental, and avant-garde, The Pearl Jacket and Other Stories will reinvigorate the position of young Chinese writers as a major presence in contemporary literature. Their voices breathe new energy into modern Chinese literature, leaving the literary and societal stagnation of the Cultural Revolution behind as a distant memory.]

Recent Fiction From China, 1987-89: Selected Stories and Novellas. Long Xu, ed. Lewiston: Edwin Mellen Press, 1991.

Roses and Thorns: The Second Blooming of the Hundred Flowers in Chinese Fiction, 1979-1980. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1984.

Science Fiction from China. Eds. Patrick Murphy and Wu Dingbo. NY: Praeger, 1989.

The Seed and Other Stories. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1972.

Shi Cheng: Short Stories from Urban China. Eds. Liu Ding, Carol Yinghu Lu, and Ra Page. Manchester, UK: Comma Press, 2012.

[Abstract: To the West, China may appear an unstoppable economic unity, a single high-performing whole, but for the inhabitants of this vast, complex and contradictory nation, it is the cities that hold the secret to such economic success. From the affluent, Westernised Hong Kong to the ice-cold Harbin in the north, from the Islamic quarters of Xi’an to the manufacturing powerhouse of Guangzhou – China’s cities thrum with promise and aspiration, playing host to the myriad hopes, frustrations and tensions that define China today. The stories in this anthology offer snapshots of ten such cities, taking in as many different types of inhabitant. Here we meet the lowly Beijing mechanic lovingly piecing together his first car from scrap metal, somnambulant commuters at a Nanjing bus-stop refusing to acknowledge the presence of a dead body just metres away, or Shenyang intellectuals conducting a letter-writing campaign on the moral welfare of their city. The challenges depicted in these stories are uniquely Chinese, but the energy and ingenuity with which their authors approach them is something readers everywhere can marvel at.]

Short Stories: Short Stories from China. Ed. Ming-ting Cze. Moscow: Cooperative Publishing Society of Foreign Workers in the USSR, 1935.

The Sound of Salt Forming: Short Stories by the Post-80s Generation in China. Eds. Geng Song and Qingxiang Yang. Honolulu: University of Hawaii, 2016.

[Abstract: China’s post-80s generation, sometimes referred to as Generation Y, is the first whose members have grown up entirely within the reformist era. They are keen to distinguish themselves from their predecessors in every aspect of life. To Western eyes, this generation of Chinese, who are highly engaged with the world, display the ambiguities and paradoxes associated with China’s economic rise: They are both nationalistic and cosmopolitan, subservient and defiant, hedonistic and mundane, materialistic and aspirational. This volume brings together some of the most popular and influential writers of this generation. Most of them remain largely unknown outside China. The short stories have been translated into English by a team of enthusiastic and skilled sinologists, and represent some of the “sweetest songs” that tell of the pains and dreams, frustrations and desires, crises and endeavors of this generation in urban China. The works also demonstrate how “youth” itself is commodified in a system of writing and production that significantly breaks away from the old socialist mode. The book is a must-read for those who are interested in not only the China of today but also of tomorrow.]

Sowing the Clouds: A Collection of Chinese Short Stories. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1961.

Spring of Bitter Waters: Short Fiction from Today’s China. Ed. Zhu Hong. London: Allison & Busby, 1989

Straw Sandals: Chinese Short Stories 1918-1933. Cambridge: MIT Press, 1974.

Stories of China at War. Tr./ed. Chi-chen Wang. NY: Columbia UP, 1947.

Stories of Contemporary China. Eds. Winston Yang and Nathan Mao. NY: Paragon Books, 1979.

Stories from the Thirties. 2 vols. Beijing: FLP, 1982.

Stubborn Weeds: Popular and Controversial Chinese Literature after the Cultural Revolution. Ed. Perry Link. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1983.

Themes in Contemporary Chinese Literature. Ed. Jianing Chen. Beijing: New World Press, 1993.

[Abstract: PRC fiction by well-known and lesser writers of the 1980s and early 90s]

The Time is Not Ripe Yet. Ed. Ying Bian. Beijing: FLP, 1991.

[Works by: Wang Meng, Ah cheng, Feng Jicai, Wang Anyi, Zhang Xianliang, etc.]

The Tragedy of Ah Qui, and Other Modern Chinese Stories. Ed. Kyn Y.Y. London: George Routledge and sons, 1930.

The Vintage Book of Contemporary Chinese Fiction. Eds. Carolyn Choa and David Su Li-Qun. NY: Vintage Books, 2001.

[Stories by: Cheng Naishan, Wang Anyi, Wang Meng, Mo Shen, etc.]

A Wind Across the Grass: Modern Chinese Writing with Fourteen Stories. Ed. Hugh Anderson. Ascot Vale, Vic.: Red Rooster Press, 1985.

[Stories by: Han Zi, Zong Pu, Wang Xiaoying, etc.]

Worlds of Modern Chinese Fiction. Ed. M. Duke. Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 1991.


Poetry

Another Kind of Nation: An Anthology of Contemporary Chinese Poetry. Eds. Zhang, Er and Dongdong Chen. Jersey City, NJ: Talisman House Publishers, 2007.

[Abstract: collects works by twenty-four poets from mainland China born after 1960 who are currently writing and publishing in Chinese. Although well-known in China, most of them appear in English translation for the first time in this book. Edited by Chinese poets Zhang Er and Chen Dongdong, Another Kind of Nation offers an introduction to Chinese poetry today in the shadows of a long poetic tradition, the globalization of capitalism, and a renewed nationalism. The Chinese texts are presented in the original as well as in English translations prepared by American poet/translators in collaboration with Chinese writers. The book includes introductions by the editors in English and in Chinese, a postface on the translation process, and biographical notes for both poets and translators.]

Anthology of Modern Chinese Poetry. Ed. and tr. Michelle Yeh. New Haven, CT: Yale UP, 1992.

Beijing–New York: Chinese Artists, Chinese Poets. Eds. Stephen Lane and Ginny MacKenzie. NY: Sister City Program of the City of New York and Coyote Press, 1988.

“China.” Eds. and trs. George O’Connell and Diana Shi. Atlanta Review xiv, 2 (Spring/Summer 2008).

[Poems by: Lan Lan, Lu Xixi, Wang Jiaxin, Sun Wenbo, Hu Xudong, Zang Di, Han Dong, Shu Cai, Yu Jian, Zhai Yongming, Yang Jian, Wang Xiaoni, Duoduo, Xiao Kaiyu, Xi Chuan]

China China: Contemporary Poetry from Taiwan. Eds. Germaine Droogenbroodt and Peter Stinson. Belgium: Point Books, 1986.

Contemporary Chinese Poetry. Ed. Robert Payne. London, Routledge, 1947.

Contemporary Chinese Poets, special issue of The Drunken Boat (Spring/Summer 2006).

[Poems by: Xi Chuan, Zhai Yongming, Chen Dongdong, Yu Jian, Duo Duo, Sun Wenbo, Ouyang Jianghe, Wang Xiaoni, Yin Lichuan, Yang Qian, Li Sen, Li Nan, Han Dong, Wang Jiaxin, “minority” poets from Tibet and elsewhere in China, Bei Dao, Ha Jin, Xue Di, etc.]

Contemporary Chinese Literature: An Anthology of Post-Mao Ficiton and Poetry. Ed. Michael S. Duke. Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 1984.

Earth-Shaking Songs: Epic of Chinese Revolution. Tr. Xu Yu. HK: Commercial Press, 1981. [poetry by modern Chinese revolutionaries]

Eight Contemporary Chinese Poets. Eds. Naikan Tao and Tony Prince. Sydney: Wild Peony Press, 2006.

[Poems by: Yang Lian, Jiang He, Han Dong, Yu Jian, Zhai Yongming, Zhang Zhen, Xi Chuan, and Hai Zi]

From the Bluest Part of the Harbour: Poems from Hong Kong. Ed. Andrew Parkin. London: Oxford UP, 1996.

From the Shelters: Modern Chinese Poetry, 1930-1950. Ed. Wai-lim Yip. NY: Garland, 1992.

Frontier Taiwan: An Anthology of Modern Chinese Poetry. Eds. Michelle Yeh and Goran Malmqvist. NY: Columbia UP, 2001.

Iron Moon: An Anthology of Chinese Migrant Worker Poetry. Ed. Qin Xiaoyu. Tr. Eleanor Goodman. Buffalo, NY: White Pine Press, 2016. [MCLC Resource Center review by Maghiel van Crevel]

Jade Ladder: Contemporary Chinese Poetry. Eds. Yang Lian and W. N. Herbert. Highgreen, UK: Bloodaxe Books, 2012. [MCLC Resource Center review by Liansu Meng]

[Abstract: This anthology is the record of a revolution in Chinese poetry. As the Cultural Revolution gave way to the post-Mao era – years of political turmoil, economic boom and the return of Hong Kong – the present period has been one of extraordinary and deeply problematic growth. Chinese poets, driven by alienation, trauma and exile, have responded with one of the most thorough and exciting experiments in world poetry. Jade Ladder shows authoritatively for the first time in English the diversity of Chinese poetry as it renegotiates its relationship with Western modernist and postmodernist poetry, and re-engages with its Classical heritage. Misty, post-Misty, Fourth Generation; publication in samizdat, publication in exile, publication on the internet – in a nation of billions, it sometimes seems that there are a million ways to write poetry. This selection provides a concise series of perspectives on a proliferating scene. It focusses on key figures and key poems. It moves beyond the lyric to showcase an astonishing diversity of genres including narrative poetry, neo-Classical writing, the sequence, experimental poetry and the long poem. Through detailed introductions, it examines how contemporary poetry grew from both the fertile Classical tradition and the stony ground of the Communist period, only to rewrite that tradition, and resist that regime. Jade Ladder is the most comprehensive single volume guide to what has been happening and what is happening now in a culture of undeniably global significance. It is indispensable reading for anyone with an interest in the future not just of China, but of poetry.]

Lyrics from the Shelter: Modern Chinese Poetry, 1930-1950. Tr. Wai-lim Yip. NY: Garland, 1992.

Menglong Shi.” Trs. Gordon T. Osing and De-An Wu Swihart. Special section of Salt Hill 5 (1998).

Mercury Rising: Contemporary Poetry from Taiwan. Eds. Frank Stewart, Arthur Sze, Michelle Yeh, Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2003.

Mists: New Poets from China. Tr. John Minford. Special Issue of Renditions 19/20 (1983): 181-270. [special issue on “misty” poetry]

Modern Chinese Poetry. Trs. Harold Acton and Chen Shih-hsiang. London: Duckworth, 1936.

Modern Chinese Poetry: Twenty Poets from the Republic of China, 1955-65. Ed. and tr. Yip Wai-lim. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 1970.

Modern Verse from Taiwan. Tr. Angela Jung Palandri. Berkeley: UCP, 1972.

New Cathay: Contemporary Chinese Poetry. Ed. Ming Di. North Adams, MA: Tupelo Press, 2013.

[Abstract: The most up-to-date anthology of contemporary Chinese poetry, translated by American poets and edited by the executive editor of the bilingual literary journal Poetry East West. Showcasing the achievement of Chinese poetry in the last twenty years, a time of tremendous literary ferment, this collection focuses on a diversity of exciting poets from the mainland, highlighting Duo Duo (laureate of the 2010 Neustadt International Prize for Literature) and Liao Yiwu (recipient of 2012 Peace Prize of the German Book Trade organization) along with not yet well-known but brilliant poets such as Zang Di and Xiao Kaiyu and younger poets Jiang Tao and Lü Yue. The anthology includes interviews with the poets and a fascinating survey of their opinions on “Ten Favorite Chinese poets” and “Ten Best-Known Western poets in China.” Featured poets: Duo Duo, Wang Xiaoni, Bai Hua, Zhang Shuguang, Sun Wenbo, Wang Jiaxin, Liao Yiwu, Song Lin, Xiao Kaiyu, Lü De’an, Feng Yan, Yang Xiaobin, Zang Di, Ya Shi, Mai Mang, Lan Lan, Jiang Tao, Jiang Hao, Lü Yue, Hu Xudong, Yi Lai, Jiang Li, Zheng Xiaoqiong, Qiu Qixuan, and Li Shumin.

New Chinese Poetry. Ed. Kwang-chung Yu. Taipei: Heritage Press, 1960.

New Generation: Poems from China Today. Ed. Wang Ping. Brooklyn: Hanging Loose Press, 1999.

New Tide: Contemporary Chinese Poetry. Ed. and Tr. Chao Tang and Lee Robinson. Toronto: Mangajin Books, 1992.

One Hundred Modern Chinese Poems. Eds/Trs. Bingjun Pang, John Minford, w/Sean Golden. HK: Commercial Press, 1987.

The Orchid Boat: Women Poets of China. Eds. and Trs. Kenneth Rexroth and Ling Chung. New York, McGraw-Hill, 1972.

Original: Chinese Language Poetry Group. Tr. Jeff Twitchell. Special issue of Parataxis 7 (Spring 1994).

Out of the Howling Storm: The New Chinese Poetry. Ed. Tony Barstone. Hanover, London: Wesleyan UP, 1993.

The People Speak Out: Translations of Poems and Songs of the People of China. Ed. Rewi Alley. Beijing: 1954.

Poetry Hong Kong: An English Translation of a Selection of Chinese Poetry. Tr./ed. J.S.M. Leung. Hong Kong: ???, 1991.

Poetry International Web–China. Ed. Simon Patton.

The PoetrySky Anthology of Contemporary Chinese Poetry, 2005-2006: A Bilingual Edition. Ed. Yidan Han. Providence, RI: PoetrySky Press, 2007.

Push Open the Window: Contemporary Poetry from China. Ed. Qingping Wang. Port Townsend, WA: Copper Canyon Press, 2011.

[Abstract: Forty-nine of China’s finest poets born after 1945 are collected in this comprehensive bilingual anthology, which offers a glimpse into the contemporary world of China’s great poetic tradition. The poems selected by award-winning poet Qingping Wang range from the mystical darkness of Zhai Yongming to the urbanist work of Huang Fan, from the compassion and personal intimacy of Wang Xiano to the philosophical prose poems of Xi Chuan. Translated by more than forty translators from all over the world, Push Open the Window: Contemporary Poetry From China makes available to a new audience many poems which had not previously been translated into English.]

The Red Azalea: Chinese Poetry Since the Cultural Revolution. Ed. Edward Morin, with intro by Leo Lee. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1990.

Roseaux sur le mur: les poetes occidentalistes chinois, 1919-1949. Ed. Michelle Loi. Paris: Gallimard, 1971.

Sailing to Formosa: A Poetic Companion to Taiwan. Bilingual Anthology. Eds. Michelle Yeh, N.G.D. Malmqvist, and Xu Huizhi. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2005. [press blurb]

Selection of Contemporary Chinese Poetry.” Ed. Inara Cedrins. Special Chinese poetry issue, The Drunken Boat (Spring/Summer 2007).

Sky Lanterns: Poetry from China, Formosa, and Beyond. Eds. Frank Stewart and Fiona Sze-Lorrain. Special issue of Manoa 24, 1 (2012):

[Abstract: Sky Lanterns brings together innovative work by authors—primarily poets—in mainland China, Taiwan, the United States, and beyond who are engaged in truth-seeking, resistance, and renewal. Appearing in new translations, many of the works are published alongside the original Chinese text. A number of the poets are women, whose work is relatively unknown to English-language readers. Contributors include Amang, Bai Hua, Bei Dao, Chen Yuhong, Duo Yu, Hai Zi, Lan Lan, Karen An-hwei Lee, Li Shangyin, Ling Yu, Pang Pei, Sun Lei, Arthur Sze, Fiona Sze-Lorrain, Wei An, Woeser, Yang Lian, Yang Zi, Yi Lu, Barbara Yien, Yinni, Yu Xiang, and Zhang Zao. Sky Lanterns also features images from the Simple Song series by photographer Luo Dan. Traveling with a portable darkroom in remote, mountainous regions of southern China’s Yunnan Province, Luo Dan uses the laborious nineteenth-century, wet plate collodion process of exposure and development. In exquisite detail, he captures a rural life that has remained intact for centuries. ]

Smoking People: Encountering the New Chinese Poetry. Ed. John Rosnewald. Special issue of The Beloit Review 39, 2 (Winter 1988/89).

Songs of Gold Mountain: Cantonese Rhymes from San Francisco Chinatown. Tr. Marlon K. Hom. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1987.

“Special China Issue.” Prairie Schooner (Summer 1991). [includes poems by Tang Lan, Liang Xiaobin, Xu Wenying, Liu Yihe, Mang Ke, Shu Ting, Liu Zhanqiu, Yang Liuhong, Zhang Xiaojian, Wang Xiaoni, Bei Dao, Hwang Yunte, and Tian Xiaofei; and a short story by Lu Minzhan]

A Splintered Mirror: Chinese Poetry from the Democracy Movement. Trs. Donald Finkel and Carolyn Kizer. San Francisco: North Point, 1991.

Summer Glory: A Collection of Contemporary Chinese Poetry. Tr. Nancy Ing. San Francisco: Chinese Materials Center, 1982.

The Tiananmen Poems. Tr. Xiao Lan. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1979.

Trees on the Mountain: An Anthology of New Chinese Writing. Ed. Stephen C. Song and John Minford. HK: Renditions Books, 1984.

Twentieth Century Chinese Poetry: An Anthology. Hsu Kai-yu, ed. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1963.

Twentieth-Century Chinese Women’s Poetry: An Anthology. Ed. and tr. Julia C. Lin. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 2009. [MCLC Resource Center review by Yanhong Zhu]

[Poems by: Bing Xin, Lin Huiyin, Cheng Jingrong, Zheng Min, Wang Erbei, Xiao Gang, Fu Tianlin, Mei Shojing, Zhang Ye, Lu Ping, Li Xiaoyu, Yi Lei, Shu Ting, Zhai Yongming, Tang Yaping, Yang Liuhong, Zhang Xiuya, Hu Pingqing, Rong Zi, Zhuo Yiyu, Xie Xing, Lin Ling, Lin Zhengnai, Dou Si, Wang Yu, Zhang Xianghua, Luo Ying, Xiong Hong, Gu Yue, Liu Yanxiang, Dan Ying, Xi Mu-ying, Zhong Ling, Xiang Lin, Lan Ling, Feng Qing, Zhu Ling, Ling Yu, Xia Yu, Xiao Xiao]

Twenty-First Century Chinese Poetry, no. 1. Eds. and trs. Meifu Wang, Huang Hongqi, and Steven Townsend. Washington, DC: Pathsharers, 2011.

Twenty-First Century Chinese Poetry, no. 2: Poems by Li Zhuang et al. Washington, DC: Pathsharers, 2012.

[Poems by: Ren Xianqing, Liu Si, Wa Dao, Li Zhuang, Liu Chengyu, Zhang Zhanyuan, Wang Qiang, Meng Ye, Liu Xuejun, Meifu Wang]

Women of the Red Plain. Tr. Julia C. LIn. Beijing: Panda Books, 1992. Also: Women of the Red Plain: An Anthology of Contemporary Chinese Women’s Poetry. Tr. Julia C. Lin. NY: Penguin Books, 1992.

“The Zigzag Way: New Writing From China.” Special issue of Manoa: A Pacific Journal of International Writing (Summer 1998).


Drama

China on Stage: An American Actress in the People’s Republic. Ed. Lois Wheeler Snow. New York: Random House, 1972. [includes “Shajiabang,” “Red Detachment of Women,” “Taking Tiger Mountain by Strategy,” and “Red Lantern”]

Chinese Drama after the Cultural Revolution, 1979-1989: An Anthology. Ed. Shiao-ling Yu. Edwin Mellen, 1996.

The Columbia Anthology of Modern Chinese Drama. Ed. Xiaomei Chen. NY: Columbia University Press, 2010.

[Abstract: The first of its kind in English, this anthology translates twenty-two popular Chinese plays published between 1919 and 2000, accompanied by a critical introduction to the historical, cultural, and aesthetic evolution of twentieth-century Chinese spoken drama. Primarily comprising works from the PRC, though including representative plays from Hong Kong and Taiwan, this collection not only showcases the revolutionary rethinking of Chinese theater and performance that began in the late Qing dynasty. It also highlights the formation of Chinese national and gender identities during a period of tremendous social and political change, along with the genesis of contemporary attitudes toward the West. Early twentieth-century Chinese drama embodies the uncertainty and anxiety brought on by modernism, socialism, political conflict, and war. After 1949, PRC theater painted a complex portrait of the rise of communism in China, with the ideals of Chinese socialism juxtaposed against the sacrifices made for a new society. The Cultural Revolution promoted a “model theater” cultivated from the achievements of earlier, leftist spoken drama, even though this theater arose from the destruction of old culture. Post-Mao drama addresses the socialist legacy and the attempts of a wounded nation to reexamine its cultural roots. Taiwan’s spoken drama synthesizes regional and foreign traditions, and Hong Kong’s spoken drama sparkles as a hybrid of Chinese and Western influences. Immensely valuable for cross-disciplinary, comparative, and performance study, this anthology provides essential perspective on China’s theatricality and representation of political life.]

Five Chinese Communist Plays. Ed. Martin Ebon. New York: The John Day Co., 1975. [includes: “White-haired Girl,” “Red Detachment…,” “Taking…,” “Red Lantern,” “Azalea Mountain.”]

Modern Drama from China. Ed. Walter Meserve. New York: NYU Press, 1970

Modern Chinese Plays. Tr. Ku Tsung-ni. Shanghai: Commercial Press, 1941.

An Oxford Anthology of Contemporary Chinese Drama. Ed. Martha Cheung and Jane Lai. HK: Oxford University Press, 1997.

Reading the Right Text: An Anthology of Contemporary Chinese Drama. Ed. Xiaomei Chen. Honolulu: University of Hawai’i Press, 2003. [plays by Liu Shugang, He Jiping, Yang Limin, Sha Yexin, Zhang Lili, and Zhang Mingyuan]. [MCLC Resource Center review by John Yu Zou]

The Red Pear Garden: Three Dramas of Revolutionary China. Ed. John Mitchell. Boston: David R. Godine, 1973.

Saturday Afternoon at the Mill, and other One-Act Plays. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1957.

[Abstract: plays by Cui Dezhi (Tsui Teh-chih), Hu Qiu (Hu Chiu), Zhao Yuxiang (Chao Yu-xiang), and Lu Yanzhou (Lu Yen-chou)]

Theater and Society: An Anthology of Contemporary Chinese Drama. Ed. Yan Haiping. Armonk: East Gate Books, 1998.

Twentieth-Century Chinese Drama: An Anthology. Edward Gunn, ed. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1983.

Voices of Taiwanese Women: Three Contemporary Plays. Ed. John Weinstein. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University East Asia Program, 2015.

[Abstract: This anthology presents three new translations representing an aspect of modern Asian drama as yet unavailable to readers in English: the community-based theaters of Taiwan, working in Chinese languages beyond Mandarin. Community theater (shequ juchang) contrasts with the more mainstream theater that has emerged in Taiwan from the 1980s onward—a theater dominated by male playwrights, centered in the capital city of Taipei, and, despite its roots as an experimental “Little Theater Movement,” increasingly commercial and professionalized. Community theater, conversely, maintains the more fluid line between professional and amateur that initially characterized contemporary Taiwan theater; it exists primarily outside of the capital, in regional cities like Tainan; and the driving forces, artistically and administratively, are women. The content of the plays in this anthology reflects that particular gendering of the community theater. Stories of women dominate in Wang Chi-Mei’s One Year, Three Seasons and Peng Ya-Ling’s We Are Here. Hsu Rey-Fang’s The Phoenix Trees are in Blossom also has significant female roles, both fictional and historical. To connect with the local communities, these playwrights seek stories from within those communities, and then contextualize those stories within the larger historical narratives of Taiwan, itself already a “local” element within the broader Chinese culture. Through these dual foci of gender and locality, stories of the women of Taiwan emerge as meaningful elements of Taiwan’s modern history. These plays go beyond the walls of the theater spaces, to educate the local, national, and—through translation—international communities about those significant, but often hidden, stories. Well-researched by the playwrights through texts and interviews, these plays can serve as primary documents for courses in Taiwan history and culture, and comparative women’s and gender studies, in addition to literature and drama courses.]

The Women’s Representative: Three One-Act Plays. Beijing: FLP, 1956.


Essay/Prose

The Chinese Essay [Ku chin san wen Ying i chi]. Tr./ed. and with an introduction by David Pollard. New York: Columbia University Press, 2000. [contains both premodern and modern essays] [MCLC Resource Center review, by Charles Laughlin]

A Garden of One’s Own: Modern Chinese Essays, 1919-1949. Tr. and Ed. by Tam King-fai. HK: Chinese University Press, 2011.

[Abstract: Fifty essays by thirty Chinese writers bring to vivid life a period in which modernization and republicanism coexisted within classical Chinese culture. Unlike the more thematically social and political fiction of the May Fourth movement, these xiaopin wen, or modern essays, address their readers with a unique intimacy, adopting a highly “personal” voice that is quietly meditative, lyrical, discreet, and full of wit and melancholy. Tam King-fai supplies critical literary and historical background on the relationship between xiaopin wen and the May Fourth movement, and with and commentary he explicates the form’s lyric aestheticism.]

Jumping through Hoops: Autobiographical Stories by Modern Chinese Women Writers. Ed. Jing M. Wang. Trs. Jing M. Wang and Shirley Chang. HK: Hong Kong University Press, 2003.

Lyrical Prose of China: Stories, Essay, and Reminiscences. Trs. Cheng Mei. Boulder: Lynne Rienner, 1997.

20th Century Chinese Essays in Translation. Ed. Martin Woesler. Bochum: Bochum UP, 2000..


Literary Criticism

Chinese Writers on Writing. Ed. Arthur Sze. San Antonio, TX: Trinity University Press, 2010.

Modern Chinese Literary Thought: Writings on Literature, 1893-1945. Ed. Kirk A, Denton. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1996.


Thematic Collections

Wounds

The Wounded: New Stories of the Cultural Revolution 1977-78. Hongkong: Joint Publishing, 1979.


Osbcure (Menglong) Poetry

The Red Azalea: Chinese Poetry Since the Cultural Revolution. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1990.

Menglong Shi.” Trs. Gordon T. Osing and De-An Wu Swihart. Special section of Salt Hill 5 (1998).

New Tide: Contemporary Chinese Poetry. Trs. Tang Chao and Lee Robinson. Mangajin Books, 1992.

Out of the Howling Storm: The New Chinese Poetry. Ed. Tony Barnstone. Hanover: UP of New England, 1993. [includes “Obscure” poets and “Post-Obscure” poets]


Realism

The New Realism: Writings from China after the Cultural Revolution. NY: Hippocrene Books, 1983.


Roots-Nativist

Oxcart. Nativist Stories from Taiwan 1934-1977. Tr./with an Introduction by Rosemary M. Haddon. Dortmund 1996,

Spring Bamboo: A Collection of Contemporary Chinese Short Stories. Ed Jeanne Tai. NY: Random House, 1989.


Reportage

Liu Binyan. People or Monsters and Other Stories and Reportage from China After Mao. Bloomington: IUP, 1983.

Dai Qing. Wang Shiwei and “Wild Lilies”: Rectification and Purges in the Chinese Communist Party. M.E. Sharpe, 1994.

—–. The River Dragon Has Come: The Three Gorges Dam and the Fate of China’s Yangtze River and Its People. Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 1998.

Ici la vie respire aussi et autres texts de litterature de reportage (1926-1982). Ed./tr. Noel Dutrait. Aix-en-Provence: Alinea, 1986. [includes essays by Zhu Ziqing, Xia Yan, Song Zhidi, Cao Bai, Huang Gang, Wei Wei, Xu Chi, and Liu Binyan]


Taiwan Literature

An Anthology of Contemporary Chinese Literature: Taiwan, 1949-1974. 2 vols, I: Poems and Essays; II: Short Stories. Eds. Ch’i Pang-yuan, John Deeney, Ho Hsin, Wu Hsi chen, Yu Kwang chung. Taipei: National Institute for Comparative Literature and Translation, 1975.

Bamboo Shoots After Rain: Contemporary Stories by Women Writers of Taiwan. Ed. Ann Carter and Sung-sheng Yvonne Chang. NY: The Feminist Press, 1990.

China China: Contemporary Poetry from Taiwan, Republic of China. Eds. Germain Droogenbroodt and Peter Stinson. Ninove, Belgium Point Books, 1986. [includes Ji Xian, Luo Fu, Yang Huan, Yu Guangzhong, Fang Qi, Lin Huanzhang, Bai Qiu, Luo Qing, Xiang Ming and Zhang Mo]

Chinese Stories from Taiwan 1960-1970. New York: Columbia University Press, 1976.

City Women: Contemporary Taiwan Women Writers. Ed. Eva Hung. Hong Kong. Research Centre for Translation, Chinese University of Hong Kong. 2001. [“Selling House and Home,” by Huang Ying; “Fin de Siècle Splendour,” by Zhu Tianwen; “Nineteen Days of the New Party,” by Zhu Tianxin; “The Colours of Love,” by Xiao Sa; “Fever,” by Yuan Qiongqiong]

A Collection of Contemporary Chinese Short Stories. Taibei: Dawning Cultural Service Center, 1971. [Stories by Zhu Huan-wen, Zhu Xining, He Xiaozhong, Wu Dongquan, Jiang Mu, Zhang Fang, Ji Deng, Dian Yuan]

Death in a Cornfield and Other Stories from Contemporary Taiwan. Ed. Ching-hsi Perng and Chiu-kuei Wang. HK: Oxford UP, 1994.

Exiles and Native Sons: Modern Chinese Stories from Taiwan. Eds. Michelle Yeh and Dominic Cheung. Taipei: National Institute for Compilation and Translation, 1992.

Folk Stories from Taiwan. Eds. Kuo-ch’ing Tu and Robert Backus. Taiwan Literature: Chinese-English Bilingual Series. Santa Barbara: Center for Taiwan Studies, University of California, 2005.

Frontier Taiwan: An Anthology of Modern Chinese Poetry. Eds. Michelle Yeh and Goran Malmqvist. NY: Columbia UP, 2001.

The Isle Full of Noises: Modern Poetry from Taiwan. Tr. Domonic Cheung. NY: Columbia UP, 1987.

The Last of the Whampoa Breed: Stories of the Chinese Diaspora. Eds. Pang-yuan Chi and David Der-wei Wang. New York: Columbia University Press, 2003.

[Abstract: Whampoa Military Academy was China´s first modern military institution. For decades the “Spirit of Whampoa” was invoked as the highest praise to all Chinese soldiers who guarded their nation heroically. But of all the battles these soldiers have fought, the most challenging one was the civil war that resulted in the “great divide” of China in the mid-twentieth century. In 1949 the Communists exiled a million soldiers and their families to compounds in Taiwan and cut off communication with mainland China for forty years. The Last of the Whampoa Breed tells the stories of the exiles written by their descendants, many of whom have become Taiwan´s most important authors. The book is an important addition to the vastly underrepresented literature of Taiwan in translation and sheds light on the complex relationship between Taiwan and the People´s Republic of China. Western readers will not at first recognize the experiences of these soldiers who were severed from a traditional past only to face unfulfilled promises and uncertain futures. Many of the exiles were doomed to live and die homeless and loveless. Yet these life stories reveal a magnanimous, natural dignity that has transcended prolonged mental suffering. “I Wanted to Go to War” describes the sadly ineffectual, even comic attempts to “recapture the mainland.” The old soldier in “Tale of Two Strangers” asks to have his ashes scattered over both the land of his dreams and the island that has sheltered him for forty years. Some of the stories recount efforts to make peace with life in Taiwan, as in “Valley of Hesitation,” and the second generation´s struggles to find a place in the native island society as in “The Vanishing Ball” and “In Remembrance of My Buddies from the Military Compound.” Narrating the homeland remembered and the homeland in reality, the stories in this book affirm that “we shall not let history be burned to mere ashes.”]

Mercury Rising: Contemporary Poetry from Taiwan. Eds. Frank Stewart, Arthur Sze, Michelle Yeh, Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2003.

Modern Chinese Poetry: Twenty Poets from the Republic of China, 1955-65. Ed. and tr. Yip Wai-lim. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 1970.

Modern Verse from Taiwan. Ed. Angela Palandri. Berkeley: UCP, 1972.

New Chinese Stories: Twelve Short Stories by Contemporary Chinese Writers. Wu Lu-chëin comp. Taipei: Heritage Press, 1961.

New Chinese Writing [from Taiwan]. Ed. Lucian Wu. Taipei: Heritage Press, 1962.

New Voices: Stories and Poems by Young Chinese Writers. Tr./ed. Nancy Ing. San Francisco: Chinese Materials Center, 1980.

Oxcart: Nativist Stories from Taiwan, 1934-1977. Tr. Rosemary Haddon. Dortmund: Projekt Verlag, 1996.

Sailing to Formosa: A Poetic Compnnion to Taiwan. Bilingual Anthology. Eds. Michelle Yeh, N.G.D. Malmqvist, and Xu Huizhi. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2005. [press blurb]

Summer Glory: A Collection of Contemporary Chinese Poetry. Tr. Nancy Ing. San Francisco: Chinese Materials Center, 1982.

The Unbroken Chain: An Anthology of Taiwan Fiction Since 1926. Bloomington: IUP, 1983.

Winter Plum: Contemporary Chinese Fiction. Ed. Nancy Ing. San Francisco: Chinese Materials Center, 1982.


Hong Kong

From the Bluest Part of the Harbour: Poems from Hong Kong. Ed. Andrew Parkin. London: Oxford UP, 1996.

Hong Kong Collage: Contemporary Stories and Writing. Ed. Martha Cheung. HK: Oxford UP, 1998.

To Pierce the Material Screen: An Anthology of 20th-Century Hong Kong Literature. Ed. Eva Hung. 2 vols. HK: Renditions, 2008.


Minority/Aboriginal Writers

An den Lederriemen geknotete Seele. Erzähler aus Tibet. Tr/ed. by Alice Grünfelder. Zürich: Unionsverlag, 1997.
[stories by Tashi Dawa, Alai, and Sebo]

Indigenous Writers of Taiwan: An Anthology of Stories, Essays, and Poems. Ed/tr. by John Balcom and Yingtsih Balcom. NY: Columbia UP, 2005. [CUP abstract]

“Never has there been a collection of works by Taiwan’s indigenous writers in English translation.

Love That Burns on a Summer Night. Beijing: Panda, 1990. [includes Malqinhu, Cai Cehai, Wure’ertu, Odsor, Jia Jun, Tah Dawa, Lim Yunchun, Hai Tao, Zhao Danian, Zhang Chengzhi]

Song of the Snow Lion: New Writings from Tibet. Ed. Tsering Wangdu Shakya. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2000.

Tales from Within the Clouds: Nakhi Stories of China. Retold by Carolyn Han. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1997.

Tales of Tibet: Sky Burials, Prayer Wheels, and Wind Horses. Ed/tr. Herbert Batt. Rowman and Littlefied, 2001. [stories by both Tibetan and Chinese writers]


Women Writers

Born of the Same Roots: Stories of Modern Chinese Women. Vivian Hsu, ed. Bloomington: IUP, 1981.

Contemporary Women Writers, Hongkong and Taiwan. ed. Eva Hung. HK: Renditions Paperbacks, 1990. [Xi Xi; Peng Cao; Li Ang; Yuan Qiongqiong; Su Weizhen; Li Li; Xin Qishi]

Contemporary Chinese Women Writers. Vol II. Beijing: Panda, 1991.

Contemporary Chinese Women Writers. Vol III. Beijing: Panda, 1993.

Contemporary Women Writers: Hongkong and Taiwan. Ed. Eva Hung. HK: Chinese University of HK Press, 1990.

Chinese Women Writers: A Collection of Short Stories by Chinese Women Writers of the 1920s and 30s. HK: Joint Publishing, 1985. [includes stories by Bing Xin, Ding Ling, Ling Shuhua, Luo Shu, Wu Shutian, Lu Yin, Xiao Hong, Feng Keng, Chen Ying, Feng Yuanjun]

City Women: Contemporary Taiwan Women Writers. Ed. Eva Hung. Hong Kong. Research Centre for Translation, Chinese University of Hong Kong. 2001. [“Selling House and Home,” by Huang Ying; “Fin de Siècle Splendour,” by Zhu Tianwen; “Nineteen Days of the New Party,” by Zhu Tianxin; “The Colours of Love,” by Xiao Sa; “Fever,” by Yuan Qiongqiong]

Dragonflies: Fiction by Chinese Women in the Twentieth Century. Eds. Shu-ning Sciban and Fred Edwards. Ithaca: Cornell East Asia Series, 2003. [stories by Ling Shuhua, Bing Xin, Zhang Ailing, Wei Junyi, Kang Yunwei, Ping Lu, Liao Huiying, Chi Li, Jiang Zidan, Wang Anyi, and Xi Xi]

I Wish I Were a Wolf: The New Voice in Chinese Women’s Literature. Tr. Diana Kingsbury. Beijing: New World Press.

May Fourth Women Writers: Memoirs. Eds. Janet Ng and Janice Wickeric. HK: Renditions, 1997.

One Half the Sky: Stories of Contemporary Women Writers of China. Eds. R.A. Roberts and A. Knox. London: Heinneman, 1987.

Red Is Not the Only Color: Contemporary Chinese Fiction on Love and Sex between Women, Collected Stories. Ed. Patricia Sieber. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, 2001. [stories by Chen Ran, Chen Xue, He An, Hong Ling, Liang Hanyi, Wang Anyi, Wong Bikwan, Zhang Mei]

The Rose-Colored Dinner: New Works By Contemporary Chinese Women Writers. Edward Morin, ed. U. of Hawaii Press, 1990.

Seven Contemporary Chinese Women Writers. Beijing: Panda Books, 1982.

The Serenity of Whiteness: Stories By and About Women in Contemporary China. Zhu Hong, tr. Available Press, 1992.

Six Contemporary Chinese Women Writers. Beijing: Panda Books, 1995.

Women of the Red Plain: An Anthology of Contemporary Chinese Women’s Poetry. Tr. Julia C. Lin. London: Penguin, 1992.

Writing Women in Modern China: An Anthology of Literature by Chinese Women of the Early Twentieth Century. Tr. Amy Dooling and K. Torgeson. NY: Columbia UP, 1997. [contains works of all genres by Qiu Jin, Chen Xengzhe, Feng Yuanjun, Lu Yin, Lin Huiyin, Bing Xin, Xiao Hong, etc.]

Writing Women in Modern China: The Revolutionary Years, 1936-1976. Ed. Amy Dooling. NY: Columbia UP, 2005. [contains texts by Bai Wei, Chen Xuezhao, Yang Gang, Hu Lanqi, Xie Bingying, Yang Jiang, Su Qing, Fengzi, Lu Xiaoman, Zong Pu, Ru Zhijuan, and Chen Ruoxi]


Dissent Literature

Fragrant Weeds: Chinese Short Stories Once Labelled as Poisonous Weeds. Ed. W.J.F. Jenner. HK: Joint Publishing, 1983.

Literature of the Hundred Flowers. Ed. and co-trs. Nie Hualing. 2 vols. NY: Columbia UP, 1981.

Proscribed Chinese Writing. Robert Tung, ed. London: Curzon Press, 1976.

A Splintered Mirror: Chinese Poetry from the Democracy Movement. Trs. Donald Finkel and Carolyn Kizer. San Francisco: North Point, 1991.

The Tiananmen Poems. Ed. and Trs. Xiao Lan. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1979.

Wild Lilies, Poisonous Weeds: Dissident Voices from People’s China. Gregor Benton, ed. London: Pluto Press, 1982.


Avant-garde

Abandoned Wine (Chinese Writing Today, No. 2). London: Wellsweep, 1997.

China’s Avant-Garde Fiction: An Anthology. Ed. Jing Wang. Durham: Duke UP, 1998.

Fissures: Chinese Writing Today. Eds. Henry YH Zhao, Yanbing Chen, and John Rosenwald. Brookline, MA: Zephyr Press, 2001.

The Lost Boat: Avant-garde Fiction from China. Ed. Henry Zhao. London: Wellsweep, 1993.

The Mystified Boat and Other New Stories from China. Eds. Frank Stewart and Herbert J. Batt. Special issue of Manoa: A Pacific Journal of International Writing 15, 2 (Winter 2003). Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press.

The New Chinese Avant-Garde Poetry, 1982-1992. Ed. Wang Ping. Forthcoming.

Out of the Howling Storm. Ed. Tony Barnstone. Middleton, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 1993.

Running Wild: New Chinese Writers. Ed. David Der-Wei Wang and Jeanne Tai. NY: Columbia, 1993.

Chairman Mao Would Not Be Amused. Ed. Howard Goldblatt. NY: Grove Press, 1995.

Under-Sky Underground. Ed. Henry Zhao. London: Wellsweep, 1994.


Memoirs (only a few of a growing genre)

Chang, Jung. Wild Swans: Three Daughters of China. NY: Anchor Books, 1991.

Chang, Leslie. Beyond the Narrow Gate: The Journey of Four Chinese Women from the Middle Kingdom to Middle America. NY: Dutton, 1999.

Chen, Chen. Come Watch the Sun Go Home: A Memoir of Upheavel and Revolution in China. NY: Marlowe and Co., 1998.

Chen, Xuezhao. Surviving the Storm: A Memoir. Ed. Jeffrey Kinkley, tr. Ti Hua. Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 1990.

Cheng, Nien. Life and Death in Shanghai. NY: Penguin Books, 1988.

Chiang, Shiang-hua. A Chinese Woman in Iowa. Boston: Cheng and Tsui, 1992.

Gao, Yuan. Born Red: a Chronicle of the Cultural revolution. Stanford: SUP 1987.

Guo, Sheng. Tears of the Moon. Auckland: Penguin, 2003.

He Dong. Ask the Sun. Tr. from Norwegian by Katherine Hanson. Seattle: Women in Translation, 1997.

Jiang, Jili. Red Scarf Girl: A Memoir of the Cultural Revolution. NY: Harper Collins, 1997.

Jiang, Yarong and David Ashley, eds. Mao’s Children in the New China: Voices from the Red Guard Generation. NY: Routledge, 2000.

Lai, Ying. The Thirty-sixth Way: A Personal Account of Imprisonment and Escape from Red China. London: Constable, 1970.

Li, Yan. Daughters of the Red Land. Toronto: Sister Vision, 1995.

Ling, Ken. The Revenge of Heaven: Journal of a Young Chinese. NY: Ballantine Books, 1972.

Lo, Fulang. Morning Breeze: A True Story of China’s Cultural Revolution. SF: China Books, 1989.

Mah, Adeline Yen. Falling Leaves: The True Story of an Unwanted Chinese Daughter. New York: Wiley, 1997.

Min, Anchee. Red Azalea. New York: Pantheon, 1994. [Chinese lesbian’s experience coming of age during the CR and her relationship with a woman while she is working on a collective farm]

Ming, Sung and Min Tsu. Never Alone: A Story of Survival under the Gang of Four. Kansas City: Beacon Hill Press, 1983.

Mu, Aiping. Vermilion Gate. London: Little, Brown, 2000.

Niu-niu. No Tears for Mao: Growing Up in the Cultural Revolution. Tr. Enne and Peter Amman. Chicago: Chicago Academy Publisher, 2001.

Peng, Jialin. Wild Cat: Stories of the Cultural Revolution. Dunvegan, Ont.: Cormorant Books, 1990.

Pu, Ning. Red Tooth in Claw: Twenty Six Years in Communist Chinese Prisons. NY: Grove, 1994.

Su, Xiaokang. A Memoir of Misfortune. Tr. Zhu Hong. NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 2001.

Sun-Childers, Jaia. The White-Haired Girl: Bittersweet Adventures of a Little Red Soldier. NY: Picador, 1996.

Voices from the Whirlwind: An Oral History of the Chinese Cultural Revolution. Denny Chu, et. al. trs. Pantheon / FLP, 1991.

Wang, Annie. Lili: A Novel of Tiananmen. NY: Pantheon, 2001.

Wang, Ping. Foreign Devil. Coffee House Press, 1996.

Wen, Chihua. The Red Mirror: Children of China’s Cultural Revolution. Boulder: Westview Press, 1995.

Xiao, Li Cao. The Autumn Winds of My Youth. Vancouver: Xiao, 1984.

Xin, Fengxia. The Memoirs of Xin Fengxia. Ed./tr. John Chinnery. Oxford University Press, 2001.

Xinran. The Good Women of China: Hidden Voices. Tr. Esther Tyldesley. NY: Pantheon, 2002.

Xu, Meihong and Larry Engelmann. Daughter of China: A True Story of Love and Betrayal. NY: John Wiley and Sons, 1999.

Yang, Chiang. A Cadre School Life: Six Chapters. Tr. Geremie Barmre. HK: Joint Publishing Co., 1982; New York: Readers International, 1984. Also as Six Chapters of Life in a Cadre School: Memoirs from China’s Cultural Revolution. Tr. Chang Chu. Boulder: Westview Press, 1986. Also Six Chapters From My Life “Downunder”. Tr. Howard Goldblatt. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1983: HK: Chinese University Press, 1984.

—–. Lost in the Crowd: A Cultural Revolution Memoir. Tr. Geremie Barme. Melbourne: McPhee Gribble, 1989.

Yang, Rae. Spider Eaters. Berkeley: UC Press, 1997.

Ye, Ting-Xing. A Leaf in the Bitter Wind. Toronto and NY: Doubleday, 1997.

Zhai, Zhenhua. Red Flower of China. NY: SOHO; Toronto: Lester Publishing, 1992.

Zhang, Zhimei. Foxspirit: A Woman In Mao’s China. Montreal: Vehicule Press; Don Mills, Ont.: Distributed by General Distribution Services, 1992.

Zhong, Xueping, Di Bai, and Zheng Wang, eds. Some of Us: Chinese Women Growing Up in the Mao Era. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers UP, 2001.

Zhu, Xiaodi. Thirty Years in a Red House: A Memoir of Childhood and Youth in Communist China. Amherst: University of Mass. Press, 1998.

For more memoirs and other literary works that deal with the Cultural Revolution, see Cultural Revolution in Literature: A Selected Bibliography


Popular Fiction

Chinese Middlebrow Fiction: From the Ch’ing and Early Republican Eras. Ed. Liu Ts’un-yan. HK: Chinese University Press, 1984.

The Columbia Anthology of Chinese Fold and Popular Literature. Eds. Victor H. Mair and Mark Bender. NY: Columbia UP, 2011.

[Abstract: two of the world’s leading sinologists, Victor H. Mair and Mark Bender, capture the breadth of China’s oral-based literary heritage. This collection presents works drawn from the large body of oral literature of many of China’s recognized ethnic groups–including the Han, Yi, Miao, Tu, Daur, Tibetan, Uyghur, and Kazak–and the selections include a variety of genres. Chapters cover folk stories, songs, rituals, and drama, as well as epic traditions and professional storytelling, and feature both familiar and little-known texts, from the story of the woman warrior Hua Mulan to the love stories of urban storytellers in the Yangtze delta, the shaman rituals of the Manchu, and a trickster tale of the Daur people from the forests of the northeast. The Cannibal Grandmother of the Yi and other strange creatures and characters unsettle accepted notions of Chinese fable and literary form. Readers are introduced to antiphonal songs of the Zhuang and the Dong, who live among the fantastic limestone hills of the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region; work and matchmaking songs of the mountain-dwelling She of Fujian province; and saltwater songs of the Cantonese-speaking boat people of Hong Kong. The editors feature the Mongolian epic poems of Geser Khan and Jangar; the sad tale of the Qeo family girl, from the Tu people of Gansu and Qinghai provinces; and local plays known as “rice sprouts” from Hebei province. These fascinating juxtapositions invite comparisons among cultures, styles, and genres, and expert translations preserve the individual character of each thrillingly imaginative work.]

Sherlock in Shanghai: Stories of Crime and Detection. Tr. Timothy C. Wong. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2006.

Stories for Saturday: Twentieth Century Chinese Popular Fiction. Tr. Timothy C. Wong. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2003. [MCLC Resource Center Publications review by John Christopher Hamm]


Chinese American Literature

Wong, Norman. Cultural Revolution: Stories. New York: Persea, 1994. [about gay Chinese-American youth in Hawaii]

Between Worlds: Women Writers of Chinese Ancestry. NY: Pergamon Press, 1990


Same-Sex Literature

Angelwings: Contemporary Queer Fiction from Taiwan. Ed. Fran Martin. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2003. [with stories by Zhu Tianwen, Zhu Tianxin, Qiu Miaojin, Hsu Yoshen, Lin Yuyi, Lin Chunying, Chen Xue, Hong Ling, Chi Tawei, and Wu Jiwen].

Red Is Not the Only Color: Contemporary Chinese Fiction on Love and Sex between Women, Collected Stories. Ed. Patricia Sieber. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, 2001. [stories by Chen Ran, Chen Xue, He An, Hong Ling, Liang Hanyi, Wang Anyi, Wong Bikwan, Zhang Mei]


Science Fiction

Invisible Planets. Ed. Ken Liu. Tor Books, 2016.

[Abstract: Award-winning translator and author Ken Liu presents a collection of short speculative fiction from China. Some stories have won awards (including Hao Jingfang’s Hugo-winning novella, Folding Beijing); some have been included in various ‘Year’s Best’ anthologies; some have been well reviewed by critics and readers; and some are simply Ken’s personal favorites. Many of the authors collected here (with the obvious exception of New York Times bestseller Liu Cixin’s two stories) belong to the younger generation of ‘rising stars’. In addition, three essays at the end of the book explore Chinese science fiction. Liu Cixin’s essay, The Worst of All Possible Universes and The Best of All Possible Earths, gives a historical overview of SF in China and situates his own rise to prominence as the premier Chinese author within that context. Chen Qiufan’s The Torn Generation gives the view of a younger generation of authors trying to come to terms with the tumultuous transformations around them. Finally, Xia Jia, who holds the first Ph.D. issued for the study of Chinese SF, asks What Makes Chinese Science Fiction Chinese?]