Translations by Author Y – Z

Y | Z |

 


Y

Ya Shi 哑石

“Adultery and Lyric Poetry.” Tr. Nick Admussen. Chinese Literature Today 5, 2 (2016): 73.

“The Cartoon Cat and Postmodern Poetry.” Tr. Nick Admussen. Chinese Literature Today 5, 2 (2016): 72.

“An Ear of Grass and Pure Poetry.” Tr. Nick Admussen. Chinese Literature Today 5, 2 (2016): 75.

Floral Matter.” Tr. Nick Admussen. Asymptote (Oct. 2015).

“Tight Corsets and the Narrativity of Poetry.” Tr. Nick Admussen. Chinese Literature Today 5, 2 (2016): 74.

Ya Xian (Ya Hsien) 痖弦

Abyss. Tr. John Balcom. St. Paul, MN: Zephyr Press, 2016.

[Abstract: A seminal work from the second wave of Chinese modernism. So great is Ya Hsien’s influence on younger generations of Taiwanese and Chinese writers that he is sometimes referred to simply as “The Poet.” Yet he never wrote a second book after Abyss appeared in an expanded edition in 1971. This single book’s variety and virtuosity have made it a modern classic and the poet something of a legend. A new documentary, “Ya Hsien: A Life that Sings,” was nominated for Best Documentary at the 2015 Taipei Film Festival.]

Salt: Poems. Tr. by author. Iowa City: Windhover Press, University of Iowa, 1968.

Poems in: The Isle Full of Noises: Modern Chinese Poetry from Taiwan. Ed/tr. Dominic Cheung. NY: Columbia UP, 1987, 79-83.

Yan Fusun 严芙孙

“The Bridal Palanquin.” Tr. Timothy C. Wong. In Wong, Stories for Saturday: Twentieth Century Chinese Popular Fiction. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2003, 49-60.

Yan Ge 颜歌

The Chili Bean Paste (我们家 ). Tr. Nicky Harman. Balestier, 2018.

[Abstract: Set in a fictional town in West China, this is the story of the Duan-Xue family, owners of the lucrative chilli bean paste factory, and their formidable matriarch. As Gran’s eightieth birthday approaches, her middle-aged children get together to make preparations. Family secrets are revealed and long-time sibling rivalries flare up with renewed vigour. As Shengqiang struggles unsuccessfully to juggle the demands of his mistress and his wife, the biggest surprises of all come from Gran herself……]

Sissy Zhong.” Tr. Nicky Harman. Paper Republic (Aug. 20, 2015).

The Spices of Life.” Tr. Poppy Toland. LA Review of Books, China Channel (Sept. 21, 2018).

“The Tragedy Theater.” Trs. Darrell Darrington and Binbin Fan. In Geng Song and Qingxiang Yang, eds., The Sound of Salt Forming: Short Stories by the Post-80s Generation in China. Honolulu: University of Hawaii, 2016, 33-51.

White Horse (白马). Tr. Nicky Harman. London: Hope Road, 2014.

[Abstract: Yun Yun lives in a small West China town with her widowed father, an uncle, aunt and an older cousin who live nearby. One day, her once-secure world begins to fall apart. Through her eyes, we observe her cousin, Zhang Qing, keen to dive into the excitements of adolescence but clashing with repressive parents. Ensuing tensions reveal that the relationships between the two families are founded on a terrible lie. ]

Yan Geling 严歌苓

The Banquet Bug. NY: Hyperion, 2006.

[Abstract: Geling Yan captivates readers once more in her breakthrough novel. This is the fantastical tale of Dan Dong, an unemployed factory worker whose life takes a series of unexpected twists after he discovers that, by posing as a journalist, he can eat exquisite gourmet meals for free at state-sponsored banquets. But the secrets he overhears at these events eventually lead Dan down a twisted, intrigue-laden path, and his subterfuge and his real identity become harder and harder to separate. When he becomes privy to a scandal that runs from the depths of society to its highest rungs, Dan must find a way to uncover the corruption — without revealing the dangerous truth about himself.]

“The Blind Woman Selling Red Apples.” Tr. Herbert Batt. In Batt, ed., Tales of Tibet: Sky Burials, Prayer Wheels, and Wind Horses. Rowman and Littlefield, 2001, 225-34.

Disappointing Returns” [妈阁是座城:赔钱货]. Tr. David Hayson. Paper Republic 23.

Little Aunt Crane. Tr. Esther Tyldesley. Harvill Secker, 2015.

[Abstract: A sweeping novel, starting at the end of World War Two and spanning several tumultuous decades of Mao’s rule, from one of China’s best female novelists In the last days of World War II, the Japanese occupation of Manchuria has collapsed. As the Chinese move in, the elders of the Japanese settler village of Sakito decide to preserve their honour by killing all the villagers in an act of mass suicide. Only 16-year-old Tatsuru escapes.  But Tatsuru’s trials have just begun. As she flees, she falls into the hands of human traffickers. She is sold to a wealthy Chinese family, where she becomes Duohe – the clandestine second wife to the only son, and the secret bearer of his children. Against all odds, Duohe forms an unlikely friendship with the first wife Xiaohuan, united by the unshakeable bonds of motherhood and family. . . Little Aunt Crane is a novel about love, bravery and survival, and how humanity endures in the most unlikely of circumstances.]

The Lost Daughter of Happiness [Fusang]. Tr. Cathy Silber. New York: Hyperion East, 2001.

White Snake and Other Stories. Tr. Lawrence A. Walker. San Francisco: Aunt Lute Books, 1999.

Yan Juanying (Yen Chuan-ying) 顏娟英

“A Buddhist Practitioner’s Art Practice–Song of the Great Tree” [修行人的藝術實現–大樹之歌,話說佛傳]. Tr. Brent Heinrich.  The Taipei Chinese Pen 177 (Summer 2016): 84-104.

Yan Jun 颜峻

Against All Organized Deception.” Tr. Maghiel van Crevel. In “The Poetry of Yan Jun.” MCLC Resource Center Publication, 2003.

August 14″ and “August 19.” Tr. Martin Winter. Lampe-tempête.

This Moment.” Tr. Martin Winter. China – Poetry International Web.

Noise and the Apocalypse.” Tr. Dominik Salter Dvorak. Pangbianr (May 2011).

Shi Ke and Yan Jun: Innovative Poets from China.” Trs. Eleanor Goodman and Ao Wang. Cerise Press 1, 3 (Spring 2010). [translations of 2 poems by Yan Jun: “February 14, Going to the Hospital with My Father” and “September 12”]

UnderGroundGround: A Stealthy Chronicle of New Music.” RockinChina.com [has a pdf version of the original Chinese text, and a wiki site that has a partial translation of a working English translation]

Yan Jun.” (introduction and translation by Maghiel van Crevel). Digital Archive for Chinese Studies DACHS, Leiden Division.

Yan Jun’s Poetry in Translation.” Tr. Martin Winter.

Yan Kunyang (Yen K’un-yang) 

“The Dirt Road of My Hometown.” Tr. Rosemary Haddon. Taiwan Literature: English Language Series 22 (Jan. 2008): 99-106.

Yan Li 严力

“Back Home.” Tr. Denis Mair. Literary Review (Winter 2003).

Poems in Wang Ping, ed., New Generation: Poems from China Today. Brooklyn: Hanging Loose Press, 1999, 159-63.

“Starboy and I.” In The Mystified Boat and Other New Stories from China. Eds. Frank Stewart and Herbert J. Batt. Special issue of Manoa: A Pacific Journal of International Writing 15, 2 (Winter 2003). Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 111-24.

“The Song of Aids.” Tr. Denis Mair. Talisman 12 (1994).

Yan Lianke 阎连科

“Black Bristle, White Bristles.” Tr. Howard Goldblatt. In Kirk A. Denton, ed. China: A Traveler’s Literary Companion. Berkeley: Whereabouts Press, 2008, 76-103.

Bon baisers de Lénine. Tr. Sylvie Gentil. Paris: Librarie le Phénix, 2009.

Darkness Visible.” Tr. Roddy Flagg. Index on Censorship 2 (2008).

Dream of Ding Village [丁庄梦]. Tr. Cindy Carter. NY: Grove Press, 2011.

[Abstract: Officially censored upon its Chinese publication, and the subject of a bitter lawsuit between author and publisher, Dream of Ding Village is Chinese novelist Yan Lianke’s most important novel to date. Set in a poor village in Henan province, it is a deeply moving and beautifully written account of a blood-selling scandal in contemporary China. As the book opens, the town directors, looking for a way to lift their village from poverty, decide to open a dozen blood-plasma collection stations, with the hope of draining the townspeople of their blood and selling it to villages near and far. Although the citizens prosper in the short run, the rampant blood-selling leads to an outbreak of AIDS and huge loss of life. Narrated by the dead grandson of the village head and written in finely crafted, affecting prose, the novel presents a powerful absurdist allegory of the moral vacuum at the heart of communist-capitalist China as it traces the life and death of an entire community. Based on a real-life blood-selling scandal in eastern China, Dream of Ding Village is the result of three years of undercover work by Yan Lianke, who worked as an assistant to a well-known Beijing anthropologist in an effort to study a small village decimated by HIV/AIDS as a result of unregulated blood selling. Whole villages were wiped out with no responsibility taken or reparations paid. Dream of Ding Villagefocuses on one family, destroyed when one son rises to the top of the Party pile as he exploits the situation, while another son is infected and dies. The result is a passionate and steely critique of the rate at which China is developing–and what happens to those who get in the way.]

England and My Clan.” Tr. Cindy M. Carter. The Guardian (March 22, 2010).

The Explosion Chronicles. Tr. Carlos Rojas. NY: Grove Press, 2016.

[Abstract: The Explosion Chronicles follows the excessive expansion of a rural community from small village to megalopolis. With the Yi River on one side and the Balou Mountains on the other, the village of Explosion was founded more than a millennium ago by refugees fleeing a seismic volcanic eruption. But in the post-Mao era the name takes on a new significance as the community grows explosively from a small village to a vast metropolis. Behind this rapid expansion are members of the community’s three major families, including the four Kong brothers; Zhu Ying, the daughter of the former village chief; and Cheng Qing, who starts out as a secretary and goes on to become a powerful political and business figure. Linked together by a complex web of loyalty, betrayal, desire, and ambition, these figures are the driving force behind their hometown’s transformation into an urban superpower. Brimming with absurdity, intelligence, and wit, The Explosion Chronicles considers the high stakes of passion and power, the consequences of corruption and greed, the polarizing dynamics of love and hate between families, as well as humankind’s resourcefulness through the vicissitudes of life.]

Four Books [四书]. Tr. Carlos Rojas. NY: Grove Press, 2015.

[Abstract: The Four Books is a daring, darkly satirical story of the dog-eat-dog psychology inside a labor camp for intellectuals during China’s “three bitter years” of famine. Reminiscent of such classics as A Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich and Darkness at Noon, Yan’s mythical, symbolic, sometimes surreal tale portrays the absurdity and grotesquerie of this traumatic period, which has been a taboo subject for a half century. In the ninety-ninth district, a subdivision of a sprawling labor camp in an isolated part of Henan province, a group of highly educated citizens are imprisoned to restore their commitment to Communist ideologies. Here, the Musician and her lover, the Scholar—along with the Author and the Theologian— live inside a community where everyone is encouraged to inform on each other for dissident behavior. The prize: winning political favor and the chance at freedom. They’re overseen by a preadolescent supervisor, the Child, who delights in draconian rules, policing inmates’ conduct, and confiscating books. But when massively inflated production quotas in steelmaking and grain harvesting rise to an unattainable level, the camp dissolves into lawlessness as the prisoners exhaust themselves to meet their goals, eventually trying to grow wheat by feeding the seedlings their blood. As famine and inclement weather arrive, the intellectuals are abandoned by the regime and left on their own to survive. Divided into four narratives—influenced by the four texts of Confucianism and the four Gospels of the New Testament—The Four Books is an affecting and poetic novel that captures the universal power of camaraderie, love, and faith against oppression and the darkest odds.]

Lenin’s Kisses [受活]. Tr. Carlos Rojas. NY: Grove Press, 2012.

[Abstract: In the bucolic village of Liven in the middle of a sweltering summer, it suddenly begins to snow, a hot snow that falls for seven days—seven long days that not only transform summer into winter but that forever disrupt the balance of life. This mystifying climatic incongruity begins the award-winning novel Lenin’s Kisses, an absurdist masterpiece that melds fable, history, and satire in an enthralling tragicomedy set in modern day China. Nestled deep within the Balou mountains, by and large spared from the government’s watchful eye, the people of Liven enjoy harmonious days filled with enough food and leisure to be fully content. But when their crops are obliterated by the unseasonal snowstorm, and with it their livelihood, a county official arrives with a lucrative scheme both to raise money for the district and boost his career. He convinces the village to start a traveling performance troupe showcasing their talents, which are unlike anything he has ever witnessed. The majority of the 197 villagers are disabled, and their skill sets include Blind Tonghua’s acute listening, One-Eye’s one-eyed needle threading, and Deafman Ma’s firecrackers on the ear. With the profits from this extraordinary show, the county official intends to buy Lenin’s embalmed corpse from Russia—where it is slowly decaying from lack of upkeep—and install it in a grand mausoleum in the mountains to attract tourism. In the ultimate marriage of capitalism and communism, such an incredible acquisition would benefit the inhabitants of Liven as well as the entire region. However, even the best intentions go astray, and the success of the Shuanghuai County Special-Skills Performance Troupe comes at a serious price.]

Marrow. Tr. Carlos Rojas. NY: Penguin, 2016.

[Abstract: In a small village deep in the Balou Mountains, Fourth Wife You despairs of what the future holds for her four mentally-impaired children. A cure for the family curse appears, but it will extract a price so primal and complete that no one can be expected to make it except, perhaps, for a mother. A chilling and relentless tale of family responsibility and a mother’s sacrifice, Marrow is Yan Lianke at his best.]

Le Reve du Village des Ding. Paris: Editions Philippe Picquier France, 2007.

Serve the People” (Chapter 6). EastSouthWestNorth [for complete text of Chinese original]

Serve the People. Tr. Julia Lovell. London: Constable and Robinson, 2007.

The Years, Months, Days: Two Novellas. Tr. Carlos Rojas. NY: Grove Atlantic, 2017.

[Abstract:  Marrow is the haunting tale of a widow who goes to extremes to provide a normal life for her four disabled children. When she discovers that bones—especially those of kin—can cure their illnesses and prevent future generations from the same fate, she feeds them a medicinal soup made from the skeleton of her dead husband. But after running out of soup, she resorts to a measure that only a mother can take. In the luminous, moving title story, The Years, Months, Days—a bestselling, classic fable in China, and winner of the prestigious Lu Xun Literary Prize—an elderly man stays behind in his small village after a terrible drought forces everyone to leave. Unable to make the grueling march through the mountains, he becomes the lone inhabitant, along with a blind dog. As he fends off the natural world from overtaking his hometown, every day is a victory over death. With touches of the fantastical and with deep humanity, these two magnificent novellas—masterpieces of the short form—reflect the universality of mankind’s will to live, live well, and live with purpose.]

Yan Youmei 

“She Shall Have Music.” Tr. Sanjia Wu. In Chinese Women Writers’ Association, eds., The Muse of China: A Collection of Prose and Short Stories. Taipei: Chinese Women Writers’ Association, 1974, 141-57.

Yang Fu

“The Water Buffalo.” Tr. Candice Pong. The Chinese Pen (Winter, 1978): 1-30. Republished in Nancy Ing, ed., Winter Plum: Contemporary Chinese Fiction. Taipei: Chinese Materials Center, 1982, 453-77.

Yang Gang

“The American South” (1949) [from Letters from America (1951)]. Tr. Robin Visser. In Amy Dooling, ed., Writing Women in Modern China: The Revolutionary Years1936-1976. New York: Columbia University Press, 2005, 35-55.

“Fragment from a Lost Diary.” Tr. Yang Gang. In Amy D. Dooling, ed., Writing Women in Modern China The Revolutionary Years, 1936-1976. NY: Columbia UP, 2005, 35-55.

Yang Han

“Upon Rising at Dawn, Gazing on the Central Mountain Range.” Tr. Nicholas Kaldis. In Michelle Yeh and Goran Malmqvist, eds., Sailing to Formosa: An Anthology of Poetry from Taiwan. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2005, 136-139.

Yang Huan 楊喚

Poems in: China, China: Contemporary Poetry from Taiwan, Republic of China. Eds. Germain Groogenbroodt and Peter Stinson. Ninove, Belgium: Point Books, 1986.

Yang Jian 杨键

“Five Poems.” Trs. Shao Wei and Jonathan Stalling. Chinese Literature Today 4, 1 (2014): 36-38.

“Lost,” “Tomb-Sweeping Day,” “Dusk.” Trs. George O’Connell and Diana Shi. Atlanta Review xiv, 2 (Spring/Summer 2008): 73-75.

Poems.” Tr. Diana Shi and George O’Connell. Pangolin House 6, 1 (Winter 2017-18).

Yang Jiang 杨绛

Arriving at the Margins of Life: Answering My Own Questions: Excerpt.” Tr. Jesse Field. Renditions 776 (Autumn 2011): 130-34.

Baptism [洗澡]. Trs. Judith Armory and Shihua Yao. HK: Hong Kong UP, 2007.

“The Art of Listening” [听话的艺术]. Tr. David Pollard. In Pollard, ed., The Chinese Essay. NY: Columbia UP, 2000, 260-64.

“The Cloak of Invisibility” [隐身衣]. Tr. David Pollard. In Pollard, ed., The Chinese Essay. NY: Columbia UP, 2000, 264-69.

The Cloak of Invisibility.” Tr. Geremie Barme. China Heritage Quarterly 28 (Dec. 2011).

“Fang Wumei and Her ‘My Old Man'” [Fang Wumei he tade ‘wo laotour’]. Chinese Literature (Spring 1999): 77-93.

“Forging the Truth.” Tr. Amy Dooling. In Amy D. Dooling, ed., Writing Women in Modern China The Revolutionary Years, 1936-1976. NY: Columbia UP, 2005, 112-77.

Heart’s Desire: Act I.” Tr. Christopher G. Rea. Renditions 76 (Autumn 2011): 15-33.

Indian Summer.” Trs. Judith M. Amory and Yaohua Shi. MCLC Resource Center Publication (June 2014).

Lost in the Crowd: A Cultural Revolution Memoir. Tr. Geremie Barme. Melbourne: McPhee Gribble, 1989.

“My Translations.” Trs. Judith Amory and Yaohua Shi. Renditions 76 (Autumn 2011): 98-103.

“On Qian Zhongshu and Fortress Besieged.” Tr. Jesse Field. Renditions 76 (Autumn 2011): 68-97.

“Reminiscing about My Childhood.” Chinese Literature Today 4, 1 (2014): 32-35.

Six Chapters from My Life Downunder. Tr. H. Goldblatt. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1984.

Six Chapters of Life in a Cadre School: Memoirs from China’s Cultural Revolution. Tr. Djang Chu. Boulder: Westview Press, 1986. Also trans. as A Cadre School Life: Six Chapters. by Geremie Barme with Bennett Lee. HK: Joint Publishing Co., 1982.

We Three: Parts I and II.” Tr. Jesse Field. Renditions 76 (Autumn 2011): 104-129.

“What a Joke.” Tr. Christopher G. Rea. Renditions 76 (Autumn 2011): 34-67.

“Windswept Blossoms.” In Edward Gunn, ed. Twentieth-Century Chinese Drama: An Anthology. Bloomington: IUP, 1983, 228-75.

Yang Kui (or Yang K’uei) 楊逵

“An Arranged Marriage for Mother Goose.” Tr. Jon B. Reed. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 38 (2016): 167-90.

“Behind the Increases in Production–the Story of an Easy-going Old Man.” Tr. Jon B. Reed. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 38 (2016): 107-42.

“Clay Dolls.” Tr. Christopher Ahn. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 38 (2016): 143-58.

“The Indomitable Rose.” Tr. Daniel Tom. The Chinese Pen (Autumn, 1978): 86-94.

“A Model Village.” Tr. John Balcom. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 38 (2016): 51-96.

“Mother Goose Gets Married.” Tr. Jane Parish Yang. In Joseph Lau, ed. The Unbroken Chain: An Anthology of Fiction from Taiwan. Bloomington: Indian UP, 1983, 33-54.

“Mother Goose Gets Married” (from Japanese). Tr. by Esther T. Hu. Taiwan Literature, English Translation Series no. 20 (2007): 73-100.

“Mud Dolls.” In Rosemary Haddon, tr./ed , Oxcart: Nativist Stories from Taiwan, 1934-1977. Dortmund: Projekt Verlag, 1996, 73-84.

“The Newspaper Carrier.” Tr. Robert Backus. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 21 (July 2007): 59-92. Rpt. in Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 38 (2016): 11-50.

“Paperboy.” Tr. Rosemary Haddon. Renditions 43 (1995): 25-58.

“Remembering Dr. Lai Ho.” Tr. Mary Treadway. Taiwan Literature, English Translation Series 2 (Dec. 1997): 59-66.

“Spring Sunlight Cannot Be Shuttered.” Tr. Bert M. Scruggs. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 38 (2016): 3-10.

“A Village Without a Doctor.” Tr. Yingtsih Hwang. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 38 (2016): 97-106.

“Water Buffalo.” Tr. Bert M. Scruggs. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 38 (2016): 159-66.

Yang Li 杨黎

Poems. Tr. Eleanor Goodman. Pathlight: New Chinese Writing (Summer 2013).

Yang Limin 杨利民

“Black Stones.” Tr. Timothy C. Wong. In Xiaomei Chen, ed., Reading the Right Text: An Anthology of Contemporary Chinese Drama. Honolulu: University of Hawai’i Press, 2003, 223-81.

“Geologists.” Tr. Timothy C. Wong. In Xiaomei Chen, ed., The Columbia Anthology of Modern Chinese Drama. NY: Columbia UP, 2010, 879-926.

Yang Lian 楊煉

City of Dead Poets, with selected poems of Yang Lian. Cyperfection, 2000. [A DVD with selected poems, readings and interview in Chinese and English Poetry wrting: Yang Lian]

“The Composer’s Tower.” Tr. Brian Holton. In In Henry YH Zhao, Yanbing Chen, and John Rosenwald. Fissures: Chinese Writing Today. Brookline, MA: Zephyr Press, 2000, 244-45.

Concentric Cirles. Trs Brian Holton and Agnes Hung-Chong Cha. Newcastle: Bloodaxe Books, 2005.

“Concerning ‘Norlang.'” Tr. Alisa Joyce with John Minford. Renditions 23 (1985): 162-63,

The Dead in Exile. Tr. Mabel Lee. Kingston: Tiananmen Publications, 1990.

“Earth I (King Zhou of Shang).” Tr. Mabel Lee. Talisman 17 (1997): 155-56.

with Gu Cheng. “Elegies for the Dead.” The Australian Journal of Chinese Studies 22 (July 1989).

“Five Poems.” Tr. Brian Holton. Conjunctions 23 (1994): 43-48.

“Ghost Talk.” Tr. Charles A. Laughlin. In David Der-wei Wang, ed., Running Wild: New Chinese Writers. NY: Columbia UP, 1994, 101-107.

Ghostspeak [excerpts]. Trs. H. R. Lan and Jerry Dennerline. Renditions 46 (1996): 92-102.

“Illusionary Space Writing.” In Wan Zhi, ed. Breaking the Barriers: Chinese Literature Facing the World. Stockholm: Olof Palme International Center, 1996, 92-100.

Poems of Hong Ying, Zhai Yongming and Yang Lian. Ed. Mabel Lee. Trs. Mabel Lee, Naikan Tao, and Tony Prince. Newtown, NSW: Vagabond Press, 2014.

In Symmetry with Death. Canberra: Australian National University, 1988.

In the Timeless Air: Chinese Language, Pound and the Cantos.” Trs. Yang Liping with Jeffrey Twitchell-Waas. Painted Bride Quarterly 65 (2001).

The Language of Exile: A Dialogue between Gao Xingjian and Yang Lian.” Tr. Ben Carrdus. Yanglian.net.

Lee Valley Poems. Trs. Brian Holton, Agnes Hung-Chong Chan, Polly Clark, Antony Dunn, Jacob Edmond, W.N. Herbert, Pascale Petit, Fiona Sampson, and Arthur Sze. Newcastle: Bloodaxe Books, 2009.

Masks and Crocodile. Tr. Mabel Lee. Sydney: University of Sydney East Asia Series, Wild Peony Press, 1990.

“Mountain.” Tr. Mabel Lee. Renditions 46 (1996): 84-91.

“Music’s Interval” (Yinyue de jianxie). Tr. Li Xia. In Tony Barnestone guest ed., Shantih (A Journal of International Writing and Art) 10, 1 (Winter-Spring 1995): 21.

Narrative Poem [叙事诗]. Tr. Brian Holton. Northumberland, UK: Bloodaxe Books, 2017.

[AbstractNarrative Poem, Yang Lian’s most personal work to date, is built around a series of family photographs, the first of which was taken on the day when he was born, on 22 February 1955, and the last of which dates from the time he spent undergoing ‘re-education through labour’ – and digging graves – during the mid-1970s. The poetry ranges backward and forward in time, covering his childhood and youth, his first period of exile in New Zealand, and his subsequent adventures and travels in and around Europe and elsewhere. In ‘this unseen structure written by a ghost’ Yang Lian weaves together lived experience with meditations on time, consciousness, history, language, memory and desire, in a search for new/old ways of speaking, thinking and living. Narrative Poem was published in China in 2011, and this bilingual edition presents the Chinese text alongside Brian Holton’s masterly translation of a technically complex work of great beauty]

Non-Person Singular: Selected Poems of Yang Lian. Tr. Brian Holton. London: Wellsweep, 1994.

Notes of a Blissful Ghost.” Tr. Brian Holton. Painted Bride Quarterly 65 (2001).

Notes of a Blissful Ghost. Tr. Brian Holton. HK: Renditions, 2002. [general collection of Yang’s poetry from early to late]

“Plowing.” In Kerry Flattley & Chris Wallace-Crabbe, eds., From the Republic of Conscience: An International Anthology of Poetry. Fredonia, N.Y.: White Pine Press, 1993, 15.

 Riding Pisces: Poems from Five Collections. Tr. Brian Holton. Exeter, UK: Shearsman Books, 2008.

“Tradition and Us.” Tr. Ginger Li. Renditions 19/20 (1983): 69-73.

“Three Poems.” Tr. John Minford, Sean Golden, Pang Bingjun, and Alisa Joyce. Renditions 23 (1985): 140-61.

Three Poems.” Tr. Brian Holton and Agnes Hung-Chong. Words Without Borders: The Online Magazine of International Literature.

Unreal City: A Chinese Poet in Auckland. Eds./trs. Hilary Chung and Jacob Edmunds. Auckland: Auckland University Press, 2006.

“Where the Sea Stands Still.” Tr. Mabel Lee. Talisman 17 (1997): 182-90.

Where the Sea Stands Still: New Poems. Tr. Brian Holton. Newcastle upon Tyne: Bloodaxe Books/Dufour Editions, 1999.

“The Writer and the Party.” Times Literary Supplement (Nov. 6, 1998): 18–19.

Yi. Tr. Mabel Lee. Los Angeles: Green Integer, 2001.

[Abstract: In this important new work Yang takes the Book of Changes as the inner structure, which he rearranges and pulls apart to emphasize the significance of this ancient classic Chinese system for symbolizing nature. Believing that the several centuries of interpretations have divorced it from its original intent, Yang Lian attempts in this work to represent man as the subject of nature.]

Yang Lufang 杨履方

“Cuckoo Sings Again” (布谷鸟又叫了). In Gunn, ed. Twentieth-Century Chinese Drama: An Anthology. Bloomington: IUP, 1983, 276-323

Yang Mingxian 

“Auntie Yao.” Tr. Chen I-djen. The Chinese Pen (Summer 1987): 51-81.

Yang Mo 杨沫

The Song of Youth. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1964.

Yang Mu 楊牧

The Completion of a Poem: Letters to Young Poets. Tr. Lisa L. M. Wong. Leiden: Brill, 2017.

[Abstract: first book-length translation of Yang Mu’s poetics. In eighteen letters addressed to young poets, Yang Mu discusses essential questions regarding the definition of poetry, a poet’s growth, the importance of nature and friendship, the choice of subject, the process of creation and publication, and relationships between poet and society, identity and history, and poetry and truth. Using a comparative approach, Yang Mu draws on literary resources from Chinese and Western traditions to expound his views, and this helps to nurture in young poets a vision of world poetry that connects different but equally inspiring expressions of humanity. In style and in theme, this book is a companion piece to Rilke’s Letters to a Young Poet and Goethe’s Dichtung und Wahrheit.]

Forbidden Games and Video Poems: The Poetry of Yang Mu and Lo Ch’ing. Tr. Joseph Roe Allen III. Seattle: U. of Washington Press, 1993.

Hawk of the Mind: Collected Poems. Ed. Michelle Yeh. NY: Columbia University Press, 2018.

[Abstract: Yang Mu is a towering figure in modern Chinese poetry. His poetic voice is subtle and lyrical, and his work is rich with precise images and crystalline thoughts invoking temporality and remembrance. A bold innovator and superb craftsman, he elegantly combines cosmopolitan experimentation with poetic forms and an allusive reverence for classical Chinese poetry while remaining rooted in his native Taiwan and its colonial history. Hawk of the Mind is a comprehensive collection of Yang Mu’s poetry that presents crucial works from the many stages of his long creative career, rendered into English by a team of distinguished translators. It conveys the complexity and beauty of Yang Mu’s work in a stately and lucid English poetic register that displays his ability to range from meditative to playful and colloquial to archaic. The volume includes an editor’s introduction and definitive commentary that offer insights into the poet’s major themes and motifs, explaining how he draws on deep engagement with Chinese and Western literary traditions, history, and art as well as mythology, philosophy, and music and a profound love for the natural world to create a nuanced and multifaceted artistic universe. It also contains translations of prefaces and afterwords written by Yang Mu for collections of his poetry. Hawk of the Mind demonstrates the breadth and depth of Yang Mu’s oeuvre, illustrating the distinctive style and affective power of a great poet.]

Memories of Mout Qilai: The Education of a Young Poet. Tr. John Balcolm. NY: Columbia University Press, 2015.

[Abstract: Hualien, on the Pacific coast of eastern Taiwan, and its mountains, especially Mount Qilai, were deeply inspirational for the young poet Yang Mu. A place of immense natural beauty and cultural heterogeneity, the city was also a site of extensive social, political, and cultural change in the twentieth century, from the Japanese occupation and the American bombings of World War II to the Chinese civil war, the White Terror, and the Cold War. Taken as a whole, these evocative and allusive autobiographical essays provide a personal response to history as Taiwan transitioned from a Japanese colony to the Republic of China. Yang Mu recounts his childhood experiences under the Japanese, life in the mountains in proximity to indigenous people as his family took refuge from the American bombings, his initial encounters and cultural conflicts with Nationalist soldiers recently arrived from mainland China, the subsequent activities of the Nationalist government to consolidate power, and the burgeoning of the island’s new manufacturing society. Nevertheless, throughout those early years, Yang Mu remained anchored by a sense of place on Taiwan’s eastern coast and amid its coastal mountains, over which stands Mount Qilai like a guardian spirit. This was the formative milieu of the young poet. Yang Mu seized on verse to develop a distinct persona and draw meaning from the currents of change reshuffling his world. These eloquent essays create an exciting, subjective realm meant to transcend the personal and historical limitations of the individual and the end of culture, “plundered and polluted by politics and industry long ago.”]

No Trace of the Gardener: Poems by Yang Mu. Trs. Laurence Smith and Michelle Yeh. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1998.

Quelqu’un m’interroge à propos de la vérité et de la justice. Trs. Angel Pino and Isabelle Rabut. Paris: You Feng, 2004.

“Selected Poems.” Chinese Literature Today 4, 1 (2014): 69-71.

Three Poems.” Trs. Michelle Yeh and Arthur Sze. Asymptote (July 2012).

“The Traditional Orientation of China’s New Poetry.” Tr. Xiang Liping and John Minford. Renditions 19/20 (1983): 74-80.

“The Wellspring of Poetry in Taiwan.” Tr. Andrea Lingenfelter. Chinese Literature Today 4, 1 (2014): 54-55.

“Wu Feng.” In Edward Gunn, ed. Twentieth-Century Chinese Drama: An Anthology. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1983, 475-513.

Poems in: The Isle Full of Noises: Modern Chinese Poetry from Taiwan. Ed/tr. Dominic Cheung. NY: Columbia UP, 1987, 35-47.

Yang Qian 杨阡

Crossroads.” Tr. Mary Ann O’Donnell. Writing Macau 3 (2005).

Hope: A Modern Chinese Play.” Tr. Mary Ann O’Donnell. Asian Theater Journal 17, 1 (Spring 2002): 34-50. [Project Muse link]

“Neither Type Nor Category.” Tr. Mary Ann O’Donnell. TheatreForum 27 (Summer/Fall 2005): 50-51.

Yang Qingchu 杨青矗 

“Born of the Same Roots.” Tr. Thomas Gold. In Vivian Ling Hsu, ed., Born of the Same Roots: Stories of Modern Chinese Women. Bloomington: IUP, 1981, 227-34.

“Enemies.” Tr. Jeanne Kelly and Joseph Lau. In Joseph S.M. Lau, ed., Chinese Stories From Taiwan: 1960-1970. NY: Columbia UP, 1976, 321-35.

“Our Chinese Manager.” In Rosemary Haddon, tr./ed , Oxcart: Nativist Stories from Taiwan, 1934-1977. Dortmund: Projekt Verlag, 1996, 143-54.

Selected Stories of Yang Ch’ing-ch’u [bilingual ed]. Tr. Thomas Gold. Gaoxiong: Diyi chubanshe, 1983.

Yang Shouyu 楊守愚

“Born Lucky.” Tr. John Balcom. Taiwan Literature English Translation Series 19 (2006): 63-80.

Yang Shu’an

“Zhuang Zi (Excerpts).” Tr. Tang Bowen. Chinese Literature (Autumn 1988).

Yang Shuo 杨朔

“Mirages and Sea-Markets” [Hai shi]. Tr. Yang Hsien-yi. Chinese Literature 12 (Dec. 1960): 41-49.

Snowflakes [Xuehua piaopiao]. Peking: Foreign Languages Press, 1961.

A Thousand Miles of Lovely Land [San qian li jiangshan]. Tr. Yuan Kejia. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1957; rpt. 1979,

Yang Sichen

“Lin’s Coopery.” Tr. Liu Shi-yee. The Chinese Pen (Spring 1985): 80-93.

Yang Su 杨苏

“Miansa” [Meiensa]. Tr. Gladys Yang. Chinese Literature 4 (April 1964): 70-81.

“The Skirt That Wasn’t Finished” [没有织完的统裙]. Chinese Literature 6 (June 1961): 96-103.

Yang Xianhui 杨显惠

Woman from Shanghai: Tales of Survival from a Chinese Labor Camp. NY: Pantheon, 2009. [MCLC Resource Center review by Paul Foster]

Yang Xiaobin 杨小滨

“The Dude Sonnet, Female Bank Monogatari, A Lively Weekend in the Underpass, A Boutique Called Hustler.” Tr. Chenxin Jiang. Pathlight (Winter, 2013): 191.

Hard Objects.” Tr. Canaan Morse. The Baffler 29 (2015).

The Lighthouses.” Tr. Canaan Morse. The Baffler 29 (2015).

Yang Xiaomin

“The Winter Season.” Tr. Li Ziliang. Chinese Literature (Summer 1993): 127-29.

Yang Xu

“The Care-Taker.” In Sowing the Clouds: A Collection of Chinese Short Stories. Peking: Foreign Languages Press, 1961, 54-69.

Yang Yiyan 杨益言 (and Luo Guobin 罗广斌)

Red Crag [红岩]. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1978.

Yang Ze

“School Bag.” Tr. Anne Behnke. The Chinese Pen (Spring, 1980): 52-55.

Poems in: The Isle Full of Noises: Modern Chinese Poetry from Taiwan. Ed/tr. Dominic Cheung. NY: Columbia UP, 1987, 233-35.

Yang Zhao 楊照

“Lost Souls.” Tr. Robert Joe Cutter. Renditions, 35-36 (1991): 202-215.

“Our Childhood.” Tr. Michelle Yeh. In David Der-wei Wang, ed., Running Wild: New Chinese Writers. NY: Columbia UP, 1994, 184-96.

Yang Zhengguang 杨争光

“The Dry Ravine.” Tr. Henry Zhao. In Henry Zhao, ed., The Lost Boat: Avant-garde Fiction from China. London: Wellsweep, 1993, 53-58.

How Old Dan Became a Tree. Trs. Hu Zongfeng, Liu Xiaofeng, He Longping, Zhang Min, and Su Rui. Scarborough, UK: Valley Press, 2018.

“Moonlight Over the Field of Ghosts.” Tr. Ellen Lai-shan Yeung. In Howard Goldblatt, ed., Chairman Mao Would Not Be Amused: Fiction from Today’s China. NY: Grove Press, 1995, 229-35.

Yang Zhensheng 杨振声

“The Anchor.” In Yuan Chia-hua and Robert Payne, eds., Contemporary Chinese Short Stories. London: Noel Carrington, 1946, 26-40.

“Li Song’s Crime.” In Chinese Stories from the Thirties. 2 vols. Beijing: Panda Books, 1982, 1: 258-62.

“One-sided Wedding.” In Chinese Stories from the Thirties. 2 vols. Beijing: Panda Books, 1982, 1: .249-52

“Wang the Miller.” In Chinese Stories from the Thirties2 vols. Beijing: Panda Books, 1982, 1: 253-57.

“Yuchun” (Yujun). In Chi-chen Wang, ed., Contemporary Chinese Stories. Wesport, CT: Greenwood, 1944. [abridged version of this “first” modern work of long fiction]

Yang Ziqiao 羊子喬 (Yang Tzu-chiao)

“Salt Field Scenery” [鹽田風景線]. Tr. David Van Der Peet. The Taipei Chinese Pen 174 (Aut. 2015): 25-26.

Yangdon

“A God without Gender.” Tr. Herbert Batt. In Batt, ed., Tales of Tibet: Sky Burials, Prayer Wheels, and Wind Horses. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, 2001, 177-88.

Yangzi 杨子

“As Night Fell, It Started Raining, Yellow Flowers Beneath the Overpass.” Tr. Nathaniel Isaacson. Pathlight (Winter, 2013): 175-76.

Yao Feng 姚风

“Amsterdam, Early Morning in Rio de Janeiro, Breakfast at Lisboa, Pattaya, Joyous Pavilion.” Tr. Tammy Ho. Pathlight (Winter, 2013): 181-84.

Yao Wenyuan 姚文元

Comments on Tao Chu’s Two Books. Beijing Foreign Languages Press, 1968.

“Is Realism Forever Changeless?” In Hualing Nieh, ed., Literature of the Hundred Flowers, Volume I: Criticism and Polemics. NY: Columbia UP, 1981, 157-60.

On the Social Basis of the Lin Piao Anti-Party Clique. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1975.

The Working Class Must Exercise Leadership in Everything. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1968.

Yao Xueyin 姚雪垠

“Half a Cartload of Straw Short.” Tr. Yeh Chun-chan. In Three Seasons and Other Stories. London: Staple Press, 1946, 73-84. Also tr. C. Mar and Jack Chen as “Chabanche Makai.” InT’ien Hsia Monthly, 7:5 (1938): 495-508. Also in The Magazine of the Short Story, 14.77 (1939): 19-26; reprinted in Chinese Student (Far Eastern Magazine), 3:1 (1940): 6, 15-16; 3:2 (1940): 14-16; reprinted in Wang Chi-chen, tr., In his Stories of China at War. NY: Columbia UP, 1947, 54-65. Also Tr. by Yuan Chia-hua and Robert Payne as “The Half-baked.” in theirContemporary Chinese Short Stories. London: Noel Carrington, 1946, 155-69.

Li Tzu-ch’eng. Excerpts trans. by William Lyell. In Kai-yu Hsu, ed., Literature of the People’s Republic of China. Bloomington: IUP, 1980, 890-98. Also excerpted under the titles “Battling South of the Pass.” Chinese Literature, 4 (1978): 10-62; 5 (1978): 29-93 and “Beseiged in His Palace.” Chinese Literature, 6 (1978): 35-86; 7 (1978): 29-94; 8 (1978): 76-103.

“Open Window, Open Talk.” In Hualing Nieh, ed., Literature of the Hundred Flowers, Volume I: Criticism and Polemics. NY: Columbia UP, 1981, 81-96.

Yao Yiying

“The Abduction.” Tr. Tsai Cho-tang. In Chinese Women Writers’ Association, eds., The Muse of China: A Collection of Prose and Short Stories. Taipei: Chinese Women Writers’ Association, 1974, 95-105.

Yao Zhongming, et. al

Comrade, You’ve Taken the Wrong Path!: a Four-Act Play Peking: Foreign Languages Press, 1962.

Ye Chanzhen

“Little Black.” Tr. Cheng Chen-yueh. In Chinese Women Writers’ Association, eds., The Muse of China: A Collection of Prose and Short Stories. Taipei: Chinese Women Writers’ Association, 1974, 107-40.

Ye Fu 野夫

Hard Road Home: Selected Essays. Tr. by A. E. Clarke. Dobbs Ferry, NY: Ragged Banner Press, 2014.

[Abstract: In the seven essays translated for this volume, Ye Fu writes about his parents and grandparents, whose tragic lives he came to understand only after their deaths, and about friends that he has loved, lost, and learned from. Blending memoir with historical reflection, he probes not only the Maoist abscess beneath his country’s current anomie but also the virtues that enabled some to transcend it. With photographs and maps. Available in softcover and e-book.]

Ye Guangqin 叶广芩

Mountain Stories. Trs. Hu Zongfeng, He Longping, Zhang MinScarborough, UK: Valley Press, 2017.

Ye Lingfeng 叶灵凤

“Le numero 7.” In Le fox-trot de Shanghai et autres novelles chinoises. Trs/eds. Isabelle Rabut and Angel Pino. Paris: Albin Michel, 1996, 283-93.

Ye Mei

“Rhapsody of the Wake Dancers.” In Six Contemporary Chinese Women Writers, IV. Beijing: Panda, 1995, 11-122.

Ye Mi 叶弥

Love’s Labor” [郎情妾意]. Tr. Hu Ying. Words without Borders (April 2008).

Ye Mimi 叶觅觅

His Days Go By the Way Her Years. Tr. Steve Bradbury. Anomalous Press, 2014.

 [Abstract: a collection of Steve Bradbury’s best translations of poetry by Taiwanese poet and filmmaker Ye Mimi. Mimi’s poetry blends a fascination with dreams with a playful approach to language and sensitivity to sound. In his translations, Bradbury has crafted English poems that sing in their new language and deftly play with its possibilities. This book was a finalist in the Anomalous Press Experimental Translation Chapbook Contest, judged by Christian Hawkey.]

A Moth Laid Its Eggs in My Armpit, and Then It Died. HK: The Chinese University Press, 2014.

Three Poems.” Tr. Steven Bradbury. Asymptote (July 2012).

Ye Sha 葉莎

“Lake Biwa” [琵琶湖]. Tr. John J. S. Balcom. The Taipei Chinese Pen 177 (Summer 2016): 16.

Ye Shengtao 叶圣陶

“Horse-bell Melons.” Tr. Jason Wang. In Modern Chinese Stories and Novellas. NY: Columbia University Press, 1981, 106-116.

How Mr Pan Weathered the Storm. Beijing: Panda Books, 1987.

[Contents: “A Life,””Bitter Greens,”“A Stroll at Dawn,” “How Mr Pan Weathered the Storm,” “The Package,” “Night,” “A Trainee,” “A Declaration,” “A Minor Flutter,” “A Year of Good Harvest,” “Lotus Root and Water Shield,” “Before Leaving,” “Traveller’s Words,” “Selling Gingko’s,” “Late-Night Food,” “Three Kinds of Boats,” “Ox,” “The Goose Sands by Sheepskin Raft,” “The Seed,” “The Thrush,” “The Scarecrow,” “The Statue of the Ancient Hero,” “The Emperor’s New Clothes,” “The Sensitive Plant,” “The Silkworm and the Ant,” “The Language of Birds and Animals,” and “The Experience of a Locomotive”]

“Intellectuals” [知识分子]. Tr. David Pollard. In Pollard, ed., The Chinese Essay. NY: Columbia UP, 2000, 182-87.

“A Lifetime.” Tr. Stanley Munro. In Genesis of a Revolution. An Anthology of Modern Chinese Short Stories. Singapore: Heinemann, 1979, 147-54.

“Mr. Pan in Distress.” In Harold R. Isaacs, ed., Straw Sandals. Cambridge: M.I.T. Press, 1974, 84-106. Also trans. as “How Mr. Pan Weathered the Storm.” by Tang Sheng. Chinese Literature, 5 (1963): 3-22.

“My Own Patch of Green” [Tianjing li de zhongzhi]. Tr. David Pollard. In Pollard, ed., The Chinese Essay. NY: Columbia UP, 2000, 178-82.

“Neighbours.” Tr. Wang Chi-chen. In Contemporary Chinese Stories. NY: Columbia UP, 1944, 174-80.

“On the Bridge.” Tr. Donald Holoch. Bulletin of Concerned Asian Scholars 8 (1976): 21-27.

“On the Literary Arts (excerpts).” Tr. Kirk A. Denton. In Denton, ed., Modern Chinese Literary Thought. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1996, 162-68.

A Posthumous Son and Other Stories. Tr. Bonnie McDougall. HK: Commercial Press, 1979.

The Scarecrow: A Collection of Stories for Children. Peking: Foreign Languages Press, 1963.

Schoolmaster Ni Huan-chih. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1956.

“Solitude.” Tr. Frank Kelly. In Lau, Hsia, Fee, eds., Modern Chinese Stories and Novellas 1919-1949. NY: Columbia UP, 1981, 95-105.

“Three to Five Bushels More.” In Straw Sandals: Chinese Short Stories, 1918-1933. Cambridge: MIT Press, 174, 337-47. Also as “A Year of Good Harvest.” Tr. Gladys Yang. Chinese Literature 4 (1960): 37-45.

“Three Kinds of Boats” [三种船]. Tr. David Pollard. In Pollard, ed., The Chinese Essay. NY: Columbia UP, 2000, 167-78.

A Ye Shengtao Reader. Tr. Zhang Bojun. Beijing: China Intercontinental Press, 2013.

Ye Shitao 叶石涛

“A Chance Encounter.” Trs. Jenn-Shann Lin and Lois Stanford. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 25 (July 2009): 69-76.

“Festival of the Heavenly Sage Mother.” Tr. Pei-yin Lin. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 25 (July 2009): 9-14.

“The House with the Pomegranate Blossoms in Full Bloom.” Tr. Christopher Lupke. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 25 (July 2009): 9-14.

“The Last of the Siraya.” Tr. Howard Goldblatt. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 25 (July 2009): 49-68.

“Longing in an Iron Cage.” Tr. Zeb Raft. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 25 (July 2009): 41-48.

“A Mixed Marriage Wedding.” Tr. Marshall McArthur. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 25 (July 2009): 89-99.

“Mother–Angel in Battle.” Tr. Jennifer Jay. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 25 (July 2009): 103-110.

“Record of Confinement.” In Rosemary Haddon, tr./ed , Oxcart: Nativist Stories from Taiwan, 1934-1977. Dortmund: Projekt Verlag, 1996, 85-114.

“Roll Call of Ghosts.” Tr. Fan Pen Chen. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 25 (July 2009): 111-18.

“Spring Dream at Gourd Valley.” Tr. Sylvia Li-chun Lin. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 25 (July 2009): 15-32.

“Third Aunt and Her Lover.” Tr. Rosemary Haddon. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 25 (July 2009): 77-89.

Ye Si (see also Liang Bingguan 梁秉钧) 也斯

“The First Day” [第一日]. Tr. Martha Cheung. In Martha P.Y. Cheung, ed., Hong Kong Collage: Contemporary Stories and Writing. HK: Oxford University Press, 1998, 99-106.

“Postcards.” In Loud Sparrows: Contemporary Chinese Short-Shorts. Trs. Aili Mu, Julie Chiu, and Howard Goldblatt. NY: Columbia UP, 2006, 139.

“Transcendence and the Fax Machine.” Tr. Jeanne Tai. In David Der-wei Wang, ed., Running Wild: New Chinese Writers. NY: Columbia UP, 1994, 13-20. Also in Kwok-kan Tam, Terry Siu-Han Yip, Wimal Dissanayake, eds., A Place of One’s Own: Stories of Self in China, Hong Kong, and Singapore. NY: Oxford UP, 1999, 390-96.

Ye Weilian (Yip Wai-lim) 叶维廉

Between Landscapes: Poems by Wai-Lim Yip. Santa Fe: Pennywhistle Press, 1994.

Poems in: The Isle Full of Noises: Modern Chinese Poetry from Taiwan. Ed/tr. Dominic Cheung. NY: Columbia UP, 1987, 84-92.

“Quest for the Right Poem: My Modernist Beginnings.” Chinese Literature Today 3, 1/2 (2013): 126-33.

“Selected Poems.” Chinese Literature Today 3, 1/2 (2013): 146-61.

“Three Poems.” Chinese Literature Today 3, 1/2 (2013): 40-41.

Ye Weilin

“Five Girls and One Rope.” Tr. Zhou Xhizong and Diane Simmons. Fiction 8, 2-3 (1987): 96-114. Also tr. by Christopher Smith. Chinese Literature (Summer 1989): 45-77.

“A Moonlit Night.” Tr. Yang Nan. Chinese Literature 11 (1983): 48-57.

“The One-legged Raftsman.” Chinese Literature 8 (1975): 64-72.

Ye Wenfu

“General, You Can’t Do This.” [poem]. In Helen F. Siu and Zelda Stern, eds./trs. Mao’s Harvest: Voices from China’s New Generation. NY: Oxford UP, 1983, 158-65.

“Whom Are You Writing About.” [essay]. In Helen F. Siu and Zelda Stern, eds./trs. Mao’s Harvest: Voices from China’s New Generation. NY: Oxford UP, 1983, 165-71.

Ye Xin

The Wages of Sin [excerpts]. Tr. Ian Chapman. Renditions 50 (1998): 109-23.

Ye Yanbin

“Mothers,” “Blooming Season,” “Blanks,” “Fleeting Clouds over Mount Tai.” Tr. Hu Shiguang. Chinese Literature (Summer 1993): 117-22..

Ye Yonglie 叶永烈

“Corrosion” [Fushi]. Tr. Pei Minxin. In Wu Dingbo and Patrick Murphy, eds., Science Fiction from China. Praeger, 1989. Also in The Road to Science Fiction Volume 6: Around the World. Ed. James Gunn. White Wolf, 1998.

“Reap as You Have Sown” [Zishi qiguo]. Tr. Pei Minxi and Yang Renmin. In Wu Dingbo and Patrick Murphy, eds., Science Fiction from China. Praeger, 1989.

“The Thursday Events.” In Frederick Pohl and Elizabeth Ann Hull, eds., Tales from the Planet Earth. NY: St. Martin’s 1986.

Ye Yunan (Yeh Yunan) 葉雨南

“The Kiss of Life” [人工呼吸]. Tr. Marcus Larsen-Strecker. The Taipei Chinese Pen 177 (Summer 2016): 28-29.

Ye Zhaoyan 叶兆言

A Flower’s Shade. Tr. NY: Simon and Schuster, 2016.

[Abstract: A decadent family drama of incest, addiction, and crime, this seductive novel set in small towns south of the Yangtze River in the 1920s was the basis for the film Temptress Moon.]

How Stubborn Our Hearts. Tr. NY: Simon and Schuster, 2016.

[Abstract: An unconventional love story that tracks the beautifully complicated arc of a marriage from youth to old age, this tender novel is a profound mediation on the mysteries—and bullheadedness—of love.]

“Murder Capital.” Tr. Shelly Bryant. Chinese Arts and Letters 2, 1 (April 2015): 31-43.

Nanjing, 1937: A Love Story. Tr. Michael Berry. NY: Columbia University Press, 2003.

Other People’s Love. Tr. Annelise Finegan Wasmoen. NY: Simon and Schuster, 2016.

[Abstract: This story of elusive love set in the TV industry has all the sex, plot twists, and family drama as a soap opera.]

“Police Python 357.” Tr. Helen Wang. Chinese Arts and Letters 2, 1 (April 2015): 6-17.

“The Writer Ms. Lin Mei.” Tr. Jesse Field. Chinese Arts and Letters 2, 1 (April 2015): 18-30.

Ye Zhongyin

“My Autobiography.” Tr. Jing M. Wang. In Wang, ed., Jumping Through Hoops: Autobiograpical Stories by Modern Chinese Women Writers. HK: Hong Kong UP, 2003, 167-88.

Ye Zi 

“Fire.” Tr. Wen Xue. In Stories from the Thirties. Beijing: Panda Books, 1982, 2: 295-326.

Harvest. Tr. Ma Ching-chun and Tang Sheng. Peking: Foreign Languages Press, 1960. [contains “Harvest,” “Fire,” “Outside the Barbed Wire Entanglement,” “The Night Sentinel,” “Grandpa Yang’s New Year,” “The Guide”]

“Harvest.” Tr. Tang Sheng. In Stories from the Thirties. Beijing: Panda Books, 1982, 2: 235-95.

“Stars.” Tr. Sidney Shapiro. In Stories from the Thirties. Beijing: Panda Books, 1982, 2: 326-98.

“Stealing Lotuses.” Tr. W. J. F. Jenner. In W. J. F. Jenner, ed., Modern Chinese Stories. London: Oxford UP, 1970, 95-100.

Yeh Tzu

“Return of A Daughter.” Tr. Jane Parish Yang. The Chinese Pen (Autumn 1983): 71-98.

Yeshi Tenzin

The Defiant Ones. Tr. David Kwan. Panda, 1993. [novel about Tibet]

Yi Heng

“Let’s Go See the Lotus Blossoms.” Tr. Loretta C. Wang. The Chinese Pen (Summer 1983): 1-16..

Yi Lu 伊路

Goats on a Desert Island.” Tr. Fiona Sze-Lorrain. Modern Poetry in Translation 3 (2014).

Poems by Yi Lu.” Tr. Fiona Sze-Lorrain. InTranslation (May 2011).

Sea Summit. Tr. Fiona Sze-Lorrain. Milkweed, 2015.

Three Poems.” Tr. Fiona Sze-Lorrain. Asymptote (July 2011).

Yell.” Tr. Fiona Sze-Lorrain. Modern Poetry in Translation 3 (2014).

Yi Ming

“My One Comment Too Many.” In Loud Sparrows: Contemporary Chinese Short-Shorts. Trs. Aili Mu, Julie Chiu, and Howard Goldblatt. NY: Columbia UP, 2006, 87-88.

Yi Ruofen

“Black Umbrella.” In Loud Sparrows: Contemporary Chinese Short-Shorts. Trs. Aili Mu, Julie Chiu, and Howard Goldblatt. NY: Columbia UP, 2006, 143.

Yi Sha 伊沙

When the Train Passed the Yellow River,” and “This Fall This Year.” Trs. Wang Ping and Richard Sieburth. Tinfish 1 (1995): 14-15.

Poems in Wang Ping, ed., New Generation: Poems from China Today. Brooklyn: Hanging Loose Press, 1999, 167-73.

Poems. Tr. John Balcolm. Pathlight: New Chinese Writing (Summer 2013).

Poems by Yi Sha.” Tr. Denis Mair. Shigeku.

“Rendezvous at the Castle Hotel.” Tr. Yu Yan Chen. In Liu Ding, Carol Yinghua Lu, and Ra Page, eds., Shi Cheng: Short Stories from Urban China. Manchester, UK: Comma Press, 2012.

Starve the Poet! Selected Poems. Trs. Tao Naikan and Simon Patton. United Kindgom: Bloodaxe Books, 2008.

Yi Shu 亦舒

“Home-coming.” Tr. Eva Hung. Renditions 29-30 (1988): 108-113.

Yin Di 隱地

“God-of-the-Day” [一日神]. Tr. Michelle Min-chia Wu. The Taipei Chinese Pen 172 (Spring 2015): 36-40.

“Fog.” Tr. Hsuan Yuan-you. The Chinese Pen (Summer 1982): 29-36.

Yin Fu 殷夫

“Words of Blood (A Poem).” In Harold Isaacs, ed., Straw Sandals: Chinese Short Stories, 1918-1933. Cambridge: MIT Press, 1974, 436-37.

Yin Lichuan 尹丽川

“Poems.” Tr. Xiao Cheng. Wasafiri 55 (2008): 45-46.

Poems.” Trs. Maghiel van Crevel. The Drunken Boat (Spring/Summer 2006).

Poems by Yin Lichuan.” Tr. Steve Bradbury. Jacket 2.

Yin Ni (Yinni) 隱匿

“Poetry and the Sphincter Muscle” [詩瑜括約肌]. Tr. Yanwing Leung. The Taipei Chinese Pen (Winter 2016): 20-21.

Yin Zhengxiong

“The Last Trip.” Tr. Lily Liy. The Chinese Pen (Autumn 1989): 49-68.

Yongzi (Yung Tzu)

Poems in: The Isle Full of Noises: Modern Chinese Poetry from Taiwan. Ed/tr. Dominic Cheung. NY: Columbia UP, 1987, 110-12.

You Jin 尤今

Death by Perfume. Tr. Jeremy Tiang. Singapore: Epigram Books, 2015.

[Abstract: In the late 1970s, a young Singaporean writer arrives in Jeddah with an infant son. She encounters a strange and often hostile environment with curiosity, empathy and good humour. In this collection of linked stories, the narrator confronts, among others, a bored expat wife with dangerously extravagant tastes, a divorced engineer with the face of a camel, and a desperate security guard who finds solace in downing bottles of perfume. Beguiling, plaintive and profoundly insightful, You Jin’s fiction is a vivid evocation of Saudi society.]

In Time, Out of Place. Shelly Bryant. Singapore: Epigram Books, 2015.

[Abstract: You Jin brings to her travel writing the same wit evident in her fiction. Whether she is trekking through the Amazon rainforest, exploring the caves of Granada with gypsy pickpockets, visiting a farm stay in Tasmania, or negotiating for a horsehair-lacquer cup in Myanmar, she is adept at weaving a whimsical incident into a compelling and amusing narrative. Her trademark spirited humour brings to life the vastness of the globe we inhabit, as well as more intimate encounters with the people she meets along the way.]

Teaching Cats to Jump Hoops. Tr. Sylvia Li-chun Li. Singapore: Epigram Books, 2012.

[Abstract: A chain-smoking student with a violent past. A girl with a weakness for rare turtles. A boy who sees a raging fire each time he opens his exam booklet. In this collection of funny and heartwarming stories by You Jin, a teacher finds herself confronted with misfits and loners, rebellious dropouts and overbearing, even abusive parents. Yet she remains determined to reach out to her students. Combining an assured style with sensitive portrayals,Teaching Cats to Jump Hoops is the first translation into English of a popular voice in Chinese literature.]

You Kecun

“Retrieval of the Nine Dragon Goblet.” Tr. Samuel Ling. The Chinese Pen (Spring 1981): 68-78.

You Ren

“October’s Writing.” Tr. Yanbing Chen. In Henry YH Zhao, Yanbing Chen, and John Rosenwald. Fissures: Chinese Writing Today. Brookline, MA: Zephyr Press, 2000, 181-82.

Yu Cong

“The Wind and the Sail.” Chinese Literature (Summer 1997).

Yu Dafu 郁达夫

“Arbutus Cocktails” (杨梅烧酒). Tr. Gladys Yang. Chinese Literature 12 (Dec 1963): 32-38.

“Blood and Tears.” In Stanley R. Munro, ed., Genesis of a Revolution: An Anthology of Modern Chinese Short Stories. Singapore: Heinemann Educational Books, 1979, 158-75.

“Class Struggle in Literature.” Tr. Haili Kong and Howard Goldblatt. In Kirk A. Denton, ed., Modern Chinese Literary Thought. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1996, 263-68.

“Early Autobiographical Fragments: A Young Sojourner in a Foreign Land.” Tr. Theodore Huters. In Helmut Martin, ed., Modern Chinese Writers: Self-portrayals. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1992, 308-312.

“Flight” (Chuben). Chinese Literature 12 (Dec 1963): 38-63.

“A Humble Sacrifice” (薄奠). Tr. Huang Shou-chen. Chinese Literature 3 (March 1957): 149-57.

“Late-Blooming Cassia” (迟桂花). Tr. Sue Jean Lee. Voices 3, 1 (1971): 20-27.

“One Intoxicating Spring Night” (春风沉醉的晚上). Trs. Chai Ch’u and Winberg Chai. In Chai, eds. A Treasury of Chinese Literature. NY: Appleton-Century, 1965. [also found in Harold Isaacs, ed. Straw Sandals. Cambridge: MIT Press, 1974.]

Nights of Spring Fever and Other Writings. Beijing: Panda Books, 1984. [contains “Nights of Spring Fever,” “A Humble Sacrifice,” “Snowy Morning,” “Smoke Shadows,” “Arbutus Cocktails,” “Flight,” “Late-Flowering Cassia,” “The Fatalist,” “Private Classes in Modern School,” “A Spring Day at the Angler’s Terrace,” “The Flowery Gorge,” “Gaoting Mt,” “A Half Day’s Journey”]

“Sinking” (沉沦). Tr. Joseph Lau and C.T. Hsia. In Joseph Lau and Howard Goldblatt, eds., Columbia Anthology of Modern Chinese Literature.NY: Columbia University Press, 1995, 44-69.

“Smoke Shadows” (烟影). Tr. B. McDougall. Renditions 9 (Spring 1978): 65-70.

“Snowy Morning” (韦雪的早晨). Tr. Chang Su. Chinese Literature 2 (Feb 1962): 70-84.

To Ying-xia.” [poem]. World Classic Poetry and Global Infomation.

“Village School and Academy” [Shudian yu xuetang]. Tr. David Pollard. In Pollard, ed., The Chinese Essay. NY: Columbia UP, 2000, 207-11.

“The Winter Scene in Jiangnan” [江南的冬景]. Tr. David Pollard. In Pollard, ed., The Chinese Essay. NY: Columbia UP, 2000, 212-15.

“Wistaria and Dodder.” In Edgar Snow, ed., Living China. NY: Reynal and Hitchcock, 1937.

Yu Feng

“Chronicle of a City” (Jiucheng jishi mozhang). Tr. David Pattinson. In Martha P.Y. Cheung, ed., Hong Kong Collage: Contemporary Stories and Writing. HK: Oxford University Press, 1998, 17-33.

Yu Guangzhong (Yu Kwang-chung) 余光中

Acres of Barbed Wire–to China, in day dreams and nightmares. Tr. by the author. Taipei: Mei Ya Publications, 1971.

“Fangliao on a Bus” [車過枋寮]. Tr. Yanwing Leung. The Taipei Chinese Pen 174 (Aut. 2015): 4-5.

Poems in: From the Bluest Part of the Harbour: Poems from Hong Kong. Ed. Andrew Parkin. London: Oxford UP, 1996; China, China: Contemporary Poetry from Taiwan, Republic of China. Eds. Germain Groogenbroodt and Peter Stinson. Ninove, Belgium: Point Books, 1986; The Isle Full of Noises: Modern Chinese Poetry from Taiwan. Ed/tr. Dominic Cheung. NY: Columbia UP, 1987, 48-61.

“The Kowloon-Canton Railway.” In Geremie Barme, New Ghosts, Old Dreams: Chinese Rebel Voices. NY: Times Books, 1992, 436-37,

“Listening to the Cold Rain” [聽聽那冷雨]. Tr. Martin Woesler. In Martin Woesler, ed., 20th Century Chinese Essays in Translation. Bochum: Bochum UP, 2000, 156-64.

“Midway” [半途]. Tr. Yanwing Leung. The Taipei Chinese Pen 175 (Winter 2015): 4-5.

“The Mirror.” The Chinese Pen (Spring 1973): 31.

“My Four Hypothetical Enemies” [我的四個假想敵]. Tr. David Pollard. In Pollard, ed., The Chinese Essay. NY: Columbia UP, 2000, 308-15.

The Night Watchman. Bilingual ed. Taipei: Jiuge, 1992.

“Remembering and Missing Taipei.” Trs. Ren Zhong and Yuzhi Yang. In Hometown and Childhood. San Francisco: Long River Press, 2005, 143-52.

“Shatin Mountain Residence” [沙田山居]. Tr. Martin Woesler. In Martin Woesler, ed., 20th Century Chinese Essays in Translation. Bochum: Bochum UP, 2000, 150-55.

“Taitung” [台東]. Tr. David Van Der Peet. The Taipei Chinese Pen 174 (Aut. 2015): 6-7.

“The Telephone Book.” The Chinese Pen (Spring 1973): 30.

“Thus Friends Absent Speak” [Chisu cunxin]. Tr. David Pollard. In Pollard, ed., The Chinese Essay. NY: Columbia UP, 2000, 305-08.

“The Wolves Are Coming” [狼來了]. Tr. Martin Woesler. In Martin Woesler, ed., 20th Century Chinese Essays in Translation. Bochum: Bochum UP, 2000, 165-68.

Yu Haiyang

“Human Nature and Literature: A Critque of Pa Jen’s and Wang Shuming’s Humanism.” In Hualing Nieh, ed., Literature of the Hundred Flowers, Volume I: Criticism and Polemics. NY: Columbia UP, 1981, 229-36.

Yu Hua 余华

“1986.” Tr. Andrew Jones. In Jing Wang, ed., China’s Avant-garde Fiction. Durham: Duke UP, 1998, 74-113.

Appendix.” Tr. Allan H. Barr. Words Without Borders: The Online Magazine of Interational Literature.

The Boisterous Game.” Tr. Allan H. Barr. Persimmon: Asian Literature, Arts, and Culture (Summer 2003).

Boy in the Twilight: Stories of the Hidden China. Tr. Allan H. Barr. NY: Pantheon, 2014.

[Abstract: Thirteen audacious stories that resonate with the beauty, grittiness, and exquisite irony of everyday life in China. Yu Hua’s narrative gifts, populist voice, and inimitable wit have made him one of the most celebrated and best-selling writers in China. These flawlessly crafted stories—unflinching in their honesty, yet balanced with humor and compassion—take us into the small towns and dirt roads that are home to the people who make China run. In the title story, a shopkeeper confronts a child thief and punishes him without mercy. “Victory” shows a young couple shaken by the husband’s infidelity, scrambling to stake claims to the components of their shared life. “Sweltering Summer” centers on an awkward young man who shrewdly uses the perks of his government position to court two women at once. Other tales show, by turns, two poor factory workers who spoil their only son, a gang of peasants who bully the village orphan, and a spectacular fistfight outside a refinery bathhouse. With sharp language and a keen eye, Yu Hua explores the line between cruelty and warmth on which modern China is—precariously, joyfully—balanced. Taken together, these stories form a timely snapshot of a nation lit with the deep feeling and ready humor that characterize its people. Already a sensation in Asia, certain to win recognition around the world, Yu Hua, in Boy in the Twilight, showcases the peerless gifts of a writer at the top of his form.]

Brothers: A Novel. Trs. Carlos Rojas and Eileen Cheng-yin Chow. NY: Pantheon, 2009. [MCLC Resource Center review by Christopher Rea]

China in Ten Words. Tr. Allan H. Barr. NY: Anchor Books, 2012.

[Abstract: Framed by ten phrases common in the Chinese vernacular, China in Ten Words uses personal stories and astute analysis to reveal as never before the world’s most populous yet oft-misunderstood nation. In “Disparity,” for example, Yu Hua illustrates the expanding gaps that separate citizens of the country. In “Copycat,” he depicts the escalating trend of piracy and imitation as a creative new form of revolutionary action. And in “Bamboozle,” he describes the increasingly brazen practices of trickery, fraud, and chicanery that are, he suggests, becoming a way of life at every level of society. Witty, insightful, and courageous, this is a refreshingly candid vision of the “Chinese miracle” and all of its consequences.]

Chronicle of a Blood Merchant. Tr. Andrew F. Jones. NY: Pantheon Books, 2004. [MCLC Resource Center review by Richard King]

Cries in the Drizzle. Tr. Allan H. Barr. NY: Anchor, 2007.

“Death Narrative.” In The Mystified Boat and Other New Stories from China. Eds. Frank Stewart and Herbert J. Batt. Special issue of Manoa: A Pacific Journal of International Writing 15, 2 (Winter 2003). Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 162-68.

“The Earth.” Trs. Ren Zhong and Yuzhi Yang. In Hometown and Childhood. San Francisco: Long River Press, 2005, 185-92.

“Friends.” Tr. Allan H. Barr. Asia Literary Review (Summer 2008): 143-53.

“I Have No Name of My Own,” Tr. Allan H. Barr.Dimsum: Asia’s Literary Journal 10 (Spring 2005), 10-25.

“The Noon of Howling Wind.” Tr. Denis Mair. In Jing Wang, ed., China’s Avant-garde Fiction. Durham: Duke UP, 1998, 69-73.

“On the Road at Eighteen.” Tr. Andrew F. Jones. The Columbia Anthology of Modern Chinese Literature. NY: Columbia UP, 1995, 485-90. Also as “Distant Journey at Eighteen.” In Kwok-kan Tam, Terry Siu-Han Yip, Wimal Dissanayake, eds., A Place of One’s Own: Stories of Self in China, Hong Kong, and Singapore. NY: Oxford UP, 1999, 323-29.

“One King of Reality.” Tr. Jeanne Tai. In David Der-wei Wang, ed., Running Wild: New Chinese Writers. NY: Columbia UP, 1994, 21-68. Also tr. Helen Wang. In Henry Zhao, ed., The Lost Boat: Avant-garde Fiction from China. London: Wellsweep, 1993, 145-84.

The Past and the Punishments. Tr. Andrew F. Jones. Honolulu, University of Hawaii Press, 1996. [contains: “On the Road at Eighteen,” “Classical Love,” “World Like Mist,” “The Past and the Punishments,” “1986,” “Blood and Plum Blossoms,” “The Death of a Landlord,” “Predestination”]

“The Past and Punishments.” Tr. Andrew F. Jones. In Howard Goldblatt, ed., Chairman Mao Would Not Be Amused: Fiction from Today’s China. NY: Grove Press, 1995, 156-171.

The Seventh Day. Tr. Alan Barr. NY: Knopf, 2016.

[Abstract: Yang Fei was born on a train as it raced across the Chinese countryside. Lost by his mother, adopted by a young switchman, raised with simplicity and love, he is utterly unprepared for the changes that await him and his country. As a young man, he searches for a place to belong in a nation ceaselessly reinventing itself, but he remains on the edges of society. At forty-one, he meets an unceremonious death, and lacking the money for a burial plot, must roam the afterworld aimlessly. There, over the course of seven days, he encounters the souls of people he’s lost. As he retraces the path of his life, we meet an extraordinary cast of characters: his adoptive father, his beautiful ex-wife, his neighbors who perished in the demolition of their homes. Vivid, urgent, and panoramic, Yang Fei’s passage movingly traces the contours of his vast nation—its absurdities, its sorrows, and its soul. This searing novel affirms Yu Hua’s place as the standard-bearer of Chinese fiction.]

“The Story is for Willow.” Tr. Denis Mair. In Jing Wang, ed., China’s Avant-garde Fiction. Durham: Duke UP, 1998, 114-46.

Timid as a Mouse.” Tr. Allan H. Barr. Words Without Borders: The Online Magazine of Interational Literature.

To Live. Tr. Michael Berry. NY: Anchor Books, 2003. [MCLC Resource Center review by Richard King]

Yu Jian 于坚

“16,” “50,” “63,” “84,” “The Last Summer Storm.” Trs. George O’Connell and Diana Shi. Atlanta Review xiv, 2 (Spring/Summer 2008): 67-69.

A Beethoven Chronology” [贝多芬纪年]. Tr. Steve Bradbury. Words without Borders (Dec. 2011).

Immanuel Kant.” Tr. Steve Bradbury. Words without Borders (Dec. 2011).

“File 0.” Tr. Maghiel van Crevel. Renditions 56 (2001): 24-57.

Flash Cards. Tr. by Wang Ping and Ron Padgett. St. Paul, MN: Zephyr Press, 2011.

“Four Poems.” Tr. Simon Patton. Renditions 46 (1996): 69-79.

Poems in Wang Ping, ed., New Generation: Poems from China Today. Brooklyn: Hanging Loose Press, 1999, 177-88.

“Short Pieces (Selections.” Tr. Nicholas Kaldis. Dirty Goat 24 (2011): 186-91.

“Small Town.” Tr. Simon Patton. Chinese Literature Today 3, 1/2 (2013): 96-119.

“Two Poems” [“fat man with a kind face…” and “crows in black robes”]. Tr. John Crespi. basalt 2, 1 (2007): 29.

Two or Three Things from the Past.” Tr. Wang Ping and Ron Padgett. Words Without Borders (Dec. 2004).

Yu Lihua 於梨華

“Two Sisters.” Tr. Hsin-sheng Kao and Michelle Yeh. In Kao, ed., Nativism Overseas: Contemporary Chinese Women Writers. Albany: SUNY, 1993, 57-80.

“Glass Marbles Scattered All Over the Ground.” Tr. Hsiao Lien-ren. In Chi Pang-yuan, et al., eds., An Anthology of Contemporary Chinese Literature. Taipei: National Institute for Compilation and Translation, 1975, II, 161-73.

“In Liu Village.” Trans. by the author and C.T. Hsia. In Joseph S.M. Lau, ed., Chinese Stories From Taiwan: 1960-1970. NY: Columbia UP, 1976, 101-42. Also in Literature East and West, 15.2 (1972): 219-43 and in Ann C. Carver and Sung-sheng Yvonne Chang, eds., Bamboo Shoots After the Rain: Contemporary Stories by Women Writers of Taiwan. NY: The Feminist Press, 1990, 47-82.

“Nightfall.” Tr. Vivian Hsu and Julia Fitzgerald. In Vivian Ling Hsu, ed., Born of the Same Roots: Stories of Modern Chinese Women. Bloomington: IUP, 1981, 194-209.

Yu Luojin 遇罗锦

A Chinese Winter’s Tale. Tr Rachel May and Zhu Zhiyu. HK: Renditions, 1986.

Yu Mo

“The Day He Was Fired.” Tr. Una Y.T. Chen. The Chinese Pen (Summer 1982): 65-93.

Yu Pingbo 俞平伯

Casual Line.” World Classic Poetry and Global Information.

Poems in: Twentieth Century Chinese Poetry: An Anthology. Hsu Kai-yu, ed. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1963, 14-15.

Return to the North.” World Classic Poetry and Global Information.

Yu Qiuqu 余秋雨

A Bittersweet Journey through Culture. NY: CN Times Books, 2015.

[Abstract: Yu Qiuyu travels across the Chinese mainland to visit the country’s national heritage sites and unlock the mysteries of China’s cultural and historical legacy. As he winds his way through the countryside, cities, and ruins, Yu Qiuyu ruminates on the places, people, and moments that have shaped his and the Chinese way of life. He also reflects on his own personal history, weaving into his tale the histories of his literary heroes and the great works that have shaped him as a writer. First published in 1992, A Bittersweet Journey Through Culture popularized the literary concept of the meditative essay, establishing a new tradition in Chinese prose.]

The Book of Mountains and Rivers. Tr. Jeremy Tiang. NY: CN Times Books, 2015.

[Abstract: Yu Qiuyu is one of China’s greatest modern essayists. Sometimes a prickly commentator, he is above all a storyteller. In this volume he takes his inspiration from China’s geography, both human and physical, and brings the culture of his country to life with human characters and historical narrative. The forests of Hainan, the Three Gorges, classical pagodas, ancient remains under modern Shanghai, even the open skies… all have their stories and cultural connections, traced with erudition and wit by an inquisitive mind. “I sought a path across mountains and rivers, plastering my brief life across a rugged corner of this planet,” explains Yu Qiuyu. The Book of Rivers and Mountains is another in a series of meditative essays about Chinese culture and history. In this book he returns to the Chinese mainland in contemplation of its people and the natural landscape that has shaped their way of life. He refers to mountains and rivers as the “facial expressions of the land” and the only true way of understanding the history of the country and its people.]

The Chinese Literary Canon. Tr. Philip Hand. NY: CN Times Books, 2015.

[Abstract: One of China’s most brilliant critics puts three millennia of Chinese writing in its proper historical context. He shows us what to read and how to read it. Yu Qiuyu traces a bright line of the very best literature that China has produced: from the first carvings on bone, through the first poems, the first philosophers, the greatest historian, to the ultimate stylists of the Tang Dynasty and beyond. And because brilliant literature is always a product of its time and place, Yu tells us about the men who did the writing and the worlds in which they lived. Most of all, Yu tells us about the ideas that motivated them, how they read the writers of the past, and how each writer of genius transformed and added his own stamp to the literary canon. The Yellow Emperor, the Book of Poetry, Confucius and Laozi, the great historian Sima Qian, Cao Cao, Kumārajīva, Li Bai, Du Fu, Cao Xueqin… Their thread weaves in and out of the history of the first Chinese, the Warring States, the unification under Qin, the destructive split into the Three Kingdoms, and the cosmopolitan Tang Dynasty. All of this history is interpreted and presented in the warm, distinctive voice of a truly great reader, Yu Qiuyu.]

“The Message Man.” Tr. David Pollard. Renditions 52: 13-20.

“The Night Boat.” Trs. Ren Zhong and Yuzhi Yang. In Hometown and Childhood. San Francisco: Long River Press, 2005, 123-34.

“Shanghai People” [Shanghai ren]. Tr. David Pollard. In Pollard, ed., The Chinese Essay. NY: Columbia UP, 2000, 351-61. Also translated as “Shanghaiese.” Tr. Newton X. Liu. China Community Forum.

A Taoist’s Parinirvana Stupa.” Chinese Literature (Autumn 1998).

West Lake: A Dream.” Chinese Literature (Autumn 1998).

The Vicissitudes of Tianyi Pavilion.” Chinese Literature (Autumn 1998).

Yangguan Snow.” Tr. Newton X. Liu.

Yu Rongjun (aka Nick Rongjun Yu) 喻荣军

Behind the Lie.” Tr. Claire Conceison. Theatre Journal 63 (2011): 323-64.

The Crowd. Tr. Gigi Chang. HK: Hong Kong University Press, 2015.

[Abstract: Inspired by Gustave Le Bon’s prophetic 1894 study of crowd psychology The Crowd: A Study of Popular Mind and Henrik Ibsen’s An Enemy of the People, The Crowd is a searing play by China’s most produced living playwright Yu Rongjun. Set in Chongqing, Beijing, Shanghai and Hong Kong, from the Cultural Revolution to the present day, The Crowd pitches the forces of irrational mass frenzy against the powerless struggle of the individual—with tragic consequences. This daring play investigates one man’s struggle to seek justice at all costs; and culminates in a rendezvous on a fateful day in Hong Kong. Will revenge settle old scores or open up new wounds?]

Yu Sang

“The Cat Watcher.” Tr. Michelle Yeh. The Chinese Pen (Summer 1989): 12-30.

Yu Shangyuan 余上沅

“The Mutiny” [Bing bian]. In Ku Tsong-nee, ed., Modern Chinese Plays. Shanghai: The Commercial Press, 1941, 23-54

Yu Xiang 宇向

I Can Almost See the Clouds of Dust. Tr. Fiona Sze-Lorrain. Brookline, MA: Zephyr Press, 2013.

“Sunlight Shines Where It’s Needed,” “My House,” “They,” “A Gust of Wind,” “Low Key,” “It Goes Without Saying,” “Holy Front,” and “Street.” Tr. Fiona Sze-Lorrain. Pathlight: New Chinese Writing 1 (2011): 123-28.

Yu Xinqiao 俞心樵

The Last Lyric. Tr. Yunte Huang. Berkeley: Tinfish Press, 2017.

[Abstract: In his poem, “Poetry Cannot Fix You” Yu Xinqiao asserts that poetry can fix many things, just not the self or a loved one (“you”). But in an address before the Dalai Lama that appears at the end of this book, ably translated by scholar and poet, Yunte Huang, he argues for poetry’s moral power: “In contemporary China, I must emphasize another aspect of poetry, that is, we must rebuild a hometown of justice and a homeland of conscience grounded in poetry. Poetry must shoulder moral obligations, must use its beauty and power like that of a revengeful goddess and intervene into the public arena that is becoming more and more ruthless and barbaric.” Born in 1968, Yu was imprisoned for eight years in China after calling in 1993 for a “Chinese Renaissance Movement.” His poems seem deliberately understated, full of unexpected reversals: “The dead are mourning the living”; and, because poetry can’t fix you, “That’s why I love poetry all my life.” The Last Lyric presents Yu’s work in Chinese and in English. Readers of English can now discover why Yu’s work is so popular (and so distrusted by the regime) in China.]

“Six Poems.” Tr. Clara Hsu. Jung Journal: Culture and Psyche 11, 1 (2017): 4-19.

Yu Xue

Yu Lan: A Chinese Short Story by Yu Xue. Tr. Robert Tung. Copenhagen: East Asian Institute, University of Copenhagen, 1990..

Yu Yingmao 

“A Cup of Tea.” In Loud Sparrows: Contemporary Chinese Short-Shorts. Trs. Aili Mu, Julie Chiu, and Howard Goldblatt. NY: Columbia UP, 2006, 40-42.

Yuan Bingfu

“Confinement.” In Loud Sparrows: Contemporary Chinese Short-Shorts. Trs. Aili Mu, Julie Chiu, and Howard Goldblatt. NY: Columbia UP, 2006, 75.

Yuan Changying 袁昌英

“Southeast Flies the Peacock.” In A. Dooling and K. Torgeson, eds., Writing Women in Modern China: An Anthology of Women’s Literature from the Early Twentieth Century. NY: Columbia UP, 1998, 213-52.

Yuan, G. K.

“The Martyr.” Tr. Susan Wilf. Renditions 89 (Spring 2018): 95-113.

Yuan Jinmei 袁劲梅

The Yangtze and My Father: A Love Story.” Tr. Paul E. Festa. MCLC Resource Center Publication (Sept. 2017).

Yuan Jing 袁静

The Story of Little Black Horse. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1959.

Yuan Jing and Kong Jue 袁静,孔厥

Daughters and Sons. Tr. Sha Po-li. New York: Liberty Press, 1952. Also: Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1979.

Yuan Qiongqiong 袁瓊瓊

“Adversity.” Tr. Cynthia Wu Wilcox. The Chinese Pen (Winter 1985): 69-87.

“Beyond Words.” Tr. Howard Goldblatt and Joseph Lau. The Chinese Pen (Summer 1983): 17-30.

“Cat.” Tr. Howard Goldblatt. Renditions 27/28 (1987): 76-77. Also in Eva Hung, ed., Contemporary Women Writers: Hong Kong and Taiwan. HK: Renditions, 1990, 85-87. Also in Loud Sparrows: Contemporary Chinese Short-Shorts. Trs. Aili Mu, Julie Chiu, and Howard Goldblatt. NY: Columbia UP, 2006, 117-18.

“Empty Seat.” In Loud Sparrows: Contemporary Chinese Short-Shorts. Trs. Aili Mu, Julie Chiu, and Howard Goldblatt. NY: Columbia UP, 2006, 194-95.

“Even-Glow.” Tr. Chen I-djen. The Chinese Pen (Summer 1985): 1-28.

“Father.” Loud Sparrows: Contemporary Chinese Short-Shorts. Trs. Aili Mu, Julie Chiu, and Howard Goldblatt. NY: Columbia UP, 2006, 219-20.

“Fever.” Tr. Felice Marcus. Renditions 52: 71-85. Also in Eva Hung, ed., City Women. HK: Renditions, 2001.

“Flies.” Tr. Peter T. Morris. Renditions 35-36 (1991): 198-201. Also in Loud Sparrows: Contemporary Chinese Short-Shorts. Trs. Aili Mu, Julie Chiu, and Howard Goldblatt. NY: Columbia UP, 2006, 123-25.

“Four Poems by Chu Ling.” Tr. Nancy Ing. The Chinese Pen (Summer 1982): 25-28.

“A Lover’s Ear.” In Loud Sparrows: Contemporary Chinese Short-Shorts. Trs. Aili Mu, Julie Chiu, and Howard Goldblatt. NY: Columbia UP, 2006, 3-4.

“The Mulberry Sea.” Tr. Susan Dooling. In Ann C. Carver and Sung-sheng Y. Chang, eds., Bamboo Shoots after the Rain: Contemporary Stories by Women Writers of Taiwan. New York: The Feminist Press at CUNY, 1990, 149-66.

“Not Seen.” In Loud Sparrows: Contemporary Chinese Short-Shorts. Trs. Aili Mu, Julie Chiu, and Howard Goldblatt. NY: Columbia UP, 2006, 208-10.

“The Old House That Stood For Thirty Years.” Tr. Ying-fun Cheung Su. The Chinese Pen (Winter 1983): 18-26.

“A Place of One’s Own.” Tr. Jane Parish Yang. The Chinese Pen (Summer 1982): 1-24. Rpt. in Michael S. Duke, ed., Worlds of Modern Chinese Fiction. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1991, 193-205. Also in Kwok-kan Tam, Terry Siu-Han Yip, Wimal Dissanayake, eds., A Place of One’s Own: Stories of Self in China, Hong Kong, and Singapore. NY: Oxford UP, 1999, 265-80. Rpt. in Jonathan Stalling, Lin Tai-man, and Yanwing Leung, eds., Contemporary Taiwanese Women Writers: An Anthology. Amherst, NY: Cambria, 2018, 117-38.

“The Sky’s Escape.” Tr. Michael S. Duke. The Chinese Pen (Winter 1979): 1-24. Rpt. in Nancy Ing, ed., Winter Plum: Contemporary Chinese Fiction. Taipei: Chinese Materials Center, 1982, 479-98.

“The Swing.” Tr. Nancy Du. The Chinese Pen (Winter 1994): 47-52.

“Typhoon Night.” Tr. Nancy Ing. The Chinese Pen (Summer 1977): 55-56.

Yuan Ren

“Tale of Two Strangers.” Tr. Daniel J. Bauer. In Pang-yuan Chi and David Der-wei Wang, eds., The Last of the Whampoa Breed: Stories of the Chinese Diaspora.New York: Columbia University Press, 2003.

Yuan Shuibo 

Soy Sauce and Prawns: Satiric Political Verse. Tr. Sidney Shapiro. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1963.

“A Young Sudanese,” “Artistic Freedom,” and “Museums—London, New York, and Points West.” In Meserve and Meserve, eds., Modern Literature from China. NY: New York UP, 1974, 156-59.

Danny N.T. Yung 榮念曾

“Chronicle of Women: Liu Sola In Concert.” Tr. Martha Cheung. In Cheung and Jane Lai, eds., An Anthology of Contemporary Chinese Drama. NY: Oxford UP, 1997, 825-73.

 

[Z]

Zang Di 臧棣

“Marriage Cuisine,” “Against Memory,” “Primer.” Trs. George O’Connell and Diana Shi. Atlanta Review xiv, 2 (Spring/Summer 2008): 58-60.

“Poems.” Tr. Eleanor Goodman. Pathlight: New Chinese Writing (Summer 2013).

The Roots of Wisdom: Selected Poetry of Zang Di. Tr. Eleanor Goodman. Brookline, MA: Zephyr, 2017.

Zang Kejia 臧克家

“Gazing at Central China.” Tr. Kai-yu Hsu. In Hsu, ed. The Chinese Literary Scene: A Writers’ Visit to the People’s Republic. NY: Vintage Books, 1975, 194-96.

Poems in: Contemporary Chinese Poetry. Ed. Robert Payne; Twentieth Century Chinese Poetry. Ed. Kai-yu Hsu.

Woman Ware Seller.” World Classic Poetry and Global Information.

Zeng Dekuang 

“Three Poems.” Tr. Jonathan Stalling. Chinese Literature Today (Winter/Spring 2011): 63-65.

Zeng Guihai (Tseng Kuei-hai)

Poems, trs. K. C. Tu and Robert Backus, in Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 16 (2005): 143-48.

Zeng Hong

“Imaginary Existence.” Tr. Nicholas Kaldis. Dirty Goat 24 (March 2011): 200-201.

“Three Short-Lived Poems from Yesterday.” Tr. Yanbing Chen. In Henry YH Zhao, Yanbing Chen, and John Rosenwald. Fissures: Chinese Writing Today. Brookline, MA: Zephyr Press, 2000, 132.

Zeng Pu 曾朴

Fleur sur l’ocean des peches. Tr. Isabelle Bijou. Paris: Editions T.E.R., 1983.

“Flower in a Sinful Sea.” Trs. Rafe de Crespigny and Liu Ts’un-yan. Renditions 18 (1982): 137-92.

Zeng Xinyi

“I Love the Professor.” In Rosemary Haddon, tr./ed , Oxcart: Nativist Stories from Taiwan, 1934-1977. Dortmund: Projekt Verlag, 1996, 207-20.

Zeng Zhuo

“I Look Afar.” Chinese Literature (Summer 1997).

“An Old Sea Gull.” Chinese Literature (Summer 1997).

Zha Jianying

“Beijing Vanities.” Venue 1 (1997): 72-98.

Issues in Contemporary Chinese Literature: Informal Roundtable Discussion by Three Authors: Wang Meng, Liu Sola, Zha Jianying.” Tr. Marshal McArthur. Baker Institute, Rice University (March 10, 1998).

“Jianhua Road South, Beijing Streets.” Venue 3 (1998): 118-24.

Zhai Yongming 翟永明

Biri.” Tr. Steve Bradbury. Jacket 2 (2011).

The Changing Room. Tr. Andrea Lingenfelter. St. Paul, MN: Zephyr Press, 2011.

Five Poems.” Tr. Andrea Lingenfelter. Cha: An Asian Literary Journal 14 (2011).

“In Ancient Times, The Chrysamthemum Lantern is Floating Over, In Springtime, Letters from a Past Dynasty, The Submarine’s Lament.” Pathlight: New Chinese Writing 2 (2012): 172-79.

“Jing’an Village.” Trs. Tony Price and Tao Naikan. Renditions 52: 92-119.

“Life,” “Doll.” Trs. George O’Connell and Diana Shi. Atlanta Review xiv, 2 (Spring/Summer 2008): 70-72.

Poems in Wang Ping, ed., New Generation: Poems from China Today. Brooklyn: Hanging Loose Press, 1999, 191-97.

Poems. Tr. Jami Proctor-Xu. Chinese Literature Today (Summer 2010): 23-27.

Poems of Hong Ying, Zhai Yongming and Yang Lian. Ed. Mabel Lee. Trs. Mabel Lee, Naikan Tao, and Tony Prince. Newtown, NSW: Vagabond Press, 2014.

The Poetry of Zhai Yongming: 1982-1995. Tr. Michael Day. URL: http://michaelmartinday.blogspot.com/2008/01/zhai-yongming-poetry-translations.html.

Kaffeehauslieder (Songs from a cafe). Tr. Wolfgang Kubin. Bonn: Weidle Verlag, 2004.

Zhan Che詹澈 (Chan Cher) 

Poems in: The Isle Full of Noises: Modern Chinese Poetry from Taiwan. Ed/tr. Dominic Cheung. NY: Columbia UP, 1987, 217-32.

“Little Orchid Isle and the Little Blue Whale,” “Dugout Canoe,” “The Oar and the Writing Brush–For Syman Rapongan.” Taiwan Literature: English Language Series 17 (July 2005): 127-34.

“Sitting by Dulan Bay at Dusk” [黃昏坐在都蘭灣]. Tr. David Van Der Peet. The Taipei Chinese Pen 174 (Aut. 2015): 21-22.

Zhan Jing 

“The Busy Secretary.” In Loud Sparrows: Contemporary Chinese Short-Shorts. Trs. Aili Mu, Julie Chiu, and Howard Goldblatt. NY: Columbia UP, 2006, 53.

Zhan Mingru (Chan Ming-ju)

The Story of Huannawa. Excerpt translated by Marshal McArthur in Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 4 (1999): 15-22.

Zhang Ailing (Eileen Chang) 张爱玲

“A Beating.” Tr. D.E. Pollard. Renditions 45 (Spring 1996). Also in Pollard, ed., The Chinese Essay. NY: Columbia UP, 2000, 292-93.

“The Betrothal of Yindi.” In Cyril Birch, ed. Anthology of Chinese Literature. NY: Grove Press, 1965-72, 2: 432-47. Rpt in Shanghai: Electric and Lurid City: An Anthology. Ed. Barbara Baker. Hong Kong: Oxford University Press, 1998, 56-63.

Book of Changes. Hong Kong: HK University Press, 2010.

“A Chronicle of Changing Clothes.” Tr. Andrew F. Jones. positions 11, 2 (Fall 2003): 427-41.

The Fall of the Pagoda. Hong Kong: HK University Press, 2010.

From the Ashes.” Tr. Oliver Stunt. Renditions 45 (Spring 1996).

“The Golden Cangue” [金鎖記]. In C. T. Hsia et.al., eds. Modern Chinese Stories and Novellas 1919-1949. New York: Columbia University Press, 1981.

“Great Felicity.” Tr. Janet Ng with Karen Kingsbury. Renditions 45 (Spring 1996). Also in Eva Hung, ed., Traces of Love and Other Stories. HK: Renditions Paperback, 2000.

Half a Lifelong Romance. Tr. Karen A. Kingsbury. NY: Anchor, 2016.

[Abstract: Shanghai, 1930s. Shen Shijun, a young engineer, has fallen in love with his colleague, the beautiful Gu Manzhen. He is determined to resist his family’s efforts to match him with his wealthy cousin so that he can marry her. But dark circumstances—a lustful brother-in-law, a treacherous sister, a family secret—force the two young lovers apart. As Manzhen and Shijun go on their separate paths, they lose track of one another, and their lives become filled with feints and schemes, missed connections and tragic misunderstandings. At every turn, societal expectations seem to thwart their prospects for happiness. Still, Manzhen and Shijun dare to hold out hope—however slim—that they might one day meet again. A glamorous, wrenching tale set against the glittering backdrop of an extraordinary city, Half a Lifelong Romance is a beloved classic from one of the essential writers of twentieth-century China.]

“International Shanghai, 1941: Coffee House Chat about Sexual Intimacy and the Childlike Charm of the Japanese.” Tr. Edward Gunn. In Helmut Martin, ed., Modern Chinese Writers: Self-Portrayals. Armonk: M. E. Sharpe, 1992, 296-301.

“Intimate Words.” Tr. Janet Ng. Renditions 45 (Spring 1996).

“Little Finger Up.” In Lucian Wu, tr. and ed., New Chinese Stories: Twelve Short Stories by Contemporary Chinese Writers. Taipei: Heritage Press, 1961, 63-84.

Little Reunions. Tr. Jane Weizhen Pan and Martin Merz. NY: New York Review of Books Classics, 2018. [MCLC Resource Center review by Roy Bing Chan]

“Love in a Fallen City.” Tr. Karen Kingsbury. Renditions 45 (Spring 1996). Also in Love in a Fallen City. NY: New York Review of Classics, 2006. Also tr. by Shu-ning Sciban. In Shu-ning Sciban and Fred Edwards, eds., Dragonflies: Fiction by Chinese Women in the Twentieth Century (East Asia Series 115). Ithaca: East Asia Program, Cornell University, 2003, 32-70.

Love in a Fallen City. Tr. Karen Kingsbury. NY: New York Review of Books Classics, 2006. [“Aloeswood Incense,” “Jasmine Tea,” “Love in a Fallen City,” “The Golden Cangue,” “Sealed Off,” Red Rose, White Wine”] [MCLC Resource Center review by Haiyan Lee]

Lust, Caution: The Story. Tr. Julia Lovell. With afterword by Ang Lee and special essay by James Schamus. New York: Anchor Books, 2007.

[Abstract: Now a major motion picture from Oscar-winning director Ang Lee: an intensely passionate story of love and espionage, set in Shanghai during World War II. In the midst of the Japanese occupation of China and Hong Kong, two lives become intertwined: Wong Chia Chi, a young student active in the resistance, and Mr. Yee, a powerful political figure who works for the Japanese occupational government. As these two move deftly between Shanghai’s tea parties and secret interrogations, they become embroiled in the complicated politics of wartime — and in a mutual attraction that may be more than what they expected. Written in lush, lavish prose, and with the tension of a political thriller, Lust, Caution brings 1940s Shanghai artfully to life even as it limns the erotic pulse of a doomed love affair.]

“My Writing.” Tr. Wendy Larson. In Kirk A. Denton, ed., Modern Chinese Literary Thought. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1996, 436-42.

Naked Earth. Hong Kong: Union Press, 1956. Rpt. New York: New York Review of Books Classics, 2015. [MCLC Resource Center review by Jiwei Xiao]

“Red Rose and White Rose.” Tr. Carolyn Brown. Ph. D. Dissertation. Washington, D.C.: American University, 1978.

“The Religion of the Chinese” [中國人的宗教]. Tr. David Pollard. In Pollard, ed., The Chinese Essay. NY: Columbia UP, 2000, 283-92.

The Rice Sprout Song. New York: Scribner’s, 1955.

The Rouge of the North (originally in English). Berkeley: UCP, 1998.

“Sealed Off” [封鎖]. Tr. Karen Kingsbury. In Lau, Goldblatt, eds., Columbia Anthology of Modern Chinese Literature. NY: CUP, 1995, 188-97. Also as “Shut Down.” Tr. Janet Ng with Karen Kingsbury. Renditions 45 (Spring 1996).

“Shame, Amah.” In Carter and Chang, eds., Bamboo Shoots After Rain: Contemporary Stories by Women Writers of Taiwan. NY: The Feminist Press, 1990.

“Sing-song Girls of Shanghai.” [first two chapters of Haishang hua liezhuan]. In Chinese Middlebrow Fiction form the Ch’ing and Early Republican Eras. HK: Chinese University Press; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1984.

Sing-Song Girls of Shanghai. By Han Bangqing. Trs. by Eileen Chang. NY: Weatherhead Books, 2006.

“Stale Mates” (written in English). Renditions 27/28 (Spring/Autumn 1987): 10-16. Also in Eva Hung, ed., Traces of Love and Other Stories. HK: Renditions Paperback, 2000.

“Steamed Osmanthus Flower and Ah Xiao’s Unhappy Autumn.” Tr. Simon Patton. In Eva Hung, ed., Traces of Love and Other Stories. HK: Renditions Paperback, 2000, 59-91.

“Traces of Love.” Tr. Eva Hung. Renditions 45 (Spring 1996). Also in Eva Hung, ed., Traces of Love and Other Stories. HK: Renditions Paperback, 2000.

Traces of Love and Others Stories. Ed. Eva Hung. HK: Renditions Book, 2000.

“What is Essential Is That Names Be Right.” Tr. Karen Kingsbury. Renditions 45 (Spring 1996).

“Wife, Vamp, Child.” (1943). Rpt. in Lianhe wenxue 3, 5 (March 1987): 54.

Written on Water. Tr. Andrew F. Jones. Introduction by Nicole Huang. NY: Columbia UP, 2005. [essays on art, literature, war, and urban life] [CUP abstract]

Zhang Baishan 

“Rented Wife.” Tr. Michael S. Weiss. In Jianing Chen, ed. Themes in Contemporary Chinese Literature. Beijing: New World Press, 1993, 29-34.

Zhang Baoxin

“Can a Dramatic Ensemble Be Administered Like an Army Unit?” In Hualing Nieh, ed., Literature of the Hundred Flowers, Volume I: Criticism and Polemics. NY: Columbia UP, 1981, 105-110.

Zhang Biwu

“Rickshaw Man.” Tr. Timothy C. Wong. In Wong, Stories for Saturday: Twentieth Century Chinese Popular Fiction. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2003, 37-43.

Zhang Chengzhi 张承志

The Black Steed (Hei junma). Beijing: Chinese Literature Press, 1989.

“The Black Steed.” In Love That Burns on a Summer’s Night. Beijing: Chinese Literature Press, 1990, 137-230.

“Chairman Mao Graffiti.” In Geremie Barme, Shades of Mao: The Posthumous Cult of the Great Leader. Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 1996.

“Dazzling Poma.” Tr. Steven L. Riep. In Michael S. Duke, ed., Worlds of Modern Chinese Fiction. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1991, 329-38.

“The Love of Shata.” Chinese Literature (Winter 1995): 169-183.

“The Nine Palaces” (Jiuzuo gongdian), in Jeanne Tai, ed., Spring Bamboo: A Collection of Contemporary Chinese Short Stories. NY: Random House, 1989, 41-55.

“River of the North” (Beifang de he). Tr. Stephen Fleming. Chinese Literature (Summer 1987): 42-137.

“Statue of a Dog.” Tr. Andrew F. Jones. positions: east asia cultures critique 10, 3 (Winter 2002): 511-24.

“The Way of Heaven, Beginning of Autumn”. Tr. Helen Wang. In Henry Zhao and John
Caley, eds., Under-sky Underground: Chinese Writing ‘Today’ 1. London: Wellsweep, 199: 145-148.

“Why Herdsmen Sing about ‘Mother'” (Qishou weishenme gechang muqin). Tr. Xu Ying. In Prize-Winning Stories from China 1978-1979, 123-35.

Zhang Cuo (Chang Ts’o, or Dominic Cheung)

Poems in: The Isle Full of Noises: Modern Chinese Poetry from Taiwan. Ed/tr. Dominic Cheung. NY: Columbia UP, 1987, 139-53..

Zhang Dachun (Chang Ta-chun) 张大春

“Alley 116, Liaoning Stret.” Tr. Ying-tsih Hwang. The Chinese Pen (Winter 1992): 53-59.

“Birds of a Feather.” Tr. Hsin-sheng C. Kao. In Joseph S.M. Lau, ed., The Unbroken Chain: An Anthology of Taiwan Fiction Since 1926. Bloomington: IUP, 1983, 262-75.

“The General’s Monument.” Tr. Ying-tsih Hwang and John Balcom. The Chinese Pen (Spring 1987): 58-84. Rpt in Michael S. Duke, ed., Worlds of Modern Chinese Fiction. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1991, 13-28; and in Pang-yuan Chi, ed., Taiwan Literature in Chinese and English. Taipei: Commonwealth Publishing, 1999, 177-239.

“A Guided Tour of an Apartment Complex.” Tr. Chen I-djen. The Chinese Pen (Winter 1989): 1-24.

“Lucky Worries About His Country.” Tr. Chu Chiyu. Renditions 35-36 (1991): 130-43. Also in Columbia Anthology of Modern Chinese Literature. NY: CUP, 1995, 460-73.

“Speaker of the Aside.” Tr. Hwang Ying-tsih. The Chinese Pen (Winter 1986): 75-85.

“Ximi in the Metropolis.” In Kwok-kan Tam, Terry Siu-Han Yip, Wimal Dissanayake, eds., A Place of One’s Own: Stories of Self in China, Hong Kong, and Singapore. NY: Oxford UP, 1999, 376-89.

“The Wall.” Tr. Chen I-djen. The Chinese Pen (Summer 1987): 1-21.

Wild Kids: Two Novels About Growing Up. Tr. Michael Berry. NY: Columbia UP, 2000.

Zhang Er 张耳

Carved Water. Tr. Bob Holman. Kaneohe, HI: Tinfish Press, 2003.

“Raindrop,” and “Chinese Honey.” In Wang Ping, ed., New Generation: Poems from China Today. Brooklyn: Hanging Loose Press, 1999, 201-03,

Rainwiper.” Tr. Arpine Konyalian Grenier. Tinfish 6 (March 1998).

Slight Progress. Tr. Rachel D. Levitsky. NY: Pleasure Boat Studio, 2006.

So Translating Rivers and Cities. Trs. Bob Holman, Arpine Konyalian Grenier, Timothy Liu, Bill Ransom, Susan Schultz and Leonard Schwartz. Brookline, MA: Zephyr Press, 2007.

The Husband of a Younger Cousin on My Father’s Side.” Tr. Steve Bradbury. Jacket 2.

Two Poems.” Tr. Bob Holman. Words Without Borders: The Online Magazine of International Literature.

Verses on Bird. Tr. Rachel D. Levitsky. Brookline, MA: Zephyr Press, 2004.

Zhang Guixing 

My South Seas Sleeping Beauty: A Tale of Memory and Longing. Tr. Valerie Jaffe. NY: Columbia UP, 2007. [MCLC Center review by Pei-Yin Lin]

[AbstractMy South Seas Sleeping Beauty is a captivating coming-of-age tale set in the magical jungles of Borneo. Told through the vivid recollections of a Chinese-Malay youth, the novel recounts the life of Su Qi, a troubled, sensitive son of a wealthy family, and exemplifies the imaginative range of one of Taiwan’s most innovative writers.]

Siren Song.” Tr. Anna Gustafson. Asymptote (Jan. 2016).

Zhang Henshui 张恨水

“Eighty-one Dreams (Prologue and Dreams 72, 15 and 36). Tr. T. M. McClellan. Renditions 57 (2002): 35-67; 61 (2004): 27-49; 62 (2004): 41-69.

Eighty-one Dreams (excerpts).” Tr. Simon Schuchat. Renditions 87/88 (Spring/Autumn 2017): 245-68.

“The Famine of ’29” [chps. 2-4 of Return of the Swallow (Yan guilai; 1936)]. Tr. T. M. McClellan. In McClellan, Zhang Henshui and Popular Chinese Fiction, 1919-1949. Lampeter: Edwin Mellen, 2005, appendix A.

“Fate in Tears and Laughter” (partial). Tr. Borthwick. In Liu Ts’un-yan, ed., Chinese Middlebrow Fiction: Fiction from the Ch’ing and Early Republican Eras. HK: The Chinese University Press, 1984, 255-87.

Shanghai Express: A Thirties Novel by Zhang Henshui. Tr. William Lyell. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1997.

Zhang Jishu

“Bed-Wetting.” In Loud Sparrows: Contemporary Chinese Short-Shorts. Trs. Aili Mu, Julie Chiu, and Howard Goldblatt. NY: Columbia UP, 2006, 101.

Zhang Jianfeng 张剑峰

A Journey to Inner Peace and Joy: Tracing Contemporary Chinese Hermits (寻访终南隐士). Tr. Tony Blishen. NY: Better Link Press, 2015.

Zhang Jie 张洁

Die Arche, Roman. Tr. Nelly Ma. Munich: Frauenoffensive, 1985.

As Long as Nothing Happens Nothing Will. London: Virago, 1988.

“The Boat I Steer: A Study in Perseverance.” Tr. Yu Fanqin. In Helmut Martin, ed., Modern Chinese Writers: Self-portrayals. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1992, 119-122.

“Bouquet for Dajiang.” Tr. He Yunlan. Chinese Literature 9 (1979): 59-71.

“Gathering of Ears of Wheat.” Trs. Ren Zhong and Yuzhi Yang. In Hometown and Childhood. San Francisco: Long River Press, 2005, 109-14.

“Glean of Wheat Ears” [Jian maisui]. Tr. Martin Woesler. In Martin Woesler, ed., 20th Century Chinese Essays in Translation. Bochum: Bochum UP, 2000, 174-76.

Leaden Wings. Tr. Gladys Yang. London: Virago Press, 1987. Also Trans. as Heavy Wings. Tr. Howard Goldblatt. NY: Grove Weidenfeld, 1989.

“Love Must Not Be Forgotten.” In Love Must Not Be Forgotten. San Francisco: China Books, 1986. Rpt in Carolyn Choa and David Su Li-qun, eds., The Vintage Book of Contemporary Chinese Fiction. NY: Vintage Books, 2001, 205-19. Also trs as “Love Cannot Be Forgotten” in Helen F. Siu and Zelda Stern, eds./trs. Mao’s Harvest: Voices from China’s New Generation. NY: Oxford UP, 1983, 23-29.

Love Must Not Be Forgotten. San Francisco: China Books, 1986

“The Music of the Forests.” Tr. Gao Yan. Chinese Literature 9 (1979): 48-58.

“The Position of Women in China: A Lecture by Woman Writer Zhang Jie.” Tr. Chong Woei Lien. China Information 10, 1 (Summer 1995): 51-58.

“Pursuit.” China Reconstructs 12, 44 (1981).

“Remorse.” In Helen F. Siu and Zelda Stern, eds., Mao’s Harvest: Voices From China’s New Generation. NY: Oxford University Press, 1983, 23-28.

Schwere Flugel, Roman. Tr. Michael Kahn-Ackermann. Munich: Hanser, 1985.

She Knocked at the Door. Long River Press, 2005.

“The Time is Not Yet Ripe.” Tr. Gladys Yang. In Yang Bian, ed., The Time is Not Ripe: Contemporary China’s Best Writers and Their Stories. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1991, 260-80.

“An Unrecorded Life.” Tr. Nienling Liu. In The Rose Coloured Dinner. HK: Joint Publishing Company, 1988, 38-50.

Zhang Jinghong 張經弘 (Chang Ching-hung)

“The Temple Thief” [偷寺廟的賊]. Tr. Linda Wong. The Taipei Chinese Pen 173 (Summer 2015): 58-77.

Zhang Jungu

“Twilight Years.” Tr. Jun-mei Chang Chou and Eva Shan Chou. The Chinese Pen (Spring 1982): 66-81.

Zhang Junmai (Carsun Chang) 张君劢

The Development of Neo-Confucian Thought. Rowman and Littlefield, 1957. [written in English]

“Human Rights Are the Basis of Constitutionalism.” Contemporary Chinese Thought (Special issue on Rights and Human Rights). 31, 1 (Fall 1999): 100-03.

—– et al., A Manifesto on the Reappraisal of Chinese Culture; Our Joint Understanding of the Sinological Study Relating to World Cultural Outlook. n.p. [1957?].

The Third Force in China. NY: Bookman Associates, 1952.

Wang Yang-ming: Idealist Philosopher of Sixteenth-Century China. Jamaica, NY: St. John’s University Press, 1962.

Zhang Kangkang 张抗抗

“Bitter Dreams.” Tr. Katharina Byrne. In Yang Bian, ed., The Time is Not Ripe: Contemporary China’s Best Writers and Their Stories. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1991, 287-326.

“Cruelty.” Tr. Richard King. Renditions 49 (Spring 1998): 115-52. Rpt. in Richard King, ed., Living with Thier Past: Post-Urban Youth Fiction. Hong Kong: Renditions Paperbacks, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2003, 33-72.

“The ‘Grand’ Realm Versus the ‘True’ Realm.” In Hui Wu, ed., Once Iron Girls: Essays on Gender by Post-Mao Chinese Literary Women. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2010, 139-40.

The Invisible Companion. Tr. Daniel Bryant. HK: New World Press, 1996.

Living With Their Past: Post-Urban Youth Fiction. Ed. By Richard King. Hong Kong: Renditions, 2002.

“Northern Lights.” Tr. Daniel Bryant. Chinese Literature (Winter 1988): 92-102.

“The Peony Garden.” In Richard King, ed., Living with Their Past: Post-Urban Youth Fiction. Hong Kong: Renditions Paperacks, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2003, 15-29.

“A Preface for Myself.” In Hui Wu, ed., Once Iron Girls: Essays on Gender by Post-Mao Chinese Literary Women. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2010, 137-38.

“The Right to Love” [爱的权利]. Trs. R.A. Roberts and Angela Knox. In One Half of the Sky: Selections from Contemporary Women Writers of China. London: William Heinemann, 1987, 51-81.

“Sandstorm.” In Richard King, ed., Living with Their Past: Post-Urban Youth Fiction. Hong Kong: Renditions Paperacks, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2003, 77-138.

“Sea Turtle.” In Loud Sparrows: Contemporary Chinese Short-Shorts. Trs. Aili Mu, Julie Chiu, and Howard Goldblatt. NY: Columbia UP, 2006, 121-22.

“The Spirit of Fire” (Huo de jingling). Tr. Nienling Liu. In The Rose Colored Dinner. HK: Joint Publishing Company, 1988, 51-59.

“The Wasted Years” (Kongbai). Tr. Shen Zhen. Chinese Literature 3 (1982): 5-16. Also in Seven Contemporary Chinese Women Writers. Beijing: Panda Books, 1982, 235-48.

“We Need Two Worlds.” In Hui Wu, ed., Once Iron Girls: Essays on Gender by Post-Mao Chinese Literary Women. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2010, 131-35.

White Poppies and Other Stories. Trs. Karen Germant and Chen Zeping. Ithaca: Cornell East Asia Series, 2011.

Zhang Kangkang and Mei Jin

“The Tolling of a Distant Bell.” Tr. Daniel Bryant. In Michael S. Duke, ed., Contemporary Chinese Literature: An Anthology of Post-Mao Fiction and Poetry. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1984, 1985, 98-108.

Zhang Kun 張堃

“Performing You–Remembering Hsin Yu” [演出的你–懷詩人辛鬱]. Tr. John J. S. Balcom. The Taipei Chinese Pen 177 (Summer 2016): 10-11.

Zhang Langlang 张郎郎

“My Home is Next to Tiananmen Square” [我家就在天安门旁边]. In Geremie Barme, New Ghosts, Old Dreams: Chinese Rebel Voices. NY: Times Books, 1992, 111-20.

“The Legend of the Sun Brigade.” Tr. Helen Wang. In Henry Y. H. Zhao and John Cayley, eds., Under-Sky Underground: Chinese Writing Today. Wellsweep, 1994, 87-95.

Zhang Lili

“Green Barracks.” Tr. Yuanxi Ma. In Xiaomei Chen, ed., Reading the Right Text: An Anthology of Contemporary Chinese Drama. Honolulu: University of Hawai’i Press, 2003, 336-90.

Zhang Ling 张翎

Gold Mountain Blues. Tr. Nicky Harman. Toronto: Viking Canada, 2011.

[Abstract: In the epic storytelling tradition of Amy Tan and Jiang Rong comes Gold Mountain Blues, a rich saga chronicling the lives of five generations of a Chinese family from Guandong Province transformed by the promise of a better life in Gold Mountain, the Chinese name for Canada’s majestic West Coast. In 1879, 16-year-old Fong Tak-Fat boards a ship to Canada determined to make a life for himself and support his family back home. He will blast rocks for the Pacific Railway, launder linens for his countrymen, and save every penny he makes to reunite his family—because his heart remains in China. Spanning from the 1860s to the present day, Gold Mountain Blues relates the struggles and sacrifices of the labourers who built the Canadian Pacific Railway and who laid the groundwork for the evolution of the modern Chinese-Canadian identity. A novel about family, hope and sacrifice, Gold Mountain Blues is a marvelous saga from a remarkable new Canadian voice.]

Woman at Forty” [女人四十]. Tr. Emily Jones. Paper Republic 9.

Zhang Lingling

“Afternoon in the Study.” Tr. Norma Liu Hsiao. The Chinese Pen (Winter 1973): 41-43.

Zhang Manjuan

“A Bowl of White Rice.” Tr. Kenneth Lee. The Chinese Pen (Autumn 1990): 27-32.

Zhang Mei

“A Record.” Tr. Patricia Sieber. In Patricia Sieber, ed., Red Is Not the Only Color: Contemporary Chinese Fiction on Love and Sex between Women, Collected Stories. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, 2001, 73-92.

Zhang Mingfei

“The Windmaster.” Tr. Timothy C. Wong. In Wong, Stories for Saturday: Twentieth Century Chinese Popular Fiction. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2003, 109-24.

Zhang Mingquan

“Trust Man a Little Bit More.” In Hualing Nieh, ed., Literature of the Hundred Flowers, Volume II: Poetry and Fiction. NY: Columbia UP, 1981, 131-32.

Zhang Mingyuan

“Wild Grass.” Tr. Philip F. Williams. In Xiaomei Chen, ed., Reading the Right Text: An Anthology of Contemporary Chinese Drama. Honolulu: University of Hawai’i Press, 2003, 391-457.

Zhang Mo (Chang Mo)

Poems in: China, China: Contemporary Poetry from Taiwan, Republic of China. Eds. Germain Groogenbroodt and Peter Stinson. Ninove, Belgium: Point Books, 1986.

Zhang Qinghai

“Pick Up the Torch.” Tr. Robert Reynolds. The Chinese Pen (Autumn 1985): 1-12.

Zhang Ran

“The Eye of Dusk.” Tr. Hwang Ying-tsih. The Chinese Pen (Winter 1991): 1-25.

Zhang Shizhao 章士钊

“Self-Awareness.” Contemporary Chinese Thought (Special issue on Rights and Human Rights). 31, 1 (Fall 1999): 48-53. Rpt. in The Chinese Human Rights Reader: Documents and Commentary, 1900-2000. Eds. Stephen C. Angle and Marina Svensson. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 2001, 57-61.

Zhang Tianyi 张天翼

Big Lin and Little Lin. Tr. Gladys Yang. Peking: Foreign Languages Press, 1958.

“The Breasts of a Girl.” Eds. Yuan and Payne. Contemporaryu Chinese Short Stories. London: Noel Carrington, 1946, 97-117.

“The Bulwark.” Tr. Nathan Mao. In Joseph S.M. Lau, Leo Ou-fan Lee, and C.T. Hsia, eds., Modern Chinese Stories and Novellas, 1918-1948. NY: Columbia UP.

“Dream” (Meng). Tr. Shu-ying Tsau. In Tsau, Zhang Tianyi’s Fiction: The Beginning of Proletarian Fiction in China. Ph.d. diss. University of Toronto, 1976, 217-32.

“Generosity.” Tr. W.J.F. Jenner. In Jenner, ed., Modern Chinese Stories. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1970, 101-106.

“Going to the Cinema.” People’s China 12 (1953): 33-36. Rpt. in Zhang Tianyi, Stories of Chinese Young Pioneers. Peking: Foreign Languages Press, 1954, 1-9.

“Hatred.” Tr. Tsau Shu-ying. Bulletin of Concerned Asian Scholars 8 (1976): 63-71.

“How Lo Wen-ying Became a Young Pioneer.” Chinese Literature 3 (1954): 139-46.

“The Inside Story.” In Chi-chen Wang, tr. Contemporary Chinese Short Stories. NY: Columbia University Press, 1944, 9-17.

Magic Gourd. Tr. Gladys Yang. Peking: Foreign Languages Press, 1959.

“Mid-Autumn Festival.” Tr. Mary Gregory. Tea Leaves 1, 1 (1965): 12-23. Also Tr. Ronald Miao. Columbia Anthology of Modern Chinese Literature. NY: CUP, 1995, 136-42.

“Mr. Hua Wei.” Tr. J. Vochala and I Lervitova. New Orient 5, 4 (1966): 123-26. Also Tr. Yeh Chun-chan. In Three Seasons and Other Stories. London: Staples Press, 1946, 111-118.

“Mutation.” In Edgar Snow, ed., Living China; Modern Chinese Stories. NY: John Day Co., 1937, 267-88.

“A New Life.” Tr. Carl Durley. Renditions, 2 (1974): 31-49. Tr. Tso Cheng. “New Life.” Chinese Literature 1 (1955): 160-180; Wang Chi-chen. “A New Life.” In Chi-chen Wang, tr.Stories of China at War. NY: Columbia UP, 1946, 133-44.

The Pidgin Warrior [洋涇浜奇俠]. Tr. David Hull. London: Balestier Press, 2017.

[Abstract: In the 1930s, wartime Shanghai is a cosmopolitan metropolis where conmen and dance-hall girls mingle with refugees streaming in from the occupied areas. One of those refugees is Shi Zhaochang.  Having read too many gongfu novels, he is convinced that only an elite martial artist with magical powers can save China.  He flees to Shanghai on a quixotic search for a gongfu master who can teach him the secret techniques that will make himself that warrior.  The fate of China itself hangs in the balance, and everyone has a scheme to save the nation, or at least get rich trying. The Pidgin Warrior is a rollicking satire of nationalism and modernity that is remarkably relevant today.]

“Reunion.” In Chi-chen Wang, tr. Contemporary Chinese Short Stories. NY: Columbia University Press, 1944, 119-26.

“The Road.” In Chi-chen Wang, tr. Contemporary Chinese Short Stories. NY: Columbia University Press, 1944, 1-8.

“Smile.” In Chi-chen Wang, tr. Contemporary Chinese Short Stories. NY: Columbia University Press, 1944, 108-18.

“Spring Breeze.” Tr. Hou Chien. In C.T. Hsia, ed., Twentieth-Century Chinese Stories. NY: Columbia UP, 1971, 64-89.

Stories of Chinese Young Pioneers. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1962. [includes: “How Lo Wen-ying Became a Young Pioneer,” “They and We,” and “Yung-sheng at Home”]

“A Summer Night’s Dream.” Tr. Sidney Shapiro. Chinese Literature 1 (1962): 3-39.

“They and We.” Chinese Literature 3 (1954): 146-151.

“Twenty-one Men.” Tr. Sze Ming-ting. China Today 1, 4 (1935): 75-77.

A Zhang Tianyi Reader. Trs. Liu Jun and Erik Nilsson. Beijing: China Intercontinental Press,  2013.

Zhang Wei 张炜

The Ancient Ship. Tr. Howard Goldblatt. NY: HarperCollins, 2008.

The Black Shark Sea.” Tr. T. C. Russell. World Literature in English Translation. University of Manitoba.

Blending in the Untamed Land.” Tr. Terrence Russell. Studies in Asia Series II, 2, 2 (Fall 2005): 98-111.

September’s Fable [九月的寓言] (excerpt). Tr. Terrence Russell. Words Without Borders: The Online Magazine for International Literature.

September’s Fable. Trs. Terrence Russell and Shawn Xian Ye. Paramus, NJ: Homa and Sekey Books, 2007.

Seven Kinds of Mushrooms (excerpt). Tr. Terrence Russell. Muse Apprentice Guild.

“You Are on the Highland” (excerpt). Tr. Joel Martinsen. Pathlight: New Chinese Writing 1 (2011): 10-19.

Zhang Weixin

“Story of a Small Village.” Tr. Li Ziliang. Chinese Literature (Summer 1993): 130-32.

Zhang Wenda

“I’m All for Fox Fairies.” Tr. David Pollard. Renditions 29/30 (Spring/Aut. 1988): 182-83.

Zhang Wenhuan (Chang Wen-huan) 張文環

“The Analects and the Chicken.” Tr. Robert Backus. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 29 (2012): 49-70.

“A Betel Nut Basket.” Tr. Lili Selden. Taiwan Literature English Translation Series 22 (Jan. 2008): 77-80.

“The Capon.” Tr. Robert Backus. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 29 (2012): 89-140.

“Epiphany.” Tr. Robert Backus. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 29 (2012): 71-88.

“Fallen Bud.” Tr. Bert Scruggs. Taiwan Literature English Translation Series 30 (2012): 161-186.

“The Geidan‘s House. Tr. Lili Selden. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 30 (2012): 197-245.

“The Lost Child.” Tr. Patricia Welch. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 29 (2012): 37-48.

“Overburdened.” Tr. Lili Selden. Taiwan Literature English Translation Series 22 (Jan. 2008): 21-28.

“Portrait of a Geitan” (excerpt). Trs. Sim Yee Chiang and Sayuri Okamoto. Asymptote (Jan. 2012).

“Returning Home from Japan.” Tr. Elizabeth S. Wong. Taiwan Literature English Translation Series 2 (1997): 67-70.

“The Scallions Jar.” Tr. Christopher Ahn. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 29 (2012): 25-36.

Zhang Xiguo (Chang Hsi-kuo, Chang S. K.)

“The Amateur Cameraman.” Tr. Jeffrey C. Bent. In David Der-wei Wang, ed., Running Wild: New Chinese Writers. NY: Columbia UP, 1994, 197-237.

“Banana Freighter.” Tr. Jeffrey Toy Eng. The Chinese Pen (Summer 1987): 82-92.

The City Trilogy: Five Jade Disks, Defenders of the Dragon City, and Tale of a Feather. Tr. John Balcolm. NY: Columbia UP, 2003.

Chess King. Hongkong: Chinese University of HK, 1986.

“Les conquèrants.” Tr. Marc Gilbert. In Angel Pino and Issabelle Rabut, eds., A mes frères du village de garrison: Anthologie de nouvelles taiwanaises contemporaines. Paris: Blue de China, 2001, 55-91.

“The Conquerors.” Tr. Ross Lonergan. In Michael S. Duke, ed., Worlds of Modern Chinese Fiction. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1991, 125-44.

“Earth.” Tr. John Kwan-Terry. In Joseph S.M. Lau, ed., Chinese Stories From Taiwan: 1960-1970. NY: Columbia University Press, 1976, 145-93. Also in Kwok-kan Tam, Terry Siu-Han Yip, Wimal Dissanayake, eds., A Place of One’s Own: Stories of Self in China, Hong Kong, and Singapore. NY: Oxford UP, 1999, 330-75.

“Flute.” Tr. David Steelman. The Chinese Pen (Summer 1975): 55-76. Republished in Nancy Ing, ed., Winter Plum: Contemporary Chinese Fiction. Taipei: Chinese Materials Center, 1982, 21-45.

“Immolation.” Tr. Diane Ying. The Chinese Pen (Spring 1975): 35-38.

“Red Child.” Tr. Jane Parish Yang. The Chinese Pen (Winter 1981): 51-71. Also as “Red Boy.” Tr. Jeannette L. Faurot. In Joseph S.M. Lau, ed., The Unbroken Chain: An Anthology of Taiwan Fiction Since 1926. Bloomington: IUP, 1983, 218-31.

Zhang Xian 张弦

“A Corner Forsaken by Love.” Tr. Hu Zhihui. Chinese Literature 11 (1982): 5-26. Also in Contemporary Chinese Short Stories. Beijing: Chinese Literature, 1983, 42-70. Also in Helen F. Siu and Zelda Stern, eds., Mao’s Harvest: Voices From China’s New Generation. NY: Oxford University Press, 1983, 106-124. Also trans. by Katherine Lu as “A Place Forgotten by Love.” In Lee Yee, ed., The New Realism: Writings From China After the Cultural Revolution. NY: Hippocrene Books, 1983, 244-60.

“The Widow.” Tr. Howard Goldblattt and Ellen Yeung. In Michael S. Duke, ed., Contemporary Chinese Literature: An Anthology of Post-Mao Fiction and Poetry. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1984, 1985, 91-97. also in Bulletin of Concerned Asian Scholars, 16.3 (1984): 38-43.

Zhang Xianliang 张贤亮

“After Twenty Years of Silence We Lick Our Wounds: Our Battle for a Place in World Literature.” Tr. W.J.F. Jenner. In Helmut Martin, ed., Modern Chinese Writers: Self-Portrayals. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1992, 80-83.

“Bitter Springs–A Truck Driver’s Story.” Tr. Rui An. In Yang Bian, ed., The Time is Not Ripe: Contemporary China’s Best Writers and Their Stories. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1991, 333-82.

“Body and Soul.” Tr. Phillip F.C. Williams. In W.C. Chau, ed., Prize Winning Stories From China: 1980-81. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1985, 58-92.

Getting Used to Dying. Tr. M. Avery. London: Collins, 1991.

“Good Morning Friends: Excerpts.” Tr. Mark Kruger. Renditions 31 (1989): 7-30.

Grass Soup. Tr. M. Avery. London: Secker and Warburg, 1994.

“The Great Wind.” In Hualing Nieh, ed., Literature of the Hundred Flowers, Volume II: Poetry and Fiction. NY: Columbia UP, 1981, 133-35.

Half of Man is Woman. New York: Norton, 1986.

“Letter to the Yen-ho Editorial Board.” In Hualing Nieh, ed., Literature of the Hundred Flowers, Volume II: Poetry and Fiction. NY: Columbia UP, 1981, 136-40.

Mimosa. Tr. G. Yang. Beijing: Panda, 1985.

My Bodhi Tree. Tr. Martha Avery. London: Secker and Warburg, 1996.

“Shorblac: A Driver’s Story.” Tr. Zhu Hong, In Zhu Hong, ed., The Chinese Western. NY: Ballantine, 1988, 117-52. Also in Spring of Bitter Waters: Short Fiction from China Today. London: W.H. Allen and Co., 1989.

“The Story of an Old Man and a Dog.” Tr. Zhu Hong, In Zhu Hong, ed., The Chinese Western. NY: Ballantine, 1988,, 75-100. Also in Spring of Bitter Waters: Short Fiction from China Today. London: W.H. Allen and Co., 1989.

Zhang Xiaofeng

“Lumps of Coal.” Tr. Jane Parish Yang. The Chinese Pen (Spring 1985): 33-60.

“A Variety of Lovely Things.” Tr. Christopher Lupke. The Chinese Pen (Summer 1985): 63-73.

Zhang Xiaolu

“The Phillips Electric Razor.” Tr. Thomas Moran. In Geng Song and Qingxiang Yang, eds., The Sound of Salt Forming: Short Stories by the Post-80s Generation in China. Honolulu: University of Hawaii, 2016, 193-226.

Zhang Xin 张欣

“Certainly Not Coincidence.” In Six Contemporary Chinese Women Writers, IV. Beijing: Panda, 1995, 264-74.

“Invincible Time.” Chinese Literature (Spring 1997).

What Hope For.” Chinese Literature (Winter 1998).

Zhang Xinxin 张辛欣

“A ‘Bengal Tigress’ Interviews Herself: A Panorama of Our Times from Within.” Tr. Ellen Lai-shan Yeung. In Helmut Martin, ed., Modern Chinese Writers: Self-portrayals. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1992, 137-46.

“The Dreams of Our Generation” and “Selections From Beijing’s People.” Ed. and tr. by Edward Gunn, Donna Jung and Patricia Farr. Ithaca, NY: Cornell East Asia Papers, 1986.

“Dust.” Tr. W.J.F. Jenner. Renditions 27-28 (1987) 163-73.

“How Did I Miss You?” Tr. Angela Knox. In R.A. Roberts and Angela Knox, eds., One Half of the Sky. Heinneman: London, 1987, 92-124. Also trans. by Nienling Liu. In The Rose Coloured Dinner. HK: Joint Publishing, 1988, 134-66. Also in Kwok-kan Tam, Terry Siu-Han Yip, Wimal Dissanayake, eds., A Place of One’s Own: Stories of Self in China, Hong Kong, and Singapore. NY: Oxford UP, 1999, 3189-214.

“The ‘June 4 Syndrome’: Spiritual and Ideological Schizophrenia.” Tr. Jeffrey Kinkley. In Helmut Martin, ed., Modern Chinese Writers: Self-portrayals. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1992, 165-67.

“Theatrical Effects.” Tr. Jeffrey C. Kinkley. Fiction 8, 2/3 (1987): 146-65.

Zhang Xinxin 张辛欣 and Sang Ye 桑晔

Chinese Lives. Eds. and trs. W.J.F. Jenner and Delia David. London: Macmillan London, 1987. Also as Chinese Profiles. Beijing : Chinese Literature, 1986.

Zhang Xingjian

“Goodwives” [Poniangmen]. Tr. David Pollard. In Pollard, ed., The Chinese Essay. NY: Columbia UP, 2000, 363-67.

Zhang Xiuya

“The Old Man and the Duck.” Tr. Una Y.T. Chen. The Chinese Pen (Summer 1980): 73-88.

Zhang Yanxun

“The Frog-Catchers.” Tr. Norma Liu Hsiao. The Chinese Pen (Spring 1973): 67-77.

Zhang Yi

“Brothers From Taipei.” Tr. Chen I-djen. The Chinese Pen (Summer 1985): 74-85.

Zhang Yiwei 张怡微

“Only Later.” Tr. Poppy Toland. Pathlight (Winter, 2013): 133-44.

“Some Reluctant Recollections.” Tr. Pei-yin Lin. In Geng Song and Qingxiang Yang, eds., The Sound of Salt Forming: Short Stories by the Post-80s Generation in China. Honolulu: University of Hawaii, 2016, 161-73.

Zhang Yongxiang

“Autumn Execution.” Tr. Yu Jen-chang and David Steelman. The Chinese Pen (Autumn 1977): 37-121.

Zhang Yueran 张悦然

Binary.” Tr. Jeremy Tiang. Paper Republic (2015).

Dirty Rain.” Tr. Jeremy Tiang. Asymptote (Jan. 2012).

“Home.” Tr. Geng Song.” In Geng Song and Qingxiang Yang, eds., The Sound of Salt Forming: Shorts Stories by the Post-’80s Generation in China. Honlulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2016, 1-20.

Ten Loves. Tr. Jeremy Tiang. Singapore: Math Paper Press, 2013.

[Abstract: A bride is haunted by her dead lover on her wedding day. A medieval scholar’s act of betrayal goads his wife into murder. A fairy tale character meets his first girlfriend after a gap of many years. Alternately charming and chilling, this collection of stories from influential young Chinese writer Zhang Yueran takes a sideways look at affairs of the heart.]

“A Thousand and One Nights.” Pathlight: New Chinese Writing 2 (2012): 112-21.

Zhang Zao 张枣

“Farewell (to the) Fortress of Solitude,” “A Year of Letters.” Tr. Nicholas Kaldis. In Qingping Wang, ed., Contemporary Poetry from China: Push Open the Window. Port Townsend, Washington: Copper Canyon Press. 2011, 95-101.

“The Optician” and “Chorus.” Tr. John Cayley. In John Cayley and Henry Zhao, ed., Under Sky Underground. Wellsweep, 1994.

Mirror. Tr. Fiona Sze-Lorrain. St. Paul, MN: Zephyr Press, 2015.

“Night View of New York.” Tr. Yanbing Chen. In Henry YH Zhao, Yanbing Chen, and John Rosenwald. Fissures: Chinese Writing Today. Brookline, MA: Zephyr Press, 2000, 144-46.

Zhang Zhihao

“Dear Wisdom Tooth.” Tr. Josh Stenberg. In Liu Ding, Carol Yinghua Lu, and Ra Page, eds., Shi Cheng: Short Stories from Urban China. Manchester, UK: Comma Press, 2012.

Zhang Zhen

“The Foreign Beach.” Tr. Yanbing Chen. In Henry YH Zhao, Yanbing Chen, and John Rosenwald. Fissures: Chinese Writing Today. Brookline, MA: Zephyr Press, 2000, 96-97.

“Poetry,” and “Revolution.” In Wang Ping, ed., New Generation: Poems from China Today. Brooklyn: Hanging Loose Press, 1999, 207-09.

Zhang Zheng

“Fad.” In Loud Sparrows: Contemporary Chinese Short-Shorts. Trs. Aili Mu, Julie Chiu, and Howard Goldblatt. NY: Columbia UP, 2006, 11-15.

Zhang Zhilu

“A Broken Promise.” Tr. Richard A. Kunst. In Jianing Chen, ed. Themes in Contemporary Chinese Literature. Beijing: New World Press, 1993, 299-302.

Zhang Zizhang 张子樟

“The Banyan Tree.” Tr. Anne Behnke. The Chinese Pen (Autumn 1979): 63-92.

“The Hole.” Tr. Howard Goldblatt. In Nancy Ing, ed., Winter Plum: Contemporary Chinese Fiction. Taipei: Chinese Materials Center, 1982, 1-20.

“Mishap.” Tr. Jane Parish Yang. The Chinese Pen (Spring 1981): 1-24.

Zhao Danian

“Three Sketches.” In Carolyn Choa and David Su Li-qun, eds., The Vintage Book of Contemporary Chinese Fiction. NY: Vintage Books, 2001, 229-36

Zhao Dan 赵丹

“Rigid Control Ruins Art and Literature.” Chinese Literature 1 (1981): 108-11.

Zhao Haihong 赵海虹

“1923–A Fantasy.” Trs. Nicky Harman and Pang Zhaoxia. Renditions 77/78 (Spring/Autumn 2012): 239-54. In Mingwei Song and Theodore Huters, eds., The Reincarnated Giant: An Anthology of Twenty-First-Century Chinese Science Fiction. NY: Columbia University Press, 2018, 258-78.

“Excavation.” Tr. Haihong Zhao. Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet 25 (April 2010).

Zhao Qiong

Poems in Wang Ping, ed., New Generation: Poems from China Today. Brooklyn: Hanging Loose Press, 1999, 213-15.

Zhao Qingge 赵清阁

“Can This Also Be Called an Autobiography?” Tr. Jing M. Wang. In Wang, ed., Jumping Through Hoops: Autobiograpical Stories by Modern Chinese Women Writers. HK: Hong Kong UP, 2003, 189-96.

The Legend of the White Snake. Beijing: New World, 1998.

Zhao Shuli 赵树理

Changes in Li Village. Tr. Gladys Yang. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1954, 55-92.

“Little Erhei’s Marriage.” Chinese Literature 5 (1979): 28-54.

“Lucky.” Tr. Cyril Birch. In Lau, Hsia, Lee, eds., Modern Chinese Stories and Novellas 1919-1949. NY: Columbia UP, 1981, 324-333.

“Meng Xiangying Stands Up.” Tr. W.J.F. Jenner. In W.J.F. Jenner, ed. Modern Chinese Stories. London: Oxford UP, 1970, 121-38.

“A New Canteen and Old Memories.” Tr. Yang Hsien-yi. Chinese Literature 12 (1959): 107-11.

“Patriarch.” Tr. Sidney Shapiro. Chinese Literature 3 (1964): 19-30.

“Registration.” Chinese Literature (1952): 5-33. Also in Registration and Other Stories by Contemporary Chinese Writers. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1954, 55-92.

Rhymes of Li Youcai and Other Stories. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1980.

Sanliwan Village. Tr. Gladys Yang. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1964. Excerpted in Chinese Literature, 3 (1957): 3-137.

“The Tax Collecter.” Tr. Joseph Kalmer. Eastern World 4 (1950).

“The Unglovable Hands.” Chinese Literature 1 (1961): 44-57. Also trans. by Nathan K. Mao and Winston L.Y. Yang. In Kai-yu Hsu, ed., Literature of the People’s Republic of China. Bloomington: IUP, 1980, 494-502.

“The Widow Tian and Her Pumpkins.” Tr. Jeffrey C. Kinkley. In Helen Siu, ed., Furrows–Peasants, Intellectuals, and the State: Stories and Histories From Modern China. Stanford: SUP, 1990, 103-105.

Zhao Shumin

“Autumn.” Tr. Loh I-cheng. The Chinese Pen (Autumn 1982): 1-55.

“Kitty is Dead.” In Chinese Women Writers’ Association, eds., The Muse of China Volume II: A Collection of Prose and Short Stories. Taipei: Chinese Women Writers’ Association, 1978, 1-25.

Zhao Tianyi 趙天義 (Chao Tien-yi)

“Eluanbi–the Southermost Point of Taiwan” [鵝鑾鼻]. Tr. Yanwing Leung. The Taipei Chinese Pen 174 (Aut. 2015): 35-36.

Zhao Tiaokuang

“In the Pawnshop.” Tr. Timothy C. Wong. In Wong, Stories for Saturday: Twentieth Century Chinese Popular Fiction. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2003, 195-204.

Zhao Yiheng

“The Woman in Crimson.” Tr. John Minford. In Under-Sky Underground. London: Wellsweep, 1994, 33-38.

Zhao Ying

Red Bean Sticky Cakes and Running” [红豆年糕与奔跑]. Tr. Victoria Hsieh. Words without Borders (2008).

Zhao Yuxiang (Chao Yu-hsiang)

“Two Ways of Looking at It.” In Saturday Afternoon at the Mill and Other One-Act Plays. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1957, 79-95.

Zhao Yuan

“The Courtyard of My Childhood.” Trs. Ren Zhong and Yuzhi Yang. In Hometown and Childhood. San Francisco: Long River Press, 2005, 41-50.

Zhao Zhenkai (Bei Dao and Shi Mo)

“The Homecoming Stranger.” Tr. Bonnie S. McDougall and Susette Ternent Cooke. In Waves. Tr. and ed. Bonnie S. McDougall. HK: Chinese University Press, 1985. Also trans. by Susette Cooke. In Michael S. Duke, ed., Contemporary Chinese Literature: An Anthology of Post-Mao Fiction and Poetry. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1985, 11-18. also in Bulletin of Concerned Asian Scholars, 16.3 (1984): 8-13.

“Moon on the Manuscript.” Tr. Bonnie S. McDougall. Renditions 19-20 (1983): 173-78. Also in Waves.

“13 Happiness Street.” Tr. Bonnie S. McDougall. In Geremie Barme and John Minford, eds., Seeds of Fire: Chinese Voices of Conscience. HK: Far Eastern Economic Review, 1986, and NY: Hill and Wang, 1988, 2-17.

“Waves.” Tr. Susette Cooke. Renditions 19-20 (1983): 125-67. Reprinted in Stephen C. Soong and John Minford, eds., Trees on the Mountain: An Anthology of New Chinese Writing. HK: Chinese University Press, 1984, 125-68. Also in Waves.

Waves. Tr. and ed. Bonnie S. McDougall. HK: Chinese University Press, 1985.

Zhen Danyi

Poems in Wang Ping, ed., New Generation: Poems from China Today. Brooklyn: Hanging Loose Press, 1999, 219-21.

Wings of Summer – Selected Poems, 1984 – 1997. Tr.Luo Hui. Hong Kong: Sixth Finger Press, 2003.

Zheng Chouyu (Cheng Ch’ou-yu)

Poems in: The Isle Full of Noises: Modern Chinese Poetry from Taiwan. Ed/tr. Dominic Cheung. NY: Columbia UP, 1987, 73-78.

Zheng, Egoyan 伊格言

“The Dream Devourer” [chps. 5-7]. Tr. Cara Healey. In Mingwei Song and Theodore Huters, ed., The Reincarnated Giant: An Anthology of Twenty-First-Century Chinese Science Fiction. NY: Columbia University Press, 2018, 111-29.

Zheng Guojiang (Cheng Kwok Kong)

“Years like Water.” Tr. Wee Kek Koon. Renditions 79 (Spring 2013): 108-110.

Zheng Hengxiong 鄭恆雄 (Jeng Hengsyung)

“Ten Bunun Animal Stories.” Tr. Jeng Hengsyung. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 41 (2018): 169-80.

Zheng Huan (Cheng Huan)

“Snake Fruit” [She guo]. Tr. Sylvia Li-chun Lin. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 16 (2005): 51-66.

“The Stranger.” Tr. Howard Goldblatt. The Chinese Pen (Winter 1974): 53-64.

Zheng Min 郑敏

Poems in: The Orchid Boat: Women Poets of China. Ed. Kenneth Rexroth and Ling Chung. NY: McGraw-Hill, 1972;

Poems in Twentieth Century Chinese Poetry. Ed. Kai-yu Hsu.

Zheng Mingli

“A Chip Off the Old Block.” Tr. Michelle Yeh. The Chinese Pen (Summer 1992): 29-35.

Zheng Qingwen (Cheng Ch’ing-wen or Tseng Ching-wen) 郑清文

“Betel Palm Village.” Tr. Charles Hartmann. In Joseph Lau, ed. The Unbroken Chain: An Anthology of Fiction from Taiwan. Bloomington: Indian UP, 1983, 74-84. Also trans. as “Betel Nut Town” by James R. Landers. The Chinese Pen (Winter, 1983): 26-44.

“Braids.” Tr. Joseph Allen. Renditions 35/36: 52-64.

“A Fisherman’s Family.” Tr. Jane Parish Yang. The Chinese Pen (Autumn 1984): 72-79.

“The Last of the Gentlemen.” Tr. Chen I-djen. The Chinese Pen (Summer 1986): 1-30.

Magnolia: Stories of Taiwanese Women. Taiwan Writers Translations Series. Santa Barbara: Center for Taiwan Studies, University of California, 2005.

“The Mosquito.” Tr. Anne Behnke. The Chinese Pen (Winter 1978): 68-81.

“The River Suite.” Tr. Hsiao Lien-ren. The Chinese Pen (Spring 1974): 5-31.

“Secrets.” Tr. Jeffrey Toy Eng. The Chinese Pen (Spring 1990): 13-39.

“The Social Significance and Artistic Quality of Literary Works.” Tr. Robert Backus. Taiwan Literature English Translation Series 5 (1999): 3-8.

“Spring, Morning, and the Cry of the Spotted-Neck Doves.” Tr. Rosemary Haddon. Taiwan Literature English Translation Series 22 (Jan. 2008): 29-44.

“Spring Rain” (Chun yu). Tr. Karen Steffen Chung. In Pang-yuan Chi, ed., Taiwan Literature in Chinese and English. Taipei: Commonwealth Publishing, 1999, 27-70.

The Three-Legged Horse. Ed. Pang-yuan Chi. NY: Columbia UP, 1999. [short story collection]

“The White Period” (Bai de shidai). Tr. Sara Neswald. Taiwan Literature English Translation Series 1 (Aug. 1996).

Zheng Wanlong

“The Clock” (Zhong). Tr. Jeanne Tai. In Jeanne Tai, ed., Spring Bamboo: A Collection of Contemporary Chinese Short Stories. NY: Random House, 1989, 3-18. Also translated as “The Clock.” Tr. Caroline Mason. Renditions 39: 76-85.

“Mother Lode.” Tr. Jeffrey C. Kinkley. In Michael S. Duke, ed., Worlds of Modern Chinese Fiction. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1991, 319-28.

“My Light.” Tr. Caroline Mason. Renditions 46: 7-46.

“Springtide, Rolling Along.” Tr. Kai-yu Hsu. In Hsu, ed. The Chinese Literary Scene: A Writers’ Visit to the People’s Republic. NY: Vintage Books, 1975, 119-30.

Strange Tales from Strange Lands. Ithaca: Cornell East Asia Series, 1993.

Zheng Xiaolü 郑小驴

The Festival of Ghosts.” Trs. Karen Gernant and Chen Zeping. Writers without Borders (Dec. 2011).

Zheng Xiaoqiong 郑小琼

“Four poems.” Tr. Jonathan Stalling. Chinese Literature Today (Winter/Spring 2011): 63-65.

“Eight Poems.” Tr. Zhou Xiaojing. Chinese Literature Today 6, 1 (2017): 102-109.

“The Woolen Mill.” Tr. Zhou Xiaojing. Chinese Literature Today 6, 1 (2017): 110-13.

Zheng Yi 郑义

“Maple” (枫), in Perry Link, ed., Stubborn Weeds: Popular and Controversial Chinese Literature after the Cultural Revolution. Bloomington: IUP, 1983, 57-73.

“Morning Fog” (晨雾). Tr. Li Guoqing. Chinese Literature (Autumn 1989): 38-49.

Old Well (老井). Tr. David Kwan. San Francisco: China Books and Periodicals, 1989.

Scarlet Memorial: Tales of Cannibalism in Modern China. Tr./ed. T. P. Sym. Boulder: Westview Press, 1996.

Zheng Zhengduo 郑振铎

“A Contemporary Appraisal of Lin Shu.” Tr. Diana Yu. Renditions 5: 26-29.

Zhi Xia 知侠

The Railway Guerrillas. Peking: Foreign Languages Press, 1966.

Zhong Guoqiang 鐘國強 (Chung Kwok-keung)

Poems.” Trs. Diana Shi and George O’Connell. Pangolin House 5, 1 (Winter 2016-17).

Zhong Jufang

“Losing the Feet.” In Loud Sparrows: Contemporary Chinese Short-Shorts. Trs. Aili Mu, Julie Chiu, and Howard Goldblatt. NY: Columbia UP, 2006, 8-10.

Zhong Lihe 鐘理合

“Bamboo-Root Village.” Tr. John Balcolm. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 21 (July 2007): 21-34.

La Ferme de la Montagne Li. Tr. Artur K Wardega. Artois Presses Université, 2010.

“Flies.” Tr. John Balcom. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 35 (2015): 103-8.

“Flight” [奔逃]. Tr. John Balcom. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 35 (2015): 91-102.

“For Richer or for Poorer” [貧賤夫妻]. Tr. Howard Goldblatt. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 35 (2015): 63-76.

From the Old Country: Stories and Sketches of China and Taiwan. Ed/Tr. T. M. McClellan. NY: Columbia University Press, 2014. [MCLC Resource Center review by John Balcom]

[Abstract: Though he lived most of his life in rural South Taiwan, Zhong Lihe spent several years in Manchuria and Peking, moving among an eclectic mix of ethnicities, social classes, and cultures. His fictional portraits unfold on Japanese battlefields and in Peking slums, as well as in the remote, impoverished hill-country villages and farms of his native Hakka districts. His scenic descriptions are deft and atmospheric, and his psychological explorations are acute. The first anthology to present his work in English, this volume features two novellas, ten short stories, and four short prose works.]

“Hometowners.” Tr. Kevin Tsai. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 35 (2015): 39-52.

“A Marriage of Two with the Same Family Name.” Tr. Sylvia Li-chun Lin. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 35 (2015): 77-90.

“Mountain Fire.” Tr. Yingtsih Hwang. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 35 (2015): 123-36.

“Old Country Folk” [原鄉人, 1959]. Tr. Tommy McClellan. The Edinburgh Review 124 (August 2008): 53-68.

“Relatives by Marriage and Folk Songs.” Tr. John Balcom. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 35 (2015): 147-58.

“Restored to Life.” Tr. Timothy Ross. The Chinese Pen (Spring 1977): 54-70.

“Returning to My Home Village.” Tr. John Balcolm. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 21 (July 2007): 35-40.

“The Sorrow of the Sweet Potatoes.” Tr. Terry Russell. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 35 (2015): 53-62.

“The Tobacco Shed.” Tr. Timothy Ross. The Chinese Pen (Spring 1978): 91-105.

“Together Through Thick and Thin” [貧賤夫妻]. Tr. Shiao-ling Yu. In Josheph S.M. Lau, ed., The Unbroken Chain: An Anthology of Taiwan Fiction Since 1926. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1983, 57-67.

“Uncle Ah Huang.” Tr. John Balcom. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 35 (2015): 137-46.

“Uncle Headman.” Tr. Feng-ying Ming. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 21 (July, 2007).

Zhong Ling

“Contemplating Water.” In Loud Sparrows: Contemporary Chinese Short-Shorts. Trs. Aili Mu, Julie Chiu, and Howard Goldblatt. NY: Columbia UP, 2006, 213-17.

“The Isle of Wang’an.” Tr. Kirk Anderson and Randy Du. In David Der-wei Wang, ed., Running Wild: New Chinese Writers. NY: Columbia UP, 1994, 69-88.

“Killer Well.” In Loud Sparrows: Contemporary Chinese Short-Shorts. Trs. Aili Mu, Julie Chiu, and Howard Goldblatt. NY: Columbia UP, 2006, 224-25.

“Little Stray Cat.” In Loud Sparrows: Contemporary Chinese Short-Shorts. Trs. Aili Mu, Julie Chiu, and Howard Goldblatt. NY: Columbia UP, 2006, 131-35.

“The Quadrangle Compound.” Tr. Chung Ling. The Chinese Pen (Spring 1988): 33-40.

“The Window.” Tr. Wendy Larson. In Michael S. Duke, ed., Worlds of Modern Chinese Fiction. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1991, 221-26..

Zhong Qiao (Chung Chiao)

“River in the Heart” [Xin zhong de heliu]. Trs. Ron Smith and Kerry Chang. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 16 (2005): 205-25. [play].

Zhong Shunwen (Chung Shun-Wen) 鐘順文

“Plenty of Rainfall” [多雨]. Tr. Yanwing Leung. The Taipei Chinese Pen 177 (Summer 2016): 14-15.

Zhong Weimin

“The Whale Hunter.” Tr. John and Esther Dent-Young. Renditions 29/30 (Spring/Aut. 1988): 22-31.

Zhong Wenyin (Nina Wen-yin Chung) 鐘文音

“The Story-Hatching Plain of Dreams” [孵育小說的夢幻平原]. Tr. David Van Der Peet. The Taipei Chinese Pen 177 (Summer 2016): 71-75.

“The Travels and Lover of a Junior High Girl.” Tr. Jonathan Barnard. In Jonathan Stalling, Lin Tai-man, and Yanwing Leung, eds., Contemporary Taiwanese Women Writers: An Anthology. Amherst, NY: Cambria, 2018, 69-82.

Zhong Xiaoyang 钟晓阳

“Greensleeves.” Tr. Cathy Poon. Renditions 29-30 (1988): 132-45. Also trans. by Michael S. Duke. In Michael S. Duke, ed., Worlds of Modern Chinese Fiction. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1991, 206-221.

“The Wedding Night.” Tr. Samuel Cheung. In Kao, ed., Nativism Overseas: Contemporary Chinese Women Writers. Albany: SUNY, 1993, 211-220.

Zhong Yiwen

“A Declaration of War Against Time” (Gei shijian de zhantie). Tr. Du Nanqing. In Pang-yuan Chi, ed., Taiwan Literature in Chinese and English. Taipei: Commonwealth Publishing, 1999, 317-38..

Zhong Zhaozheng (Chung Chao-cheng) 钟肇政

“Ah Yangma.” Tr. John Balcom. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 33 (2014): 35-48.

“Battle of the Beasts and Birds.” Tr. Sylvia Li-chun Lin. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 33 (2014): 101-4.

“The Bear Hunters.” Tr. Terry Russell. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 33 (2014): 109-30.

“Bitter Melon.” Tr. Yingtsih Hwang. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 33 (2014): 49-54.

“Cloud Shadows.” Tr. Irene Leung. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 33 (2014): 61-74.

“The Field Hospital.” Tr. John Balcom. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 33 (2014): 131-48.

“The Five-Colored Deer.” Tr. Sylvia Li-chun Lin. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 33 (2014): 97-101.

“Foreign Doll.” Tr. Sylvia Li-chun Lin. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 33 (2014): 105-8.

“Lowering Clouds.” Tr. Yingtsih Hwang. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 33 (2014): 55-60.

“Mountain Trail.” Tr. Robert Hegel. The Chinese Pen (Summer 1973): 3-13.

“The Skull and the Faceless Clock” [Gulou yu meiyou shuziban de zhong]. Tr. John Balcom. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 16 (2005): 83-100.

“Spillway.” Tr. Sylvia Li-chun Lin. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 33 (2014): 75-96.

“Song of the Egret.” Tr. Sue Wiles. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 21 (July 2007): 41-58.

Zhong Zheng

“Feet.” In Lucian Wu, tr. and ed., New Chinese Stories: Twelve Short Stories by Contemporary Chinese Writers. Taipei: Heritage Press, 1961, 3-12.

“Oranges.” Tr. Nancy Ing. The Chinese Pen (Summer 1978): 91-105. Rpt. in Nancy Ing, ed., Ivory Balls and Other Stories. Taipei: Meiya, 1970, 79-96.

Zhou Daxin

For Love of a Silversmith. Beijing: Panda, 1995.

“Out of the Woods.” Tr. William Riggle. Chinese Literature (Winter 1992): 3-57.

“The Sesame Oil Mill.” Tr. Paul White. Chinese Literature (Winter 1992): 59-92.

Zhou Erfu 周而复

Doctor Norman Bethune.. Tr. Alison Bailey. Beijng: Foreign Languages Press, 1982.

Morning in Shanghai. Tr. A.C. Barnes. Peking: Foreign Languages Press, 1962.

Zhou Fenling 周芬伶 (Chou Fen-ling)

“The Night of the Great Retreat” [大撤退之夜]. Tr. Linda Wong. The Taipei Chinese Pen 174 (Aut. 2015): 48-68.

Zhou Feili, Phillip

“The Big Event of the Week.” Tr. Howard Goldblatt. The Chinese Pen (Autumn 1986): 1-30.

“One Who Feeds Will Live to be Fed.” Tr. Jeffrey Toy Eng. The Chinese Pen (Winter 1988): 48-73.

“A Patient by Trade.” Tr. Jeffrey Toy Eng. The Chinese Pen (Autumn 1991): 34-51.

Zhou Haohui 周浩晖

Death Notice. Tr. Zac Haluza. NY: Doubleday, 2018. 

[Abstract: An elite police squad hunts a manipulative mastermind out to publically execute criminals the law cannot reach. A wild thriller and deadly game of cat-Valland-mouse from one of China’s most popular authors. For fans of Jo Nesbo, Se7en, and Hong Kong police cinema. The brutal murder of respected police officer Sergeant Zheng Haoming sends shock waves through Chengdu, a modern metropolis in the heart of China’s stunning Sichuan province. He had been obsessed by an unsolved, eighteen-year-old murder case until an entity calling itself Eumenides (after the Greek goddess of vengeance and retribution) releases a terrifying manifesto. Is the manifesto a sick joke, or something more sinister? Soon, the public starts nominating worthy targets for Eumenides to kill, and, two days later, Sergeant Zheng is dead. Eumenides’ cunning game is only getting started. The police receive a “death notice,” a chilling note announcing the killer’s next target, the crimes they have committed, and the date of their execution. The note is both a challenge and a taunt to the police. When the first victim dies in public, under their complete protection, the police are left stunned. More death notices are coming. The chase is on. Death Notice is an explosive, page-turning thriller filtered through a vibrant cultural lens. Zhou Haohui expertly adds an exhilarating new perspective to the twists and tropes of the genre all fans love, making for a uniquely propulsive and entertaining read.]

Valley of Terror. Tr. Bonnie Huie. Seattle: AmazonCrossing, 2017.

[Abstract: A mysterious “fear disease” is scaring to death the citizens of Longzhou, China. Literally. Victims go insane or die frozen in terror, while survivors rant maniacally about demons infiltrating the city. But what’s really behind the sudden epidemic? To find the answer, Chief Inspector Luo Fei teams up with a controversial historian and a brilliant psychologist to track down the true source of the illness and halt the wave of horror that threatens the metropolis. As the trio ventures to the primitive jungles and mountains of Yunnan, they’re haunted by tales of a seventeenth-century general whose demonic soul, said to have been sealed away in a vial of his blood, has been unleashed on the modern world. Now, trekking deep into the legendary Valley of Terror, they find themselves being stalked by someone—or something—daring them to uncover the truth. And as superstition, science, and history collide, their discovery could be as heart-stopping as fear itself.]

Zhou Jianing 周嘉宁

“Mr. Paolo.” Tr. Andrew Chubb. In Geng Song and Qingxiang Yang, eds., The Sound of Salt Forming: Short Stories by the Post-80s Generation in China. Honolulu: University of Hawaii, 2016, 77-84.

Zhou Jinbo 周金波 (Chou Chin-po)

“The Volunteer.” Tr. Hiroaki Sato. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 37 (2016): 3-22.

“Noma.” Tr. Faye Yuan Kleeman. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 37 (2016): 23-30.

Zhou Keqin 周克芹

“Li Hsiu-man.” Chinese Literature 2 (1974): 94-103.

“A Sketch.” Tr. Shi Junbao. Chinese Literature (Summer 1992): 68-75.

“Xu Mao and His Daughters.” Tr. Wang Mingjie. Chinese Literature 5 (1981) 3-53; 6 (1981): 3-60.

Zhou Libo 周立波

“The Family on the Other Side of the Mountain.” Tr. Yu Fan-chin. Chinese Literature 2 (1960): 18-26. Also in Sowing the Clouds: A Collection of Chinese Short Stories. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1961, 26-33; and in Chinese Stories From the Fifties. Beijing: Chinese Literature, 1984, 63-73. Rpt in Carolyn Choa and David Su Li-qun, eds., The Vintage Book of Contemporary Chinese Fiction. NY: Vintage Books, 2001, 220-28.

Great Changes in a Mountain Village. Bejing: Foreign Languages Press, 1961. (Only vol. 1)

“The Guest.” Tr. Joe Huang. Bulletin of Concerned Asian Scholars 8, 2 (1976): 17-23.

“How to Experience Life.” Chinese Literature 11 (1978): 95-97.

The Hurricane. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1955.

“Veiled Enemy.” In Hualing Nieh, ed. and tr. Literature of the Hundred Flowers, Volume II: Poetry and Fiction. NY: Columbia UP, 1981, 406-09.

Zhou Mengdie (Chou Meng-tieh)

Poems in: The Isle Full of Noises: Modern Chinese Poetry from Taiwan. Ed/tr. Dominic Cheung. NY: Columbia UP, 1987, 93-98.

Zhou Rui

“The Bus Stop and Haw-sicles.” In Loud Sparrows: Contemporary Chinese Short-Shorts. Trs. Aili Mu, Julie Chiu, and Howard Goldblatt. NY: Columbia UP, 2006, 179-80.

“Division.” In Loud Sparrows: Contemporary Chinese Short-Shorts. Trs. Aili Mu, Julie Chiu, and Howard Goldblatt. NY: Columbia UP, 2006, 137-38.

Zhou Shoujuan 周瘦鹃

“Charming Confidante.” Tr. Cheuk Wong. Renditions 87/88 (Spring/Autumn 2017): 29-81.

“Congratulations to Happy Magazine.” Tr. Gilbert C.F. Fong. In Kirk A. Denton, ed., Modern Chinese Literary Thought. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1996, 245-46.

“The Little Apartment across the Way.” Tr. Richard King. Renditions 87/88 (Spring/Autumn 2017): 23-28.

“The Phonograph Record.” Tr. Andrew F. Jones. Renditions 87/88 (Spring/Autumn 2017): 82-90.

“We Shall Meet Again.” Tr. Perry Link. Bulletin of Concerned Asian Scholars 8, 1 (1976).

Zhou Weibo, et. al.

“The Artillery Commander’s Son” [炮兵司令的儿子]. In Gunn, ed. Twentieth-Century Chinese Drama: An Anthology. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1983, 448-67.

Zhou Yang 周扬

China’s New Literature and Art, Essays and Addresses. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1954.

“Building a Socialist Literature.” Chinese Literature 4 (1956): 198-222.

“The Fighting Task Confronting Workers in Philosophy and the Social Sciences.” In Harold Hinton, The People’s Republic of China: A Documentary Survey. Wilmington: Scholarly Resources, 1980, vol. 2.

A Great Debate on the Literary Front. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1965. [based on a 1957 and primarily an attack on Ding Ling and Feng Xuefeng.]

“The Important Role of Art and Literature in the Building of Socialism.” Chinese Literature 1 (1957):179-88.

“Inherit the Past and Usher in the Future.” Tr. Betty Ting. In Howard Goldblatt, ed., Chinese Literature for the 1980’s: The Fourth Congress of Writers and Artists. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1982, 15-38.

“On National Defense Literature.” Tr. Richard King. In Denton, ed., Modern Chinese Literary Thought. Stanford: SUP, 1996, 409-14.

“On The Relationship Between Politics and Literature and Art.” Beijing Review 15 (1981): 23-25.

“Our Achievements, Lessons, and Tasks.” Chinese Literature 3 (1980): 38-51. Also excerpted as “Our Lessons and Tasks Ahead.” Beijing Review 50 (1979): 8-15.

The Path of Socialist Literature and Art in China–Report Delivered to the Third Congress of Chinese Literary and Art Workers. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1960. Excerpted by Merle Goldman. In Kai-yu Hsu, ed., Literature of the People’s Republic of China. Bloomington: IUP, 1980, 440-48.

“The People’s New Literature.” In The People’s New Literature: Four Reports at the First All-China Conference of Writers and Artists. Beijing: Cultural Press, 1950, 89-131.

“Raise High the Banner of Mao Tse-tung’s Thinking, Be Fighters on the Literary Front Who Can Labour as well as Write.” Chinese Literature 3 (1966): 90-126.

“Thoughts on Realism.” Tr. Catherine Pease Campbell. In Denton, ed. Modern Chinese Literary Thought. Stanford: SUP, 1996, 335-44.

“Written in Deepest Grief [in memory of Kuo Mo-jo].” Chinese Literature 10 (1978): 3-8.

“Zhou Yang on Reality in Literature and Other Questions.” Chinese Literature 1 (1980): 92-96.

Zhou Yaping

“The Big Machine.” Tr. Zhen Zhen and Jeffrey Twitchell-Waas. Facture 1 (2000): 211-218.

Miss Jiji and Fragrance.” Tr. Zhen Zhen and Jeffrey Twitchell-Waas. Interpoetics: Poetry of Asia and the Pacific Rim 1, 2 (Spring 1998).

Poems in Original: Chinese Language-Poetry Group, A Writing Anthology. Tr. Jeff Twitchell. Afterword by J.H. Prynne. Brighton, England: Parataxis Press, 1995. 42-78.

Remembering and Forgetting.” Tr. Zhen Zhen and Jeff Twitchell. Tinfish 2 (February 1996): 20-21.

“Vulgar Beauty,” “Story Horse . Red Firewood.” Tr. Jeff Twitchell. Exact Change Yearbook No. 1. Ed. Peter Gizzi. Boston: Exact Change-Carcanet, 1995, 25-27.

“Youth.” Tr. Zhen Zhen and Jeffrey Twitchell. World Literature Today 71, 1 (1997): 38.

Zhou Zuoren 周作人

“The Aging of Ghosts’ [Gui de shengzhang]. Tr. David Pollard. Renditions 26: 70-75. Rpt in Pollard, ed., The Chinese Essay. NY: Columbia UP, 2000, 149-56; and in Goldblatt and Lau, eds., The Columbia Anthology of Modern Chinese Literature. NY: Columbia UP, 1995, 605-10.

“The Aesthetic Essay” [Meiwen]. Tr. Martin Woesler. In Woesler, 20th Century Chinese Essays in Translation. Bochum: Bochum UP, 2000, 13-14.

“Bitter Rain” [Ku yu]. Tr. Xu Lanting. In Woesler, 20th Century Chinese Essays in Translation. Bochum: Bochum UP, 2000, 23-26.

“Candy Selling.” Tr. Ernst Wolff. In Wolff, Chou Tso-jen. NY: Twayne, 1971, 92-95.

“The Chinese National Character: A Japanese Perspective.” Tr. Richard Rigby. Renditions 26: 95-96.

“Different Ways to Die” [Si fa]. Tr. Xu Lanting. In Woesler, 20th Century Chinese Essays in Translation. Bochum: Bochum UP, 2000, 29-32.

“An Encounter With Mounted Troops at Qianmen” [Qianmen yu madui ji]. In Geremie Barme, New Ghosts, Old Dreams: Chinese Rebel Voices. NY: Times Books, 1992, 98-99.

“First Love” [Chu lian]. Tr. Yi Yang. In Woesler, 20th Century Chinese Essays in Translation. Bochum: Bochum UP, 2000, 27-28.

“The Fly” [Cangying]. Tr. Yi Yang. In Woesler, 20th Century Chinese Essays in Translation. Bochum: Bochum UP, 2000, 20-22.

“Getting Oneself Hurt.” Tr. Ernst Wolff. In Wolff, Chou Tso-jen. NY: Twayne, 1971, 90-91.

“How I Translated from the Greek.” Tr. David Pollard. Renditions 7: 16.

“Humane Literature.” Tr. Ernst Wolfe. In Wolfe, ed., Chou Tso-jen. NY: Twayne, 1971, 97-105; rpt. in Denton, ed., Modern Chinese Literary Thought. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1996, 151-61.

“Japan and China.” Tr. Richard Rigby. Renditions 26: 91-94.

“Japan Re-encountered.” Tr. Richard Rigby. Renditions 26: 97-106.

“On ‘Passing the Itch'” [Tan guo lai]. Tr. David Pollard. Renditions 26: 79-86. Also in Pollard, ed., The Chinese Essay. NY: Columbia UP, 2000, 139-49.

“One’s Own Garden.” Tr. Ernst Wolff. In Wolff, Chou Tso-jen. NY: Twayne, 1971, 95-97.

“In Praise of Mutes” [Yaba lizan]. Tr. David Pollard. Renditions 26: 76-78. Also in Pollard, ed., The Chinese Essay. NY: Columbia UP, 2000, 156-59.

“Reading in the Lavatory” [Ru ce dushu]. Tr. David Pollard. Rpt in Pollard, ed., The Chinese Essay. NY: Columbia UP, 2000, 135-39. Also translated as “Reading on the Toilet. Tr. Don J. Cohn. Renditions 26: 87-90. Rpt. in Goldblatt and Lau, eds., The Columbia Anthology of Modern Chinese Literature. NY: Columbia UP, 1995, 611-15.

Requisites for a New Literature” [Xin wenxue de yaoqiu]. Tr. Kirk A. Denton. MCLC Resource Center Publication (Oct. 2000).

“Relentless Rain.” Tr. David Pollard. In Pollard, The Chinese Essay. NY: Columbia UP, 2000, 160-64.

Selected Essays by Zhou Zuoren. Tr. David Pollard. HK: Chinese University Press, 2005. [MCLC Resource Center review by Geoges Be Duc]

[Contents: “Relentless Rain,” “Black Awning Boats,” “Flies,” “Things in the Water,” “First Love,” “Corporal Punishment,” “Where Hearts Have Gone To,” “A Tax on Dumplings,” “The Photograph of Second Brother,” “Ways of Dying,” “The Cruelty of Dishonouring the Dead,” “Rickshas and Beheading,” “History,” “On What Can Be Said,” “Thoughts on the Shanghai Incident,” “On Closing One’s Door and Getting Down to Studying,” “Fear Heaven, Pity Man,” “An Investigation into Short Hair,” “On the Arrest of Homosexuals,” “The Woman Question and Eastern Civilization etc.,” “On Mencius’ Mother,” “Middle Age,” “On Burning the Books and Burying the Scholars,” “Reading in the Lavatory,” “The Ageing of Ghosts,” “On ‘Passing the Itch,'” “In Praise of Mutes,” “In Praise of Anaesthesia,” “My Own Composition.”]

“Seven Essays.” Tr. D.E. Pollard. Renditions 26 (Aut. 1986): 68-106.

“Relentless Rain” [Ku yu]. Tr. David Pollard. In Pollard, ed., The Chinese Essay. NY: Columbia UP, 2000, 131-35.

“The Tea Pastries of Peking” [Beijing de chashi]. Tr. Jin Li. In Woesler, 20th Century Chinese Essays in Translation. Bochum: Bochum UP, 2000, 15-16.

“The Way to Die.” Tr. Paula Chin and Rebecca Kwan. Journal of Asian Culture (1977): 24-35.

“Wild Vegetable of My Home Region” [Guxiang de yecai]. Tr. Martin Woesler. In Woesler, 20th Century Chinese Essays in Translation. Bochum: Bochum UP, 2000, 17-19.

“Wine Talk” [Tan jiu]. Tr. Benjamin Pi-Wei Liu. In Woesler, 20th Century Chinese Essays in Translation. Bochum: Bochum UP, 2000, 33-36.

“Women and Literature.” Tr. Michelle Yeh. In Denton, ed., Modern Chinese Literary Thought. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1996, 228-32.

Poems in: Modern Chinese Poetry. Trs. Harold Acton and Chen Shih-hsiang. London: Duckworth, 1936.

Zhu Fengming

“Meteor Account.” Tr. Nicholas Kaldis. Dirty Goat 24 (2011): 184-85.

Zhu Guangqian 朱光潛

“Literature and Life.” Tr. Longxi Zhang. In Denton, ed., Modern Chinese Literary Thought. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1996, 392-99.

“What Can Modern Poetry Learn from Classical Poetry?” In Hualing Nieh, ed./tr. Literature of the Hundred Flowers. 2 vols. NY: Columbia UP, 1981, II: 23-29.

Zhu Lili, Lily

“The Pumpkin.” Tr. Howard Goldblatt. The Chinese Pen (Winter 1981): 72-94.

Zhu Lin 竹林

“Downpour on a Leaky Roof” (Shenghuo de lu). Tr. Richard King. In Michael S. Duke, ed., Contemporary Chinese Literature: An Anthology of Post-Mao Fiction and Poetry. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1985, 30-35.

Snake’s Pillow and Other Stories. Tr. Richard King. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1998.

The Sobbing Lancang River [excerpts]. Tr. Richard King. Renditions 50 (1998): 37-52.

“The Web.” Tr. Richard King. Renditions 16 (1981): 112-21.

Zhu Ling 朱零

“World Map, The Intersection of Nanjing Rd. and Beijing Rd.” Tr. Kyle Anderson. Pathlight (Winter, 2013): 161-62.

Zhu Qihua

China 1927: Memoir of a Debacle. Tr. Zhu Hong. Merwin Asia, 2013.

Zhu Shouju 朱瘦菊

“The Confidence in the Game.” Tr. Timothy C. Wong. In Wong, Stories for Saturday: Twentieth Century Chinese Popular Fiction. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2003, 5-28.

The Shanghai Tide (excerpts).” Tr. Theodore Huters Renditions 87/88 (Spring/Autumn 2017): 90-146.

Zhu Tianren (Zhu T’ien-jen)

“Autumn Note.” Tr. James C.T. Shu. In Joseph Lau, ed. The Unbroken Chain: An Anthology of Fiction from Taiwan. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1983, 24-32.

Zhu Tianwen 朱天文

“Le boudda incarné.” Trs. Angelo Pino and Isabelle Rabut. In Pino and Rabut, eds., Le dernier Train pour Tamshui et autres nouvelles. Trs.Angelo Pino and Isabelle Rabut. Paris: Christian Bourgois, 2004, 195-223.

“Boddhisattva Incarnate.” Tr. Fran Martin. In Martin, ed., Angelwings: Contemporary Queer Fiction from Taiwan. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2003, 29-50.

“La cité de l’été brulant.” Trs. Angelo Pino and Isabelle Rabut. In Pino and Rabut, eds., Le dernier Train pour Tamshui et autres nouvelles. Trs.Angelo Pino and Isabelle Rabut. Paris: Christian Bourgois, 2004, 143-94.

“A City of Hot Summer.” Tr. Michelle Yeh. The Chinese Pen (Summer 1988): 1-38. Also trans. as “The Long Hot Summer.” Tr. Ellen Lai-shan Yeung. Renditions 35/36 (1991): 216-39.

“Fin de Siecle Splendor.” Tr. Eva Hung. In The Columbia Anthology of Modern Chinese Literature. NY: Columbian UP, 1995, 444-59. Rpt. in Eva Hung, ed., City Women. HK: Renditions, 2001.

“The Long Hot Summer.” Tr. Ellen Lai-shan Yeung. Renditions 35/36: 216-39.

“Maitre Chai.” Tr. Olivier Bialais. In Angel Pino and Issabelle Rabut, eds., A mes frères du village de garrison: Anthologie de nouvelles taiwanaises contemporaines. Paris: Blue de China, 2001, 131-154.

“Master Chai.” Tr. Michelle Yeh. In David Der-wei Wang, ed., Running Wild: New Chinese Writers. NY: Columbia UP, 1994, 89-100.

Notes of a Desolate Man. Trs. Howard Goldblatt and Sylvia Li-Chuan Lin. NY: Columbia UP, 1999.

“On Confessions.” Tr. Li Guo. Chinese Literature Today 5, 2 (2016): 58-62.

“On Myths and Riddles.” Tr. Ping Zhu. Chinese Literature Today 5, 2 (2016): 63-69.

“Plus de paradis.” Trs. Angelo Pino and Isabelle Rabut. In Pino and Rabut, eds., Le dernier Train pour Tamshui et autres nouvelles. Paris: Christian Bourgois, 2004, 103-42.

“The Story of Hsiao-Pi.” Tr. David Van der Peet. In Jonathan Stalling, Lin Tai-man, and Yanwing Leung, eds., Contemporary Taiwanese Women Writers: An Anthology. Amherst, NY: Cambria, 2018, 25-36.

“We All Change into Somebody Else: In Acceptance of the 2015 Newman Prize for Chinese Literature.” Tr. Ping Zhu. Chinese Literature Today 5, 2 (2016): 42-43.

Witches Brew.” Trs. Sylvia Li-chun Lin and Howard Goldblatt. Asymptote (Jan. 2012).

Zhu Tianxin (Chu Tien-hsin) 朱天心

“A mes frères du village de garrison.” Tr. Olivier Bialais. In Angel Pino and Issabelle Rabut, eds., A mes frères du village de garrison: Anthologie de nouvelles taiwanaises contemporaines. Paris: Blue de China, 2001, 93-129.

“Le Chevalier de la Mancha.” Trs. Angelo Pino and Isabelle Rabut. In Pino and Rabut, eds., Le dernier Train pour Tamshui et autres nouvelles. Trs.Angelo Pino and Isabelle Rabut. Paris: Christian Bourgois, 2004, 311-29.

“Le dernier train pour Tamshui.” Trs. Angelo Pino and Isabelle Rabut. In Pino and Rabut, eds., Le dernier Train pour Tamshui et autres nouvelles. Trs.Angelo Pino and Isabelle Rabut. Paris: Christian Bourgois, 2004, 227-72.

“Epilogue: In Remembrance of My Buddies from the Military Compound.” Tr. Michelle Wu. In Pang-yuan Chi and David Der-wei Wang, eds., The Last of the Whampoa Breed: Stories of the Chinese Diaspora.New York: Columbia University Press, 2003.

“Je me souviens.” Trs. Angelo Pino and Isabelle Rabut. In Pino and Rabut, eds., Le dernier Train pour Tamshui et autres nouvelles. Trs.Angelo Pino and Isabelle Rabut. Paris: Christian Bourgois, 2004, 273-310.

“The Last Train to Tamshui.” Tr. Michelle Yeh. The Chinese Pen (Spring 1988): 41-71.

“Nineteen Days of the New Party.” Tr. Martha Cheung. Renditions 35/36 (1991): 144-70. Rpt. in Eva Hung, ed., City Women. HK: Renditions, 2001.

The Old Capital: A Novel of Taipei. Tr. Howard Goldblatt. NY: Columbia UP, 2007. [publisher’s blurb]

“A Story of Spring Butterflies.” Tr. Fran Martin. In Martin, ed., Angelwings: Contemporary Queer Fiction from Taiwan. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2003, 75-94.

Zhu Wen 朱文

“Da Ma’s Way of Speaking.” Tr. Mao Liang. In Henry YH Zhao, Yanbing Chen, and John Rosenwald. Fissures: Chinese Writing Today. Brookline, MA: Zephyr Press, 2000, 230-47.

Da Ma’s Way of Talking.” Tr. Julia Lovell. Words Without Borders (July 2008).

“How to Look at a Woman.” Tr. Julia Lovell. In Liu Ding, Carol Yinghua Lu, and Ra Page, eds., Shi Cheng: Short Stories from Urban China. Manchester, UK: Comma Press, 2012.

I Love Dollars and Other Stories. Tr. Julia Lovell. NY: Columbia University Press, 2007. [Columbia UP blurb] [MCLC Resource Center review by Jason McGrath]

The Matchmaker, The Apprentice and the Football Fan. Tr. Julia Lovell. NY: Columbia UP, 2013.

[AbstractThe Matchmaker, the Apprentice, and the Football Fan moves between anarchic campuses, maddening communist factories, and the victims of China’s economic miracle to showcase the absurdity, injustice, and socialist Gothic of everyday Chinese life. In “The Football Fan,” readers fall in with an intriguingly unreliable narrator who may or may not have killed his elderly neighbor for a few hundred yuan. The bemused antihero of “Reeducation” is appalled to discover that, ten years after graduating during the pro-democracy protests of 1989, his alma mater has summoned him back for a punitive bout of political reeducation with a troublesome ex-girlfriend. “Da Ma’s Way of Talking” is a fast, funny recollection of China’s picaresque late 1980s, told through the life and times of one of our student narrator’s more controversial classmates; while “The Apprentice” plunges us into the comic vexations of life in a more-or-less planned economy, as an enthusiastic young graduate is over-exercised by his table-tennis-fanatic bosses, deprived of sleep by gambling-addicted colleagues, and stuffed with hard-boiled eggs by an overzealous landlady. Full of acute observations, political bite, and piercing insight into friendships and romance, these stories further establish Zhu Wen as a fearless commentator on human nature and contemporary China.]

Zhu Xiaoping 朱晓平

“Chronicle of Mulberry Tree Village” (Sangshuping jishi). Tr. Zhu Hong. In The Chinese Western: Short Fiction from Today’s China. NY: Ballantine Books, 1988, 53-74. Also in Spring of Bitter Waters: Short Fiction from China Today. London: W.H. Allen and Co., 1989.

“Old Lu the Potter” (Yaogong Lao Lu). Tr. Gladys Yang. Chinese Literature (Spring 1991): 3-17.

Zhu Xiang 朱湘

“Thirteen Lyric Poems.” Tr. Bonnie S. McDougall. Renditions 21/22 (1984).

Poems in Twentieth Century Chinese Poetry: An Anthology. Hsu Kai-yu, ed. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1963, 93-101.

Zhu Xining 朱西甯

“Dawn.” Tr. Hou Chien. In Chi Pang-yuan, et al., eds., An Anthology of Contemporary Chinese Literature. Taipei: National Institute for Compilation and Translation, 1975, II, 115-57.

“Le fer en fusion.” Trs. Angelo Pino and Isabelle Rabut. In Pino and Rabut, eds., Le dernier Train pour Tamshui et autres nouvelles. Trs. Angelo Pinot and Isabelle Rabut. Paris: Editions Christian Bourgois, 2004, 17-44.

“The General.” Tr. David Steelman. The Chinese Pen (Summer 1976): 1-41. Republished in Nancy Ing, ed., Winter Plum: Contemporary Chinese Fiction. Taipei: Chinese Materials Center, 1982, 79-110.

“The Great Puppet Show.” Tr. Hua-yuan Li Mowry. The Chinese Pen (Autumn 1980): 1-19.

“The Men Who Smelt Gold.” Tr. Gorge Kao. Renditions 1 (1973): 107-121. Republished in The Chinese Pen (Winter, 1974): 25-52.

“Molten Iron.” Tr. Nancy Ing. The Chinese Pen (Spring 1977): 22-43. Republished in Nancy Ing, ed., Ivory Balls and Other Stories. Taipei: Meiya, 1970, 45-56.

“La nouvelle tombe.” Trs. Angelo Pino and Isabelle Rabut. In Pino and Rabut, eds., Le dernier Train pour Tamshui et autres nouvelles. Trs.Angelo Pino and Isabelle Rabut. Paris: Editions Christian Bourgois, 2004, 69-99.

“Sur la charrette.” Trs. Angelo Pino and Isabelle Rabut. In Pino and Rabut, eds., Le dernier Train pour Tamshui et autres nouvelles. Trs. Angelo Pino and Isabelle Rabut. Paris: Editions Christian Bourgois, 2004, 45-68.

“The Wolf.” Tr. Hou Chien. In Chi Pang-yuan, et al., eds., An Anthology of Contemporary Chinese Literature. Taipei: National Institute for Compilation and Translation, 1975, II, 77-114.

Zhu Yan

“Nausea.” Tr. Chen I-djen. The Chinese Pen (Autumn 1985): 13-25.

Zhu Yongliang 朱永良

“Memory of a Moment’s Bliss.” Tr. Nicholas Kaldis. Dirty Goat 24 (2011): 192-93.

Zhu Yue 朱岳

“An Incident at Dr. Greene’s” [格林大夫的遭遇]. Tr. Pathlight 2 (2016): 124-27.

Zhu Ziqing 朱自清

“Children” [Ernu]. Tr. Daniel A. Fried. In Woesler, 20th Century Chinese Essays in Translation. Bochum: Bochum UP, 2000, 51-57.

“Facing the New China” [Xin Zhongguo zhi wang zhong]. Tr. Martin Woesler. In Woesler, 20th Century Chinese Essays in Translation. Bochum: Bochum UP, 2000, 67-68.

“Green” [Lu]. Tr. Benjamin Wen-Pi Liu. In Woesler, 20th Century Chinese Essays in Translation. Bochum: Bochum UP, 2000, 38-39.

The Little Grass.” World Classic Poetry and Global Information.

“The Lotus Pond by Moonlight” [He tang yuese]. Tr. David Pollard. In Pollard, ed., The Chinese Essay. NY: Columbia UP, 2000, 222-24.

“In Memory of My Deceased Wife” [Gei wangfu]. Tr. Benjamin Pi-Wei Liu. In Woesler, 20th Century Chinese Essays in Translation. Bochum: Bochum UP, 2000, 58-62.

Poems in: Modern Chinese Poetry. Ed. Julia Lin; Twentieth Century Chinese Poetry: An Anthology. Hsu Kai-yu, ed. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1963, 9-13.

“Selecting a Wife.” Tr. Tao Tao Liu. Renditions 38: 56-59.

“Souvenirs du massacre du 18 mars.” Tr. Noel Dutrait. In Dutrait, ed., Ici respire la vie aussi: litterature de reportage, 1926-1982. Aix-en-Provence: Alinea, 1986, 19-32.

“Traces of Wenzhou” [Wenzhou de zongji]. Tr. David Pollard. In Pollard, ed., The Chinese Essay. NY: Columbia UP, 2000, 221-22.

“To My Departed Wife.” Tr. Howard Goldblatt. The Chinese Pen (Summer, 1974): 21-27.

“Report of the Government’s Great Massacre” [Zhi zhengfu da tusha ji]. Tr. Lihong Xie. In Woesler, 20th Century Chinese Essays in Translation. Bochum: Bochum UP, 2000, 43-50.

“Venice” [Weinisi]. Tr. Benjamin Pi-Wei Liu. In Woesler, 20th Century Chinese Essays in Translation. Bochum: Bochum UP, 2000, 63-66.

“The View from the Rear” [Bei ying]. Tr. David Pollard. In Pollard, ed., The Chinese Essay. New York: Columbia UP, 2000, 217-21.

“White People–God’s Proud Children” [Baizhongren–Shangdi de jiaozi]. Tr. Daniel A. Fried. In Woesler, 20th Century Chinese Essays in Translation. Bochum: Bochum UP, 2000, 40-42.

Zhuang Huatang

“Bagusi’s Homecoming Road.” Tr. Joshua P. Dyer. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 21 (July 2007): 105-111.

“Earth God Shrine.” Tr. Michelle Yeh. The Chinese Pen (Summer 1992): 1-28.

Zhuo Yan

“Xiqingzhai Notes.” In Faye Chunfang Fei, ed./tr., Chinese Theories of Theater and Performance from Confucius to the Present. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1999, 123.

Zi Gang

“Self-Criticism and Self-Encouragement: A Short Autobiography of a Journalist.” Tr. Jing M. Wang. In Wang, ed., Jumping Through Hoops: Autobiograpical Stories by Modern Chinese Women Writers. HK: Hong Kong UP, 2003, 197-201.

Zi Min

“Let’s Go to Kin Shan.” Tr. Norma L. Hsiao. The Chinese Pen (Spring 1974): 35-40.

Zi Yu

“Bamboo Streamers.” Tr. Jeffrey Toy Eng. The Chinese Pen (Winter 1987): 1-27.

“Bewildered.” Tr. Hsiao Lien-rien. The Chinese Pen (Summer 1978): 1-37. Republished in Nancy Ing, ed., Winter Plum: Contemporary Chinese Fiction. Taipei: Chinese Materials Center, 1982, 413-35.

Zong Fuxian 宗福先

“In a Land of Silence” (Yu wusheng qu). In Gunn, ed. Twentieth-Century Chinese Drama: An Anthology. Bloomington: IUP, 1983, 409-47.

“My Wish.” Chinese Literature 4 (1979): 57-59.

Zong Pu (or Feng Zongpu) 宗璞

“The Back Door.” In Hugh Anderson, ed., A Wind Across the Grass. Ascot Vale, Victoria: Red Rooster Press, 1985, 89-98.

“The Call of the Ruins” [Feixu de zhaohuan]. Tr. David Pollard. In Pollard, ed., The Chinese Essay. NY: Columbia UP, 2000, 317-20.

The Everlasting Rock. Trs. Aimee Lykes. Boulder: Lynne Rienner, 1997.

“Lu Lu.” In Hugh Anderson, ed. A Wind Across the Grass. Ascot Vale, Victoria: Red Rooster Press, 1985, 105-116.

Lulu.” Trs. Taylor Brady, Haiyan Lee, and Sylvia Yang. MCLC Resource Center Publication (August 2013).

“The Marriage of Late Sister.” Tr. Sidney Shapiro. Chinese Literature 1 (1964): 3-21. Also in Hugh Anderson, ed., A Wind Across the Grass. Ascot Vale, Victoria: Red Rooster Press, 1985, 74-88.

“Melody in Dreams.” Tr. Song Shouquan. Chinese Literature 8 (1979): 78-99. Also in Seven Contemporary Chinese Women Writers. Beijing: Chinese Literature, 1982, 87-112; and in Prize Winning Stories From China 1978-1979. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1981, 83-107. Also Tr. Aimee Lykes, “A Dream on the Strings.” In Mason Y.H. Wang, ed., Perspectives in Contemporary Chinese Literature. Michigan: Green River Press, 1983, 229-72.

“Red Beans.” Tr. Geremie Barme. In W.J.F. Jenner, ed., Fragrant Weeds. HK: Joint Publishing, 1983, 195-228. Also in Hugh Anderson, ed., A Wind Across the Grass. Ascot Vale, Victoria: Red Rooster Press, 1985, 52-72. Rpt. in Amy D. Dooling, ed., Writing Women in Modern China The Revolutionary Years, 1936-1976. NY: Columbia UP, 2005, 247-74

“The Tragedy of the Walnut Tree.” Tr. Zhu Hong. In Zhu Hong, ed., The Serenity of Whiteness: Stories By and About Women in Contemporary China. NY: Ballantine Books, 1991, 282-300.

“Who Am I?” In Anderson, ed., A Wind Across the Grass. Ascot Vale, Victoria: Red Rooster Press, 99-104.

Zou Difan 邹荻帆

“Five Short Stanzas.” In Kaiyu Hsu, ed., Twentieth Century Chinese Poetry: An Anthology. NY: Doubleday, 1963, 325-26.

“He Who Hanged Himself.” In Kaiyu Hsu, ed., Twentieth Century Chinese Poetry: An Anthology. NY: Doubleday, 1963, 319-25.

“Northward March.” In Kaiyu Hsu, ed., Twentieth Century Chinese Poetry: An Anthology. NY: Doubleday, 1963, 318-19.

“The River.” In Kaiyu Hsu, ed., Twentieth Century Chinese Poetry: An Anthology. NY: Doubleday, 1963, 316-18. Rpt. in Madeleine Lynn, ed., Yangtse River: The Wildest, Wickedest River on Earth: An Anthology. HK, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997, 264-66.

Zou Jingzhi

Poems in Wang Ping, ed., New Generation: Poems from China Today. Brooklyn: Hanging Loose Press, 1999, 225-32.

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