Region

| Taiwan | Hong Kong | Diaspora, Exile, Transnational |


Taiwan

Au, Chung-to. Modernist Aesthetics in Taiwanese Poetry since the 1950s. Leiden: Brill, 2008.

[Abstract: Much of the previous scholarship on Taiwanese modernist poetry easily falls into ideological arguments. This book participates in the development of an alternative approach to understanding Taiwanese modernist poetry. Dr. Au’s approach emphasizes the diversity and intensity of experiences of place and placelessness in the work of five poets: Lomen, Luo Fu, Rong Zi, Yu Guangzhong and Zheng Chouyu. The phenomenon of placelessness is a problem in all modernity and so modern aesthetics is an outgrowth of modern society’s sense of placelessness. This book not only shows how place becomes placelessness but also analyses Taiwanese modernist poets’ responses to the phenomenon of placelessness. Four kinds of places are examined, namely, the house, the city, homeland and an imagined literary community, in this work. The result is both refreshing and original.]

Allen, Joseph. “From Literature to Lingerie: Classical Chinese Poetry in Taiwan Popular Culture.” In Marc L. Moskowitz, ed., Popular Culture in Taiwan: Charismatic Modernity. New York: Routledge, 2010, 65-85.

Bai, Ling. “The Era after Social Diversification: Developments in Taiwanese Poetry 1985-1990.” Trs. Duncan Hewitt and Chu Chiyu. Renditions 35/36 (1991): 294-98.

Berry, Michael. A History of Pain: Trauma in Modern Chinese Literature and Film. NY: Columbia University Press, 2008.

[Abstract: The portrayal of historical atrocity in fiction, film, and popular culture can reveal much about the function of individual memory and the shifting status of national identity. In the context of Chinese culture, films such as Hou Hsiao-hsien’s City of Sadness and Lou Ye’s Summer Palace and novels such as Ye Zhaoyan’s Nanjing 1937: A Love Story and Wang Xiaobo’s The Golden Age collectively reimagine past horrors and give rise to new historical narratives. Table of Contents: Prelude: A History of Pain. Part I: Centripetal Trauma: 1. Musha 1930; 2. Nanjing 1937; 3. Taipei 1947. Part II: Centrifugal Trauma: 4. Yunnan 1968; 5. Beijing 1989; Coda: Hong Kong 1997]

—–. “Taiwan Literature in the Post-Martial Law Era.” Kirk A. Denton, ed., Columbia Companion to Modern Chinese Literature. NY: Columbia University Press, 2016, 422-30.

Birch, Cyril. “Images of Suffering in Taiwan Fiction.” In Jeannette L. Faurot, ed. Chinese Fiction from Taiwan: Critical Perspectives. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1980, 71-85.

Braester, Yomi. “Retelling Taiwan: Identity and Dislocation in Post-Chiang Mystery.” In Braester, Witness Against History: Literature, Film, and Public Discourse in Twentieth-Century China. Stanford: Stanford UP, 2003, 158-76. Rpt. as “Taiwanese Identity and the Crisis of Memory: Post-Chiang Mystery,” in David Der-wei Wang and Carlos Rojas eds., Writing Taiwan: A New Literary History. Durham, NC: Duke UP, 2006, 213-32.

Chang, Bi-yu. “Disclaiming and Renegotiating National Memory: Taiwanese Xiqu and Identity.” In Carsten Storm and Mark Harrison, eds., The Margins of Becoming: Identity and Culture in Taiwan. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2007, 51-68.

—–. “Taiwanese Identity Shift and the Struggle for Cultural Hegemony in the 1990s.” In Chin-Chuan Cheng, I-Chun Wang, and Steven Totosy de Zepetnek, eds. Cultural Discourse in Taiwan. Kaohsiung: Center for the Humanities and Social Sciences, National Sun Yat-sen University, 2009, 30-51.

—–. Place, Identity, and National Imagination in Postwar Taiwan. NY: Routledge, 2015.

[Abstract: In the struggles for political and cultural hegemony that Taiwan has witnessed since the 1980s, the focal point in contesting narratives and the key battlefield in the political debates are primarily spatial and place-based. The major fault line appears to be a split between an imposed identity emphasizing cultural origin (China) and an emphasis on the recovery of place identity of ‘the local’ (Taiwan).Place, Identity and National Imagination in Postwar Taiwan explores the ever-present issue of identity in Taiwan from a spatial perspective, and focuses on the importance of, and the relationship between, state spatiality and identity formation. Taking postwar Taiwan as a case study, the book examines the ways in which the Kuomintang regime naturalized its political control, territorialized the island and created a nationalist geography. In so doing, it examines how, why and to what extent power is exercised through the place-making process and considers the relationship between official versions of ‘ROC geography’ and the islanders’ shifting perceptions of the ‘nation’. In turn, by addressing the relationship between the state and the imagined community, Bi-yu Chang establishes a dialogue between place and cultural identity to analyse the constant changing and shaping of Chinese and Taiwanese identity.]

Chang, Bi-yu and Henning Kloter, eds. Imaging and Imagining Taiwan: Identity Representation and Cultural Politics. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2012.

Chang, Chiung-fang. “Taiwan Literature: The Next Export Success Story?Sinorama 26, 1 (Jan. 2001).

Chang, Hui-ching and Richard Holt, eds. Language, Politics and Identity in Taiwan: Naming China. Routledge, 2014.

[Abstract: Following the move by Chiang Kai-shek and the Chinese Nationalist Party Kuomingtang (KMT) to Taiwan after losing the Chinese civil war to the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) in the late 1940s, and Chiang’s subsequent lifelong vow to reclaim the mainland, “China ” has occupied―if not monopolized―the gaze of Taiwan, where its projected images are reflected. Whether mirror image, shadow, or ideal contrast, China has been, and will continue to be, a key reference point in Taiwan’s convoluted effort to find its identity. Language, Politics and Identity in Taiwan traces the intertwined paths of five sets of names Taiwan has used to name China since the KMT came to Taiwan in 1949: the derogatory “Communist bandits”; the ideologically focused “Chinese Communists”; the seemingly neutral geographical designators “mainland” and “opposite shore/both shores”; and the ethnic and national label “China,” with the official designation, “People’s Republic of China.” In doing so, it explores how Taiwanese identities are constituted and reconstituted in the shifting and switching of names for China; in the application of these names to alternative domains of Taiwanese life; in the waning or waxing of names following tides of history and polity; and in the increasingly contested meaning of names. Through textual analyses of historical archives and other mediated texts and artifacts, the chapters chart Taiwan’s identity negotiation over the past half century and critically evaluate key interconnections between language and politics.]

Chang, Shi-kuo. “Realism in Taiwan Fiction: Two Directions.” In Jeannette L. Faurot, ed. Chinese Fiction from Taiwan: Critical Perspectives. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1980, 31-42.

Chang, Sung-cheng Yvonne. Modernism and the Nativist Resistance: Contemporary Fiction from Taiwan. Durham: Duke University Press, 1993.

—–. “Beyond Cultural and National Identities: Current Re-evaluation of the Kominka Literature from Taiwan’s Japanese Period.” Journal of Modern Literature in Chinese 1, 1 (1997): 75-107.

—–. “Elements of Modernism in Fiction from Taiwan.” Tamkang Review 19, 1-4 (Aut. 1988/Sum. 1989): 591-606.

—–. “Modern Taiwanese Fiction from Taiwan.” In Murray Rubinstein, ed., Taiwan: A History, 1600-1994. Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 1998.

—–. “Modernism and Contemporary Fiction of Taiwan.” In Roger Bauer, Douwe Fokkema, eds., Proceedings of the XIIth Conference of the Inernational Comparative Literature Association: Space and Boundaries of Literature. Munich: Iudicium, 1990, 285-90.

—–. “Three Generations of Taiwan’s Contemporary Women Writers: A Critical Introduction.” In Ann Carver and Sung-cheng Yvonne Chang, eds., Bamboo Shoots After the Rain: Contemporary Stories of Taiwan. NY: The Feminist Press, 1990.

—–. “Taiwanese New Literature and the Colonial Context: A Historical Survey.” In Murray A. Rubinstein, ed. Taiwan: A New History. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1999, 261-74.

—–. “Literature in Post-1949 Taiwan, 1950s to 1980s.” In Murray A. Rubinstein, ed. Taiwan: A New History. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1999, 403-18.

—–. Literary Culture in Taiwan: From Martial Law to Market Law. NY: Columbia UP, 2004.

—–. “Representing Taiwan: Shifting Geopolitical Frameworks.” In David Wang and Carlos Rojas eds., Writing Taiwan: A New Literary History. Durham, NC: Duke UP, 2006, 17-25.

—–. “Contexts of Taiwan STudies in the U.S. Academe.” In Chin-Chuan Cheng, I-Chun Wang, and Steven Totosy de Zepetnek, eds. Cultural Discourse in Taiwan. Kaohsiung: Center for the Humanities and Social Sciences, National Sun Yat-sen University, 2009, 10-29.

—–. “Building a Modern Institution of Literature: The Case of Taiwan.” In Yingjin Zhang, ed. A Companion to Modern Chinese Literature. Chichester, UK: Wiley Blackwell, 2016, 116-33.

Chang, Yvone Sung-Sheng, Michelle Yeh, and Ming-ju Fan, eds. The Columbia Sourcebook of Literary Taiwan. NY: Columbia University Press, 2014.

[Abstract: This sourcebook contains more than 160 documents and writings that reflect the development of Taiwanese literature from the early modern period to the twenty-first century. Selections include seminal essays in literary debates, polemics, and other landmark events; interviews, diaries, and letters by major authors; critical and retrospective essays by influential writers, editors, and scholars; transcripts of historical speeches and conferences; literary-society manifestos and inaugural journal prefaces; and governmental policy pronouncements that have significantly influenced Taiwanese literature. These texts illuminate Asia’s experience with modernization, colonialism, and postcolonialism; the character of Taiwan’s Cold War and post-Cold War cultural production; gender and environmental issues; indigenous movements; and the changes and challenges of the digital revolution. Taiwan’s complex history with Dutch, Spanish, and Japanese colonization; strategic geopolitical position vis-à-vis China, Japan, and the United States; and status as a hub for the East-bound circulation of technological and popular-culture trends make the nation an excellent case study for a richer understanding of East Asian and modern global relations.]

Chang, Wen-chi. “Taiwanese identity in Contemporary Literature.” In Chung-min Chen et al. eds., Ethnicity in Taiwan: Social, Historical, and Cultural Perspectives. Nangang: Institute of Ethnology, Academia Sinica, 1994, 169-87.

Chen, Aili. The Search for Cultural Identity: Taiwan ‘Hsiang-T’u’ Literature in the Seventies. Ph.d. diss. Columbus: The Ohio State University, 1991.

Chen, Chang-fang and Sung Mei-hwa. “Elements of Change in the Fiction of Taiwan in the 1980s.” The Chinese Pen (Summer 1989): 31-42.

Chen, Chien-chung. “Taiwan Fiction under Japanese Colonial Rule, 1895-1945.” In Shu-mei Shih and Chien-hsin Tsai eds. Sinophone Studies: A Critical Reader. NY: Columbia University Press, 2013, 227-41.

Chen, Fangming. “Postmodern or Postcolonial? An Inquiry into Postwar Taiwanese Literary History.” In David Wang and Carlos Rojas eds., Writing Taiwan: A New Literary History. Durham, NC: Duke UP, 2006, 26-50.

Chen, Jo-hsi. “Literary Formosa.” The China Quarterly 15 (July-Sept, 1963): 75-85.

Chen, Letty Lingchei. Writing Chinese: Reshaping Chinese Cultural Identity. New York: Palgrave Macmillan Publishing, 2006.

—–. “Writing Taiwan’s Fin-de-Siecle Splendor: Zhu Tianwen and Zhu Tianxin.” In Kirk A. Denton, ed., Columbia Companion to Modern Chinese Literature. NY: Columbia University Press, 2016, 363-70.

Chen, Li-fen. Fictionality and Reality in Narrative Discourse: A Reading of Four Contemporary Taiwanese Writers. Ph. D. diss. Seattle: University of Washington, 2000.[chapters on Ch’en Ying-chen, Ch’i-Teng Sheng, Wang Chen-ho, and Wang Wen-hsing; available through Dissertation.com]

—–. “Queering Taiwan: In Search of Nationalism’s Other.” Modern China 37 (2011): 384-421.

[Abstract: This article deals with the formation of Taiwan’s homosexual cultural politics in the 1990s, the impact and implications of which are yet to be examined within the larger context of Taiwan’s cultural and political development and ethnic relationships. It is argued that the rise of this cultural politics is both a reflection and a source of a growing sense of identity crisis on the island. By examining the configurations of “queer” in various discursive domains, this interdisciplinary study seeks to delineate the cross-referencing ideological network of this cultural movement and its entanglement with the complexity of Taiwan’s nationalism. At the same time, to the extent that this movement tends to present itself as a radical politics from a privileged epistemological and cultural standpoint, this claimed radicalism is also scrutinized for its problematics and ironies.]

Chen, Lucy. “Literary Formosa.” In Mark Mancall, ed., Formosa Today. NY, London: Praeger, 1964, 131-41.

Chen, Shao-Hsing. “Diffusion and Acceptance of Modern Artistic and Intellectual Expression in Taiwan.” Studia Taiwanica 2 (1957): 1-6.

Chen, Shou-yi. “Contemporary Literature in Taiwan.” Claremont Quarterly 11, 3 (1964): 50-70.

Chen, Yu-ling. “The State of Taiwan Literature–Feminine, Nativist, and Anti-Colonial Discourse. Tr. Suefen Tsai. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 22 (Jan. 2008): 147-53.

Cheng, Chin-Chuan. “Immigrant Brides and Language Problems in Taiwan.” In Chin-Chuan Cheng, I-Chun Wang, and Steven Totosy de Zepetnek, eds. Cultural Discourse in Taiwan. Kaohsiung: Center for the Humanities and Social Sciences, National Sun Yat-sen University, 2009, 161-76.

Cheng, Chin-Chuan, I-Chun Wang, and Steven Totosy de Zepetnek, eds. Cultural Discourse in Taiwan. Kaohsiung: Center for the Humanities and Social Sciences, National Sun Yat-sen University, 2009.

Cheung, Dominic. “The Continuity of Modern Chinese Poetry in Taiwan.” World Literature Today 65, 3 (1991): 399-404.

Chi, Pang Yuan. “Taiwan’s History in Literature.” Solidarity 120 (1988): 51-58.

—–. “Taiwan Literature, 1945-1999.” In Pang-yuan Chi and David Wang, eds., Chinese Literature in the Second Half of the Twentieth Century: A Critical Survey. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 2000, 14-30.

Chien, Ying ying. “From Utopian to Dystopian World: Two Faces of Feminism in Contemporary Taiwanese Women’s Fiction.” World Literature Today 68, 1 (1994): 35-42.

Chiu, Kuei fen. “Taking Off: A Feminist Approach to Two Contemporary Women’s Novels in Taiwan.” Tamkang Review 23, 1-4 (1992-1993): 709-33.

—–. “Identity Politics in Contemporary Women’s Novels in Taiwan.” Tamkang Review 30, 2 (Winter 1999): 27-54. Rpt. in Peng-hisang Chen and Whitney Crothers Dilley, eds., Feminism/Femininity in Chinese Literature. Amsterdam,: Rodopi, 2002, 67-86.

—–. “Treacherous Translation: Taiwanese Tactics of Intervention in Transnational Cultural Flows.” Concentric: Literary and Cultural Studies 31, 1 (Jan. 2005): 47-69.

—–. “‘Worlding’ World Literature from the Literary Periphery: Four Taiwanese Models.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 30, no.1  (Spring 2018): 13-41.

Chong, Ling. “Feminism and Female Taiwan Writers.” In Pang-yuan Chi and David Wang, eds., Chinese Literature in the Second Half of the Twentieth Century: A Critical Survey. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 2000, 146-60.

Chou, Ying-hsiung. “Between History and the Unconscious: Contemporary Taiwanese Fiction Revisited.” Tamkang Review 22, 1-4 (1991): 155-76.

Chun, Allen. “The Culture Industry as National Enterprise: The Politics of Heritage in Contemporary Taiwan.” In Virginia R. Dominguez and David Y. H. Wu, eds., From Beijing to Port Moresby: The Politics of National Identity in Cultural Policies. Amsterdam: Gordon and Breach, 1998, 77-113.

Chung, Mingder. The Little Theatre Movement of Taiwan (1980-1989): In Search of Alternative Aesthetics and Politics. Ph.D. diss. NY: New York University, 1992.

“Contemporary Literature in Taiwan.” Special Section of Free China Review 41, 4 (April 1991): 1-47.

Damm, Jens. Ku’er vs. tongzhi – Diskurse der Homosexualität. Über das Entstehen sexueller Identitäten im glokalisierten Taiwan und im postkolonialen Hongkong (Discourses on homosexual identities in Taiwan and Hong Kong). Bochum: Cathay Skripten, Taiwan Studies Series, no. 16, 2000.

[Abstract: During the nineties, two different discourses on homosexual identity have developed in Hong Kong and in Taiwan: a tongzhi-discourse in Hong Kong, which attributes the negative attitude toward homosexuality in modern Chinese societies to the influence of (post)colonialism and appeals for a more tolerant attitude by making frequent and pointed reference to the Chinese tradition of male homosexual relationships. The Taiwanese ku’er (queer) discourse, which regards Taiwanese society as being firmly embedded in a globalized world, may therefore be seen as resulting from a blend of glocalized influences and a more tolerant attitude is only possible in a pluralistic society where the flow of gender and desire is recognized. In the paper, two recently published works are presented as examples for the two discourses: Post-Colonial ‘Tongzhi’, written by the Hong Kong sociologist Zhou Huashan and Queer Archipelago: A Reader of the Queer Discourses in Taiwan compiled by the Taiwanese author of belles-lettres and ku’er-theoretician Ji Dawei. It is also shown that the differences in the discourses may be traced back to the drifting apart of the political and social scenarios in Taiwan and Hong Kong.]

Diamond, Catherine Theresa Cleeves. The Role of Cross-cultural Adaptation in the Little Theatre Movement in Taiwan. Ph.D. diss. Seattle: University of Washington, 1993.

Dluhošová, Táňa. “Early Postward Debates on Taiwan and Taiwanese Literature.” In Ann Helen and Scott Sommers, eds., Becoming Taiwan: From Colonialism to Democracy. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2010, 181-97.

—–. “Taiwan funü in the Early Post-war Period (1945-49).” Oriental Archive 79, 3 (2011): 357-77.

—–. “Does ‘Dominating’ Mean ‘Mainstream’?–Official Taiwan Literature in 1945-47.” Studia Orientalia Slovaca 11, 1 (2012).

Dutrait, Noel. “Four Taiwanese Writers on Themselves Chu T’ien-wen, Su Wei Chen, Cheng Chiung-ming and Ye Lingfang respond to our questionnaire.” China Perspectives 17 (May/June 1998).

Faurot, Jeannette L., ed. Chinese Fiction from Taiwan: Critical Perspectives. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1980.

Fix, Douglas L. Conscripted Writers: Collaborating tales?: Taiwanese War Stories. Cambridge, Mass: Fairbank Center, 1994.

—–. “Conscripted Writers, Collaborating Tales? Taiwanese War Stories.” Harvard Studies on Taiwan: Papers of the Taiwan Studies Workshop 2 (1998): 19-41.

Fleming, Brent Leonard. Theatre Management Procedures: An Operations Manual for the Cultural Center Theatres in Taiwan, the Republic of China. Ph.D.diss. Texas Technical University, 1987.

Goldblatt, Howard. “Taiwan Literature in the People’s Republic of China.” Journal of the Chinese Language Teachers Association 16, 2 (1981): 57-66.

Haddon, Rosemary M. “Mimesis and Motivation in Taiwan Colonial Fiction.” B.C. Asian Review 1 (1987)

—–. “Taiwan Xiangtu wenxue: The Sojourner-Narrator.” B.C. Asian Review 3-4 (1990).

—–. Nativist Fiction in China and Taiwan: A Thematic Survey. Ph.D. diss. Vancouver: University of British Columbia, 1993.

—–. “Chinese Nativist Literature of the 1920s: The Sojourner-Narrator.” Modern Chinese Literature 8, no. 1-2 (1994): 97-124.

—–. “T’ai-wan hsin wen-hsueh and the Evolution of a Journal: T’ai-wan min-pao.” Tamkang Review 25, 2 (1994): 1-35.

—–. “Introduction: Taiwanese Nativism and the Colonial/Post-Colonial Discourse.” In Rosemary Haddon, tr./ed , Oxcart: Nativist Stories from Taiwan, 1934-1977. Dortmund: Projekt Verlag, 1996, v-xxv.

—–. “Engendering Women: Taiwan’s Recent Fiction by Women.” In Antonia Finnan and Ann McLaren, eds. Dress, Sex and Text in Chinese Culture. Clayton, Australia: Monash Asia Institute, 1999, 212-24.

Hammer, Christiane. Reif für die Insel. Ein Streifzug durch die taiwanesische Literature in deutscher Übersetzung. Mit einer Auswahlbibliographie (A Survey of Taiwanese literature in German translation. With a selective bibliography). Bochum: Cathay Skripten, Taiwan Studies Series, no. 14, 1999.

[Abstract: Compared with the literature from the Chinese mainland, modern texts from Taiwan in German translations lead a far more marginal life on Germany’s book market. This is not so much attributable to a lack of quality, but correlates to the minor importance Taiwan studies enjoy in the field of German sinology, in stark contrast to the situation, e.g., in the USA. However, quite a number of translations are hidden in various theses and studies, the so-called ‘grey literature’. This survey examines some of these semi-official publications, most of which were initiated by the late Professor Helmut Martin, and considers whether they provide useful references to interesting authors or even raw matereial which could be transformed into translations on a commercial scale.]

Hegel, Robert E. “The Search for Identity in Fiction from Taiwan.” In Robert Hegel and Richard Hessney, eds., Expressions of Self in Chinese Literature. NY: Columbia UP, 1985. 342-360.

Hillenbrand, Margaret. “GIs and the City: The Vietnam War in Taiwanese Fiction of the 1970s and 1980s.” Asian Studies Review 25, 4 (2001).

—–. “Trauma and the Politics of Identity: Form and Function in the Fictional Narratives of the February 28th Incident.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 17, 2 (Fall 2005): 49-89.

—–. “The National Allegory Revisited: Writing Private and Public in Contemporary Taiwan.” positions: east asia cultures critique 14, 3 (2006): 633-662. [Project Muse link]

—–. Literature, Modernity, and the Practice of Resistance: Japanese and Taiwanese Fiction, 1960-1990. Leiden: Brill, 2007. [MCLC Resource Center review by Bert Scruggs]

[Abstract: This book is a cross-cultural, interdisciplinary study which compares responses to modernity in the literary cultures of Japan and Taiwan, 1960-1990. Moving beyond the East-West framework that has traditionally dominated comparative enquiry, the volume sets out to explore contemporary East Asian literature on its own terms. As such, it belongs to the newly emerging area of inter-Asian cultural studies, but is the first full-length monograph to explore this field through the prism of literature. The book combines close readings of paradigmatic texts with in-depth analysis of the historical, social, and ideological contexts in which these works are situated, and explores the form and function of literary practice within the “miracle” societies of industrialized East Asia.]

The House of Hong Kong Literature [香港文學館].

Hsia, Yu, et al. “Cross it Out, Cross it Out, Cross it Out: Erasurist Poetry from Taiwan’s Poetry Now (Issue #9, Feb 2012).” Asymptote (April 2012).

Hsiau, A-Chin. Contemporary Taiwanese Cultural Nationalism. NY: Routledge, 2000.

—–. “The Indigenization of Taiwanese Literature: Historical Narrative, Strategic Essentialism, and State Violence.” In John Makeham and A-chin Hsiau, eds. Cultural, Ethnic, and Political Nationalism in Contemporary Taiwan: Bentuhua. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005, 125-55.

Hsu, Chien-jung. The Construction of National Identity in Taiwan’s Media, 1896-2012. Leiden: Brill, 2014.

[Abstract: National identity has been an ongoing political issue in Taiwan since the late-1890s. The Construction of National Identity in Taiwan1s Media, 1896-2012 breaks new ground with the most comprehensive analysis of the development of Taiwan1s media and the construction of national identity in Taiwan1s media. Using a variety of media contents including newspapers, opposition magazines, broadcasting radio, news TV stations and the Internet as well as numerous interviews with journalists, senior media staffs and academics, Dr Hsu provides many original insights into the formation of national identity in Taiwan’s media. Taiwan’s media began to demonstrate a variety of new identities under democratization. Part of this change responded to market conditions as a majority of Taiwan’s population stressed their Taiwan identity.]

Hsu, Vivian. “Universal Vision in Contemporary Taiwan Literature.” Journal of the Chinese Language Teachers Association 16, 3 (1981): 19-40

Hsu, Wen Hsiung. “Purism and Alienation in Recent Taiwanese Fiction.” In Bjorn Jernudd and Michael Shapiro eds., The Politics of Language Purism. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 1989, 197-210.

Huang, Hans Tao-Ming. Queer Politics and Sexual Modernity in Taiwan. HK: Hong Kong University Press, 2011.

[Abstract: This book delineates the history and politics of gender and sexuality since postwar Taiwan. Tracking the interface between queerness and national culture, it underscores the imbrications of male homosexuality, prostitution and feminism within the modernizing process and offers a trenchant critique of the violence of sexual modernity.]

Huang, Heng-ch’iu. “Relections on Hakka Literature in Taiwan.” Tr. Yingtsih Huang. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 16 (2005): 171-84.

Huang, Peter I-min. Linda Hogan and Contemporary Taiwanese Writers: An Ecocritical Study of Indigeneities and Environment. Lanham, MD: Lexington, 2016.

Huang, Yu-ting. “The Archepelagos of Taiwan Literature: Comparative Methods and Island Writings in Taiwan.” In Shu-mei Shih and Ping-hui Liao, eds., Comparatizing Taiwan. London: Routledge, 2015, 80-99.

Hung, Eva (ed.); Pollard, D. E. (ed.) “Contemporary Taiwan Literature.” Renditions 35/36 (1991).

Kinkley, Jeffrey. “Mainland Chinese Scholars’ Images of Contemporary Taiwan Literature.” In Sung-sheng Yvonne Chang and Michelle Yeh, eds., Contemporary Chinese Literature: Crossing the Boundaries. Special issue of Literature East and West. Austin, TX: Department of Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures, 1995, 25-42.

Kleeman, Faye Yuan. 2003. Under an Imperial Sun: Japanese Colonial Literature of Taiwan and the South. Honolulu: University of Hawai’i Press.

—–. “Off the Beaten Path: (Post)-Colonial Travel Writings on Taiwan.” Studia Orientalia Slovaca 11, 1 (2012).

Klöter, Henning. “What Is the Mainstream in Taiwanese Literature? An Introduction.” Studia Orientalia Slovaca 11, 1 (2012).

Ko, Ch’ing-ming. “Modernism and Its Discontents: Taiwan Literature in the 1960s.” In Pang-yuan Chi and David Wang, eds., Chinese Literature in the Second Half of the Twentieth Century: A Critical Survey. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 2000, 76-95.

Ku, Tim-hung. “Modernism in Modern Poetry of Taiwan, ROC: A Comparative Perspective.” Tamkang Review 18 (1987/88): 125-39.

Kwan-Terry, John. “Modernism and Tradition in Some Recent Chinese Verse.” Tamkang Review 3, 2 (1972): 189-202.

Lancashire, Edel Marie. Concord and Discord in the World of Literature in Taiwan, 1949-1971: A Selective Study of Writers’ associations, Literary Movements and Controversial Writers. Ph.D. thesis. London: School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London,1981.

—–. “The Lock of the Heart Controversy in Taiwan, 1962-1963: A Question of Artistic Freedom and a Writer’s Social Responsibility.” The China Quarterly (Sept. 1985): 462-488.

Lau, Joseph. “Echoes of the May Fourth Movement in Taiwan Hsiang-t’u Fiction.” In Hung-mao Tien, ed., Mainland China, Taiwan and US Policy. Cambridge, MA: OG Publishers, 1983, 135-50.

Laureillard, Marie. “La poésie visuelle taiwanaise: un retour réflexif sur l’écriture.” Transtext(e)s Transculture: Journal of Global Cultural Studies 2 (Jan. 2007).

Lee, Leo Ou-fan. “Modernism and Romanticism in Taiwan Fiction.” In Jeannette L. Faurot, ed. Chinese Fiction from Taiwan: Critical Perspectives. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1980, 6-30.

—–. “Taiwanese Literature-Chinese Literature? Research Topics of the Nineties Concerning the Colonial Period and Post-war Development.” Asiatica Venetiana 2 (1997): 105-116.

—–. “Last Rehearsals, Waiting in the Wings–Taiwan’s Cultural Criticism of the Nineties.” In Raoul Findeisen and Robert Gassmann, eds., Autumn Floods: Essays in Honour of Marian Galik. Bern: Peter Lang, 1997, 447-58.

—–. “A New Proximity: Chinese Literature in the People’s Republic and on Taiwan.” In H. Goldblatt, ed., Worlds Apart: Recent Chinese Writing and Its Audiences. Armonk, NY : M. E. Sharpe, 1990. 29-43.

Lee, Yu-lin. Writing Taiwan: A Study of Taiwan’s Nativist Literature. VDM verlag, 2008.

—–. “Linguistic Flows, Subjectivity in Cross-Writing, and Language Experiments in Modern Taiwan Literature.” In Chin-Chuan Cheng, I-Chun Wang, and Steven Totosy de Zepetnek, eds. Cultural Discourse in Taiwan. Kaohsiung: Center for the Humanities and Social Sciences, National Sun Yat-sen University, 2009, 131-60.

Leroux, Alain. “Poetry Movements in Taiwan from the 1950s to the late 1970s: Break and Continuities.” China Perspectives 68 (2007): 56-65.

Li, Ch’iao. “Bickering about the Meaning of ‘Taiwanese Literature.'” Tr. Robert Smitheram. Taiwan Literature, English Translation Series 1 (Aug. 1996).

Liao, Hsien-hao. “From Central Kingdom to Orphan of Asia: The Transformation of Identity in Modern Taiwanese Literature in the five Major Literary Debates.” In Sung-sheng Yvonne Chang and Michelle Yeh, eds., Contemporary Chinese Literature: Crossing the Boundaries. Special issue of Literature East and West. Austin, TX: Department of Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures, 1995, 106-26.

—–. “Becoming Cyborgian: Postmodernism and Nationalism in Contemporary Taiwan.” In Xudong Zhang and Arif Dirlik, eds., Postmodernism and China. Durham: Duke UP, 2000, 175-201.

Liao, Ping-hui. “The Case of the Emergent Cultural Criticism Columns in Taiwan’s Newspaper Literary Supplements: Global/Local Dialectics in Contemporary Taiwanese Public Culture.” In Rob Wilson and Wimal Dissanayake, eds., Global/local: Cultural Production and the Transnational Imaginary. Durham: Duke University Press, 1996, 337-47.

—–. “From Romancing the State to Romancing the Store: Further Elaborations of Butterfly Motifs in Contemporary Taiwan Literature.” In Carlos Rojas and Eileen Cheng-yin Chow, eds., Rethinking Chinese Popular Culture: Cannibalizations of the Canon. NY: Routledge, 2009, 32-47.

Lin, Esther. “Ecrire on Japonais: Les ecrivains Taiwanais des annees 1930 et 1940.” In Isabelle Rabut, ed., Les belles infideles dans l’empire du milieu: Problematique et pratiques de la traduction dans le monde Chinois moderne. Paris: You Feng, 2010, 224-38.

Lin Jui-ming. “Literature Originates From the Land and People.”Tr. Jenn-Shann Jack Lin. Taiwan Literature, English Translation Series 4 (1999): 3-8.

Lin, Julia C. Essays on Contemporary Chinese Poetry. Athens, OH: Ohio University Press, 1985.

Lin, Pei-Yin. “Negotiating Colonialism: Taiwanese Literature During the Japanese Occupation.” IIAS Newsletter 38 (Sept. 2005): 20.

—–. “Memory, History, and Identity: Representations of the February 28th Incident in Taiwanese Literature.” In Evolving Cultural Memory in China and Her Neighbours. Hong Kong: Education Press, 2008, 306-335.

—–. “Cultural Memory and Identity in Taiwanese Fiction of the Twentieth Century.” In Cultural Memory and Chinese Society. Malaysia: University of Malaya, 2008, 111-127.

—–. “Nativist Rhetoric in Contemporary Taiwan.” In Chin-Chuan Cheng, I-Chun Wang, and Steven Totosy de Zepetnek, eds. Cultural Discourse in Taiwan. Kaohsiung: Center for the Humanities and Social Sciences, National Sun Yat-sen University, 2009, 52-77.

—–. “Remaking ‘Taiwan’: Literary Representations of the 2.28 Incident by Lin Yaode and Li Qiao.” In Ann Heytlen and Scott Sommers, eds., Becoming Taiwan: From Colonialism to Democracy. Wiesbaden: Otto Harrassowitz, 2010, 63-81.

—–. “Writing Beyond Boudoirs: Sinophone Literature by Female Writers in Contemporary Taiwan.” In Shu-mei Shih and Chien-hsin Tsai eds. Sinophone Studies: A Critical Reader. NY: Columbia University Press, 2013, 255-69.

Lin, Peiyin and Weipin Tsai, ed. Print, Profit, and Perception: Ideas, Information and Knowledge in Chinese Societies, 1895-1949. Leiden: Brill, 2014.

[Abstract: Print, Profit, and Perception examines the dynamic cross-cultural exchanges occurring in China and Taiwan from the first Sino-Japanese War to the mid-twentieth century. Drawing examples from various genres, this interdisciplinary volume presents nine empirically grounded case studies on the growth in the production, dissemination and consumption of texts,which lay behind a dramatic expansion of knowledge. The chapters collectively address the co-existence of globalization and localization processes in the period. By taking into account intra-Asian cultural encounters and tracing the multiple competing forces encountered by many, this book offers a fresh and compelling take on how individuals and social groups participated in transnational conceptual flows. Contributors include: Paul Bailey, Che-chia Chang, Elizabeth Emrich, Tze-ki Hon, Max K.W. Huang, Mei-e Huang, Mike Shi-chi Lan, Pei-yin Lin, and Weipin Tsai.]

Lin, Sylvia Li-chun. “Two Texts to a Story: White Terror in Taiwan.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 16, 1 (Spring 2004): 65-114.

—–. “Toward a New Identity: Nativism and Popular Music in Taiwan.” China Information 17, 2 (2003): 83-107.

—–. Representing Atrocity in Taiwan: The 2/28 Incident and White Terror in Fiction and Film. NY: Columbia UP, 2007. [publisher’s blurb]

Lin, Yaofu. “Toward a Version of China: The Taiwan Experience.” Surfaces 5 (1995).

Liou, Liang-ya. “Gender Crossing and Decadence in Taiwan Fiction at the Fin-de-siecle.” In John C. Hawley ed., Post-colonial and Queer Theories: Intersections and Essays. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2001. 71-86.

Literature.” The Republic of China Yearbook–Taiwan, 2001. [decent overview of Taiwan literature]

Liu, Joyce C. “Re-staging Cultural Memories in Contemporary Theatre in Taiwan: Wang Qimei, Stanley Lai, and Lin Huaimin.” In Steven Totosy de Zepetnek and Jennifer W. Jay, eds., East Asian Cultural and Historical Perspectives: Histories and Society, Culture and Literatures. Edmonton: Research Institute for Comparative Literature and Cross-Cultural Studies, University of Alberta, 1997, 267-78.

—–. “The Importance of Being Perverse: China and Taiwan, 1931-1937.” In David Wang and Carlos Rojas eds., Writing Taiwan: A New Literary History. Durham, NC: Duke UP, 2006, 93-112.

Liu, Kenneth S. H. “Publishing Taiwan: A Survey of Publications of Taiwanese Literature in English Translation.” In Anna Guttman, Michel Hockx and George Paizis, eds., The Global Literary Field. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Press, 2006, 200-227.

Lu, Han-hsiu. “The Line Graph of Memory: The Return Road to One’s Hometown.” Tr. John Balcolm. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 22 (Jan. 2008): 3-8.

Lupke, Christopher. Modern Chinese Literature in the Post-Colonial Diaspora. Ph.D. diss. Ithaca: Cornell University, 1993.

—–. “Xia Ji’an’s (T.A. Hsia) Critical Bridge to Modernism in Taiwan.” Journal of Modern Literature in Chinese 4, 1 (2000): 35-64.

—–. “The Taiwan Modernists.” In Joshua Mostow, ed, and Kirk A. Denton, China section, ed., Columbia Companion to Modern East Asian Literature. NY: Columbia UP, 2003, 481-87.

—–. “The Taiwan Nativists.” In Joshua Mostow, ed, and Kirk A. Denton, China section, ed., Columbia Companion to Modern East Asian Literature. NY: Columbia UP, 2003, 502-508.

—–. “Cold War Fiction from Taiwan and the Modernists.” In Kirk A. Denton, ed., Columbia Companion to Modern Chinese Literature. NY: Columbia University Press, 2016, 250-57.

—–. “Nativism and Localism in Taiwanese Literature.” Kirk A. Denton, ed., Columbia Companion to Modern Chinese Literature. NY: Columbia University Press, 2016, 258-66.

Makeham, John and A-chin Hsiau, eds. Cultural, Ethnic, and Political Nationalism in Contemporary Taiwan: Bentuhua. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005.

Malmqvist, Goran. “On the Development of Modern Taiwanese Poetry.” Archiv Orientalni 67, 3 (1999): 311-22.

Marijnissen, Silvia. “‘Made Things’: Serial Form in Modern Poetry from Taiwan.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 13, 2 (Fall 2001): 172-206.

Martin, Fran. Situating Sexualities: Queer Narratives in 1990s Taiwanese Fiction and Film. Ph. D. diss. Melbourne: University of Melbourne, 2000.

—–. Situating Sexualities: Queer Representations in Taiwanese Fiction, Film and Public Culture. HK: University of Hong Kong Press, 2003. [reviewed by Kam Louie in Intersections 10 (Aug. 2004)].

Martin, Helmut. The History of Taiwanese Literature: Towards Cultural-Political Identity. Views from Taiwan, China, Japan and the West. Bochum: Ruhr University, 1995.

—–. “The History of Taiwanese Literature.” Chinese Studies 14, 1 (June 1996): 1-51.

McArthur, Charles. ‘Taiwanese Literature’ after the Nativist Movement: Construction of a Literary Identity Apart from a Chinese Model. Ph. D. diss. Austin: University of Texas, 1999.

Mei, Wen-li. “The Intellectual in Formosa.” The China Quarterly (July/Sept 1978): 65-74.

Moskowitz, Marc L. ed. Popular Culture in Taiwan: Charismatic Modernity. NY: Routledge, 2010.

Neder, Christina and Ines Susanne Schilling, eds. Transformation! Innovation? Perspectives on Taiwan Culture. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2003.

P’eng Jui-chin. “The Primary Issue for Taiwan Literature is Identifying with the Land.” Tr. Mabel Lee. Taiwan Literature, English Translation Series 4 (1999): 9-12.

—–. “The Characteristics of Taiwan Hakka Writers and Their Works.” Tr. John Crespi. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 16 (2005): 185-202.

Peng, Hsiao-yen. “Seven Decades of Taiwan Literature: An Outline.” In Steven Totosy de Zepetnek and Jennifer W. Jay, eds., East Asian Cultural and Historical Perspectives: Histories and Society, Culture and Literatures. Edmonton: Research Institute for Comparative Literature and Cross-Cultural Studies, University of Alberta, 1997, 313-21.

—–. “From Anti-Imperialism to Post-Colonialism: Taiwan Fiction Since the 1977 Nativist Literature Debate.” In Kwok-kan Tam et al., eds., Sights of Contestation: Localism, Globalism and Cultural Production in Asia and the Pacific. HK: The Chinese University Press, 2002, 57-78.

—–. “Historical Revisionism in Taiwanese Literature and Culture: A Post-Martial Law Phenomenon.” In Christine Neder and Ines Susanne Schilling, eds., Transformation! Innovation? Perspectives on Taiwan Culture. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 2003, 13-28.

Rawnsley, Ming-Yeh. Cultural and Social Change in Taiwan: Society, Cinema and Theatre. NY: Routledge, 2011.

[Abstract: From a Japanese colony to an authoritarian regime to a new democracy, Taiwanese society has gone through many phases of social transition since 1945. This book examines the processes of cultural, social and political transition in Taiwan since 1945, investigating their impact on the Taiwanese cultural industries, with a particular focus on cinema and theatre, and showing how changes in cinema and theatre illustrate the broader cultural, social and political changes taking place. It sets out the history of the development of Taiwanese theatre and cinema since the 1930s, and relates this to broader changes within Taiwanese society. It analyses the socio-politics of Taiwanese-language cinema, and the impact of language policies including the government’s encouragement and promotion of Mandarin in the 1960s. Important issues are considered, notably the modernization and commercialization of cinema and theatre in Taiwan, focusing in particular on Taiwanese produced gangster movies, and also questions of liberalization and democratization, especially the new wave of independent cinema that arrived in the mid 1980s. The book includes interviews with important movie directors, actors, producers, industry workers and critics, including Chen Qiu-yan and Huang Jian-ye. Overall, it provides a full account of cultural, political and social change in Taiwan over the last eighty years, and its relationship with Taiwanese cinema and theatre.]

Research Unit on Taiwanese Culture and Literature (Ruhr University Bochum)

Riep, Steven. “Piecing Together the Past: The Notion of Recovery in Fiction and Film from Taiwan.” Modern China 38, 2 (March 2012): 199-232.

[Abstract: Writers and filmmakers in Taiwan have sought to use the narrative techniques of classic detective fiction to recover events of the Nationalist government-imposed White Terror of the early 1950s to bring the once-concealed past to light. Fiction writer Chen Yingzhen (Ch’en Ying-chen) pioneered this technique in short fiction written in 1983 to bring before the public the events of the White Terror and to consider how guilt for the atrocities should be affixed. Wan Jen’s (Wan Ren) 1995 feature film Super Citizen Ko explores possibilities for memorialization and the notion of victimhood in its recovery of the Nationalist repression of progressive political movements and its impact on a former political prisoner and his family. Finally, Tseng Wen-Chen (Zeng Wenzhen) in her documentary Spring: The Story of Xu Jinyu offers a portrait of a woman White Terror survivor turned political activist living in an era when the White Terror has been commemorated but remains poorly understood by the younger generation.]

Ross, Timothy A. “Taiwan Fiction: A Review of Recent Criticism.” Journal of the Chinese Language Teachers Association 13, 1 (1978): 72-80.

Sang, Tze-lang. “Lesbian Feminism in the Mass-Mediated Public Sphere of Taiwan.” In Mayfair Mei-hui Yang, ed., Spaces of Their Own: Women’s Public Sphere in Transnational China. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1999, 132-61.

Schulz, Julia. “In Search of Taiwaneseness in Modern Taiwan Poetry.” Studia Orientalia Slovaca 11, 1 (2012).

Scruggs, Bert Mitchell. Collective Consciousness and Individual Identities in Colonial Taiwan Fiction. Ph. D. diss. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania, 2003.

—–. “Censorship, Education, Technology, and the Colonial Taiwan Literary Field.” Journal of the International Student Center, Yokohama National University 10 (2003): 95-108.

—–. Translingual Narration: Colonial and Postcolonial Taiwanese Fiction and Film. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2015.

[AbstractTranslingual Narration is a study of colonial Taiwanese fiction, its translation from Japanese to Chinese, and films produced during and about the colonial era. It is a postcolonial intervention into a field largely dominated by studies of colonial Taiwanese writing as either a branch of Chinese fiction or part of a larger empire of Japanese language texts. Rather than read Taiwanese fiction as simply belonging to one of two discourses, Bert Scruggs argues for disengaging the nation from the former colony to better understand colonial Taiwan and its postcolonial critics. Following early chapters on the identity politics behind Chinese translations of Japanese texts, attempts to establish a vernacular Taiwanese literature, and critical space, Scruggs provides close readings of short fiction through the critical prisms of locative and cultural or ethnic identity to suggest that cultural identity is evidence of free will. Stories and novellas are also viewed through the critical prism of class-consciousness, including the writings of Yang Kui (1906–1985), who unlike most of his contemporaries wrote politically engaged literature. Scruggs completes his core examination of identity by reading short fiction through the prism of gender identity and posits a resemblance between gender politics in colonial Taiwan and pre-independence India. The work goes on to test the limits of nostalgia and solastalgia in fiction and film by looking at how both the colonial future and past are remembered before concluding with political uses of cinematic murder. Films considered in this chapter include colonial-era government propaganda documentaries and postcolonial representations of colonial cosmopolitanism and oppression. Finally, ideas borrowed from translation and memory studies as well as indigenization are suggested as possible avenues of discovery for continued interventions into the study of postcolonial and colonial Taiwanese fiction and culture.]

Shen, Na-huei. The Age of Sadness: A Study of Naturalism in Taiwanese Literature under Japanese Colonization. Ph. D. diss. Seattle: University of Washington, 2003.

Shih, Fang-long, Stuart Thompson, and Paul-Francois Tremlett, eds. Re-Writing Culture in Taiwan. London: Routledge, 2009.

Shih, Shu-mei and Ping-Hui Liao, eds. Comparatizing Taiwan. Routledge, 2014.

[Contents: Introduction: Why Taiwan? Why Comparatize?, Shu-mei Shih and Ping-hui Liao Part I: Taiwan in Comparison 1. Comparativism and Taiwan Studies: Analyzing Taiwan in/out of Context, or Taiwan as an East Asian New World Society, Frank Muyard 2. Tiger’s Leap into the Past: Comparative Temporalities and the Politics of Redemption, Chien-heng Wu 3. Comparison for Compassion: Exploring the Structures of Feeling in East Asia, Hong-luen Wang 4. Archipelagoes of Taiwan Literature: Comparative Methods and Island Writings in Taiwan, Yuting Huang 5. Paradoxes of Conservation and Comparison: Taiwan, Environmental Crises, and World Literatures, Karen Thornber 6. Weak Links, Literary Spaces, and Comparative Taiwan, Jing Tsu 7. Far-fetched Lands: The Caribbean, Taiwan, and Submarine Relations, Li-chun Hsiao Part II: Imperial Conjunctures and Contingencies 8. Is Feminism Translatable? Spivak, Taiwan, A-Wu, Shu-mei Shih 9. Voices of Empire in Dubliners and Taibenren, Margaret Hillenbrand 10. Body (Language) across the Sea: Gender, Ethnicity, and the Embodiment of Post/colonial Modernity, Faye Yuan Kleeman 11. Interlingual Discovery: Sato Haruo’s Travels in the Colony, Ping-hui Liao 12. Taiwan’s Postcolonial and Queer Discourse in the 1990s, Liang-ya Liou 13. Taiwan after the Colonial Century: Bringing China into the Foreground, Jieh-min Wu]

Shimazu, Naoka. “Colonial Encounters: Japanese Travel Writings on Colonial Taiwan.” In Yuko Kikuchi, ed. Refracted Modernity: Visual Culture and Identity in Colonial Taiwan. Honolulu: University of Hawaii, 2007, 21-37.

Shu, James C. T. “Iconoclasm in Taiwan Literature: A Change in the ‘Family.'” Chinese Literature: Essays, Articles, Reviews 2, 1 (Jan.1980): 73-85

Smith, Craig. “Aboriginal Autonomy and Its Place in Taiwan’s National Trauma Narrative.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 24, 2 (Fall 2012): 209-39.

Sterk, Darryl. “The Hunter’s Gift in Ecorealist Indigenous Fiction from Taiwan.” Oriental Archive 81 (2013): 555-80.

Storm, Carsten and Mark Harrison, eds., The Margins of Becoming: Identity and Culture in Taiwan. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2007.

Sung, Mei-hwa. “Feminist Consciousness in Contemporary Fiction of Taiwan.” In S. Harrell and Chun-chieh Huang, eds. Cultural Exchange in Postwar Taiwan. Boulder: Westview, 1994, 275-93.

—–. “Writing Women’s Literary History: Gender Discourse and Women’s Literature in Taiwan.” In Kwok-kan Tam and Terry Siu-han Yip, eds., Gender, Discourse and the Self in Literature: Issues in Mainland China, Taiwan and Hong Kong. HK: The Chinese University Press, 2010, 171-92.

Taiwan Cultural Studies (Taiwan wenhua yanjiu)

Taiwan Literature Studies Database (Forum for the Study of World Literatures in Chinese, UC Santa Barbara)

Taiwan Literature Symposium (NY, Apri-May 1998)

Tang, Xiaobing. “On the Concept of Taiwan Literature.” Modern China 25, 4 (Oct. 1999): 379-422. Rpt. in David Wang and Carlos Rojas eds., Writing Taiwan: A New Literary History. Durham, NC: Duke UP, 2006, 51-90.

Tarumi, Chie. “Listenting to Voices from the Netherworld: Lu Heruo and the Kuso-Realism Debate.” Tr. Bert Scruggs. In Ping-hui Liao nad David Der-wei Wang, eds., Taiwan under Japanese Colonial Rule, 1895-1945. NY: Columbia UP, 2006, 262-76.

Tay, William, ed. “Contemporary Chinese Fiction from Taiwan.” Special issue. Modern Chinese Literature 6, 1/2 (1992).

Thornber, Karen Laura. Empire of Texts in Motion: Chinese, Korean, and Taiwanese Transculturations of Japanese Literature. Cambridge: Harvard University Asia Center, 2009.

[Abstract: By the turn of the twentieth century, Japan’s military and economic successes made it the dominant power in East Asia, drawing hundreds of thousands of Chinese, Korean, and Taiwanese students to the metropole and sending thousands of Japanese to other parts of East Asia. The constant movement of peoples, ideas, and texts in the Japanese empire created numerous literary contact nebulae, fluid spaces of diminished hierarchies where writers grapple with and transculturate one another’s creative output. Drawing extensively on vernacular sources in Japanese, Chinese, and Korean, this book analyzes the most active of these contact nebulae: semicolonial Chinese, occupied Manchurian, and colonial Korean and Taiwanese transculturations of Japanese literature. It explores how colonial and semicolonial writers discussed, adapted, translated, and recast thousands of Japanese creative works, both affirming and challenging Japan’s cultural authority. Such efforts not only blurred distinctions among resistance, acquiescence, and collaboration but also shattered cultural and national barriers central to the discourse of empire. In this context, twentieth-century East Asian literatures can no longer be understood in isolation from one another, linked only by their encounters with the West, but instead must be seen in constant interaction throughout the Japanese empire and beyond.]

—–. “Paradoxes of Conservation and Comparison: Taiwan, Environmental Crises, and World Literature.” In Shu-mei Shih and Ping-hui Liao, eds., Comparatizing Taiwan. London: Routledge, 2015, 100-22.

Tozer, W. “Taiwan’s ‘Cultural Renaissance.'” The China Quarterly (July/Sept. 1970): 81-90.

Tsai, Chien-hsin. A Passage to China: Literature, Loyalism, and Colonial Taiwan. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2017.

[Abstract: This book, the first of its kind in English, examines the reinvention of loyalism in colonial Taiwan through the lens of literature. It analyzes the ways in which writers from colonial Taiwan—including Qiu Fengjia, Lian Heng, Wu Zhuoliu, and others—creatively and selectively employed loyalist ideals to cope with Japanese colonialism and its many institutional changes. In the process, these writers redefined their relationship with China and Chinese culture. Drawing attention to select authors’ lesser-known works, author Chien-hsin Tsai provides a new assessment of well-studied historical and literary materials and a nuanced overview of literary and cultural productions in colonial Taiwan. During and after Japanese colonialism, the islanders’ perception of loyalism, sense of belonging, and self-identity dramatically changed. Tsai argues that the changing tradition of loyalism unexpectedly complicates Taiwan’s tie to China, rather than unquestionably reinforces it, and presents a new line of inquiry for future studies of modern Chinese and Sinophone literature.]

Tseng, Shih-jung. “Identity and War: The Taiwanese National Consciousness under War Mobilization and Kominka Movement: A Study of ChenWancheng’s and Wu Xinrong’s Diaries (1937-1945).” In Carsten Storm and Mark Harrison, eds., The Margins of Becoming: Identity and Culture in Taiwan. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2007, 153-72.

—–. From Honto Jin to Bensheng Ren: The Origin and Development of Taiwanese National Consciousness. Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 2009.

[Abstract: This book attempts to use numerous volumes of mostly unpublished diaries for examining issues of Taiwanese identity. Using the diaries of two Taiwanese intellectuals, the author examines how the Taiwanese national consciousness emerged and was reconstructed under the Japanese and Chinese Nationalist rule between 1920 and 1955, suggesting that a multi-dimensional Taiwanese national consciousness was created in the 1920s. Nevertheless, between 1937 and 1945, it was reconstructed by the imperial war mobilization. It then underwent a further reconstruction during and after the regime change from Japan to China, leading to the emergence of the bensheng ren (native Taiwanese) consciousness. The emerging international Cold War environment enabled the creation of a de facto independent state based on Taiwan-size governance, which had an impact on shaping the bensheng ren identity.]

Tso, Sarah Yihsuan. “My Body, My Poetry”: Ai-lin Yen’s and Taiwanese Women Poets’ Poetics of the Body.” The Wenshan Review of Literature and Culture 9, 1 (Dec. 2015): 29-59.

[Abstract: With the tenet of “my body, my poetry,” this paper argues that poetry written by women claims the right to articulate the female body and champions the validity of their poems about the female body. Rather than being denominated in literary history as an alternative school of carnality, women’s poetry about the body should be judged by its aesthetic value. A pioneer among Taiwanese women poets on the subject of the body, Ai-lin Yen in Bone, Skin, and Flesh (1997) advances a personal feminism which is frank and honest about female desire as well as the female body, and about the exploitation of the female body. Yen’s poems expand on the motility and stases of the drives and abjection, and sketch what Elaine Showalter calls a “double-voiced discourse” in dialectical relationships with both male and female traditions.]

Tsu, Jing. “Weak Links, Literary Spaces, and Comparative Taiwan.” In Shu-mei Shih and Ping-hui Liao, eds., Comparatizing Taiwan. London: Routledge, 2015, 123-44.

Tu, Kuo-ch’ing. “The Study of Taiwan Literature: An International Perspective.” Taiwan Literature English Translation Series 2 (Dec. 1997): xiii-.

—–. “Urban Literature and the Fin-de-siecle in Taiwan.” Taiwan Literature English Translation Series 6 (Dec. 1999): xiii-.

—–. “Foreword: Lai Ho, Wu Cho-liu, and Taiwan Literature.” Taiwan Literature English Translation Series 15 (2004): xix-xxx.

—–. “Taiwan Literature and Childhood.” Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 22 (Jan. 2008): vii-xii.

Tuan, Iris Hsin-chun. Alternative Theater in Taiwan: Feminist and Intercultural Approaches. Amherst, NY: Cambria Press, 2007.

[Abstract: Taiwan’s historical and contemporary status as a nexus of Asian and Western cultural influences provides a rich canvas of research for the author who is uniquely trained in both Western critical and Taiwanese theatrical practices. This highly original book furnishes a creative interpretation of alternative, contemporary Taiwanese Theater by applying Feminism, Interculturalism and other western theories to three intercultural performances of four avant-garde female directors from 1993-2004. Although several important playwrights and directors have staged vital gender critiques of national and international practices, almost no critic has remarked upon them. The book’s intersection of a gender critique, and, in part, a postcolonial one, with Taiwanese stage practices is, therefore, a unique and significant contribution.]

Tung, Constantine. “Current Literary Scene in Taiwan: An Observation.” Asian Thought and Society 3 (1978): 338-45.

van Fliet Hang, Krista. “The Road to Industrialization: Chinese Realism in Taiwan and the People’s Republic.” In Marc L. Moskowitz, ed., Popular Culture in Taiwan: Charismatic Modernity. NY: Routledge, 2010, 52-64.

Wang, David. “Radical Laughter in Lao She and His Taiwan Successors.” In H. Goldblatt, ed., Worlds Apart: Recent Chinese Writing and its Audiences. Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 1990, 44-63.

—–. “Translating Taiwan: A Study of Four English Anthologies of Taiwan Fiction.” In Eugene Eoyang, ed., Translating Chinese Literature. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1995. 262-72.

—– and Carlos Rojas, eds. Writing Taiwan: A New Literary History. Durham, NC: Duke UP, 2006. [MCLC Resource Center Publications review by Pei-Yin Lin]

Wang, Jing. “Taiwan Hsiang-t’u Literature: Perspectives in the Evolution of a Literary Movement.” In J. Faurot, ed. Chinese Fiction from Taiwan: Critical Perspectives. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1980.

—–. “The Rise of Children’s Poetry in Contemporary Taiwan.” Modern Chinese Literature 3, 1/2 (1987): 57-70.

Wang, Tuo. “Native Literature as a Stimulus for Social Change: From a Writing Career to Political Activism.” Tr. Juliettte Gregory. In Helmut Martin Modern Chinese Writers: Self-portrayals. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1992, 224-30.

Weinstein, John B. “Multilingual Theater in Contemporary Taiwan.” Asian Theatre Journal 17, 2 (2000): 269-83. [Project Muse link]

Wu, Chia-rong. Supernatural Sinophone Taiwan and Beyond. Amherst, NY: Cambria Press, 2016. [MCLC Resource Center review by Alvin K. Wong]

[Abstract: The first scholarly monograph focusing on the literary and cultural geography of Taiwan through a Sinophone lens . . . While reexamining the cultural and political complexities of Sinophone Taiwan, this book also recognizes the narrative of the strange as a widely adopted artistic form in highlighting Sinophone practices and experiences separated from the China-centric ideology. The study argues that the narratives of the strange in Sinophone Taiwan cross the boundaries between the living and the dead as well as the past and the present, in response to a pastiche of phantasm, Chinese diaspora, gender discourse, and transnational politics.]

Xiong, Ying. Representing Empire: Japanese Colonial Literature in Taiwan and Manchuria. Leiden: Brill, 2014. [MCLC Resource Center review by Norman Smith]

[Abstract: In Representing Empire Ying Xiong examines Japanese-language colonial literature written by Japanese expatriate writers in Taiwan and Manchuria. Drawing on a wide range of Japanese and Chinese sources, Representing Empire reveals not only a nuanced picture of Japanese literary terrain but also the interplay between imperialism, nationalism, and Pan-Asianism in the colonies. While the existing literature on Japanese nationalism has largely remained within the confines of national history, by using colonial literature as an example, Ying Xiong demonstrates that transnational forces shaped Japanese nationalism in the twentieth century. With its multidisciplinary and comparative approach, Representing Empire adds to a growing body of literature that challenges traditional interpretations of Japanese nationalism and national literary canon.]

Yang, Jane Parish. “The Evolution of the Taiwanese New Literature Movement from 1920-1940.” Fu Jen Studies: Literature and Linguistics 15 (1982): 1-18.

Yang, Xiaobin. “Telling (Hi)story: Illusory Truth or True Illusion.” Tamkang Review 21, 2 (1990): 127-47.

Yee, Angelina C. “Constructing a Native Consciousness: Taiwan Literature in the Twentieth Century.” The China Quarterly 165 (March 2001): 83-101. [pdf version on China Quarterly website]. Rpt. in Richard Louis Edmonds and Steven M. Goldstein, eds., Taiwan in the Twentieth Century: A Retrospective View. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2001, 83-101.

Yeh, Michelle. “Modern Poetry in Taiwan: Continuities and Innovations.” In S. Harrell and Chun-chieh Huang, eds. Cultural Exchange in Postwar Taiwan. Boulder: Westview, 1994, 227-45.

—–. “From Surrealism to Nature Poetics: A Study of Prose Poetry from Taiwan.” Journal of Modern Literature in Chinese 3, 2 (Jan. 2000): 119-56.

—–. “Modern Poetry of Taiwan.” In Joshua Mostow, ed, and Kirk A. Denton, China section, ed., Columbia Companion to Modern East Asian Literature. NY: Columbia UP, 2003, 561-69. Rpt. in Kirk A. Denton, ed., Columbia Companion to Modern Chinese Literature. NY: Columbia University Press, 2016, 3327-35.

—–. “‘On Our Destitute Dinner Table’: Modern Poetry Quarterly in the 1950s.” In David Wang and Carlos Rojas eds., Writing Taiwan: A New Literary History. Durham, NC: Duke UP, 2006, 113-39.

Yeh Shih-t’ao. “A Long Range View of Taiwan Fiction.” Tr. Linda G. Wang. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 4 (1999): 99-102.

—–. “The Multi-Ethnic Issue of Taiwan Literature.” Tr. Wan-shu Lu. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series, No. 3 (1998): 3-12.

—–. An Outline History of Taiwan Literature. Taiwan Writers Translation Series. Santa Barbara: Center for Chinese Studies, University of California, 2007.

—–. “Protest Literature during the Japanese Occupation.” Taiwan Literature, English Translation Series 20 (2007): 145-59.

—–. “Memories of the Literary Circles during the Japanese Occupation.” Tr. John Balcom. Taiwan Literature, English Translation Series 20 (2007): 113-24.

Yen, Yuan-shu. “The Japanese Experience in Taiwan Fiction.” Tamkang Review 4, 2 (Oct. 1973): 167-88.

—–. “Social Realism in Recent Chinese Fiction from Taiwan.” Thirty Years of Turmoil in Asian Literature. Taipei: International PEN, 1976, 197-231.

Yip, June. Envisioning Taiwan: Fiction, Cinema and the Nation in the Cultural Imaginary. Durham, NC: Duke UP, 2004.

Yip, Wai-lim, ed. Chinese Arts and Literature: A Survey of Recent Trends. Occasional Papers/Reprint Series in Contemporary Asian Studies. Baltimore, 1977. [articles on Chen Ruoxi and on poetry]

Yu Guangzhong (Yu Kwang-chung). “Chinese Poetry in Taiwan.” The Chinese Pen (Autumn 1972): 42-65.


Hong Kong

Abbas, M. A. “The Last Emporium: Verse and Cultural Space.” In Leung Ping-Kwan, ed., City at the End of Time. Hong Kong: Twilight Books, 1992, 3-19.

—–. Hong Kong: Culture and the Politics of Disappearance. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1997.

Abbas, Ackbar and Wu Hung, eds. “Hong Kong 1997: The Place and the Formula.” Special issue of Public Culture 9, 3 (1997).

Birus, Hendrik. “Introduction to and Discussion Summary of William Tay’s Colonialism, Cold War Era, and Marginal Space: The Existential Conditions of Four Decades of Hong Kong Literature.” Surfaces 5 (1995).

Chan, Mimi. “Women in Hong Kong Fiction Written in English: The Mixed Liason.” Renditions. 29/30 (Spring/Autumn, 1988): 257-74.

Chan, Sin-wai, ed. Translation in Hong Kong: Past, Present and Future. Hong Kong: Chinese University of HK Press, 2000.

Cheung, Esther M. K. “The Hi/stories of Hong Kong.” Cultural Studies 15, 3/4 (July 2001): 564-90.

[Abstract: This paper examines the formation of modernity in three colonialist epics of Hong Kong and the recent historical and fictional works that aim to rewrite the history of the’local’. Adopting a challenge-response structure, the paper argues that the colonialist epics construct a monolithic discourse of modernity-as-progress via the amnesia of conflicts, tensions, and processes of domination and negotiation in the rural and everyday space of colonial Hong Kong. It is stressed that to piece together the above anomalies is not an attempt to restore a pre-given ‘native’ to but rather an endeavour to examine how the ‘local’ as divergent historical agents shaped and has been shaped by the political, social, and economic environment of Hong Kong and the larger world outside. This can be called a model of dialectics composed of an internal dialectic and a dialectic of articulation. In this regard, with the benefit of the rapprochement of history and anthropology and a non-linear view of history, this paper is a historical bricolage of the anomalous history of Hong Kong, aiming to destabilize the Hong Kong historical grand narrative. Through rethinking the impact of the colonial experience, this paper hopes to liberate alterity and diversity in historical interpretations and imaginations.

—–. “Voices of Negotiation in Late Twentieth-Century Hong Kong Literature.” In Joshua Mostow, ed, and Kirk A. Denton, China section, ed., Columbia Companion to Modern East Asian Literatures. NY: Columbia UP, 2003, 604-609.

—–. “New Ends in a City of Transition.” In Cheung, ed., City at the End of Time: Poems by Leung Ping-kwan. Trans. Gordon Osing. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 2013, 1-19.

—–. “Hong Kong Voices: Literature from the Late Twentieth Century to the New Millennium.” Kirk A. Denton, ed., Columbia Companion to Modern Chinese Literature. NY: Columbia University Press, 2016, 407-13.

Cheung, Kai-chong. “Fictional Portrayals of the Colonial Cultures of Hong Kong.” Canadian Review of Comparative Literature 24, 4 (1997): 829-34.

Chow, Rey. “Between Colonizers: Hong Kong’s Postcolonial Self-Writing in the 1990s.” Diaspora 2, 2 (Fall 1992).

—–. “King Kong in Hong Kong: Watching the ‘Handover’ from the USA.” Social Text 55 (Summer 1998): 93-108.

Chu, Yiu-Wai. Lost in Transition Hong Kong Culture in the Age of China. Albany: SUNY Press, 2013. [MCLC Resource Center review by David Desser]

[Abstract: In this timely and insightful book, Yiu-Wai Chu takes stock of Hong Kong¡¦s culture since its transition to a Special Administrative Region of the People¡¦s Republic of China in 1997. Hong Kong had long functioned as the capitalist and democratic stepping stone to China for much of the world. Its highly original popular culture was well known in Chinese communities, and its renowned film industry enjoyed worldwide audiences and far-reaching artistic influence. Chu argues that Hong Kong¡¦s culture was ¡§lost in transition¡¨ when it tried to affirm its international visibility and retain the status quo after 1997. In an era when China welcomed outsiders and became the world¡¦s most rapidly developing economy, Hong Kong¡¦s special position as a capitalist outpost was no longer a privilege. By drawing on various cultural discourses, such as film, popular music, and politics of everyday life, Chu provides an informative and critical analysis of the impact of China¡¦s ascendency on the notion of ¡§One Country, Two Cultures.¡¨ Hong Kong can no longer function as a bridge between China and the world, writes Chu, and must now define itself from global, local, and national perspectives.]

Damm, Jens. Ku’er vs. tongzhi – Diskurse der Homosexualität. Über das Entstehen sexueller Identitäten im glokalisierten Taiwan und im postkolonialen Hongkong (Discourses on homosexual identities in Taiwan and Hong Kong). Bochum: Cathay Skripten, Taiwan Studies Series, no. 16, 2000.

[Abstract: During the nineties, two different discourses on homosexual identity have developed in Hong Kong and in Taiwan: a tongzhi-discourse in Hong Kong, which attributes the negative attitude toward homosexuality in modern Chinese societies to the influence of (post)colonialism and appeals for a more tolerant attitude by making frequent and pointed reference to the Chinese tradition of male homosexual relationships. The Taiwanese ku’er (queer) discourse, which regards Taiwanese society as being firmly embedded in a globalized world, may therefore be seen as resulting from a blend of glocalized influences and a more tolerant attitude is only possible in a pluralistic society where the flow of gender and desire is recognized. In the paper, two recently published works are presented as examples for the two discourses: Post-Colonial ‘Tongzhi’, written by the Hong Kong sociologist Zhou Huashan and Queer Archipelago: A Reader of the Queer Discourses in Taiwan compiled by the Taiwanese author of belles-lettres and ku’er-theoretician Ji Dawei. It is also shown that the differences in the discourses may be traced back to the drifting apart of the political and social scenarios in Taiwan and Hong Kong.]

Evans, Grant and Maria Tam. Hong Kong: The Anthropology of a Chinese Metropolis. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1998.

Feeley, Jennifer. “Reimagined Cities: Fabulist Tales from Hong Kong.” Words without Borders (June 2018).

Ho, Elaine Yee Lin. “Women in Exile: A Study of Hong Kong Fiction.” In Elizabeth Sinn, ed. Culture and Society in Hong Kong. HK: Centre of Asian Studies, University of Hong Kong, 1995, 133-59.

——. “Connecting Cultures: Hong Kong Literature in English, the 1950s.” New Zealand Journal of Asian Studies 5, 2 (Dec. 2003): 5-25.

Ho, Louis. “Apartheid Discourse in Contested Space: Aspects of Hong Kong Culture.” Comparative Literature and Culture 3 (Sept. 1998): 1-10.

Ingham, Michael. Hong Kong: A Cultural and Literary History. HK: Hong Kong University Press, 2007.

Lam, Agnes. “Poetry in Hong Kong: The 1990s.” World Literature Today 73, 1 (1999): 53-62.

Lee, Quentin. “Delineating Asian (Hong Kong) Intellectuals: Speculations on Intellectual Problematics and Post/Coloniality.” Third Text 26 (Spring 1994): 11-23.

Lilley, Rozanna. Staging Hong Kong: Gender and Performance in Transition. Richmond, Surrey: Curzon, 1998.

Liu, Denghan 刘灯翰, ed. Xianggang wenxue shi 香港文学史 (History of Hong Kong literature). Beijing: Renmin wenxue, 1997.

Lo, Kwai-Cheung. “Look Who’s Talking: The Politics of Orality in Transitional Hong Kong Mass Culture.” Boundary 2. Special Issue ed. Rey Chow. 25, 2 (Fall 1998): 47-76.

—–. “Men Aren’t Men: Feminization of the Masculine Subject in the Works of Some Hong Kong Male Writers.” In Kwok-kan Tam and Terry Siu-han Yip, eds., Gender, Discourse and the Self in Literature: Issues in Mainland China, Taiwan and Hong Kong. HK: The Chinese University Press, 2010, 225-44.

McFarlane, Scot. “Transporting the Emporium: Hong Kong Art and Writing Through the Ends of Time.” West Coast Line 21 (1997): 39-40.

Ng, Janet. Paradigm City: Space, Culture, and Capitalism in Hong Kong. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2009.

[Abstract: Hong Kong is often cast in the role of the paradigmatic “global city,” epitomizing postmodernism and globalization, and representing a vision of a cosmopolitan global and capitalist future. In Paradigm City, Janet Ng takes us past the obsession with 1997—the year of Hong Kong’s return to China—to focus on the complex uses and meanings of urban space in Hong Kong in the period following that transfer. She demonstrates how the design and ordering of the city’s space and the practices it supports inculcates a particular civic aesthetic among Hong Kong’s population that corresponds to capitalist as well as nationalist ideologies. Ng’s insightful connections between contemporary film, literature, music and other media and the actual spaces of the city—such as parks, shopping malls, and domestic spaces—provide a rich and nuanced picture of Hong Kong today.]

Snow, Donald B. Written Cantonese and the Culture of Hong Kong: The Growth of Dialect Literature. Ph.D. diss. Bloomington: Indiana University, 1991.

Tay, William. “Colonialism, the Cold War Era, and Marginal Space: The Existential Conditions of Four Decades of Hong Kong Literature.” Surfaces 5 (1995). Aslo in Sung-sheng Yvonne Chang and Michelle Yeh, eds., Contemporary Chinese Literature: Crossing the Boundaries. Special issue of Literature East and West. Austin, TX: Department of Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures, 1995, 141-47.

—–. “Colonialism, The Cold War Era, and Marginal Space: The Existential Condition of Five Decades of Hong Kong Literature.” In Pang-yuan Chi and David Wang, eds., Chinese Literature in the Second Half of the Twentieth Century: A Critical Survey. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 2000, 31-38.

Taylor, Jeremy E. “Nation, Topography, and Historiography: Writing Topographical Histories in Hong Hong.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 15,2 (Fall 2003): 45-75.

Turner, Matthew. Hong Kong Sixties: Designing Identity. HK: Hong Kong Arts Centre, 1995.

Veg, Sebastian. “Putting Hong Kong’s New Cultural Activism on the Literary Map: Review Essay.” MCLC Resource Center Publication (May 2013).

—–. “Creating a Textual Public Space: Slogans and Texts from Hong Kong’s Umbrella Movement.” Journal of Asian Studies 75, 3 (2016): 673-702.

[Abstract: HK’s Umbrella Movement (September–December 2014) represented a watershed in HK’s political culture and self-understanding. Based on over 1,000 slogans and other textual and visual material documented during the movement, this study provides an overview of claims, which are oriented towards an assertion of agency, articulated at different levels: in a universalistic mode (“democracy”), in relation with a political community (HK autonomy and decolonization), and through concrete policy aims. At the same time, slogans mobilize diverse cultural and historical repertoires that attest the hybrid quality of HK identity and underscore the diversity of sources of political legitimacy. Finally, it will be argued that by establishing a system of contending discourses within the occupied public spaces, the movement strived to act out a type of discursive democracy. Despite the challenges that this discursive space encountered in interacting with the authorities and the public at large, it represented an unfinished attempt to build a new civic culture among Hong Kong’s younger generation.]

Wang, Xiaoying. “Hong Kong, China, and the Question of Postcoloniality.” In Xudong Zhang and Arif Dirlik, eds., Postmodernism and China. Durham: Duke UP, 2000, 89-122.

Wong, Dorothy. “Local, Place and Meaning: A Cultural Reading of the Hong Kong Stories.” Asian and African Studies [Brataslava] 9, 2 (2000): 168-86.

Wong, Wai-leung. Hong Kong Literature in the Context of Modern Chinese Literature. Hong Kong: Centre for Hong Kong Studies, Chinese University of Hong Kong, 1987.

Wu, Gabriel. “The Post-1997 Northbound Movement of Hong Kong Writers.” International Communication of Chinese Culture 3, 3 (2016): 479-94.

[Abstract: The return of Hong Kong to the PRC in 1997 has reworked the contours of HK’s literary landscape, from which more and more writers are moving northward, some physically but more in terms of publishing works on the mainland. The access to a gigantic readership in the north is obviously the major pull factor for such movement. It invites writers and the publishers to employ different strategies to attain success, involving not simply the switch from the traditional form of Chinese to the simplified one but something much more complicated. On the one hand, the publishing houses require writers to reduce their use of local expressions and to adhere to standardized Chinese, not to mention the editorial censorship of politically incorrect subject matter and expressions. On the other hand, mainland readers seem to maintain keen interest in seeking what they consider to be exotic, either content- or language-wise, in HK writing. This has led to the emergence of different types of HK writers—compromising and uncompromising clusters—in terms of their responses to the imposed publication restrictions. More importantly, the so-called ‘HK identity’ remains a subject of negotiation and constant reformation.]

Ye Si 也斯. Xianggang wenhua 香港文化 (Hong Kong culture). HK: Hong Kong Arts Centre, 1995.

Zha, Jianying. “Citizen Chan: Is Hong Kong Poised to Take Over Mainland China?” Transition 65 (1995): 69-94.

Zhang Meijun [Esther Cheung] and Zhu Yaowei, eds. Xianggang wenxue@wenhua yanjiu (Hong Kong literature as/and cultural studies). HK: Oxford UP, 2002.


Diaspora/Exile/Transnational/Sinophone

Ang, Ien. On Not Speaking Chinese: Living between Asia and the West. London / New York: Routledge, 2001.

Bachner, Andrea. Beyond Sinology: Chinese Writing and the Scripts of Culture. NY: Columbia University Press, 2014. [MCLC Resource Center review by Edward McDonald]

[Abstract: New communication and information technologies provide distinct challenges and possibilities for the Chinese script, which, unlike alphabetic or other phonetic scripts, relies on multiple signifying principles. In recent decades, this multiplicity has generated a rich corpus of reflection and experimentation in literature, film, visual and performance art, and design and architecture, within both China and different parts of the West. Approaching this history from a variety of alternative theoretical perspectives, Beyond Sinology reflects on the Chinese script to pinpoint the multiple connections between languages, scripts, and medial expressions and cultural and national identities. Through a complex study of intercultural representations, exchanges, and tensions, the text focuses on the concrete “scripting” of identity and alterity, advancing a new understanding of the links between identity and medium and a critique of articulations that rely on single, monolithic, and univocal definitions of writing. Chinese writing–with its history of divergent readings in Chinese and non-Chinese contexts, with its current reinvention in the age of new media and globalization–can teach us how to read and construct mediality and cultural identity in interculturally responsible ways and also how to scrutinize, critique, and yet appreciate and enjoy the powerful multi-medial creativity embodied in writing.]

Balcom, John. “To the Heart of Exile: The Poetic Odyssey of Luo Fu.” In Christopher Lupke ed., New Perspectives on Contemporary Chinese Poetry, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007: 65-84.

Barmé, Geremie R. In the Red: On Contemporary Chinese Culture. NY: Columbia UP, 1999. [ch 3, “Traveling Heavy,” is on intellectual and cultural diaspora / exile etc]

Bernards, Brian. Writing the South Seas: Imagining the Nanyang in Chinese and Southeast Asian Postcolonial Literature. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2016.

[Abstract: Postcolonial literature about the South Seas, or Nanyang, examines the history of Chinese migration, localization, and interethnic exchange in Southeast Asia, where Sinophone settler cultures evolved independently by adapting to their “New World” and mingling with native cultures. Writing the South Seas explains why Nanyang encounters, neglected by most literary histories, should be considered crucial to the national literatures of China and Southeast Asia]

—–. “Sinophone Literature.” Kirk A. Denton, ed., Columbia Companion to Modern Chinese Literature. NY: Columbia University Press, 2016, 72-79.

Brady, Anne-Marie. “Dead in Exile: The Life and Death of Gu Cheng and Xie Ye.” China Information XI, 4 (1997): 126-148.

Chiu, Kuei-fen. “Empire of the Chinese Sign: The Question of Chinese Diasporic Imagination in Transnational Literary Production.” Journal of Asian Studies 67, 2 (May 2008): 593-620.

[Abstract: This paper begins with an examination of the burgeoning interest in literatures in Chinese. It argues that studies in literatures in Chinese map out a terrain where complex negotiations and interventions for different purposes are carried out. As studies in literatures in Chinese often imply a shift from the nation-state paradigm to the transnational paradigm, which implicitly celebrates diasporic imagination as a counterforce to the power of the nation-state, this paper proposes to examine the intersection of Chinese Malaysian literature and Taiwan literature at two specific moments of transnational literary production—the late 1970s to the mid-1980s and the late 1990s to the present—so as to demonstrate the unstable meanings of the diaspora sign. It highlights the importance of historicization in investigating phenomena of transnational cultural production and the need to reincorporate the notion of “place” into our agenda in conducting cultural critiques. The paper ends with a critique of the global city as a methodological concept and argues for a place paradigm without privileging the global city as a metaphor for transnational space.]

Chow, Rey. Writing Diaspora: Tactics of Intervention in Contemporary Cultural Studies. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1993.

Dirlik, Arif. “Literary Identity/Cultural Identity: Being Chinese in the Contemporary World.” MCLC Resource Center Publication (Sept. 2013).

Edmond, Jacob and Hilary Chung. “Yang Lian, Auckland and the Poetics of Exile.” In Yang Lian, Unreal City: A Chinese Poet in Auckland. Auckland: Auckland UP, 2006, 1-23.

Eoyang, Eugene Chen. “Tianya, the Ends of the World or the Edge of Heaven: Comparative Literature at the Fin de Siècle.” In Yingjin Zhang ed., China in a Polycentric World: Essays in Chinese Comparative Literature. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1998, 218-232; 280-282.

Gao Xingjian and Yang Lian. Was hat uns das Exil gebracht? Ein Gespräch zwischen Gao Xingjian und Yang Lian über chinesische Literatur (What Has Exile Brought Us? A Conversation between Gao Xingjian and Yang Lian on Chinese Literature). Tr. Peter Hoffmann, Berlin: DAAD Berliner Künstlerprogramm, 2001.

—–. “The Language of Exile: When Pain Turns to Gain.” Abridged and translated by Ben Carrdus. In Index on Censorship (2002).

Groppe, Alison. Not Made in China: Inventing Local Identities in Contemporary Malaysian Chinese Fiction. PhD diss. Cambridge: Harvard University, 2006.

—–. “The Dis/Reappearance of Yu Dafu in Ng Kim Chew’s Fiction.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 22, 2 (Fall 2010): 161-95.

—–. Sinophone Malaysian Literature: Not Made in China. Amherst, NY: Cambria Press, 2013. [MCLC Resource Center review by Tzu-hui Celina Hung]

[Abstract: China’s recent economic growth has fed a rapid increase in the study of modern Chinese language and literature globally. In this shifting global context, authors who work on the edges of the literary empire raise important questions about the homogeneity of language, identity, and culture that is produced by the modern Chinese literary canon. Sinophone Malaysian Literature: Not Made in China examines a key segment of this literature and asks, “What does it mean to be of Chinese descent and Chinese-speaking outside of China?” This book looks specifically at how diasporic Chinese subjects make sense of their Chinese and Malaysian identities in postcolonial Malaysia. By analyzing the literary texts of several of the most influential contemporary Malaysia-born, Chinese-language authors, the author shows how the texts’ complex explorations of sentimental attachments, cultural contexts, and sources of power form the basis for a contested, fractured, unstable, and yet enduring Chinese Malaysian identity. This book traces the development of this identity from negotiations with diverse cultural sources and often conflicting affiliations with the appointed centers of cultural productions in Beijing, Shanghai, Taipei, and Kuala Lumpur. The special value of the Sinophone Malaysian literary texts that form the focus of the book is that they place political and cultural affiliations of the Chinese-origin, Chinese-speaking Malaysians under a microscope, revealing intricacies and transformations that would otherwise remain invisible…]

Hayot, Eric. “Commentary: On the ‘Sainifeng’ as a Global Literary Practice.” In Jing Tsu and David Der-wei Wang, eds., Global Chinese Literature: Critical Essays. Leiden: Brill, 2010, 219-28.

Holden, Philip. “Reading Between the Lines: Singapore Novels in a Global Frame.” In Anna Guttman, Michel Hockx and George Paizis, eds., The Global Literary Field. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Press, 2006, 2-21.

Huang, Yibing. “Duoduo: An Impossible Farewell, or, Exile between Revolution and Modernism.” Amerasia Journal 27, 2 (2001): 64-85

—–. “The Ghost Enters the City: Gu Cheng’s Metamorphosis in the ‘New World.'” In Christopher Lupke, ed., New Perspectives on Contemporary Chinese Poetry. NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007, 123-43.

Hutt, Michael. “Reading Nepali Maoist Memoirs.” Studies in Nepali History and Society 17, no. 1 (June 2012): 107–142.

Janssen, Ronald R. “What History Cannot Write: Bei Dao and Recent Chinese Poetry.” Critical Asian Studies 34, 2 (2002): 259-277.

Kenley, David L. New Culture in a New World: The May Fourth Movement and the Chinese Diaspora in Singapore, 1919¡V1932. London: Routledge, 2003.

Khoo, Olivia. The Chinese Exotic: Modern Diasporic Femininity. HK: Hong Kong University Press, 2008.

[Abstract: examines new representations of diasporic Chinese femininity emerging from Asia Pacific modernities since the late twentieth century. Through an analysis of cultural artefacts such as films, popular fiction, food and fashion cultures, the book challenges the dominant tendency in contemporary cultural politics to define Chinese femininity from a mainland perspective that furthermore equates it with notions of primitivism. Rather, the book argues for a radical reconfiguration of the concept of exoticism as a frame for understanding these new representations.This engaging study raises important questions on the relationship between the Chinese diasporas and gender. The Chinese Exotic provides a timely critical intervention into the current visualizations of diasporic Chinese femininity. The book contends that an analysis of such images can inform the reconfigured relations between China, the Chinese diasporas, Asia and the West in the context of contemporary globalization, and in turn takes these new intersections to account for the complex nature of modern definitions of diasporic Chinese femininity.]

Kleeman, Faye Yuan. In Transit: The Formation of a Colonial East Asian Cultural Sphere. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2014.

[Abstract: This work examines the creation of an East Asian cultural sphere by the Japanese imperial project in the first half of the twentieth century. It seeks to re-read the “Greater East Asian Co-prosperity Sphere” not as a mere political and ideological concept but as the potential site of a vibrant and productive space that accommodated transcultural interaction and transformation. By reorienting the focus of (post)colonial studies from the macro-narrative of political economy, military institutions, and socio-political dynamics, it uncovers a cultural and personal understanding of life within the Japanese imperial enterprise. To engage with empire on a personal level, one must ask: What made ordinary citizens participate in the colonial enterprise? What was the lure of empire? How did individuals not directly invested in the enterprise become engaged with the idea? Explanations offered heretofore emphasize the potency of the institutional or ideological apparatus. Kleeman asserts, however, that desire and pleasure may be better barometers for measuring popular sentiment in the empire–what Raymond Williams refers to as the “structure of feeling” that accompanied modern Japan’s expansionism. The negative impact of Japanese imperialism on both nations and societies has been amply demonstrated and cannot be denied, but In Transit focuses on the opportunities and unique experiences it afforded a number of extraordinary individuals to provide a full- er picture of Japanese colonial culture. By observing the empire–from Tokyo to remote Mongolia and colonial Taiwan, it explores an area of colonial experience that straddles the public and the private, the national and the personal, thereby revealing a new aspect of the colonial condition and its postcolonial implications.]

Kong, Belinda. Tiananmen Fictions Outside the Square: The Chinese Literary Diaspora and the Politics of Global Culture. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2012.

[Abstract: An exciting analysis of the myriad literary effects of Tiananmen, Belinda Kong’s Tiananmen Fictions Outside the Square is the first full-length study of fictions related to the 1989 movement and massacre. More than any other episode in recent world history, Tiananmen has brought a distinctly politicized Chinese literary diaspora into stark relief. Kong redefines Tiananmen’s meaning from an event that ended in local political failure to one that succeeded in producing a vital dimension of contemporary transnational writing today. She spotlights key writers—Gao Xingjian, Ha Jin, Annie Wang, and Ma Jian—who have written and published about the massacre from abroad. Their outsider/distanced perspectives inform their work, and reveal how diaspora writers continually reimagine Tiananmen’s relevance to the post-1989 world at large. Compelling us to think about how Chinese culture, identity, and politics are being defined in the diaspora, Tiananmen Fictions Outside the Square candidly addresses issues of political exile, historical trauma, global capital, and state biopower.]

Kong, Shuyu. “Diaspora Literature.” In Joshua Mostow, ed, and Kirk A. Denton, China section, ed., Columbia Companion to Modern East Asian Literature. NY: Columbia UP, 2003, 546-53.

—–. “Diaspora in Modern Chinese Literature.” In Kirk A. Denton, ed., Columbia Companion to Modern Chinese Literature. NY: Columbia University Press, 2016, 62-71.

Kramer, Oliver. “No Past to Long For? A Sociology of Chinese Writers in Exile.” In Michel Hockx ed., The Literary Field of Twentieth-Century China. Richmond: Curzon, 1999, 161-177

—–. Chinese Fiction Abroad: The Exilic Nature of Works Written by Chinese Writers Living Abroad after the Tiananmen Massacre. PhD diss. Edinburgh: University of Edinburgh, 2002.

Kubin, Wolfgang. “Das Ende des Propheten: Chinesischer Geist und chinesische Dichtung im 20. Jahrhundert” (The End of the Prophet: Chinese Spirit and Chinese Poetry in the 20 th Century). In Die horen. Zeitschrift für Literatur, Kunst und Kritik 169 (1993): 75-91

—–. “The End of the Prophet: Chinese Poetry between Modernity and Postmodernity.” In Wendy Larson and Anne Wedell-Wedellsborg eds., Inside Out: Modernism and Postmodernism in Chinese Literary Culture. Aarhus: Aarhus University Press, 1993, 19-37

Lee, Gregory, ed. Chinese Writing and Exile, Select Papers, vol 7. Chicago: The Center for East Asian Studies, University of Chicago, 1993. [contributions by Gregory Lee, Leo Ou-fan Lee, Wang-chi Wong, Susan Daruvala, CH Wang]

—–. Troubadours, Trumpeters, Troubled Makers: Lyricism, Nationalism, and Hybridity in China and Its Others. London: Hurst, 1996.

Lee, Karen An-hwei. Anglophone Literatures in the Asian Diaspora: Literary Transnationalism and Translingual Migrations. Amherst, NY: Cambria Press, 2013.

[Abstract: Conversant in critical and creative modes of thought, this book examines the uses of translation in Asian and Anglophone literatures to bridge discontinuous subjectivities in Eurasian transnational identities and translingual hybridizations of literary Modernism. Anglophone Literatures in the Asian Diaspora focuses on the roles of mysticism and language in Dict?e’s poetic deconstruction of empire, engaging metaphysical issues salient in the history of translation studies to describe how Theresa Cha and four other authors–Sui Sin Far, Chuang Hua, Kazuo Ishiguro, and Virginia Woolf–used figurative and actual translations to bridge discontinuous subjectivities. The author Karen Lee’s explorations of linguistic politics and poetics in this eclectic group of writers concentrates on the play of innovative language deployed to negotiate divided or multiple consciousness.]

Li, Dian. The Chinese Poetry of Bei Dao, 1978-2000: Resistance and Exile. Lewiston, ME: Edwin Mellen Press, 2006.

Li, Jessica Tsui Yan. “Female Body and Identities: Re-presenting Ibsen’s Nora in China Doll.” In K.K. Tam, Terry S. Yip and Frode Helland eds., Ibsen and the Modern Self. Hong Kong: Open University of Hong Kong Press, and Oslo: Centre for Ibsen’s Studies, University of Oslo Publications, 2010, 298-310.

Liao, Ping-hui. “Sinophone Literature.” In Yingjin Zhang, ed. A Companion to Modern Chinese Literature. Chichester, UK: Wiley Blackwell, 2016, 134-47.

Lin, Julia C. “Yip Wai-lim (1937-): A Poet of Exile.” In Lin, Essays on Contemporary Chinese Poetry. Athens: Ohio UP, 1985, 110-33.

Liu, Tao Tao. “Exile, Homesickness and Displacement in Modern Chinese Literature.” I n Wolfgang Kubin ed., Symbols of Anguish: In Search of Melancholy in China. Bern: Peter Lang, 2001, 335-351.

Lovell, Julia. The Politics of Cultural Capital: China’s Quest for a Nobel Prize in Literature. Honolulu: Hawai’i UP, 2006, 144-152.

—–. “Chinese Literature in the Global Canon: The Quest for Recognition.” In Jing Tsu and David Der-wei Wang, eds., Global Chinese Literature: Critical Essays. Leiden: Brill, 2010, 197-218.

Ng, Kim Chew. “Minor Sinophone Literature: Diasporic Modernity’s Imcomplete Journey.” In Jing Tsu and David Der-wei Wang, eds., Global Chinese Literature: Critical Essays. Leiden: Brill, 2010, 15-28.

Parker, David. “Going with the Flow?: Reflections on Recent Chinese Diaspora Studies.” Diaspora: A Journal of Translational Studies 14, 2/3 (Fall/Winter 2005): 411-23.

Rojas, Carlos. “‘Tell My Mother I’m Sorry’: On Chinese as a Minor Discourse.” Chinese Literature Today 7, 1 (2018): 143-52.

[Abstract: Taking its inspiration from a line in Chinese that appears in an episode of the popular US television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer, this essay reflects on the broader phenomenon of minor or minoritized discourses and, specifically, insofar as it relates to modern Chinese literature. The focus, however, is not on discursive formations positioned at the margins of what might be regarded as mainstream Chinese literature (such as ethnic minority literature, Sinophone literature, and so forth), but rather on works by authors who may be viewed as paradigmatically canonical.]

Shih, Shu-mei. Visuality and Identity: Sinophone Articulations Across the Pacific. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2007. [MCLC Resource Center review by Sheldon Hsiao-peng Lu]

—–. “Against Diaspora: The Sinophone as Places of Cultural Production.” In Jing Tsu and David Der-wei Wang, eds., Global Chinese Literature: Critical Essays. Leiden: Brill, 2010, 29-48.

—– and Chien-hsin Tsai and Brian Bernards, eds., Sinophone Studies: A Critical Reader. New York: Columbia University Press, 2011.

[Abstract: This definitive anthology casts Sinophone studies as the study of Sinitic-language cultures born of colonial and postcolonial influences. Essays by such authors as Rey Chow, Ha Jin, Leo Ou-fan Lee, Ien Ang, Wei-ming Tu, and David Wang address debates concerning the nature of Chineseness while introducing readers to essential readings in Tibetan, Malaysian, Taiwanese, French, Caribbean, and American Sinophone literatures. By placing Sinophone cultures at the crossroads of multiple empires, this anthology richly demonstrates the transformative power of multiculturalism and multilingualism, and by examining the place-based cultural and social practices of Sinitic-language communities in their historical contexts beyond ¡§China proper,¡¨ it effectively refutes the diasporic framework. It is an invaluable companion for courses in Asian, postcolonial, empire, and ethnic studies, as well as world and comparative literature.]

—–. “What Is Sinophone Studies” [in Chinese]. The Wenshan Review of Literature and Culture 9, 2 (June 2016): 105-23.

[Abstract: Due to the fact that Western colonialism is largely oceanic and the fact that China has long been considered victim of Western colonialism, it is easy for us to overlook China’s internal colonization of various indigenous peoples and the critical role Chinese migrants played in the colonization of Taiwan and parts of Southeast Asia. With the rise of China, these phenomena are more and more worthy of our attention. Sinophone studies attends to the difference between the Chinese mode of colonization and other modes of colonization through a dialogue with at least the following three academic discourses. To begin with, Anglophone and Francophone postcolonial studies gives the false impression that only Western powers are capable of colonizing Asia. Furthermore, the casting of Chinese migration to Taiwan and Southeast Asia in terms of diaspora conceals its settler colonial character. Finally, terms like literature in Chinese and Chinese literature are problematic categories when it comes to literatures written in Sinitic languages. In fact, Sinophone is multilingual, polyphonic, and also poly-scriptic. I argue that Sinophone studies takes as its objects of study the Sinitic-language communities and cultures outside China as well as ethnic minority communities and cultures within China where Mandarin Chinese is adopted or imposed. It is because these linguistic communities are largely formed through three interrelated historical processes of continental colonialism, settler colonialism and (im)migration that the Sinophone is not a unifying category but a heterogeneous formation calibrated by the time and place specificities of each practice and articulation.]

Tan, E. K. Rethinking Chineseness: Translational Sinophone Identities in the Nanyang Literary World. Amherst, NY: Cambria Press, 2013. [MCLC Resource Center review by Karen Thornber]

[Abstracts: This book examines the relationship between the Nanyang Chinese, their original homelands (Borneo, Malaysia and Singapore) and their imaginary homeland (China) through the works of writers such as Kuo Pao Kun, Chang Kuei-hsing, and Vyvyane Loh. The increasing international scholarly interest in works by these individuals–part of an ever-growing Sinophone canon–draws critical attention to the politics of identity formation and transnational discourses of ethnicity and identity. Although these works and concomitant discourses have generated a great deal of interest in Asia, they remain largely unexplored in English-language scholarship. While many scholars such as Ien Ang, Quah Sy Ren, Philip Kuhn, Ng Kim Chew, Aihwa Ong, Shu-mei Shih, Tee Kim Tong, Jing Tsu, David Der-wei Wang, Wang Gungwu, and Zhu Chongke have contributed to the field, there is still a great disparity between both the primary and secondary literature written in Chinese and English. To expand the scope of discussion on Sinophone studies with a focus on the Nanyang Chinese, Rethinking Chineseness creates a dialogue by breaking down the linguistic boundaries between these critical discourses. In recent years, scholars in anthropology, cultural studies, literature, and sociology have critically examined Sinophone communities as part of Chinese diaspora and Chinese overseas studies. Focusing on the triangular relationship among globalization, transnationalism and diaspora studies, these scholars tend to assume that Sinophone experiences are similar across culture, history, ethnicity and gender, neglecting the uniqueness of individual Sinophone communities. Rethinking Chineseness addresses this oversight by adopting the Sinophone as a critical concept to investigate the unique experience of the Nanyang Chinese within the context of literary studies. The concept of Chineseness has arisen as a topic widely discussed and debated among scholars such as Ien Ang, Rey Chow, Allen Chun, Shu-mei Shih, Wei-ming Tu, Wang Gungwu and Ling-chi Wang for the past two decades. As a project that takes as its objective a rethinking of the meaning of Chineseness in the context of the Nanyang Chinese, Rethinking Chineseness addresses Chineseness as a theme that poses a problem to scholars involved in Ethnic and Area studies via the critical concept of the Sinophone. The investigation of the productivity of the Sinophone in evaluating the notion of Chineseness is to foreground the significance of the Nanyang Chinese writers and their works within the larger scope of representation in the global cultural experience of Sinophone communities. As cultural products, their works directly and also symptomatically tackle questions relating to Sinophone identities in a less metaphysical but phenomenological sense.]

Teng, Emma J. “What’s ‘Chinese’ in Chinese Diasporic Literature?” I n Charles Laughlin ed., Contested Modernities in Chinese Literature. NY: Palgrave MacMillan, 2005, 61-79.

—–. Eurasian: Mixed Identities in the United States, China and Hong Kong, 1842-1943. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2013. [MCLC Resource Center review by Beth Lew-Williams]

Tong, Tee Kim. “The Position of Sinophone Malaysian Literature within the Polysystem of Taiwan Literature.” In Chin-Chuan Cheng, I-Chun Wang, and Steven Totosy de Zepetnek, eds. Cultural Discourse in Taiwan. Kaohsiung: Center for the Humanities and Social Sciences, National Sun Yat-sen University, 2009, 108-22.

—–. “(Re)mapping Sinophone Literature.” In Jing Tsu and David Der-wei Wang, eds., Global Chinese Literature: Critical Essays. Leiden: Brill, 2010, 77-92.

Tsu, Jing. Sound and Script in Chinese Diaspora. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2011. [MCLC Resource Center review by Andrea Bachner]

[Abstract: What happens when language wars are not about hurling insults or quibbling over meanings, but are waged in the physical sounds and shapes of language itself? Native and foreign speakers, mother tongues and national languages, have jostled for distinction throughout the modern period. The fight for global dominance between the English and Chinese languages opens into historical battles over the control of the medium through standardization, technology, bilingualism, pronunciation, and literature in the Sinophone world. Encounters between global languages, as well as the internal tensions between Mandarin and other Chinese dialects, present a dynamic, interconnected picture of languages on the move. … Jing Tsu explores the new global language trade, arguing that it aims at more sophisticated ways of exerting influence besides simply wielding knuckles of power. Through an analysis of the different relationships between language standardization, technologies of writing, and modern Chinese literature around the world from the nineteenth century to the present, this study transforms how we understand the power of language in migration and how that is changing the terms of cultural dominance. Drawing from an unusual array of archival sources, this study cuts across the usual China-West divide and puts its finger on the pulse of a pending supranational world under “literary governance.”]

—–. “Sinophonics and the Nationalization of Chinese.” In Jing Tsu and David Der-wei Wang, eds., Global Chinese Literature: Critical Essays. Leiden: Brill, 2010, 93-114.

Tsu, Jing and David Der-wei Wang, eds. Global Chinese Literature: Critical Essays. Leiden: Brill, 2010.

—–. “Introduction: Global Chinese Literature.” In Jing Tsu and David Der-wei Wang, eds., Global Chinese Literature: Critical Essays. Leiden: Brill, 2010, 1-14.

Van Crevel, Maghiel. Language Shattered: Contemporary Chinese Poetry and Duoduo. Leiden: CNWS, 1996, 221-234.

—–. “Exile: Yang Lian, Wang Jiaxin and Bei Dao.” In van Crevel, Chinese Poetry in Times of Mind, Mayhem and Money. Leiden: Brill, 2008: 137-186.

Wan, Zhi, ed. Breaking the Barriers: Chinese Literature Facing the World. Trs. Chen Maiping, Anna Gustafsson, and Simon Patton. Stockholm: Olof Palme International Center, 1997. [contributions by Wan Zhi, Duoduo, Yan Li, Yang Lian, Yo Yo, Gao Xingjian, Zhao Yiheng, and others]

Wang, Chih-ming. “Bidding Farewell with Regret: Notes towards Affective Articulations and Inter-Asian Writing.” Frontiers of Literary Studies in China 7, 2 (2013): 214-34.

[Abstract: This paper proposes an alternative approach to the contemporary discussion of Asia, or more specifically East Asia. Rather than conceptualizing Asia as a geo-economic entity, as a cultural historical construct of Euro-centrism, and as a capitalist vision of the world market, this paper seeks to recapture “Asia” in what I call “affective articulations.” Specifically, I will examine Dazai Osamu’s Farewell with Regret (Sekibetsu, 1945) and Zhang Chengzhi’s Respect and Farewell with Regret (Jingzhong yu xibie, 2008) as two exemplars of inter-Asian writing in which Asia is represented as a loaded symbol of affect. Whereas Dazai’s book was written in the heat of Great East Asia War, to comply with the demands of the Japanese war effort, Zhang’s book was written at the no less challenging time of China’s rise to regional hegemony. Though they differ in style and purpose, both texts hold up a vision of Asia which is distinctly grasped in affective encounters, symbolized by the act of “bidding farewell with regret” ( xibie). Intrigued by the affective significance of bidding farewell with regret, this paper first considers “farewell” as a method to recast the discussion of Asia in regional and geopolitical terms, and then performs an analysis of the texts in question so as to identify crucial moments when Asia, despite its internal heterogeneity and complicated history, is grasped in the affective articulation of Sino-Japanese encounters. Such moments, I believe, are real, sincere, and indispensable for our attempt to re-imagine Asia as a translocal solidarity.]

Wong, Lisa Lai-ming. Framings of Cultural Identities: Modern Poetry in Post-Colonial Taiwan with Yang Mu As a Case Study. PhD thesis. HK: Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, 1999.

—–. “Writing Allegory: Diasporic Consciousness as a Mode of Intervention in Yang Mu’s Poetry of the 1970s.” Journal of Modern Literature in Chinese 5, 1 (2001): 1-28

Wong, Sau-ling C. “Global Vision and Locatedness: World Literature in Chinese/by Chinese from a Chinese-American Perspective.” In Jing Tsu and David Der-wei Wang, eds., Global Chinese Literature: Critical Essays. Leiden: Brill, 2010, 49-76.

Wong, Yoon Wah. Post-Colonial Chinese Literatures in Singapore and Malaysia. Singapore: Department of Chinese Studies, National University of Singapore / River Edge, NJ: Global Publishing, 2002.

Yang, Lian. “In Search of Poetry as the Prototype of Exile.” Tr. Torbjörn Lodén. 00tal # 9/10 (2002): 35-41.

Yao, Steven G. Foreign Accents: Chinese American Verse from Exclusion to Postethnicity. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010. [MCLC Resource Center Review by Dian Li]

Zhang, Zhen. “The Jet Lag of a Migratory Bird: Border Crossings toward/from ‘The Land That Is Not’.” In Sharon K Hom ed., Chinese Women Traversing Diaspora: Memoirs, Essays, and Poetry. New York and London: Garland, 1999, 51-75.

Zhang, Zao. Auf die Suche nach poetischer Modernität: Die neue Lyrik Chinas nach 1919 (The Search for Poetic Modernity: China’s New Poetry after 1919). PhD thesis. Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen, 2004. [ch 7, “Bei Dao und das Exil der Wörter” (Bei Dao and the Exile of Words) is on exile].

Zheng Yi, Su Wei, Wan Zhi, Huang Heqing, eds. Busi liuwangzhe (The undying exile). Taibei: INK, 2005.

Zhou, Gang. Placing the Modern Chinese Vernacular in Transnational Literature. NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011. [MCLC Resource Center review by Jon Eugene von Kowallis]

[Abstract: This is the first book to concentrate not only on the triumph of the vernacular in modern China but also on the critical role of the rise of the vernacular in world literature, invoking parallel cases from countries throughout Europe and Asia. Contents: Introduction; The Language of Utopia; The Chinese Renaissance; The Shaky House; ‘The Vernacular Only’ Writing Mode; Epilogue]