Author Studies A – G

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A

A Cheng 阿城

Duke, Michael S. “Two Chess Masters, One Chinese Way: A Comparison of Chang Hsi-kuo’s and Chung Ah-cheng’s “Chi Wang”.” Asian Culture Quarterly (Winter 1987): 41-63.

Dutrait, Noel. “Analyse d’un succes: Ah Cheng et son oeuvre, biographie et thematique.” Etudes Chinoises 11, 2 (Autumn 1992): 32-75.

Huters, Theodore. “Speaking of Many Things: Food, Kings, and the National Tradition in Ah Cheng’s ‘The Chess King.'” Modern China 14, 4 (1988): 388-418.

Knapp, Bettina. “A Cheng’s ‘The King of the Trees’: Exile and the Chinese Re-education Process.” In David Bevan, ed., Literature and Exile. Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1990, 91-106.

Lonergan, Ross. “Tradition and Modernity in Ah Cheng’s ‘The Chess King.'” B.C. Asian Review 2 (1988).

Louie, Kam. “The Short Stories of Ah Cheng: Daoism, Confucianism and Life.” Australian Journal of Chinese Affairs 18 (1987): 1-14. Rpt. In Louie, Between Fact and Fiction: Essays on Post-Mao Chinese Literature and Society. Sydney: Wild Peony, 1989, 76-90.

Mair, Denis C. “Ah Cheng and His King of Chess.” In Yang Bian, ed., The Time is Not Ripe: Contemporary China’s Best Writers and Their Stories. Beijing: FLP, 1991, 1-14.

Wang, Ban. “Citation of Discourse and Ironic Debunking in Ah Cheng’s Work.” In Wang, Narrative Perspective and Irony in Selected Chinese and American Fiction. Lewiston, NY: Edwin Mellen, 2002.

Wang, David. “Tai Hou-ying, Feng Chi-Ts’ai and Ah Cheng: Three Approaches to the Historical Novel.” Asian Culture Quarterly 16, 2 (1988): 70-88.

Wang, Yanjie. “Remapping Emotion and Desire: Same-Sex Romance in Ah Cheng’s The King of Chess.” American Journal of Chinese Studies 21, 1 (2013): 45-60.

Wong, Kin-yuen. “Between Aesthetics and Hermeneutics: A New Type of Bildungsroman in Ah Cheng’s ‘The Chess Champion.'” MCL 5, 1 (1989): 43-54.

Yue, Gang. “Surviving in ‘The Chess King’: Toward a Post-Revolutionary Nation-Narration.” Positions 3, 2 (Fall 1995): 565-94.

—–. “The Strange Landscape of the Ancients: Environmental Consciousness in ‘The King of Trees.'” American Journal of Chinese Studies 5, 1 (1998): 68-88.

Yue, Gang. “Postrevolutionary Leftovers: Zhang Xianliang and Ah Cheng.” In The Mouth that Begs: Hunger, Cannibalism, and the Politics of Eating in Modern China. Durham: Duke University Press, 1999, 184-221.

Zhong, Chengxiang. “The Zhongs: Father and Son–Ah Cheng and His Father.” Trans. by Stephen Fleming. Chinese Literature (1989): 76-96.

A Long 阿垅

Sekine, Ken. “A Verbose Silence in 1939 Chongqing: Why Ah Long’s Nanjing Could Not Be Published.” MCLC Resource Center Publication, 2004.

Ai Bei 艾蓓

Decker, Margaret. “Femininity as Imprisonment: Subjectivity, Agency, and Criminality in Ai Bei’s Fiction.” In Lu Tonglin, ed. Gender and Sexuality in Twentieth-Century Chinese Literature and Society. Albany: SUNY Press, 1993, 135-56.

Ai Qing 艾青

Eoyang, Eugene. “Editor’s Introduction.” In Ai Qing, Selected Poems of Ai Qing. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1982, i-x.

Feng, Chih. “On the Poetry of Ai Ch’ing.” In Hualing Nieh, ed., Literature of the Hundred Flowers, Volume II: Poetry and Fiction. NY: Columbia UP, 1981, 76-98.

Huang, Guiyou. “A Newer Realm of Poetry: Whitman and Ai Qing.” Walt Whitman Quarterly Review 15, 4 (1998): 172-79.

Ting, Mang. “A Rebuttal of Ai Ch’ing (poem).” In Hualing Nieh, ed., Literature of the Hundred Flowers, Volume II: Poetry and Fiction. NY: Columbia UP, 1981, 99.

Palandri, Angela Jung. “The Poetic Theory and Practice of Ai Qing.” In Mason Y.H. Wang, ed., Perspectives in Contemporary Chinese Lterature. Michigan: Green River Press, 1983, 61-76.

Sha, Ou. “Various Masks: Ai Ch’ing (poem).” In Hualing Nieh, ed., Literature of the Hundred Flowers, Volume II: Poetry and Fiction. NY: Columbia UP, 1981, 1000.

Ts’ang, Ke-chia. “What Has Been Expressed in Ai Ch’ing’s Recent Work?” In Hualing Nieh, ed. and co-trans., Literature of the Hundred Flowers Volume II: Poetry and Fiction. NY: Columbia University Press, 1981, 278-82.

Ai Wu 艾芜

Anderson, Marston. “Beyond Realism: The Eruption of the Crowd.” In Anderson, The Limits of Realism: Chinese Fiction in the Revolutionary Period. Berkeley: UCP, 1990, 180-202.

Ge, Mai. “A Profile of Ai Wu.” Trans. by Lei Ming. Chinese Literature (Summer, 1992): 40-43.

Ng, Maria Noelle. Three Exotic Views of Southeast Asia: The Travel Narratives of Isabella Bird, Max Dauthendey, and Ai Wu, 1850-1930. Norwalk, CT: Eastbridge.

Wagner, Alexandra. “Ai Wu.” In Dictionary of Literary Biography–Chinese Fiction Writers, 1900-1949. Ed. Thomas Moran. NY: Thomson Gale, 2007, 3-9.

Aku Wuwu 阿库乌雾 (Luo Qingchun 罗庆春)

Bender, Mark. “Poet of the Late Summer Corn: Aku Wuwu and Contemporary Yi Poetry.” In Carlos Rojas and Andrea Bachner, eds., The Oxford Handbook of Modern Chinese Literatures. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016, 498-520.

Alai 阿来

Baranovich, Nimrod. “Literary Liberation of the Tibetan Past: The Alternative Voice in Alai’s Red Poppies.” Modern China 36, 2 (2010): 170-209.

[Abstract: In 2000, the novel Red Poppies, by the Chinese-Tibetan writer Alai, won the Mao Dun Prize, China’s most prestigious literary award. Yet, to date, few have paid serious attention to the sociopolitical implications of the book, and those who have are unanimously critical, suggesting that it repeats the standard Han Chinese narrative about “Old Tibet.” This article offers a new reading of Alai’s novel, arguing that notwithstanding its many obvious overlaps with the Han Chinese narrative, the novel also contains a subtext with an alternative narrative. Identifying several references to Tibet and its history that challenge the hegemonic Han Chinese narrative, the author proposes that the main agenda in Red Poppies is to undo the hellish stigma that the Chinese government and the Han majority have attached to “Old Tibet” and the concomitant narrative about the “liberation” of Tibet by the Chinese People’s Liberation Army. The author also analyzes the reasons for the multiplicity of narratives in the novel and the implications of its publication in China.]

Choy, Howard. “Historiographic Alternatives for China: Tibet in Contemporary Fiction by Tashi Dawa, Alai, and Ge Fei.” American Journal of Chinese Studies. 12, 1 (2005): 65-84.

—–. “In Quest(ion) of an ‘I’: Identity and Idiocy in Alai’s Red Poppies.” In Lauran Hartley and Patricia Schiaffini-Vedani, eds., Modern Tibetan Literature and Social Change. Durham, NC: Duke UP, 2008, 225-235.

—–. “Tibetan Plateau: Historical Alternatives by Tashi Dawa, Alai, and Ge Fei.” In Choy, Remapping the Past: Fictions of History in Deng’s China, 1979-1997. Leiden: Brill, 2008, 103-32.

Rojas, Carlos. “Alai and the Linguistic Politics of Internal Diaspora.” In Jing Tsu and David Der-wei Wang, eds., Global Chinese Literature: Critical Essays. Leiden: Brill, 2010, 115-32.

—–. “Danger in the Voice: Alai and the Sinophone,” in Shu-mei Shih, Chien-hsin Tsai, and Brian Bernards, eds., Reader of Sinophone Literature. New York: Columbia University Press, 2013, 296-303.

Wang, Yiyan. “The Politics of Representing Tibet: Alai’s Tibetan Native-Place Stories.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 25, 1 (Spring 2013): 96-130.

Yue, Gang. “As the Dust Settles in Shangri-La: Alai’s Tibet in the Era of Sino-globalization.” Journal of Contemporary China 56 (Aug. 2008): 543-63.

[Abstract: With the English translation of his novel Red Poppies published in 2000, the ethnic Tibetan author Alai has established a prominent presence outside the People’s Republic, apart from the Shangri-La myth that has dominated the Western imagination of Tibet. This essay attempts to unpack the multitudes of meaning of the novel, situate it against a material history of opium in Eastern Tibet, and highlight the dilemma of a leading Tibetan author. Through further discussion of his essays unavailable in English, this essay aims at developing a cultural geography of Alai’s intellectual travel, energized by a Tibetan warrior tradition in his homeland and yet detailed about contemporary social, cultural, and environmental changes. It paints a picture about a Tibet that is neither a paradise nor a human hell, alive in the moment to survive the creative destruction of Sino-globalization that began long before the People’s Liberation Army marched into Lhasa.]

Anni Baobei 安妮宝贝

Yang, Xin. “Cyber Writing as Urban Fashion: The Case of Anni Baobei.” Southeast Review of Asian Studies 28 (2006): 121-129.

—–. “Configuring Female Sickness and Recovery: Chen Ran and Anni Baobei.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 23, 1 (Spring 2011): 169-96.


B

Ba Jin 巴金

Ba Jin. (Anarchy Archives, Pitzer College).

“Ba Jin [Ba Kin] anarchiste.” Special issue on Ba Jin of A Contretemps: Bulletin de Critique Bibliographique 45 (March 2013).

Briere, O., S. J. (1942). “Un romancier chinois contemporain Pa Kin.” Bulletin de l’Universite de l’Aurore. Ser. 3, 3. 3 (1942): 577-598.

Chen Tan-chen. “Pa Chin the Novelist: An Interview.” Chinese Literature. 6 (1963): 84-92.

Chen, Danchen. “Ba Jin’s Literary Career.” Beijing Review 25, 16 (1989): 22.

Duke, Michael S. “Ba Jin (1904- ): From Personal Liberation to Party ‘Liberation.'” In Mason Y.H. Wang, ed., Perspectives in Contemporary Chinese Lterature. Michigan: Green River Press, 1983, 49-60.

Feng, Jin. “En/gendering the Bildungsroman of the Radical Male: Ba Jin’s Girl Students and Women Revolutionaries.” In Feng, The New Woman in Early Twentieth-Century Chinese Fiction. West Lafayette, IN: Purdue University Press, 2004, 83-100.

Fiss, Geraldine. “Feminine and Masculine Dimensions of Feminist Thought and Transcultural Modernism in Republican China.” Frontiers of Literary Studies in China 8, 1 (March 2014): 101-24.

[Abstract: This study examines critical essays and imaginative fiction by three key writers of the Republican period: Mao Dun, Ba Jin and Lu Yin. I argue that, while Mao Dun and Ba Jin fuse elements of classical Chinese and modern Western sources so as to create strong heroines and a critique of “new men” for the purpose of revolutionary cultural and national reform, Lu Yin foregrounds an inward examination of the self, multiple narrative points of view and a dialogical perspective which fuses her protagonists’ interior consciousness with external reality as well as other characters’ streams of feeling and thought. My reading of Lu Yin’s texts reveals that she not only succeeds in bringing communion and solace to her readers but also creates “moments of being,” markedly similar to Virginia Woolf’s modernist aesthetics and Walter Benjamin’s mosaic-like “moments of recognition,” which allow her characters to perceive “wholeness” from fragmentary flashes of understanding. These intense moments of awareness enhance Lu Yin’s dialogic imagination and enable her to create discursive feminine narratives that convey the full complexity of women’s consciousness while simultaneously resisting the male realist literary discourse and strengthening her feminist-activist agenda in the national public sphere.]

Galik, Marian. “Pa Chin’s Cold Night: the Interliterary Relations with Zola and Wilde.” In Galik, ed., Milestones in Sino-Western Literary Confrontation (1898-1979). Weisbaden: Otto Harrassowitz, 1986, 201-24.

Granat, Diana. Three Stories of France: Pa Chin and His Early Short Stories. M.A. thesis, University of Pennsylvania, 1972.

Guo, Jie. “From Patriarchal Polygamy to Conjugal Monogamy: Imagining Male Same-Sex Relationship in Modern China.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 25, 1 (Spring 2013): 165-205. [deals in part with Family and “Second Wife”]

Hsia, C.T. “Pa Chin.” In C.T. Hsia, A History of Modern Chinese Fiction. 2nd ed. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1971, 237-56, 375-88.

Huang, Yiju. “Coda: Ba Jin: Toward an Ethical Relations to History.” In Huang, Tapestry of Light: Aesthetic Afterlives of the Cultural Revolution. Leiden: Brill, 2014, 129-36.

Kaldis, Nicholas. “Ba Jin’s Family: Fiction, Representation, and Relevance.” In Joshua Mostow, ed, and Kirk A. Denton, China section, ed., Columbia Companion to Modern East Asian Literatures. NY: Columbia UP, 2003, 411-17. Rpt in Kirk A. Denton, ed., Columbia Companion to Modern Chinese Literature. NY: Columbia University Press, 2016, 169-75.

—–. “Ba Jin.” In David Levinson, ed., Encyclopedia of Modern Asia. ed. David Levinson. New York: Scribner’s 2003, vol. 1: 209a-209b; Ref.: vol. 5: 244a-244b.

—–. “Ba Jin.” In Dictionary of Literary Biography–Chinese Fiction Writers, 1900-1949. Ed. Thomas Moran. NY: Thomson Gale, 2007, 310-25.

Kral, Oldrich. “Pa Chin’s Novel The Family.” In Jaroslav Prusek, ed. Studies in Modern Chinese Literature. Berlin: Akademie-Verlag, 1964, 98-112.

Kubler, Cornelius. “Europeanized Grammer in Ba Jin’s Novel Jia.” Journal of the Chinese Language Teachers Association 20, 1 (Feb. 1985): 39-66.

Lang, Olga. Pa Chin and his Writings: Chinese Youth Between the Two Revolutions. Cambridge: Harvard UP, 1967.

Lechowska, Teresa. “In Search of a New Ideal: The Metamorphoses of Pa Chin’s Model Heroes.” Archiv Orientalni 42 (1974): 310-22.

Mao, Nathan. Pa Chin. Boston: Twayne, 1978.

—–. “Pa Chin’s Journey in Sentiment: From Hope to Despair.” Journal of the Chinese Language Teachers Association 11 (1976): 131-37.

Ng, Mau Sang. “Ba Jin and Russian Literature.” Chinese Literature: Essays, Articles, Reviews 3, 1 (Jan 1981): pp. 67-92. [available on PROJECT MUSE]

Pino, Angel. “Ba Jin traduteur.” In Isabelle Rabut, ed., Les belles infideles dans l’empire du milieu: Problematique et pratiques de la traduction dans le monde Chinois moderne. Paris: You Feng, 2010, 45-110. Tr. as “Ba Jin the Translator.” In Peng Hsiao-yen and Isabelle Rabut, eds., Modern China and the West. Leiden: Brill, 2014, 28-105.

Shaw, Craig. “Changes in The Family: Reflections on Ba Jin’s Revisions of Jia.” Journal of the Chinese Language Teachers Association 34, 2 (1999): 21-36.

Song, Mingwei. “The Flowering of Life: Ba Jin’s Anarchist Ideals and Fictional Representation.” In Song, Young China: National Rejuvenation and the Bildungsroman, 1900-1959. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Asia Center, 2015, 187-236.

Tang, Xiaobing. “The Last Tubercular in Modern Chinese Literature: On Ba Jin’s Cold Nights.” In Chinese Modernism: The Heroic and the Quotidian. Durham: Duke UP, 2000, 131-60.

Bai Fengxi 白峰溪

Chen, Xiaomei. “A Stage of Their Own: The Problematics of Women’s Theater in Post-Mao China.” Journal of Asian Studies 56, 1 (1997): 3-25.

Tung, Constantine. “Tensions of Reconciliation: Individualisic Rebels and Social Harmony in Bai Fengxi’s Plays.” In Tung, ed., Drama in the People’s Republic of China. Albany: SUNY Press, 1987, 233-53.

Bai Hua 白桦

Dolezalova, Anna. “Two Waves of Criticism of the Film Script Bitter Love and the Writer Bai Hua in 1981.” Asian and Africn Studies 19 (1983): 27-54.

Duke, Michael S. “A Drop of Spring Rain: The Sense of Humanity in Pai Hua’s Bitter Love (K’u-lien).” CLEAR 5 (1983): 67-89.

Kraus, Richard. “Bai Hua: The Political Authority of a Writer.” In Carol Lee Hamrin and Timothy Cheek, eds., China’s Establishment Intellectuals. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1986, 185-211.

Martin, Helmut. “The Drama Tragic Song of Our Time (Shidai de beige): Functions of Literature in the Eighties and Their Socio-political Limitations.” In Constantine Tung and Colin Mackerras ed., Drama in the People’s Republic of China. Albany: SUNY Press, 1987, 254-81.

Spence, Jonathan. “Film and Politics: Bai Hua’s Bitter Love.” In Spence, Chinese Roundabout: Essays in History and Culture. NY: W.W. Norton, 1992, 277-92.

Bai Wei 白薇

Dooling, Amy D. “Desire and Disease: Bai Wei and the Literary Left of the 1930s.” In Charles Laughlin, ed., Contested Modernities in Chinese Literature. NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005, 51-60.

Findeisen, Raoul David. “Autobiographie als Collage–‘Tragischer Lebenslauf’ von Bai Wei.” In Christina Neder et al. eds., China in Seinen Biographischen Dimension: Gedenkscrift fur Helmut Martin. Weisbaden: Harrossowitz Verlag, 2001, 113-28.

Liu, Jianmei. “Feminizing Politics: Reading Bai Wei and Lu Yin.” Journal of Modern Literature in Chinese 5, 2 (2002): 55-80.

Yan, Haiping, “Other Life: Bai Wei, Yuan Changying, and Social Dramas in the 1930s.” In Yan, Chinese Women Writers and the Feminist Imagination, 1905-1948. London: Routledge, 2006, 100-34.

Bai Xianyong (Pai Hsien-yung) 白先勇

Chow, Rey. “‘Love Me, Master, Love Me, Son’: A Cultural Other Pornographically Constructed in Time.” In John Hay, ed., Boundaries in China. London: Reaktion Books, 1994, 243-56.

Eom, Ik-sang. “The Death of Three Men: Characters in Pai Hsien-yung’s Love Stories.” Chinese Culture 32, 1 (1991): 83-98.

Guo, Jie. “Where Past Meets Present: The Emergence of Gay Identity in Pai Hsien-yung’s Niezi.” MLN 126, no. 5 (Dec. 2011): 1049–82.

Hillenbrand, Margaret. “Voices of Empire in Dubliners and Taibeiren: Titles, Taiwan, and Comparability.” In Shu-mei Shih and Ping-hui Liao, eds., Comparatizing Taiwan. London: Routledge, 2015, 190-216.

Hsia, C. T. “The Continuing Obsession with China.” Review of National Literatures 6, 1 (1975). Rpt. in “Obsession with China (II): Three Taiwan Writers.” In Hsia, A History of Modern Chinese Fiction. 3rd ed. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 363-86. [deals with Jiang Kui, Yu Guanzhong, and Bai Xianyong]

Huang, Hans Tao-Ming. “From Glass Clique to Tongzhi Nation: Crystal Boys, Identity Formation, and the Politics of Sexual Shame.” positions: east asia cultures critique 18, 2 (Fall 2010): 373-98.

Lau, Joseph S.M. “Celestials and Commoners: Exiles in Pai Hsien-yung’s Stories.” Monumenta Serica 36 (1984-85): 409-23.

—–. “Crowded Hours’ Revisited: The Evocation of the Past in Taipei Jen.” Journal of Asian Studies 35, 1 (1975): 31-47.

Lee, Mabel. “In Lu Hsun’s Footsteps…Pai Hsien-yung, A Modern Chinese Writer.” Journal of the Oriental Society of Australia 9 (1972/3): 74-83.

Lupke, Christopher. “(En)gendering the Nation in Pai Hsien-yung’s Wandering in the Garden Waking from a Dream.” Modern Chinese Literature 6, 1 /2 (1992): 157-178.

Martin, Fran. “Nationalism, Reproduction, Homosexuality: Political Critiques of Crystal Boys.” In Martin, Situating Sexualities: Queer Representations in Taiwanese Fiction, Film and Public Culture. Hong Kong: University of Hong Kong Press, 2003, 47-72.

McFadden, Susan. “Tradition and Talent: Western Influence in the Works of Pai Hsien-yung.” Tamkang Review 9, 3 (1979): 315-44.

Ou-yang, Tzu. “The Fictional World of Pai Hsien-yung.” In Jeannette L. Faurot, ed., Chinese Fiction from Taiwan: Critical Perspectives. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1980, 166-78.

Riep, Steven. “A War of Wounds: Disability, Disfigurement, and Antiheroic Portrayals of the War of Resistance Against Japan.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 20, 1 (Spring 2008): 129-72. [treats, in part, Bai’s story “New Year’s Eve”]

—–. “Bai Xianyong.” In Thomas Moran and Ye (Dianna) Xu, eds., Chinese Fiction Writers, 1950-2000. Dictionary of Literature Biography, vol. 370. Detroit: Thomson Gale, 2013, 3-17.

Stuckey, Andrew. “Tradition in Exile: Allusion and Quotation in Bei Xianyong’s Taipei People.” In Stuckey, Old Stories Retold: Narrative and Vanishing Pasts in Modern China. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2010, 99-112.

Yang, Winston L.Y. “Pai Hsien-yung and Other Emigre Writers.” In Winston L.Y. Yang and Nathan K. Mao, eds., Modern Chinese Fiction: A Guide to Its Study and Appreciation Essays and Bibliographies. Boston: G.K. Hall and Co., 1981, 67-78.

Bao Mi 保密

(see also Wang Lixiong)
FlorCruz, Jaime A. “Secrets of a Hot Novel.” Time (March 30, 1992). [On Bao Mi’s Yellow Peril (Huanghuo)]

Bao Tianxiao 包天笑

Link, Perry. “An Interview with Pao T’ien-hsiao.” Renditions 17 /18: 241-253.

Ming, Feng-ying. “Bao Tianxiao.” In Dictionary of Literary Biography–Chinese Fiction Writers, 1900-1949. Ed. Thomas Moran. NY: Thomson Gale, 2007, 26-32.

Sibau, Maria Franca. “Portrait of the Artist as a Schoolboy: Bao Tianxiao’s Creative Interventions in Little Xin’s School Journal.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 28, 2  (Fall 2016): 1-42.

Baobei, Anni 安妮宝贝

(see Anni Baobei)

Bei Dao (Zhao Zhenkai) 北岛

Bei Dao. Website prepared in conjunction with the Stanford Presidential Lectures and Symposia in the Humanities and the Arts.

Bei Dao Biography (Pegasos Website, Findland)

Huang, Yibing. “‘Green, how I love you green’: Lorca, Bei Dao’s Waves, and Sleepwalking in History.” World Literature Today 82, 6 (Nov.-Dec. 2008): 32-35.

An Interview with Visting Artist Bei Dao: Poet in Exile.” The Journal of the International Institute 2, 1 (Fall, 1994).

Janssen, Ronald R. “What History Cannot Write: Bei Dao and Recent Chinese Poetry.” Critical Asian Studies 34, 2 (2002): 259-77.

Li, Dian. “Ideology and Conflicts in Bei Dao’s Poetry.” Modern Chinese Literature 9, 2 (1996): 369-86.

—–. “Translating Bei Dao: Translatability as Reading and Critique.” Babel, the official journal of the International Federation of Translators 44, 4 (1999): 289-303.

—–. The Chinese Poetry of Bei Dao, 1978-2000: Resistance and Exile. Albany: Edwin Mellen Press, 2006. [MCLC Resource Center review by Paul Manfredi]

—–. “Unreal Images: Bei Dao’s Dialogue with the Real.” Concentric: Literary and Cultural Studies 32, 1 (Jan. 2006): 197-218.

—–. “Paradox and Meaning in Bei Dao’s Poetry.” positions: east asia cultures critique 15, 1 (Spring 2007): 113-36. [Project Muse link]

Lin, Min. “The Search fro the ‘Unknowable’ and the Quest for Modernity in Contemporary Chinese Intellectual Discourse: A Philosophical Interpretation of Bei Dao’s Short Story ’13 Happiness Street’.” Journal of the Oriental Society of Australia 22-23 (1990-91): 57-70.

Lin, Min and Maria Galikowski. “Bei Dao’s ’13 Happiness Street’ and the Young Generation’s Quest for the ‘Unknowable.'” In Min Lin and Maria Galikowski, The Search for Modernity: Chinese Intellectuals and Cultural Discourse in the Post-Mao Era. NY: St. Martin’s Press, 1999, 89-102.

McDougall, Bonnie S. “Bei Dao’s Poetry: Revelation and Communication.” Modern Chinese Literature 1, 2 (1985): 225-52.

—–. Zhao Zhenkai’s Fiction: A Study in Cultural Alienation.” Modern Chinese Literature 1, 1 (1984): 103-30.

—–. “Quest and Confrontation: The Poetic and Fictional Voices of Bei Dao/Zhao Zhenkai.” In Bert Edström et al. eds., Vägar till Kina: Göran Malmqvist 60 år, Orientaliska studier, 1984: 49-50.

—– and Suzette Cooke. “Two Stories by Zhao Zhenkai: The Poetry and Fiction of Bei Dao/Zhao Zhenkai.” Renditions 19/20 (1983): 122-124.

Owen, Stephen. “What Is World Poetry?” The New Republic (Nov. 19, 1990): 28-32.

Patton, Simon. “Review Article on Bei Dao.” Modern Chinese Literature 9, 1 (1995): 139-145.

Pozzana, Claudia. “Distances of Poetry: An Introduction to Bei Dao.” positions: east asia cultures critique 15, 1 (Spring 2007): 91-111. [Project Muse link]

Saussy, Han. “Bei Dao and His Audiences.” Stanford Presidential Lectures and Symposia in the Humanities and the Arts.

Tan, Chee-Lay. Constructing a System of Irregularities: The Poetry of Bei Dao, Duoduo and Yang Lian. Ph. D. diss. Cambridge: Cambridge University, 2007.

Van Crevel, Maghiel. “Exile: Yang Lian, Wang Jiaxin and Bei Dao.” In van Crevel, Chinese Poetry in Times of Mind, Mayhem and Money, Leiden: Brill, 2008, 137-186.

Wedell-Wedellsborg, Anne: “Secrecy and Truth — an interview with Bei Dao.” In S. Clausen, R. Starrs and A. Wedell-Wedellsborg eds., Cultural Encounters: China, Japan and the West. Aarhus, Aarhus University Press, 1995, 227-240.

Williams, Philip. “A New Beginning for the Modernist Chinese Novel: Zhao Zhenkai’s Bodong.” Modern Chinese Literature 5, 1 (1989): 73-90.

—–. “Dystopian Warning: Zhao Zhenkai’s ‘No. 13 Happiness St.'” Journal of the Chinese Language Teachers Association 25, 1 (1990): 57-66.

Bi Feiyu 毕飞宇

Li Jingze. “Bi Feiyu’s Voice.” Tr. Su Jing. Chinese Literature Today (Summer 2010): 13-15.

Bi Shumin 毕淑敏

Choy,  Howard Y. F. “Narrative as Therapy: Stories of Breast Cancer by Bi Shumin and Xi Xi.” In Howard Y. F. Choy, ed., Discourses of DiseaseWriting Illness, the Mind and Body in Modern China. Leiden: Brill, 2016, 151-76.

Gong, Haoming. “Unmasking of Nationalism: Drug Addiction and Its Literary Imagination in Bi Shumin’s Novel.” In Howard Y. F. Choy, ed., Discourses of DiseaseWriting Illness, the Mind and Body in Modern China. Leiden: Brill, 2016, 123-50.

He, Zhenbang. “Bi Shumin’s Stories: Submersed in Reality.” Chinese Literature (Spring 1997).

Knight, Sabina. “Cancer’s Revelations: Malignancies and Therapies in a Recent Chinese Novel.” Literature and Medicine 28, 2 (Fall 2009): 351-370.

[Abstract: In Bi Shumin’s un-translated novel, Save the Breast (2003), marketed as China’s first psychotherapy novel, multiple storylines suggest diverse paths to healing. To explore the complex phenomenology of breast cancer, this paper analyzes the novel’s treatment of the characters’ distinct predicaments, the large-scale social ills they reveal, and ways therapy cultures may alleviate or exacerbate local forms of suffering. Though the novel celebrates group therapy and communicative exercises, it challenges the individualistic psychology of many therapeutic paradigms. Following modern Chinese fiction’s long tradition of using illness for allegory, breast cancer is here also a metaphor for sickness at the heart of a nation racked by rapid social and economic change. Analyzing the novel’s scrutiny of biomedical and other forms of power, the paper addresses deep distress surrounding not only breast cancer but also Cultural Revolution trauma, seismic market transitions, domestic violence, prostitution, and gender stereotyping.]

Bian Zhilin 卞之琳

Chen Bingying. Bian Zhilin pingzhuan (Critical biography of Bian Zhilin). Chongqing: Chongqing, 1998.

Fung, Mary M. Y. “Editor’s Introduction.” In Bian Zhilin, The Carving of Insects. HK: Renditions Books, 2006, 11-34.

Haft, Lloyd. Pien Chih-lin: A Study in Modern Chinese Poetry. Dordrecht: Foris Publications, 1983.

Hsu, Sang-fu. “The Less Mystery the Better.” In Hualing Nieh, ed., Literature of the Hundred Flowers, Volume II: Poetry and Fiction. NY: Columbia UP, 1981, 195-98.

Jung, Woo-Kwang. A Study of ‘The Han Garden Collection: New Approaches to Modern Chinese Poetry. Ph.D. diss. Seattle: University of Washington, 1997.

Liao, Christine M. Bian Zhilin and Ai Qing: A Comparative Study of Selected Poems, with Reference to Focus and Classical Cohesion. Ph. D. diss. University of Melbourne, 1982.

Liu, Lang. “We Don’t Like This Poetic Style.” In Hualing Nieh, ed., Literature of the Hundred Flowers, Volume II: Poetry and Fiction. NY: Columbia UP, 1981, 192-94.

Bing Xin 冰心

Admussen, Nick. “Genre Occludes the Creation of Genre: Bing Xin, Tagore, and Prose Poetry.” In Carlos Rojas and Andrea Bachner, eds., The Oxford Handbook of Modern Chinese Literatures. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016, 578-94.

Anderson, Colena M. “A Study of Two Modern Chinese Women: Ping Hsin and Ting Ling.” Ph.D. Diss. Pomona: Claremont Graduate School and University Center, 1954.

Bien, Gloria. “Images of Women In Ping Hsin’s Fcition.” In A. Palandri, ed. Women Writers of 20-Century China. Eugene: Asian Studies Publications, University of Oregon, 1982, 19-40.

Bouskova, Marcela. “The Stories of Ping Hsin.” In Jaroslav Prusek, Studies in Modern Chinese LIterature. Berlin: Akademie-Verlag, 1964, 114-129.

—–. “On the Origin of Modern Chinese Prosody: An Analysis of the Prosodic Components in the Works of Ping Hsin.” Archiv Orientalni 32, 5 (1946): 619-43.

Galik, Marian. “Studies in Modern Chinese Intellectual History: VI. Young Bing Xin (1919-1923).” Asian and African Studies [Brataslava] 2, 1 (1993): 41-60.

Larson, Wendy. “Female Subjectivity and Gender Relations: The Early Stories of Lu Yin and Bing Xin.” In X. Tang and L. Kang, eds. Politics, Ideology, and Literary Discourse in Modern China: Theoretical Interventions and Cultural Critique. Durham: Duke UP, 1993, 278-99.

McDougall, Bonnie. “Disappearing Women and Disappearing Men in May Fourth Narrative: A Post-Feminist Survey of Short Stories by Mao Dun, Bing Xin, Ling Shuhua and Shen Congwen.” In McDougall, Fictional Authors, Imaginary Audiences: Modern Chinese Literature in the Twentieth Century. HK: Chinese University Press, 2003, 133-70.

Pao, King-li. “Ping Hsin, A Modern Chinese Poetess.” Literature East and West 8 (1964): 58-72.

Wang, Lingzhen. “Bing Xin.” In Dictionary of Literary Biography–Chinese Fiction Writers, 1900-1949. Ed. Thomas Moran. NY: Thomson Gale, 2007, 33-42.

Yan, Haiping. “The Stars of Night: Bing Xing and the Literary Constellation of the 1920s.” In Yan, Chinese Women Writers and the Feminist Imagination, 1905-1948. London: Routledge, 2006, 69-99.

Bo Yang 柏杨

Lancashire, Edel. “Popeye and the Case of Guo Yidong, alias Bo Yang.” The China Quarterly 92 (1982): 663-86.

Lin, Tzu-yao, ed. One Author is Rankling Two Chinas. Taipei: Sing Kung Book Co., 1989.


C

Cai Qijiao 蔡其矫

Hsiao, Hsiang. “Which Thoughts, Which Feelings?” In Hualing Nieh, ed., Literature of the Hundred Flowers, Volume II: Poetry and Fiction. NY: Columbia UP, 1981, 206-10.

Cai Yi 蔡仪

Button, Peter. Aesthetic Formation and the Image of Modern China: The Philosophical Aesthetics of Cai Yi. Ph.d. diss. Ithaca: Cornell Univerity, 2000.

Button, Peter. “Global/Modern Figurations of the Type in Cai Yi, Heidegger, and Whitman.” In Peter Button, Configurations of the Real in Chinese Literary and Aesthetic Modernity. Leiden: Brill, 2009. [MCLC Resource Center Publications review by Thomas Moran]

Cai Yuanpei 蔡元培

Duiker, William J. Ts’ai Yuan-p’ei, Educator of Modern China. University Park, PA: The Pennsylvania University Press, 1977.

Lubot, Eugene. “Ts’ai Yuan-p’ei and the May Fourth Incident: One Liberal’s Attitude Toward Student Activism.” Chinese Culture: A Quarterly Review 13, 2 (1972): 73-82.

Can Xue 残雪

Almeida, Alexis. “Can Xue: This New Literature Has an Old Soul.” Words without Borders.

Bachner, Andrea. “New Spaces for Literature: Can Xue and Helene Cixous on Writing.” Comparative Literature Studies 42, 3 (2005): 155–182.

Bosha, Francis. “Ariyoshi Sawako, Mukoda Kuniko, and Can Xue: Three Modern Women Writers of Japan and China.” The Journal of Kawamura Gakuen Woman’s University 8, 1 (1997): 19–27.

Cai, Rong. “In the Madding Crowd: Self and Other in Can Xue’s Fiction.” China Information 11, 4 (Spring 1997): 41-57.

Can Xue’s Blog (Sina.com)

Can Xue. Contemporary Chinese Writers Project. Cambridge: MIT.

Chen, Jianguo. “The Aesthetics of Transposition of Reality, Dream, and Mirror: A Comparative Perspective on Can Xue.” Comparative Literature Studies 34, 4 (1997): 348–375.

—–. “Literary Imagination and the Politics of Memory: China.” Review of National Literatures and World Report (1999): 58–73.

—–. “Against Silence: The Cultural Revolution and Literary Memory.” MLA International Bibliography (2000): 163–181.

Dai Jinhua 带锦华. “Can Xue: Mengmo xurao de xiaowu” 残雪:梦魇萦绕的小屋 (Can Xue: a little hut surround by nightmares). Nanfang wentan 5 (2000): 9-17.

Ducornet, Rikki. The Monstrous and the Marvelous. San Francisco, CA: City Lights Books, 1999. [Can Xue is discussed in the title chapter of this book of essays.]

Edwards, Louise. “Broadening Horizons: Representations of Women in Asia.” Bulletin of Concerned Asian Scholars 24 (1992). [Article includes commentary on Can Xue’s Dialogues in Paradise]

Evans, Megan. “Translating Instability: Adapting and Staging Madam X and Mister Q (based on Can Xue’s Five Spice Street).” MCLC Resource Center Publication (March 2015).

Foley, Todd. “Can Xue.” In Thomas Moran and Ye (Dianna) Xu, eds., Chinese Fiction Writers, 1950-2000. Dictionary of Literature Biography, vol. 370. Detroit: Thomson Gale, 2013, 18-22.

Griffith, Jonathan. “Can Xue Interview.” Chinese Literature Today (Summer 2010): 80-85.

Haddon, Rosemary. “Writing Spirituality in the Works of Can Xue: Transforming the Self.” New Zealand Journal of Asian Studies 13, 2 (Dec. 2011): 68-81.

Halfmann, Roman. “Literature of the Soul: Die Kafka-Rezeption der chinesischen Autorin Can Xue.” Lili – Zeitschrift für Literaturwissenschaft und Linguistik 39, 154 (2009): 159–172.

Ho, Shuwei. “Madness in Modern Chinese Literature: Yu Hua and Can Xue.” Sun Yat-sen Journal of Humanities 11 (2000): 97–117.

Innes, Charlotte. “Foreword.” In Old Floating Cloud: Two Novellas by Can Xue. Trs. Ronald R. Janssen and Zian Zhang. Evanston: Northwestern Press University, 1991.

Janssen, Ronald R. “Afterword: Can Xue’s ‘Attacks of Madness.'” In Dialogues in Paradise. Tr. by Ronald R. Janssen and Jian Zhang. Evanston: Northwestern University Press, 1989, 163–173.

Li, Tianming. “Writing Fiction for Vengeance: The Symbolic Meaning of Can Xue’s ‘Hut on a Hill.'” B.C. Asian Review 7 (1993).

—–. “A Tormented Soul in a Locked Hut: Can Xue’s Stories.” MA Thesis. Vancouver: University of British Columbia, 1994.

Li, Yinghong. Nihilist Vision through Literary Subversion in Mainland Chinese Avant-garde Fiction: Two Cases: Nihilism of the Indifferent as Exemplified by Yu Hua and Nihilism of the Absurd as Exemplified by Can Xue. PhD diss. Madison: University of Wisconsin, 1998.

Lu, Tonglin. “Can Xue: What is so Paranoid in Her Writing.” In Lu, Gender and Sexuality in Twentieth Century Chinese Literature and Society. Albany: SUNY Press, 1993, 175-204. Rpt. in Misogyny, Cultural Nihilism and Oppositional Politics: Contemporary Chinese Experimental Fiction. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1995, 75-103.

McCandlish, Laura. “Stubbornly Illuminating ‘the Dirty Snow that Refuses to Melt’: A Conversation with Can Xue.” MCLC Resource Center Publication, 2002.

Posborg, Susanne. “Can Xue: Tracing Madness.” In Wendy Larson and Anne Wedell-Wedellsborg, eds., Inside Out: Modernism and Postmodernism in Chinese Literary Culture. Aarhus, Denmark: Aarhus University Press, 1993, 91-98.

Qualls, Melissa Ann. “A Sojourn through Madness in ‘The Embroidered Shoes’ of Can Xue.” MA Thesis. Kirksville, MO: Truman State University, 1999.

Solomon, Jon. “Taking Tiger Mountain: Can Xue’s Resistance and Cultural Critique.” Modern Chinese Literature 4, 1/2 (1988): 235-62.

Suher, Dylan and Joan Hua. “Interview with Can Xue.” Asymptote (July 2013).

Wang, Ban. The Sublime Figure of History. Stanford: SUP, 1997. [final chapter has readings of Can Xue’s fiction as examples of the anti-sublime]

Wedell-Wedellsborg, Anne. “Ambiguous Subjectivity: Reading Can Xue.” Modern Chinese Literature 8, 1/2 (1994): 7-20.

—–. “Haunted Fiction: Modern Chinese Literature and the Supernatural.” International Fiction Review 32 (2005).

Yang, Xiaobin. “Can Xue: Discursive Dystopias.” In Yang, The Chinese Postmodern: Trauma and Irony in Chinese Avante-Garde Fiction. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2002, 129-49.

—–. “Can Xue: Ever-Haunting Nightmares.” In Yang, The Chinese Postmodern: Trauma and Irony in Chinese Avante-Garde Fiction. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2002, 74-92.

Zha, Peide. “Modernism Eastward: Franz Kafka and Can Xue.” B.C. Asian Review 5 (1991).

Zhang, Jian. A Cross-Cultural Study of Story Transactions among Twelve College-Level Readers in the United States and the People’s Republic of China. Ph. D. diss. Hofstra University, 1991.

—–. ” Reading Transaction in Translation.” Babel 43, 3 (1997).

Zhong, Xueping. Masculinty Besieged? Issues of Modernity and Male Subjectivity in Chinese Literature of the Late Twentieth Century. Durham, NC and London: Duke University Press, 2000. [See especially pp.146–148 and pp. 150–151.

Cao Guilin(Glen Cao) 曹桂林

Zhong, Xueping. “Multiple Readings and Personal Reconfigurations Against the ‘Nationalist Grain.'” In Sharon K. Hom, ed., Chinese Women Traversing Diaspora. Garland Publishing, 1999, 103-25.

Cao Yu 曹禺

Galik, Marian. “Ts’ao Yu’s Thunderstorm: Creative Confrontation with Euripides, Racine, Ibsen and Galsworthy.” In Galik, ed., Milestones in Sino-Western Literary Confrontation (1898-1979). Weisbaden: Otto Harrassowitz, 1986, 101-22.

Gunn, Edward. “Cao Yu’s Peking Man and Literary Evocations of the Family in Republican China.” Republican China 16, 1 (1990): 73-88.

Hu John Y.H. Ts’ao Yu. New York: Twayne, 1972.

Lau, Joseph S.M. Ts’ao Yu: The Reluctant Disciple of Chekhov and O’Neill: A Study in Literary Influence. HK: HKUP, 1970.

Noble, Jonathan. “Cao Yu and Thunderstorm.” In Joshua Mostow, ed, and Kirk A. Denton, China section, ed., Columbia Companion to Modern East Asian Literatures. NY: Columbia UP, 2003, 446-51. Rpt in Kirk A. Denton, ed., Columbia Companion to Modern Chinese Literature. NY: Columbia University Press, 2016, 205-10.

Robinson, Lewis S. “On the Sources and Motives Behind Ts’ao Yu’s Thunderstorm: A Qualitative Analysis.” Tamkang Review 16 (1983): 177-92.

Wan Fang. “Linghun de shitou: jinian wode baba Cao Yu” (Stones of the soul: in memory of my father Cao Yu). Shouhuo 3 (1997).

Wang, Aixue. A Comparison of the Dramatic Work of Cao Yu and J. M. Synge. Lewiston, NY: Mellen Press, 1999.

Cao Zhenglu 曹征路

Lu, Jie. “Constructing Agency: Challenges and Possibilities in Chinese New Left Literature.” In Ban Wang and Jie Lu, eds., China and New Left Visions: Political and Cultural Interventions. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2012, 121-38.

Yan, Hairong. “Rethinking Is Not Demonizing: A Conversation with Cao Zhenglu About His Novel Lessons in Democracy.” Monthly Review 65, 5 (2013).

Zhong, Xueping. “Internationale as Specter: Na’er, ‘Subaltern Literature,’ and Contemporary China’s ‘Left Bank.'” In Ban Wang and Jie Lu, eds., China and New Left Visions: Political and Cultural Interventions. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2012, 101-20.

Che Qianzi 车前子

Mott, Glen. “Poetics as Reincarnation: A Conversation with Che Qianzi.” Chinese Literature Today 2, 1 (2011): 60-67.

Chen Baichen 陈白尘

Kuoshu, Harry H. “Visualizing Ah Q: An Allegory’s Resistance to Representation.” In Harry Kuoshu, Lightness of Being in China: Adaptation and Discursive Figuration in Cinema and Theater. NY: Peter Lang, 1999, 17-49. [deals in part with Chen’s film script]

Weinstein, John B. “Ding Xilin and Chen Baichen: Building a Modern Theater through Comedy.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 20, 2 (Fall 2008): 92-130.

Chen Cun 陈村

Chen, Jianguo. “The Logic of the Phantasm: Haunting and Spectrality in Contemporary Chinese Literary Imagination.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 14, 1 (Spring 2002): 231-65. [deals with texts by Mo Yan, Chen Cun, and Yu Hua]

Hockx, Michel. “Master of the Web: Chen Cun and the Continuous Avant-Garde.” In Maghiel van Crevel, Tian Yuan Tan, and Michel Hockx, eds. Text, Performance, and Gender in Chinese Literature and Music: Essay in Honor of Wilt Idema. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2009, 413-430.

Leung, Laifong. “Chen Cun: Half a Muslim.” In Leung, ed., Morning Sun: Interviews with Chinese Writers of the Lost Generation. Armonk, NY: M. E. Sharpe, 1994, 3-13.

Liu Xiaobo 刘小波. “Yi zhong xin de shenmei sichao: cong Xu Xing, Chen Cun, Liu Suola de san bu zuopin tanqi”  一种新的审美思潮: 从徐星, 陈村, 刘索拉的三部作品谈起 (A New Wave in Aesthetic Thinking: Starting from Three Works by Xu Xing, Chen Cun, and Liu Suola). Wenxue pinglun, no. 3 (1986): 35–43.

Chen Diexian 陈蝶仙

Hanan, Patrick. “The Autobiographical Romance of Chen Diexian.” In Hanan, Chinese Fiction of the Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries. NY: Columbia UP, 2004.

Lean, Eugenia. “The Butterfly Mark: Chen Diexian, His Brand, and Cultural Entrepreneurship in Republican China.” In Christopher Rea and Nicolai Volland, eds., The Business of Culture: Cultural Entrepreneurs in China and Southeast Asia, 1900-65. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 2015, 62-91.

Lee, Haiyan. “All the Feelings That Are Fit to Print: The Community of Sentiment and the Literary Public Sphere in China, 1900-1918.” Modern China 27, no. 3 (July 2001): 291-327. [deals in part with The Money Demons]

Chen Duxiu 陈独秀

Chen Duxiu.net [website devoted to the study of Chen Duxiu; in Chinese]

Feigon, Lee. Chen Duxiu, Founder of the Chinese Communist Party. Princeton: Princeton UP, 1983.

Galik, Marian. “Hu Shih, Chou Tso-jen, Ch’en Tu-hsiu and the Beginning of Modern Chinese Literary Criticism.” In Galik, The Genesis of Modern Chinese Liteary Criticism (1917-1930). London: Curzon Press, 1980, 9-27.

Kuo, Thomas. Chen Duxiu (1879-1942) and the Chinese Communist Movement. South Orange, NJ: Seton Hall University Press, 1975.

—–. “Ch’en Tu-hsiu (1879-1942) and Hu Shih (1891-1962).” Chinese Studies of History 31, 1 (Fall 1997): 23-54.

Schwartz, Benjamin. “Chen Tu-hsiu and the Acceptance of the Modern West.” Journal of the History of Ideas 12, 1 (Jan. 1965): 61-74.

Chen Fang 陈放

Kinkley, Jeffrey C. “The Banned Blockbuster: Chen Fang’s Heaven’s Wrath.” In Kinkley, Corruption and Realism in Late Socialist China. Palo Alto: Stanford UP, 2007, 47-77.

Chen Guanzhong, aka Chan Koonchung (陈冠中)

Wang, Chaohua. “Dreamers and Nightmares: Political Novels by Wang Lixiong and Chan Koonchung.” China Perspectives 1 (2015): 23-32.

[Abstract: Wang Lixiong’s Yellow Peril (1991) represents the return of political fiction of the future not seen in China for decades. Chan Koonchung’s The Fat Years (2009) brings the imagination to a full dystopian vision. Reading the two novels side by side, this paper argues that Chinese fiction of the future in the early 1990s responded to the country’s struggle for direction when the bloody crackdown of the Tiananmen protest wiped out collective idealism in society. In the twenty-first century, such fiction is written in response to China’s rapid rise as one of the world’s superpowers, bringing to domestic society a seemingly stabilised order that has deprived it of intellectual vision.]

Chen Guidi and Wu Chuntao 陈桂棣 / 吴春桃

Dunstan, Helen. “Inconvenient Confucianism and the Construction of Heroes in Recent Chinese Reportage: A Banned Investigation into China’s Peasantry.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture vol. 22, no. 1 (Spring 2010): 1-58

Chen Hengzhe (Chen Nan-hua) 陳衡哲

Cheng, Tieniu. “The Construction of ‘New Woman’ in Chen Hengzhe’s Autobiography.” Journal of Literature and Art Studies 3, 12 (Dec. 2013): 739-756.

Denise Gimpel. Chen Hengzhe: A Life Between Orthodoxies. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2015. [MCLC Resource Center review by Megan M. Ferry]

[Abstract: This book takes as its starting point the life, activities, and writings of Chen Hengzhe (1890-1976) in order to investigate the effects of transnational experience and in particular the manner in which different, foreign and Chinese, narratives of life were interwoven into activities and attitudes as well as literary and scholarly output at a time “between orthodoxies” (Jerome Grieder) and of eclectic borrowings in search of change in most areas of national life in China. Chen Hengzhe has been celebrated as China’s first female professor, first professor of Western history, and first person to publish a history of the West that was not a translation into Chinese. She is moreover celebrated as one of the first to write fiction and poetry in the vernacular and to have been the first to write children’s literature. In 1914 she was among the first group of women to gain a Boxer Indemnity grant to study in America. The reiteration of these many “firsts” has led to a rather stereotypical portrait of Chen Hengzhe in Chinese sources and, as a result, in most Western references to her. To date we have no critical study of her work or activities in Chinese or any other language. Chen Hengzhe’s life and textual production, however, deserve and reward closer scholarly attention. They are not only pertinent to analysis of developments in early twentieth-century China; they speak to important questions in China today. This study, then, is not a biography of a person; it is an attempt to understand the way in which foreign influences (narratives of being, organizing, thinking, writing) seep into a person’s life and work and meld with the “home” influences (narratives of being, organizing, thinking, writing) to produce a mix that cannot be predicted by any overarching “isms” or theories.]

Hockx, Michel. “Mad Women and Mad Men: Intraliterary Contact in Early Republican Literature.” In Findeison and Gassmann, eds., Autumn Floods: Essays in Honour of Marian Galik. Bern: Peter Lang, 1997.

“Chen Hengzhe.” In H.L. Boorman and R.D. Howard, eds. Biographical Dictionary of Republican China. 4 vols. NY: Columbia UP, 1967, 1: 183-87.

Ng, Janet. “Chen Hengzhe’s Fiction of Aurality: The New Feminine Strategy.” Journal of Modern Literature in Chinese 4, 2 (2000): 63-86.

—–. “A New Strategy for Autobiographical Narratives: Chen Hengzhe’s Writing of Aurality.” In Ng, The Experience of Modernity: Chinese Autobiography of the Early Twentieth Century. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2002, 21-40.

Yi, Zhuxian. “The Eternal Friendship Between Hu Shi and Chen Hengzhe.” Chinese Studies in History 37, 3 (Spring 2004): 66-86.

Chen Jingrong 陈敬容

Almberg, Shui-Pang. The Poetry of Chen Jingrong: A Modern Chinese Woman Poet. Stockholm: Foringen for Orientaliska Studier, 1988.

Meng, Liansu. “A Window to the Busy Street: Noise Pollution and Chen Jingrong’s Eco-Poetry of the 1980s.” Chinese Literature Today 5, 1 (Jan. 2015): 26-33.

Tamburello, Guisi. “Charming Connections: Chen Jingrong’s Translations as a Factor of Poetic Influence.” Chinese Literature Today 5, 1 (Jan. 2015): 18-25.

Chen Jitong 陈季同

Ren, Ke. Fin-de-Siècle Diplomat: Chen Jitong (1852-1907) and Cosmopolitan Possibilities in the Late Qing World. Ph. D. diss. Baltimore: John Hopkins University, 2014. [Dissertation Reviews review by Wen Yu]

Yeh, Catherine Vance. “The Life-Style of Four Wenren in Late Qing Shanghai.” Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies 57, 1 (1997): 419-70. [deals with Wang Tao, Chen Jitong, Zeng Pu, and Jin Songcen]

Chen Kexiong and Ma Ming 陈可雄 / 马鸣

Xiao, Hui Faye. “Science and Poetry: Narrativizing Marital Crisis in Reform-Era Rural China.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 23, 2 (Fall 2011): 146-74.

—–. “Divorcing the Rural: Miss Science and Marital Crisis in the Reform Era.” In Xiao, Family Revolution: Marital Strife in Contemporary Chinese Literature and Visual Culture. Seattle and London: University of Washington Press, 2014, 27-51.

Chen Li 陈黎

Bachner, Andrea. “The Secrets of Language: Chen Li’s Sinographic Anagrams.” In Carlos Rojas and Andrea Bachner, eds., The Oxford Handbook of Modern Chinese Literatures. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016, 112-30.

Lee, Tong King. “Toward a Material Poetics in Chinese: Text, Translation, and Technology in the Works of Chen Li.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 26, 1 (Spring 2014): 71-104.

—–. Experimental Chinese Literature: Translation, Technology, Poetics. Leiden: Brill, 2015.

[Abstract: the first theoretical account of material poetics from the dual perspectives of translation and technology. Focusing on a range of works by contemporary Chinese authors including Hsia Yü, Chen Li, and Xu Bing, Tong King Lee explores how experimental writers engage their readers in multimodal reading experiences by turning translation into a method and by exploiting various technologies. The key innovation of this book rests with its conceptualisation of translation and technology as spectrums that interact in different ways to create sensuous, embodied texts. Drawing on a broad range of fields such as literary criticism, multimodal studies, and translation, Tong King Lee advances the notion of the translational text, which features transculturality and intersemioticity in its production and reception.]

Chen Qiufan 陈楸帆 (aka Stanley Chan)

Liu, Ken. “Staying Sensitive in the Crowd: A Conversation with Chen Qiufan.” Clarkesworld Magazine 102 (March 2015).

Sun, Mengtian. “China and Chinese SF: Interview with Chen Qiufan.” MCLC Resource Center Publication (April 2017).

Chen Ran 陈然

Chen Ran’s Blog (Sina.com)

Heinrich, Larissa N. “Good-bye Mr. Nixon”: A Review of A Private Life.” MCLC Resource Center (January 2005).

Huot, Claire. “Chen Ran’s Western Footnotes.” In Huot, China’s New Cultural Scen: A Handbook of Changes. Durham: Duke UP, 2000, 36-41.

Isaacson, Nathaniel. “Chen Ran.” In Thomas Moran and Ye (Dianna) Xu, eds., Chinese Fiction Writers, 1950-2000. Dictionary of Literature Biography, vol. 370. Detroit: Thomson Gale, 2013, 29-35.

Larson, Wendy. “Women and the Discourse of Desire in Postrevolutionary China: The Awkward Postmodernism of Chen Ran.” Boundary 2 24, 3 (1997). In Xudong Zhang and Arif Dirlik, eds., Postmodernism and China. Durham: Duke UP, 2000, 337-57.

Lin, Songyu. “Interview with Chen Ran by Lin Songyu.” Tr. Chen Minglu and Damien Spry. The IIS Interview Series (Beijing—Guangzhou; December 2006).

Pozzi, Silvia. “Leaving Taboos behind: Notes on Two Novels by Chen Ran and Lin Bai.” Annali dell’Università degli Studi di Napoli L’Orientale 64 (2004): 237-45.

Schaffer, Kay and Xianlin Song. “Narrative, Trauma and Memory: Chen Ran’s APrivate Life, Tiananmen Square and Female Embodiment.” Asian Studies Review 30, 2 (June 2006): 161-173.

—–. “Writing Beyond the Wall: Translation, Cross-cultural Exchange, and Chen Ran’s A Private Life.” Portal 3, 2 (2006).

Sieber, Patricia. “Chen Ran.” In Sieber, ed. Red Is Not the Only Color: Contemporary Chinese Fiction on Love and Sex between Women, Collected Stories. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, 2001, 183-85.

Visser, Robin. “Privacy and its Ill Effects in Post-Mao Urban Fiction.” In Bonnie S. McDougall and Anders Hansson, eds. Chinese Concepts of Privacy. Leiden: Brill, 2002,171-194. [deals with texts by Chen Ran and Liu Heng, with bits on Sun Ganlu, Qiu Huadong, and Zhu Wen]

Wang, Lingzhen. “Reproducing the Self: Consumption, Imaginary, and Identity in Chinese Women’s Autobiographical Practice in the 1990ss.” In Charles Laughlin, ed., Contested Modernity in Chinese Literature. NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005, 173-92. [deals primarily with Chen Ran’s Private Life and Lin Bai’s Self at War]

Yang, Xin. “Configuring Female Sickness and Recovery: Chen Ran and Anni Baobei.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 23, 1 (Spring 2011): 169-96.

Chen Ruoxi (Ch’en Jo-hsi) 陈若曦

Duke, Michael S. “Personae: Individual and Society in Three Novels by Chen Ruoxi.” In Michael S. Duke, ed., Modern Dhinese Women Writers: Critical Appraisals. NY: M.E. Sharpe Inc., 1989, 53-77.

Hsu, Kai-yu. “A Sense of History: Reading Chen Jo-hsi’s Stories.” In Jeannette L. Faurot, ed., Chinese Fiction from Taiwan: Critical Perspectives. Bloomington: IUP, 1980, 206-33.

Kao, George, ed. Two Writers and the Cultural Revolution: Lao She and Chen Jo-hsi. HK: Chinese University Press, 1980.

Lau, Joseph S. M. “The Stories of Ch’en Juo-hsi.” In Wai-lim Yip, ed., Chinese Arts and Literature: A Survey of Recent Trends. Occasional Papers/Reprint Series in Contemporary Asian Studies. Baltimore, 1977, 5-16.

Lee, Leo Ou-fan. “Dissent Literature from the Cultural Revolution.” Chinese Literature: Essays, Articles, Reviews 1, 1 (1979): 59-79.

Leys, Simon. “Who is Chen Jo-hsi?” In Chen Jo-hsi, The Execution of Mayor Yin and Other Stories from the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution. Bloomington: IUP, 1978, xxii-xxviii.

McCarthy, Richard M. “Chen Jo-hsi: Memoirs and Notes.” Renditions 10 (Autumn 1978): 90-92.

Chen Tianhua 陳天華

Andolfatto, Lorenzo. “Making Sense of Incompleteness: Approximations of Utopia in Liang Qichao’s Xin Zhongguo Weilai Ji and Chen Tianhua’s Shizi Hou.” Ming Qing Studies (2015): 15-44.

Chen Xue 陳雪

Lee, Tong Kong. “Forbidden Imaginations: Three Chinese Narratives on Mother-Son Incest.” Chinese Literature: Essays, Articles, Reviews 36 (2014): 1-24.

[Abstract:This paper explores the representation of incest in contemporary Chinese fiction. Specifically, it looks at three short stories by Chinese woman writers, focusing its discussion on their relation to psychoanalytic models, the significance of trauma and causality and the arising discourses on incestuous desire. It asks the following questions: To what extent do incest narratives challenge or reinforce extant norms on sexual relations? What are the ethical implications of these stories for (de)situating incest within the popular erotic imagination? The analysis indicates that in articulating the occurrence of incest, different narrative trajectories project divergent discourses on consanguineous sex. The various guises in which the Oedipal narrative is replayed also reveal the tensions and anxieties involved in representing the culturally tabooed.]

Martin, Fran. “Chen Xue’s Queer Tactics.” positions: east Asia cultures critique 7, 1 (Spring 1999): 165-91.

—–. “Hybrid Citations: Chen Xue’s Queer Tactics.” In Martin, Situating Sexualities: Queer Representations in Taiwanese Fiction, Film and Public Culture. Hong Kong: University of Hong Kong Press, 2003, 119-40.

Sieber, Patricia. “Chen Xue.” In Sieber, ed. Red Is Not the Only Color: Contemporary Chinese Fiction on Love and Sex between Women, Collected Stories. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, 2001, 185-86.

Tan, E. K. “From Exile to Queer Homecoming: Chen Xue’s A Wife’s Diary.” In Carlos Rojas and Andrea Bachner, eds., The Oxford Handbook of Modern Chinese Literatures. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016, 770-96.

Chen Yinke 陳寅恪

Xia, Zhongyi and Brian Skerratt. “Against the Grain of History: In Search of Humanity in the Mao Era: The Contemporary Classical Poetry of Chen Yinke, Nie Gannu, and Wang Xindi.” Journal of Chinese Literature and Culture 3, 2 (Nov. 2016): 429-47.

[Abstract: This article argues that the classical verse of three twentieth-century writers, Chen Yinke 陳寅恪 (1890–1969), Nie Gannu 聶紺弩 (1903–86), and Wang Xindi 王辛笛 (1912–2004), is significant to the canon of contemporary Chinese literature. The literary historical merit of their poetry is due not only to its aesthetic accomplishments but even more to the poets’ specific responses to the challenges posed to human dignity during the thought reform campaigns of the 1950s and the Cultural Revolution. Whereas Chen Yinke’s last twenty years demonstrate the faith and hauteur of a scholar who wore the mantle of the entire classical tradition, Nie Gannu expresses the deepest despair through deceptively humorous rustic topics, and Wang Xindi’s grief over separation and loss recall Du Fu’s poetry of the An Lushan Rebellion. Although the thirty years between the establishment of the People’s Republic of China through the end of the Cultural Revolution may have been a time when intellectuals were intimidated into conformity or silence, these three poets show that such hardship created an opportunity to exalt the spirit of individual dignity, if only through poetry.

Chen Yingsong 陈应松

Chen, Lily Hong Chen. “Between Animalizing Nature and Dehumanizing Culture: Reading Yingsong Chen’s Shennongjia Stories.” In Simon C. Estok and Won-Chung Kim, eds.,East Asian Ecocriticisms: A Critical Reader. NY: Palgrave MacMillan, 2013.

Chen Yingzhen (Ch’en Ying-chen) 陈映真

Chen, Li-fen. Fictionality and Reality in Narrative Discourse: A Reading of Four Contemporary Taiwanese Writers. Ph. D. diss. Seattle: University of Washington, 2000.[chapters on Ch’en Ying-chen, Ch’i-Teng Sheng, Wang Chen-ho, and Wang Wen-hsing; available through Dissertation.com]

Kinkley, Jeffrey. “From Oppression to Dependency: Two Stages in the Fiction of Chen Yingzhen.” Modern China 16 (1990): 243-68.

Lau, Joseph S.M. “Death in the Void: Three Tales of Spiritual Atrophy in Ch’en Ying-chen’s Post-Incarceration Fiction.” Modern Chinese Literature 2 (1986): 21-28.

—–. “How Much Truth Can a Blade of Grass Carry?: Ch’en Ying-chen and the Emergence of Native Taiwan Writers.” Journal of Asian Studies 32, 4 (Aug. 1973): 623-38.

—–. “Ch’en Ying-chen and Other Native Writers.” In Winston L.Y. Yang and Nathan K. Mao, eds., Modern Chinese Fiction: A Guide to Its Study and Appreciation Essays and Bibliographies. Boston: G.K. Hall and Co., 1981, 79-94.

Lupke, Christopher. “Chen Yingzhen.” In Thomas Moran and Ye (Dianna) Xu, eds., Chinese Fiction Writers, 1950-2000. Dictionary of Literature Biography, vol. 370. Detroit: Thomson Gale, 2013, 36-46.

Miller, Lucien. “A Break in the Chain: The Short Stories of Ch’en Ying-chen.” In Jeannette L. Faurot, ed., Chinese Fiction from Taiwan: Critical Perspectives. Bloomington: IUP, 1980, 86-109.

—-. “Introduction.” In Exiles at Home: Short Stories By Ch’en Ying-chen. Trans. and ed. by Lucien Miller. Ann Arbor : Michigan Center for Chinese Studies, University of Michigan, 1986, 1-26.

—–. “Occidentalism and Alterity: Native Self and Foreign Other in Chen Yingzhen and Shusaku Endo.” Chinoperl Papers 20-22 (1997-99): 197-218.

Pieper, Anke. Der taiwanesische Autor Chen Yingzhen–mit einer Ubersetzung der Erzahlung ‘Wolken’. Bochum: Brockmeyer, 1987.

Riep, Steven. “Piecing Together the Past: The Notion of Recovery in Fiction and Film from Taiwan.” Modern China 38, 2 (March 2012): 199-232.

[Abstract: Writers and filmmakers in Taiwan have sought to use the narrative techniques of classic detective fiction to recover events of the Nationalist government-imposed White Terror of the early 1950s to bring the once-concealed past to light. Fiction writer Chen Yingzhen (Ch’en Ying-chen) pioneered this technique in short fiction written in 1983 to bring before the public the events of the White Terror and to consider how guilt for the atrocities should be affixed. Wan Jen’s (Wan Ren) 1995 feature film Super Citizen Ko explores possibilities for memorialization and the notion of victimhood in its recovery of the Nationalist repression of progressive political movements and its impact on a former political prisoner and his family. Finally, Tseng Wen-Chen (Zeng Wenzhen) in her documentary Spring: The Story of Xu Jinyu offers a portrait of a woman White Terror survivor turned political activist living in an era when the White Terror has been commemorated but remains poorly understood by the younger generation.]

Robinson, Lewis S. “The Treatment of Christianity in the Fiction of Chen Yingchen.” Ching Feng: Quarterly Notes on Christianity and Chinese Religion and Culture 32, 1 (Mar. 1989): 41-81.

Shieh, Wen-shan. “Ideology, Sublimation, Violence: The Transformation of Heroines in Chen Ying-chen’s Suicidal Narratives.” Tamkang Review 32, 2 (Winter 2001): 153-74.

Wang, David Der-wei. “Three Hungry Women.” Boundary 2. Special Issue ed. Rey Chow. 25, 2 (Fall 1998): 47-76. [deals in part with Chen’s “Mountain Path”]

Yang, Xiaobin. “Telling (Hi)story: Illusory Truth or True Illusion.” Tamkan Review 21, 2 (1990): 127-47.

Chen Yun 陈耘

Tang, Xiaobing. “The Lyrical Age and Its Discontents: On the Staging of Socialist New China in The Young Generation.” In Tang, Chinese Modernism: The Heroic and the Quotidian. Durham: Duke UP, 2000, 163-95.

Chen Zhongshi 陈忠实

Huang, Yiju. “Plain, Time, and Catastrophe: An Interview with Chen Zhongshi.” MCLC Resource Center Publications (August, 2013).

Cheng Fangwu 成仿吾

Galik, Marian. “Ch’eng Fangwu and his Development from Soci-aesthetic to ‘Total Criticism.'” In Galik, The Genesis of Modern Chinese Literary Criticism, 1917-1930. London: Curzon Press, 1980, 63-103.

Cheng Naishan 程乃珊

Bi, Bingbin. “Shanghai’s Magic: A Day-and-Night Stream.” In Cheng Naishan, The Blue House. Beijing: Chinese Literature, 1989, 7-14.

Cheng Xiaoqing (Ch’eng Hsiao-ch’ing) 程小青

Tam, King-fai. “The Detective Fiction of Ch’eng Hsiao-ch’ing.” Asia Major 1 (1992): 113-32.

Weisl, Annabella. Cheng Xiaogqing (1893-1976) and His Detective Stories in Modern Shanghai. Norderstedt: Grin, 1998.

Wong, Timothy C. “Cheng Xiaoqing.” In Dictionary of Literary Biography–Chinese Fiction Writers, 1900-1949. Ed. Thomas Moran. NY: Thomson Gale, 2007, 43-52.

Chi Li 池莉

Gong, Haoming. “Constructing a Neo-Realist Reality: Petty Urbanites, Mundaneness, and Chi Li’s Fiction.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 22, 1 (Spring 2010): 59-95

Kunze, Rui. “Chi Li.” In Thomas Moran and Ye (Dianna) Xu, eds., Chinese Fiction Writers, 1950-2000. Dictionary of Literature Biography, vol. 370. Detroit: Thomson Gale, 2013, 47-53.

Lee, Lily Xiao-hong. “Localization and Globalization: Dichotomy and Convergence in Chi Li’s Fiction.” Canadian Review of Comparative Literature (Dec. 1997): 913-26.

Lu, Hongwei. “TV Romance and Popular Cultural Mood: The Chi Li Phenomenon.” The China Review 6, no. 1 (Spring 2006): 125-152.

Lu, Jie. “Cultural Invention and Cultural Intervention: Reading Chinese Urban Fiction of the Nineties.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 13, 1 (Spring 2001): 107-39.

McClellan, Tommy. “Urban Alienation and Urban Culture in the Fiction of Wang Shuo and Chi Li.” In Papers from the XIII EACS Conference: The Spirit of the Metropolis, Universitá degli Studi di Torino, 2000. Turin, 2002 [CD-ROM, ISBN 88-900888-0-X].

Xiao, Hui Faye. “Utopia or Distopia? The Sisterhood of Divorced Women.” In Xiao, Family Revolution: Marital Strife in Contemporary Chinese Literature and Visual Culture. Seattle and London: University of Washington Press, 2014, 85-115.

Chi Lingyun 池凌雲

Wu, Shengqing and Eleanor Goodman. “Dangerous Light: Chi Lingyun and her Poetry.” Chinese Literature Today 4, 2 (2014): 56-61.

Chun Shu 春树

Hillenbrand, Margaret. “Murakami Haruki in Greater China: Creative Responses and the Quest for Cosmopolitanism.” Journal of Asian Studies 68, 3 (2009): 715-747. [deals in part with Chun Shu’s fiction]

Shao Yanjun. “A Study of the Phenomenon of ‘Pretty Women’s Writing’: Weihui, Mianmian, Chunshu.” Wasafiri 55 (2008): 13-18.

Cong Weixi 从维熙

Liu, Shaotang. “A Profile of Cong Weixi.” Chinese Literature 4 (April 1980): 57-60.

Cui Zi’en 崔子恩

Wang, Qi. “The Ruin Is Already a New Outcome: An Interview with Cui Zi’en.” positions: east asia cultures critique 12, 1 (Spring 2004): 181-94.


D

Dai Houying 戴厚英

Knight, Sabina. “Historical Trauma and Humanism in Post-Mao Realism.” In The Heart of Time: Moral Agency in Twentieth-Century Chinese Fiction. Cambridge: Harvard University Asia Center, 2006, 162-190. [deals with Dai’s Humanity, O Humanity (171-85) and Soft is the Chain (185-90)]

Pruyn, Carolyn S. Humanism in Modern Chinese Literature: The Case of Dai Houying. Bochum: Brockmeyer (Chinathenmen), 1988.

Wang, David D.W. “Tai Hou-ying, Feng Chi-ts’ai, and Ah Ch’eng: Three Approaches to the Historical Novel.” Asian Culture Quarterly 15, 2 (1988): 71-88.

Dai Qing 戴晴

Barme, Geremie. “Using the Past to Serve the Present: Dai Qing’s Historiographic Dissent.” East Asian History 1 (June 1991): 141-81.

Barme, Geremie and Linda Jaivin. New Ghosts, Old Dreams: Chinese Rebel Voices. NY: Times Books, 1992, 358-62.

Wandel, Elke. “Dai Qing: A Portrait.” In China for Women: Travel and Culture. NY: The Feminist Press, 1995, 201-04

Dai Wangshu 戴望舒

Lee, Gregory. Dai Wangshu: The Life and Poetry of a Chinese Modernist. HK: The Chinese University Press,1989. [a study with extensive translations]

Lee, Gregory. “Western Influences in the Poetry of Dai Wangshu.” Modern Chinese Literature 3, 1/2 (1987): 7-32.

Mi, Jiayan. Self-Fashioning and Reflexive Modernity in Modern Chinese Poetry. Lewiston, NY: Edwin Mellen, 2004.

[Abstract: This study explores diverse modes of self-fashioning in the discursive formation of Chinese modernity between 1919 and 1949 in modern Chinese poetry. By focusing on four representative poets of modern Chinese poetry before 1949—Guo Moruo, Li Jinfa, Dai Wangshu, and Mu Dan, the study offers fresh, insightful analysis of the dynamic trajectory of the historical complexity of fashioning a new modern self-subjectivity with relation to the nation-state. Theoretically informed by the varied perspectives of modernity, the self, the body, and memory, the author for the first time reveals how the corporeal body emerges as a site of agency, trauma, and libidinal investment for engaging with the configuration of a multi-layered self, gender, and nationhood in modern China. This work will make several significant contributions to enhancing readers’ understanding of the cultural and psychological complexity of modern China. This work will be of interest to teachers, students and scholars of modern Chinese literature and culture as well as comparative literature.]

Dan Di 但娣

Smith, Norman. “The Difficulties of Despair: Dan Di and Chinese Literary Production in Manchukuo.” Journal of Women’s Studies 18, 1 (2006): 77-100.

Deng Tuo 邓拓

Cheek, Timothy. Propaganda and Culture in Mao’s China: Deng Tuo and the Intelligentsia. Oxford: Clarendon Press; New York: Oxford University Press, 1997.

Chuang, H. C. Evening Chats at Yenshan, or the Case of Teng T’o. Studies in Chinese Communist Terminology, no. 14. Berkeley: Center for Chinese Studies, University of California, 1970.

Deng Youmei 邓友梅

Rees, Robert A. “A Conversation with Deng Youmei, Secretary of the Chinese Writer’s Association.” Weber Studies 10, 3 (Fall 1993).

Yang, Gladys. “Deng Youmei and His Fiction.” In Yang Bian, ed., The Time is Not Ripe: Contemporary China’s Best Writers and Their Stories. Beijing: FLP, 1991, 41-47.

Ding Ling 丁玲

Alber, Charles J. “Ting Ling and the Front Service Corps.” In La litterature au temps de la Geurre de Resistance contre le Japon de 1937 a 1945. Paris: Editions de la Fondation Singer-Polignac, 1982, 117-30.

—–. Enduring the Revolution: Ding Ling and the Politics of Literature in Guomindang China. Westport, CT: Praeger, 2002.

—–. Embracing the Life: Ding Ling and the Politics of Literature in the PRC. Westport, CT: Praeger, 2004.

Anderson, Colena M. “A Study of Two Modern Chinese Women: Ping Hsin and Ting Ling.” Ph.D. Dissertation. Pomona: Claremont Graduate School and University Center, 1954.

Barlow, Tani. “‘Thoughts on March 8’ and the Literary Expression of Ding Ling’s Feminism.” In La litterature au temps de la Geurre de Resistance contre le Japon de 1937 a 1945. Paris: Editions de la Fondation Singer-Polignac, 1982, 131-44.

—–. “Gender and Identity in Ding Ling’s ‘Mother.'” Modern Chinese Literature 2, 2 (1986): 123-42.

—–. “Feminism and Literary Technique in Ting Ling’s Early Short Stories.” In A. Palandri, ed. Women Writers of 20-Century China. Eugene: Asian Studies Publications, University of Oregon, 1982, 63-110.

Bjorge, Gary J. “‘Sophia’s Diary’: An Introduction.” Tamkang Review 5, 1 (1974): 97-110.

—–. “Ting Ling’s Early Years: Her Life and Literature through 1942.” Ph.D. Dissertation. Madison: University of Wisconsin, 1977.

Chang, Jun-mei. Ting Ling, Her Life and Her Work. Taipei: Institute of International Relations, 1978.

Chien, Ying-ying. “Women Crossing the Wild Zone: Sexual/Textual Politics in the Fiction of Ding Ling and Li Ang.” Fu Jen Studies 28 (1995): 1-17.

Dien, Dora Shu-fang. “Ding Ling and ‘Miss Sophie’s Diary’: A Psychobiographical Study of Adolescent Identity Formation.” Making Meaning of Narratives: The Narrative Study of Lives 6: 221-237.

—–. Ding Ling and Her Mother: A Cultural Psychological Study. Huntinton, NY: Nova Science, 2001.

Feng, Jin. “The ‘Bold Modern Girl’: Ding Ling’s Early Fiction.” In Feng, The New Woman in Early Twentieth-Century Chinese Fiction. West Lafayette, IN: Purdue University Press, 2001, 149-70.

—–. “The Revolutionary Age: Ding Ling’s Fiction of the Early 1930s.” In Feng, The New Woman in Early Twentieth-Century Chinese Fiction. West Lafayette, IN: Purdue University Press, 2001, 171-88.

—–. “Ding Ling in Yan’an: A New Woman within the Part Structure?” In Feng, The New Woman in Early Twentieth-Century Chinese Fiction. West Lafayette, IN: Purdue University Press, 2001, 189-96,

Feng, Xiaxiong. “Ding Ling’s Reappearance on the Literary Stage.” Chinese Literature 1 (1980): 3-16.

Feng, Hsueh-feng. “On The Sun Shines over the Sangkan River.” In Hualing Nieh, ed., Literature of the Hundred Flowers, Volume II: Poetry and Fiction. NY: Columbia UP, 1981, 257-65.

Feuerwerker, Yi-tsi Mei. Ding Ling’s Fiction: Ideology and Narrative in Modern Chinese Literature. Cambridge: Harvard UP, 1982.

—–. “The Changing Relationship between Literature and Life: Aspects of the Writer’s Role in Ding Ling [Ting Ling].” In Merle Goldman, ed. Modern Chinese Literature in the May Fourth Era. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1977, 281-307.

—–. “Ting Ling’s ‘When I was in Sha Chuan (Cloud Village)’.” Signs, Journal of Women in Culture and Society 2, 1 (1976): 255-79.

—–. “The Uses of Literature: Ding Ling in Yan’an.” In W. Kubin and R. Wagner, eds., Essays in Contemporary Chinese Literature and Literary Criticism. Bochum: Brockmeyer, 1981.

He, Jixian and Lu Taiguang. “One Village and One Novel: Revisiting Wenquantun Village.” In Xueping Zhong and Ban Wang, eds. Debating the Socialist Legacy and Capitalist Globalization in China. NY: Palgrave MacMillan, 2014, 57-72. [deals with The Sun Shines on the Sanggan River]

Hodges, Eric. Messianism in Ding Ling and Zhou Libo’s Novels: A Study of The Sun Shines over the Sanggan River and The Hurricane and Their Literary and Philosophical Milieu. Saarbrücken: LAP Lambert Academic Publishing, 2012.

Huang, Xincun. “Politics, Gender and Literary Writings: A Study of Ding Ling in the Early 1940s.” Journal of Asian Culture 14 (1990): 33-54.

Kinkley, Jeffrey. “Echoes of Maxim Gorky in the Works of Ding Ling and Shen Congwen.” In Marian Galik, ed., Interliterary and Intraliterary Aspects of the May Fourth Movement 1919 in China. Bratislava: Veda, 1990, 179-88.

Kubin, Wolfgang. “Sexuality and Literature in the People’s Republic of China, Problems of the Chinese woman before and after 1949 as seen in Ding Ling’s ‘Diary of Sophia’ (1928) and Xi Rong’s story ‘An Unexceptional Post’ (1962).” In Wolfgang Kubin and Rudolf G. Wagner, eds., Essays in Modern Chinese Literature and Literary Criticism. Bochum: Brockmeyer, 1982, 168-91.

—–. “Ding Ling’s Yan’an Short Story ‘The Night’ (1940).” in La litterature chinoise au temps de la guerre de resistance contre le Japon. Paris: Editions de la Fondation Singer- Polignac, 1982, 147-53.

Lai, Amy Tak-yee. “Liberation, Confusion, Imprisonment: The Female Self in Ding Ling’s ‘Diary of Miss Sophie’ and Zhang Jie’s ‘Love Must Not Be Forgotten.'” Comparative Literatue and Culture 3 (Sept. 1998): 88-103.

Lo, Man Wa. “Female Selfhood and Initiation in Shen Congwen’s The Border Town and Ding Ling’s The Girl Ah Mao.” Chinese/International Comparative Literature Bulletin 1 (1996): 20-33.

Mao, Tun et al. “Excerpts from Criticism of Ding Ling.” In Hualing Nieh, ed., Literature of the Hundred Flowers, Volume II: Poetry and Fiction. NY: Columbia UP, 1981, 266-72.

Moran, Thomas. “Ding Ling.” In Dictionary of Literary Biography–Chinese Fiction Writers, 1900-1949. Ed. Thomas Moran. NY: Thomson Gale, 2007, 53-65.

Shen, Congwen. Ji Ding Ling (Remembering Ding Ling). Shanghai: Liangyou, 1934.

Schonebaum, Andrew. “Vectors of Contagion and Tuberculosis in Modern Chinese Literature.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 23, 1 (Spring 2011): 17-46.

Tang, Xiaobing. “Shanghai Spring 1930: Engendering the Revolutionary Body.” In Chinese Modernism: The Heroic and the Quotidian. Durham: Duke UP, 2000, 97-130.

Wang, Ban. “Passion and Politics in Revolution: A Psychoanalytic Reading of Ding Ling.” In Carlos Rojas and Andrea Bachner, eds., The Oxford Handbook of Modern Chinese Literatures. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016, 746-65.

Wang, Shunzhu. “The Double-Voiced Feminine Discouses in Ding Ling’s ‘Miss Sophie’s Diary’ and Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God.” Tamkang Review 27, 1 (1997): 133-158.

Wang, Xiaojue. “Over Her Dead Body: Ding Ling’s Politicization after the Socialist Revolution.” In Wang, Modernity with a Cold War Face: Reimagining the Nation in Chinese Literature Across the 1949 Divide. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Asia Center, 2013, 108-54. [MCLC Resource Center review by Jeffrey C. Kinkley]

Yan, Haiping. “Rhythm of the Unreal [I]: Early Ding Ling and a Feminist Passage.” In Yan, Chinese Women Writers and the Feminist Imagination, 1905-1948. London: Routledge, 2006, 168-99.

—–. “Rhythms of the Unreal [II]: The Ding Ling Story and the Chinese Revolution.” In Yan, Chinese Women Writers and the Feminist Imagination, 1905-1948. London: Routledge, 2006, 200-40.

Yuan Liangjun. “On the Fiction of Ding Ling.” Tr. Song Xianchun. Social Sciences in China 7, 3 (1986): 131-50.

Zhang, Jingyuan. “Feminism and Revolution: The Work and Life of Ding Ling.” In Joshua Mostow, ed, and Kirk A. Denton, China section, ed., Columbia Companion to Modern East Asian Literatures. NY: Columbia UP, 2003, 395-400. Rpt in Kirk A. Denton, ed., Columbia Companion to Modern Chinese Literature. NY: Columbia University Press, 2016, 152-58.

Zhou Liangpei. Ding Ling zhuan (Biography of Ding Ling). Beijing: Beijing shiyue wenyi, 1993.

Ding Mang

Wang, Shu and I Sha. “Vulgar Feelings and Gloomy Heart.” In Hualing Nieh, ed., Literature of the Hundred Flowers, Volume II: Poetry and Fiction. NY: Columbia UP, 1981, 181-86.

Ding Wenjiang 丁文江

Fiskesjö, Magnus and Chen Xingcan. China Before China: Johan Gunnar Andersson, Ding Wenjiang and the Discovery of China’s Prehistory. Bilingual ed. Stockholm: Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities, 2004.

Furth, Charlotte. Ting Wen-chiang: Science and China’s New Culture. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1970.

Ding Xilin 丁西林

Herd, Ruth and Zhang Jian. “Wildean Echoes in the Plays of Ding Xilin.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 22, 1 (Spring 2010): 162-96.

Lau, Joseph S.M. “Oppression as a Situational Comedy: A Note on the Stagecraft of Ting Hsi-lin.” In William Nienhauser, Jr., ed., Critical Essays on Chinese Literature. HK: Chinese UP, 1976, 113-34.

Rea, Christopher. “Three Dollars in National Currency: A One-Act Comedy by Ding Xilin.” Asian Theater Journal 25, 2 (Fall 2008): 173-92.

Weinstein, John B. “Dong Xilin and Chen Baichen: Building a Modern Theater through Comedy.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 20, 2 (Fall 2008): 92-130.

Weinstein, John B. and Carsey Yee. “Introduction to the Translation of ‘Flushed with Wine’: Reclaiming Amateur Drama.” MCLC Resource Center Publication (March 2004).

Dong Hong 东虹

Dong, Hong. “My Stories.” Chinese Literature (Spring 1997).

Dong Qizhang (Dung Kai-cheung) 董启章

Rojas, Carlos. “‘Symptom of an Era’: Dung Kai-Cheung’s Histories of Time.Frontiers of Literary Studies of China 10, 1 (2016): 133-49.

[Abstract: This essay uses the notion of a symptom to examine the ways in which temporality is deployed in Hong Kong author Dung Kai-Cheung’s 2007 novel, Histories of Time. In particular, the essay follows Dung’s own lead, in Histories of Time, and considers the peculiar temporality implicit in the concept of figuration in Biblical hermeneutics, wherein the “figure” mediates between the two distinct—yet structurally related—temporalities of the Old and the New Testaments: the “prefiguration” of the Old Testament and the “fulfillment of figuration” of the New Testament. I propose that a literary “figure,” in Dung’s work, similarly mediates between the different temporal planes within his novel, while at the same time mediating between the fictional space of the novel and the historical era within which the work is positioned. Just as a symptom is simultaneously a function of—but also structurally external to—the underlying condition that it signifies, this sort of literary figure may similarly be seen as a function of—but simultaneously external to—the historical era to which it corresponds. This sort of literary figure, accordingly, marks a point of rupture within the temporality of the novel and its corresponding era, while at the same time providing the ground on which that temporal continuum is established in the first place.]

—–. “On Time: Anticipatory Nostalgia in Dung Kai-Cheung’s Fiction.” In Carlos Rojas and Andrea Bachner, eds., The Oxford Handbook of Modern Chinese Literatures. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016, 847-65.

Tam, Kwok-kan. “Desire, Fear and Gender in Dong Qizhang’s Novel Dual Body.” In Kwok-kan Tam and Terry Siu-han Yip, eds., Gender, Discourse and the Self in Literature: Issues in Mainland China, Taiwan and Hong Kong: HK: The Chinese University Press, 2009, 217-24.

Wang, David Der-wei. “A Hong Kong Miracle of a Different Kind.” Tr. Caroline Mason. China Perspectives 1 (2011): 80-85.

Dou Dou 豆豆

Zhou, Zuyan. “Dao and Reconstruction of Cultural Identity in Contemporary Chinese Literary and Mass Media Products.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 28, 2  (Fall 2016): 223-284.

Du Pengcheng 杜鹏程

n.a. “Crush Peng Te-huai’s ‘Rebellious Dispositions’–thoroughly criticize and repudiate the anti-party novel Defense of Yenan.” Selections from Mainland Magazines 606 (Dec. 18, 1967): 11-16.

Li, Peter. “War and Modernity in Chinese Military Fiction.” Society 34, 5 (July 1997): 77-89. [deals in part with Du Pengcheng’s Defend Yan’an and Wu Qiang’s Red Sun]

Duanmu Hongliang 端木蕻良

Hsia, C.T. “The Novels of Tuan-mu Hung-liang.” In Joseph S.M. Lau and Leo Ou-fan Lee, eds., Critical Persuasions, forthcoming.

—–. “The Korchin Banner Plains: A Biographical and Critical Study.” in La Litterature Chinoise au Temps de la Guerre de Resistance contre Japon (de 1937 a 1945). Paris, Editions de la Fondation Singer-Polignac, 1982, 31-56.

Kong, Haili. “The Spirit of ‘Native-Soil’ in the Fictional World of Duanmu Hongliang and Mo Yan.” China Information 11, 4 (Spring 1997): 58-67.

—–. “In Memorianm: Duanmu Hongliang (1912-1996).” China Information 11, 4 (Spring 1997): 58-67.

—–. “What Did Literary Patronage Mean to an Individualistic Writer in the 1930s: The Case of Duamu Honglian.” Journal of Modern Literature in Chinese 2, 1 (July 1998): 31-52.

Duo Duo 多多

Huang, Yibing. “Duo Duo: An Impossible Farewell, or, Exile between Revolution and Modernism.” Amerasia Journal 27, 2 (2001): 64-85.

—–. “Duo Duo: An Impossible Farewell, or, Exile between Revolution and Modernism.” In Huang, Contemporary Chinese Literature: From the Cultural Revolution to the Future. NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007.

Mai, Mang (Yibing Huang). “Duo Duo: Master of Wishful Thinking.” World Literature Today (March/April 2011): 48-50.

Tan, Chee-Lay. Constructing a System of Irregularities: The Poetry of Bei Dao, Duoduo and Yang Lian. Ph. D. diss. Cambridge: Cambridge University, 2007.

Van Crevel, Maghiel. “Man and Nature, Man and Man: Aspects of Duoduo’s Poetry.” In Lloyd Haft, ed., Words from the West: western texts in Chinese literary context: essays to honor Erik Zurcher on his sixty-fifth birthday. Leiden: CNWS Publications, 1993, 100-15.

—–. Language Shattered: Contemporary Chinese Poetry and Duoduo. Leiden: CNWS Research School, 1996.

Yeh, Michelle. “‘Monologue of a Stormy Soul’: The Poetry and Poetics of Duo Duo, 1972-1988.” World Literature Today (March/April 2011): 51-57.


E

Er Yuehe 二月河

Zhou, Baiyi. “Er Yuehe and Contemporary Historical Novels.” Tr. Zhang Siying.Chinese Literature (Autumn 1998).


F

Fan Wen 范稳

Humes, Bruce. “Interview with Chinese Novelsit Fan Wen: A Century of Cultural Collisions in Shangri-la.” Ethnic ChinaLit: Writing by/about non-Han Peoples of China.

Fang Fang 方方

Guo, Li. “The Aesthetics of Hysteria in Fang Fang’s Water under Time (2008).” Frontiers of Literary Studies in China 11, 1 (2017): 73-105.

[AbstractWater under Time, the novel by the reputed Chinese fiction writer Fang Fang, appropriates and reconstructs the conventions of the hysteric narrative as an affective form of feminine history telling and writing. The novel, which accounts Hankou city’s past through the heroine’s life story, illustrates how feminine hysteria provides a gendered lens of reconstructed historical authenticity via the panorama of China’s early Republican period, the anti‐Japanese War, and the present new millennium. Transcending the official historical accounts, Fang Fang’s narrative features women’s innovative reconfiguration of contesting historical discourses about the city, the community, and the nation. This study of Water under Time suggests that women’s explorations of hysteria actually surpass the psychoanalytical reading of hysteria as paradigms of feminine bodily, sexual, and social abjection, and instead envisions it as a validating narrative aesthetic which carries the potential to rewrite the boundaries of gender, nation, and history.]

Wu, Lijuan. “Fang Fang, Reflecting Her Times.” Tr. Li Ziliang. Chinese Literature (Summer 1997).

Fang Ji 方纪

Decker, Margeret. “Living in Sin: From May Fourth via the Antirightist Movement to the Present.” In Ellen Widmer and David Wang, eds., From May Fourth to June Fourth: Fiction and Film in Twentiety-Century China. Cambridge: Harvard UP, 1993, 221-46.

Fang Lingru 方令孺

Wagner, Alexandra R. “Tradition as Construct and the Search for a Modern Identity: A Reading of Traditional Gestures in Modern Chinese Essays of Place.” In Martin Woesler, ed., The Modern Chinese Literary Essay: Defining the Chinese Self in the 20th Century. Bochum: Bochum UP, 2000, 133-46. [deals with Yu Dafu, Zhu Ziqing, and Fang Lingru]

Fei Dao 飞刀

Ash, Alec. “Science Fiction in China: A Conversation with Fei Dao.” LA Review of Books (May 1, 2013).

Fei Ming 废名

see Feng Wenbing

Feng Jicai 冯骥才

Altenburger, Roland. “Feng Jicai.” In Thomas Moran and Ye (Dianna) Xu, eds., Chinese Fiction Writers, 1950-2000. Dictionary of Literature Biography, vol. 370. Detroit: Thomson Gale, 2013, 54-64.

Braester, Yomi and Zhang Enhua. “The Future of China’s Memories: An Interview with Feng Jicai.” Journal of Modern Literature in Chinese 5, 2 (2002): 131-48.

Feng Jicai’s Blog (Sina.com)

Gaenssbauer, Monika. “The Cultural Revolution in Feng Jicai’s Fiction.” In Woei Lian Chong, ed., China’s Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution: Master Narratives and Post-Mao Counternarratives. Lanham: Rowman and Littlefield, 2002, 319-44.

Li, Jun. “Feng Jicai: A Giant of a Writer in More Ways Than One.” In Yang Bian, ed., The Time is Not Ripe: Contemporary China’s Best Writers and Their Stories. Beijing: FLP, 1991, 78-84.

Martin, Helmut. “What If History Has Merely Played a Trick on Us? Feng Chi-ts’ai’s Writing, 1979-1984.” In Reform and Revolution in Twentieth Century China. Taipei: Institute of International Relations, 1987, 277-90. Rpt as a book: Taipei: Institute of International Relations, National Cheng-chi University, 1987.

Wang, David. “Tai Hou-ying, Feng Chi-Ts’ai and Ah Cheng: Three Approaches to the Historical Novel.” Asian Culture Quarterly 16, 2 (1988): 70-88.

Zhang, Zhen. “Reimagining the Soviet Union in Contemporary Chinese Literature: Soviet Ji in Wang Meng’s In Remembrance of the Soviet Union and Feng Jicai’s Listening to Russia.” Frontiers of Literary Studies in China 8, 4 (2014): 598-616.

[Abstract: An examination of Soviet nostalgia—nostalgia for the times when the People’s Republic of China (PRC) had a close relationship with the Soviet Union, as it appears in contemporary discourses that reimagine the Soviet Union, is essential to understand the quotidian aspect and cultural history of the PRC in the 1950s, as well as cultural attitudes in contemporary China. Wang Meng’s In Remembrance of the Soviet Union (2007) and Feng Jicai’s Listening to Russia (2005) are characterized by nostalgia for the lost Soviet Union, which exerted a strong influence on the PRC during the 1950s. In contemporary China, where the market economy is the dominant mode of production, Wang and Feng’s Soviet nostalgia is a gesture of yearning for a type of historical temporality that has seemingly been lost. Their works express the desire to reclaim the historical past of the 1950s, which they portray as having been completely erased by the developmental logic of late-capitalism—the authentic cultural experiences in the 1950s, especially the everyday life along with the revolutionary ideals are rendered unreal within the post-revolutionary logic. The concept of Soviet “ji” (祭, “remembrance”) provides a theoretical framework through which to understand the way in which the phenomenon of Chinese nostalgia has the potential to shift contemporary social reality.]

Feng Naichao 冯乃超

Galik, Marian. “The Red Gauze Lantern of Feng Naich’ao.” Asian and African Studies, 10 (1974): 69-95.

—–. “Feng Naich’ao’s The Red Gauze Lantern and French Symbolism.” In Galik, ed., Milestones in Sino-Western Literary Confrontation (1898-1979). Weisbaden: Otto Harrassowitz, 1986, 135-52.

—–. “Feng Nai-ch’ao, Li Ch’u-li and their Leftis Theory of Art and Literature.” In Galik, The Genesis of Modern Chinese Liteary Criticism (1917-1930). London: Curzon Press, 1980, 308-20.

Feng Wenbing 冯文炳

Dang, Shengyuan and Gao Jie. “About Fei Ming.” Tr. Li Guoqing. Chinese Literature (Spring 1990): 123-27.

Gunn, Edward. Rewriting Chinese: Style and Innovation in Twentieth-Century Chinese Prose. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1991, 125-29, 284-86.

Lee, Haiyan. “The Other Chinese: Romancing the Folk in May Fourth Native Soil Fiction.” Concentric: Literary and Cultural Studies ( special issue: “Ethics and Ethnicity”) 33, 2 (Sept. 2007): 9-34. [Deals with the works of Yang Zhensheng, Fei Ming, and Shen Congwen.]

Li, Ningyi. “Fei Ming’s Short Stories: A Poetry of Folk Elements.” Studies on Asia Series II, 2, 2 (Fall 2005): 112-25.

Liu, Haoming. “Fei Ming’s Poetics of Representation: Dream, Fantasy, Illusion, and Alayavijnana.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 13, 2 (Fall 2001): 30- 71.

—–. Transformation of Childhood Experience: Rainer Maria Rilke and Fei Ming. Ph.d. diss. New Haven: Yale University, 2001.

Liu, Jianmei. “Fei Ming: From Artistic Transcendence to Political Kitsch.” In Liu, Zhuangzi and Modern Chinese Literature. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016, 126-40.

Ogawa, Toshiyasu. “The Methodology of Fei Ming’s Bridge–With Reference to the Influence from Kuriyagawa Hakuson.” Journal of Modern Literature in Chinese 12, 2  (Summer 2015): 12-26.

Shih, Shu-mei. “Writing English with a Chinese Brush: The Work of Fei Ming.” In Shi, The Lure of the Modern: Writing Modernism in Semicolonial China, 1917-1937. Berkeley: UC Press, 2001, 190-203.

Feng Xuefeng 冯雪峰

n.a. “Criticism of the Writer Feng Xuefeng.” Survey of the China Mainland Press 1607 (Sept. 11, 1957): 6-12.

Ho, Ch’i-fang. “The Anti-Party, Anti-Marxist Literary and Social Thought of Feng Hsueh-feng.” In Hualing Nieh, ed. and co-trans., Literature of the Hundred Flowers Volume II: Poetry and Fiction. NY: Columbia University Press, 1981, 310.

Feng Yuanjun 冯沅君

Feng, Jin. “Sentimental Autobiographies: Feng Yuanjun, Lu Yin and the New Woman.” In Feng, The New Woman in Early Twentieth-Century Chinese Fiction. West Lafayette, IN: Purdue University Press, 2004, 126-148.

Feng Zhi 冯至

Cheung, Dominic. Feng Chih. Boston: Twayne, 1979.

Fiss, Geraldine. “From Du Fu to Rilke and Back: Feng Zhi’s Modernist Aesthetics and Poetic Practice.” In Chinese Poetic Modernisms. Leiden: Brill, forthcoming.

Galik, Marian. “Feng Chih’s Sonnets: the Interliterary Relations with German Romanticism, Rilke and van Gogh.” In Galik, ed., Milestones in Sino-Western Literary Confrontation (1898-1979). Weisbaden: Otto Harrassowitz, 1986, 177-200.

—–. “Feng Zhi and His Goethean Sonnet.” In Masayuki Akiyama and Yiu-nam Leung, eds., Crosscurrents in the literatures of Asia and the West: Essays in Honor of A. Owen Aldridge. Newark: University of Delaware Press; London; Cranbury, NJ: Associated University Presses, 1997, 123-34.

Haft, Lloyd. “Some Rhythmic Structures in Feng Zhi’s Sonnets.” Modern Chinese Literature 9, 2 (1996): 297-326.

Wang, David Der-wei. “Of Dream and Snake: He Qifang, Feng Zhi, and Born-Again Lyricism.” In Wang, The Lyrical in Epic Time: Modern Chinese Intellectuals and Artists through the 1949 Crisis. NY: Columbia University Press, 2015, 113-54.

Wang, Xiaojue. “Fashioning Socialist Affinity: Feng Zhi and the Legacy of European Humanism in Modern Chinese Poetry.” In Wang, Modernity with a Cold War Face: Reimagining the Nation in Chinese Literature Across the 1949 Divide. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Asia Center, 2013, 202-54. [MCLC Resource Center review by Jeffrey C. Kinkley]

Zhang, Hui. “Feng Zhi’s Spiritual Transformation in the Mirror of Du Fu: A Dialogue between the Modern and the Traditional.” Frontiers of Literary Studies in China 9, 4 (Dec. 2015): 616-34.

Zhu, Yanhong. Reconfiguring Chinese Modernism: The Poetics of Temporality in 1940s Fiction and Poetry. Ph. D. diss. Los Angeles: University of Southern California, 2009.

[Authors that are discussed in the dissertation include: Shen Congwen, Feng Zhi, Nine Leaves Poets (primarily Yuan Kejia and Mu Dan)].

Feng Zikai 丰子恺

Barme, Geremie. An Artist Exile: A Life of Feng Zikai (1898-1978). Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002.

Harbsmeier, Christoph. The Cartoonist Feng Zikai: Social Realism with a Buddhist Face. Oslo: Universitetforlaget, 1984.

Hung, Chang-tai. “War and Peace in Feng Zikai’s Wartime Cartoons.” Modern China 16 (Jan. 1990): 39-83.

Fu Lei 傅雷

Chau, Angie. “Defining the Modern Wenren and the Role of the White Female Body in Modern Chinese Literature and Art.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 29, 1  (Spring 2017): 1-54.

Volland, Nicolai. “A Linguistic Enclave: Translation and Language Policies in the Early People’s Republic of China.” Modern China 35, 5 (2009): 467-494.

[Abstract: After 1949, the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) made great efforts to control the Chinese language–the way people write, speak, and think. Especially during the Mao years, linguistic conformity was one of the chief means through which the CCP tried to make the articulation of dissent all but impossible. As this article shows, however, the party’s actual control of language was not total; niches of greater linguistic diversity remained accessible to readers and writers who made the effort to mediate between the party-state’s prescriptions and their individual styles. Comparing three translations of Balzac’s (1949) Père Goriot by the Chinese translator Fu Lei from 1946, 1951, and 1963, and reading them against the official “blueprint” of Mao style, the author argues that Fu Lei was able to resist the pressure for conformity and in his translations continued to apply his own, idiosyncratic style. The analysis shows how segments of public writing that were less susceptible to direct intervention, such as translation of foreign literature, enjoyed more autonomy from the party-state’s pervasive linguistic controls. Due to its high popularity, translated literature thus provided readers with an important alternative to the omnipresent Mao style and served as a source of inspiration for later generations.]

Fu Lin 符霖

Hanan, Patrick. “Introduction.” In The Sea of Regret: Two Turn of the Century Chinese Romantic Novels. Trs. Patrick Hanan. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1995, 1-17.

Fu Sinian 傅斯年

Wang, Fan-sen. Fu Ssu-nien: A Life in Chinese History and Politics. NY: Cambridge UP, 2000.


G

Gao Xiaosheng 高晓声

Decker, Margeret. The Vicissitudes of Satire in Contemporary Chinese Fiction: Gao Xiaosheng. Ph.d. diss. Stanford University, 1987.

—–. “Living in Sin: From May Fourth via the Antirightist Movement to the Present.” In Ellen Widmer and David Wang, eds., From May Fourth to June Fourth: Fiction and Film in Twentiety-Century China. Cambridge: Harvard UP, 1993, 221-46.

Faurot, Jeanette L. “Shoes That Fit– The Stories of Gao Xiaosheng.” In Mason Y.H. Wang, ed., Perspectives in Contemporary Chinese Literature. Michigan: Green River Press, 1983, 77-88.

Feuerwerker, Yi-tsi Mei. “An Interview with Gao Xiaosheng.” Modern Chinese Literature 3, 1/2 (Spring/Fall 1987): 113-35.

—–. “Reassesing the Past in the ‘New Era’: Gao Xiaosheng.” In Feuerwerker, Ideology, Power, Text: Self-Representation and the Peasant “Other” in Modern Chinese Literature. Stanford: SUP, 1998, 146-87.

Kuiper, P.N. “A Critical Writer Feasted by his ‘Characters’: Gao Xiaosheng’s Novelette Hutu (Foolishness).” In Helmut Martin, ed., Cologne-Workshop 1984 on Contemporary Chinese Literature: Chinesische Gegenwartsliteratur. Koln: Deutsche Welle, 1986.

Li, Guoqing. “Roots in the Same Land: On Hwang Ch’un-ming and Kao Hsiao-sheng’s Stories.” Chinese Culture 38, 3 (1997): 117-35.

Wagner, Rudolf. Inside the Service Trade: Studies in Contemporary Chinese Prose. Cambridge: Council on East Asian Studies, Harvard University, 1992, 431-80. [deals with “Li Shundao Builds a House”]

Gao Xingjian 高行健

Anon. “News Brief: A Traditionalist.” Asian Art News 8, 4 (Jul/Aug 1998): 15.

Barme, Geremie. “A Touch of the Absurd–Introducing Gao Xingjian and His Play The Bus Stop.” Renditions. 19/20 (1983): 373-77.

Baum, Julian. “Peking’s Wildman Jolts Theater Goers.” The Christian Science Monitor (June 24, 1985): 9-10.

Burckhardt, Olivier. “The Voice of One in the Wilderness.” Quadrant (April 2000).

CND Special Supplement of HuaXia wenzhai on Gao Xingjian [in Chinese].

Chan, Wai-sim. “Postscript: On Seeing the Play Bus Stop: He Wen’s Critique in the Literary Gazette.” Renditions 19/20 (1983): 387-92.

Chen, Jianguo. “In Search of ‘Origin’: Gao Xingjian’s Nostalgic Journey to ‘Being’.” In Chen, The Aesthetics of the ‘Beyond’: Phantasm, Nostaligia, and the Literary Practice in Contemporary China. Newark: University of Deleware Press, 2009, 126-61.

Chen, Xiaomei. “A Wildman Between Two Cultures: Some Paradigmatic Remarks on ‘Influence Studies.” Comparative Literature Studies 29:4 (1992):397-417. Rpt. in Tam, Kwok-kan, ed. Soul of Chaos: Critical Perspectives on Gao Xingjian. HK: Chinese University Press, 2001, 89-110.

—–. “A Wildman Between the Orient and the Occident: Retro-Influence in Comparative Lierary Studies.” In Chen, Occidentalism: A Theory of Counter-Discourse in Post-Mao China. NY: Oxford UP, 1995, 99-118. [on Gao’s play Yeren]

Conceison, Claire. “Fleshing out the Dramaturgy of Gao Xingjian.” MCLC Resource Center Publication (Dec. 2002).

—–. “The French Gao Xingjian, Bilingualism, and Ballade Nocturne.” Hong Kong Drama Review (Xianggang xiju xuekan) 8 (2009).

Conlon, Stephen. “The Individual Writer’s Voice: Gao Xingjian’s Aesthetic and Creation.” Asian Journal of Literature, Culture and Society 7, 1 (2013).

Coulter, Todd J. Transcultural Aesthetic in the Plays of Gao Xingjian. NY: Palgrave, 2014.

[Abstract: Gao Xingjian has been lauded for his inventive use of Chinese culture in his paintings, plays, and cinema, however he denies that his current work participates in any notion of Chinese. This book traces the development of these forms and how they relate and interact in the French language plays of the Nobel Laureate.]

Dutrait, Noel. “Richly Rewarding: The Work of Gao Xingjian, Bibliography of a Nobel Prize Winner.” China Perspectives 34 (March – April 2001): 66.

—–. “‘Without Ism’: An Ism for One Man.” China Perspectives 2 (2010): 6-11.

Engdahl, Horace. “Interview with the 2000 Nobel Laureate for Literature” (Dec. 13, 2000). [downloadable video interview with Gao Xingjian]

Findeisen, Raoul. “Exil als Existenzform – Einführung in Leben und Werk.” In Gao Xingjian, Der Berg der Seele (2001).

Fong, Gilbert C. F. “Introduction.” The Other Shore: Plays by Gao Xingjian. HK: The Chinese University Press, 1999, ix-xlii.

—–. “Gao Xingjian and the Idea of Theatre.” In Tam, Kwok-kan, ed. Soul of Chaos: Critical Perspectives on Gao Xingjian. HK: Chinese University Press, 2001, 147-55.

Gao Xingjian Collection (website of the Chinese University of Hong Kong special Gao Xingjian collection, opened Dec. 2004)

Gao Xingjian: Reward on the ‘Other Side.’ (extensive website in Chinese devoted to Gao)

Gao Xingjian and Liu Zaifu. “Leaving the Twentieth Century Behind: A Conversation between Gao Xingjian and Liu Zaifu.” Tr. Caroline Mason. China Perspectives 3 (2008): 118-22.

Gentz, Natascha. “How to Get Rid of China: Ethnicity, Memory, and Trauma in Gao Xingjian’s One Man’s Bible.” In Natascah Gentz and Stefan Kramer, eds., Globalization, Cultural Identities, and Media Representations. Albany: SUNY Press, 2006, 119-42.

He, Wen. “On Seeing the Play The Bus Stop.” Tr. Chan Sin-wai. Renditions 19/20 (1983): 387-92.

Huang, Alexander C. Y. “The Theatricality of Religious Rhetoric: Gao Xingjian and the Meaning of Exile.” Theatre Journal 63, 3 (2011): 365-79.

Jian, Ming. “In Search of Creativity: Agony and Ecstasy in Gao Xingjian’s Lingshan.” Asiatische Studien/Etdues Asiatiques 58, 4 (2004): 931-62.

—–. “Life’s Unattainable Goal and Actualized Meaning: Existential Anxiety and Zen Tranquility in Gao Xingjian’s Soul Mountain.” CLEAR 31 (Dec. 2009).

Kinkley, Jeffrey C. “Gao Xingjian in the “Chinese” Perspective of Qu Yuan and Shen Congwen.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 14, 2 (Fall 2002): 130-162.

Knight, Deirdre Sabina. Review of The Other Shore: Plays by Gao Xingjian, trans. Gilbert C. F. Fong (The Chinese University Press, 1999). Journal of Asian Studies 61, 1 (2002): 216-18.

Kuoshu, Harry H. “Will Godot Come by Bus or through a Trace? Discussion of a Chinese Absurdist Play.” Modern Drama 41, 3 (Fall 1998): 461-73.

Labedzka, Izabella. Gao Xingjian’s Idea of Theatre: From the Word to the Image. Leiden: Brill, 2008. [MCLC Resource Center review by Mary Mazzilli]

[Abstract: This book argues that Gao Xingjian’s Idea of Theatre can only be explained by his broad knowledge and use of various Chinese and Western theatrical, literary, artistic and philosophical traditions.The author aims to show how Gao’s theories of the theatre of anti-illusion, theatre of conscious convention, of the “poor theatre” and total theatre, of the neutral actor and the actor – jester – storyteller are derived from the Far Eastern tradition, and to what extent they have been inspired by 20th century Euro-American reformers of theatre such as Antonin Artaud, Bertolt Brecht, Vsevolod Meyerhold, Jerzy Grotowski and Tadeusz Kantor. Although Gao’s plays and theatre form the major subject, this volume also pays ample attention to his painting and passion for music as sources of his dramaturgical strategies.]

Lackner, Michael, and Nikola Chardonnens, eds., Polyphony Embodied: Freedom and Fate in Gao Xingjian’s Writings. Berlin: DeGruyter, 2014.

[Abstract: Like artists, important writers defy unequivocal interpretations. Gao Xingjian, winner of the Nobel Prize in literature, is a cosmopolitan writer, deeply rooted in the Chinese past while influenced by paragons of Western Modernity. The present volume is less interested in a general discussion on the multitude of aspects in Gao’s works and even less in controversies concerning their aesthetic value than in obtaining a response to the crucial issues of freedom and fate from a clearly defined angle. The very nature of the answer to the question of freedom and fate within Gao Xingjian’s works can be called a polyphonic one: thereare affirmative as well as skeptical voices. But polyphony, as embodied by Gao, is an even more multifaceted phenomenon. Most important for our contention is the fact that Gao Xingjian’s aesthetic experience embodies prose, theater, painting, and film. Taken together, they form a Gesamtkunstwerk whose diversity of voices characterizes every single one of them.]

Lai, Amy. “Gao Xingjian’s Monologue as Metadrama.” In Tam, Kwok-kan, ed. Soul of Chaos: Critical Perspectives on Gao Xingjian. HK: Chinese University Press, 2001, 133-45.

Larson, Wendy. “Realism, Modernism, and the Anti-‘Spiritual Pollution’ Campaign in Modern China.” Modern China 15, 1 (Jan. 1989): 37-71. [pp. 48-57 are a discussion of the debate on modernism in the well-known essays of Gao Xingjian, Xu Chi, and Xu Jingya.]

Lee, Gregory and Noel Dutrait. “Conversations with Gao Xingjian: The First ‘Chinese’ Winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature.” The China Quarterly 167 (2001): 738-84. [pdf version on The China Quarterly website]

Lee, Mabel. “Without Politics: Gao Xingjian on Literary Creation.” Stockholm Journal of East Asian Studies 6 (1995): 82-101.

—–. “Gao Xingjian’s Dialogue with Two Dead Poets from Shaoxing: Xu Wei and Lu Xun.” In Findeison and Gassmann, eds., Autumn Floods: Essay in Honour of Marian Galik. Bern: Peter Lang, 1997. Rpt. in Tam, Kwok-kan, ed. Soul of Chaos: Critical Perspectives on Gao Xingjian. HK: Chinese University Press, 2001, 277-91.

—–. “Walking Out of Other People’s Prisons: Liu Zaifu and Gao Xingjian on Chinese Literature in the 1990s.” Asian and African Studies 5, 1 (1996): 98-112.

—–. “Personal Freedom in Twentieth Century China: Reclaiming the Self in Yang Lian’s Yi and Gao Xingjian’s Lingshan.” In Mabel Lee and Michael Wilding eds., History, Literature and Society: Essays in Honour of S. N. Mukherjee. Sydney: Sydney Association for Studies in Culture and Society, 1997, 133-55.

—–. “Gao Xingjian’s Lingshan/Soul Mountain: Modernism and the Chinese Writer.” HEAT 4 (1997): 128-143.

—–. “Gao Xingjian on the Issue of Literary Creation for the Modern Writer.” Journal of Asian Pacific Communication 9.1-2 (1999). Rpt. in Tam, Kwok-kan, ed. Soul of Chaos: Critical Perspectives on Gao Xingjian. HK: Chinese University Press, 2001, 21-41.

—–. “Pronouns as Protagonists: Gao Xingjian’s Lingshan as Autobiography.” China Studies 5 (1999). Rpt. in Tam, Kwok-kan, ed. Soul of Chaos: Critical Perspectives on Gao Xingjian. HK: Chinese University Press, 2001, 235-56.

—–. “Nobel Laureate 2000 Gao Xingjian and his Novel Soul Mountain.” Comparative Literature and Culture: A WWWeb Journal 2, 3 (2000).

—–. “Nobel in Literature 2000: Gao Xingjian’s Aesthetics of Fleeing.” CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture 3, 1 (March 2003).

—–. “Gao Xingjian: First Chinese Winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature.” Persimmon 2, 1 (2001): 38-40. [with an excerpt from Soul Mountain]

—–. “Returning to Recluse Literature: Gao Xingjian.” In Joshua Mostow, ed, and Kirk A. Denton, China section, ed., Columbia Companion to Modern East Asian Literatures. NY: Columbia UP, 2003, 610-16.

—–. “Contextualizing Gao Xingjian’s Film Silhouette / Shadow.” MCLC Resource Center Publication (January 2008).

—–. “Aesthetics in Gao’s Soul Mountain.” CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture 14, 4 (Dec. 2012).

[Abstract: Mabel Lee analyses Nobel Laureate 2000 Xingjian Gao’s aesthetics. Transnational conglomerates today control the book industry from publishing house to bookshop and through aggressive market strategies they exert considerable influence on readers. Nonetheless, there are writers who refuse to capitulate to market demands and seek only to actualize their aesthetic ideas in the creation of literary texts. One such writer is Gao, author of the novel Soul Mountain. Lee posits that Gao’s aesthetics is founded on the close interrogation of both Chinese and European models and practices and explores specific aspects of Gao’s aesthetics and how these are embedded in his novel Soul Mountain. In an Appendix the article includes lists of Gao’s works in Chinese and English, as well as a list of studies on his oeuvre.]

—–. “A Note from the Translator of Gao Xingjian’s Aesthetic and Creation.” Asian Journal of Literature, Culture and Society 7, 1 (2013).

—–. “Word and Image: Gao Xingjian.” In Kirk A. Denton, ed., Columbia Companion to Modern Chinese Literature. NY: Columbia University Press, 2016, 400-06.

Li, Xia. “Bus Stop. Signal Driver — The Dramaturgy of Waiting: Gao Xingjian, Patrick White and Samuel Beckett.” Neohelicon 29, 2 (2002): 227-246.

—–. “Cross-Cultural Intertextuality in Gao Xingjian’s Novel Lingshan: A Chinese Perspective.” Canadian Review of ComparativeLiterature/Revue Canadienne de Litterature Comparee 31 (2004): 39-57.

Lin, Sylvia Li-chun. “Between the Individual and the Collective: Gao Xingjian’s Fiction.” World Literature Today (Winter 2001): 20-30.

Liu, Jianmei. “Gao Xingjian: The Triumph of Modern Zhuangzi.” In Liu, Zhuangzi and Modern Chinese Literature. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016, 211-33. Rpt. in Carlos Rojas and Andrea Bachner, eds., The Oxford Handbook of Modern Chinese Literatures. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016, 618-41.

Liu, Zaifu. “Afterword To One Man’s Bible.Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 14, 2 (Fall 2002): 237-242.

Loden, Torbjorn, “World Literature with Chinese Characteristics: On a Novel by Gao Xingjian.” The Stockholm Journal of East Asian Studies 4 (1993): 17-39. Rpt. in Tam, Kwok-kan, ed. Soul of Chaos: Critical Perspectives on Gao Xingjian. HK: Chinese University Press, 2001, 257-76.

Lovell, Julia. “Gao Xingjian, the Nobel Prize, and Chinese Intellectuals: Notes on the Aftermath of the Nobel Prize 2000.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 14, 2 (Fall 2002): 1-50.

Ma, Sen. “The Theater of the Absurd in Mainland China: Kao Hsing-chien’s The Bus Stop. In Bih-jaw Lin, ed., Post-Mao Sociopolitical Changes in Mainland China: The Literary Perspective. Taibei: Institute of International Relations, National Chengchi University, 1991, 139-48. Rpt. in Tam, Kwok-kan, ed. Soul of Chaos: Critical Perspectives on Gao Xingjian. HK: Chinese University Press, 2001, 77-88.

Mazzilli, Mary. “Gender in Gao Xingjian’s Between Life and Death: The Notion of Originary Self and the Use of Tripartition.” Frontiers of Literary Studies in China 9, 3 (2015): 369-94.

[Abstract: The relationship between the sexes and the female condition are underlying motifs in Gao Xingjian’s post-exile plays, yet very few scholarly studies of his work have focused solely on the analysis of gender in his plays. In those studies that have, most have directed their attention toward Gao’s novels, and many scholars have come to regard Gao as a misogynist writer. This paper examines Gao’s attitude toward gender through an analysis of his plays, specifically Between Life and Death(Shengsijie, 1991). The theatrical medium illustrates a more complex elaboration of gender representation than those seen in Gao’s novels—one that complicates conceptions of the writer’s misogyny. Focusing on Between Life and Death, I assert that Gao’s alleged misogyny is a misrepresentation. Regarding my theoretical approach, I make particular reference to feminist theorists such as Julia Kristeva and Judith Butler. The debate is linked to Gao’s concept of an un-gendered/originary self and considers the use of dramatic devices—specifically focusing on the use of tripartition.]

—–. Gao Xingjian’s Post-Exile Plays: Transnationalism and Postdramatic Theatre. New York: Bloomsbury Methuen Drama, 2015. [MCLC Resource Center review by Todd J. Coulter]

[Abstract: Awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2000, Gao Xingjian is the first Chinese writer to be so lauded for his prose and plays. Since relocating to France in 1987, in a voluntary exile from China, he has assembled a body of dramatic work that has best been understood neither as expressly Chinese nor French, but as transnational. In this comprehensive study of his post-exile plays, Mary Mazzilli explores Gao’s plays as examples of postdramatic transnationalism: a transnational artistic and theatrical trend that is fluid, flexible and full of variety of styles and influences. As such this innovative interdisciplinary investigation offers fresh insights on contemporary theatre. Whereas other publications have considered Gao’s work as a cultural and artistic phenomenon, Gao Xingjian’s Post-Exile Plays: Transnationalism and Postdramatic Theatre is the first study to relate his plays to postdramatic theatre and to provide close textual and dramatic analysis that will help readers to better understand his complex work, and also to see it in the context of the work of contemporary playwrights such as Martin Crimp, Peter Handke, and Elfriede Jelinek. Among the plays discussed are: The Other Shore, written just before he left China in 1987; Between Life and Death (1991) – compared in detail to Martin Crimp’s Attempts on her life; Dialogue and Rebuttal (1992), and its relationship to Beckett’s Happy Days; Nocturnal Wanderer (1993), Weekend Quartet (1995), and the latest plays Snow in August (1997), Death Collector (2000) and Ballade Nocturne (2010).]

Millichap, John. “Gao Xingjian at Alisan Fine Arts” (review). Asian Art News 8, 5 (Sept/Oct 1998): 83.

Moran, Thomas. “Lost in the Woods: Nature in Soul Mountain.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 14, 2 (Fall 2002): 207-236.

—–. “Gao Xingjian.” In Thomas Moran and Ye (Dianna) Xu, eds., Chinese Fiction Writers, 1950-2000. Dictionary of Literature Biography, vol. 370. Detroit: Thomson Gale, 2013, 65-80.

Nobel Laureate, Swedish Sinologist Speak (Video files of talks given in Mandarin at City University HK, Jan. 31, 2001).

Quah, Sy Ren. Gao Xingjian and China’s Alternative Theatre of the 1980s. M. Phil. Thesis. Cambridge: U of Cambridge, 1997.

—–. The Theatre of Gao Xingjian: Experimentation Within the Chinese Context and Towards New Modes of Representation. Ph.D. thesis. Cambridge University, 1999.

—–. “Searching for Alternative Aesthetics in the Chinese Theatre: The Odyssey of Huang Zuolin and Gao Xingjian.” Asian Culture 24 (June 2000): 44-66.

—–. “Space and Suppositionality in Gao Xingjian’s Theatre.” In Tam, Kwok-kan, ed. Soul of Chaos: Critical Perspectives on Gao Xingjian. HK: Chinese University Press, 2001, 157-99.

—–. “Perfomance in Alienated Voices: Mode of Narrative in Gao Xingjian’s Theater.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 14, 2 (Fall 2002): 51-98.

—–. Gao Xingjian and Transultural Chinese Theater. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2004.

—–. “Historical Reality, Fictional Narrative.” China Perspectives 2 (2010): 13-23.

Riley, Josephine, and Michael Gissenwehrer. “The Myth of Gao Xingjian.” In Riley and Else Unterrieder, eds., Haishi Zou Hao: Chinese Poetry, Drama and Literature of the 1980s. Bonn: Engelhard-Ng Verlag, 1989, 129-51. Rpt. in Tam, Kwok-kan, ed. Soul of Chaos: Critical Perspectives on Gao Xingjian. HK: Chinese University Press, 2001, 111-32.

Rojas, Carlos. “Without [Femin]ism: Femininity as Axis of Alterity and Desire in Gao Xingjian’s One Man’s Bible.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 14, 2 (Fall 2002): 163-206.

—–. “Gao Xingjian and Maternal Photographs.” In Rojas, The Naked Gaze: Reflections on Chinese Modernity. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Asia Center, 2008, 213-43.

Roubicek, Bruno. “Introduction to Wild Man: A Contemporary Chinese Spoken Drama.” Asian Theatre Journal 7, 2 (1990): 184-90.

Shepherd, Eric. “The Reaction in China.” Persimmon 2, 1 (2001): 44-45. [fall 2001 reaction to Gao winning the Nobel prize]

Shih, Chong-wen. “Interview with Gao Xingjian.” Journal of the Chinese Language Teachers Association 36, 3 (2001): 1-10.

Sze-Lorrain, Fiona, ed. Silhouette/Shadow: The Cinematic Art of Gao Xingjian. Paris: Contours, 2007.

[Abstract: contains new and translated essays written by the 2000 Nobel Prize Laureate in Literature, Gao Xingjian and his film collaborators, Alain Melka and Jean-Louis Darmyn, all addressing their film completed in 2005, Silhouette/Shadow (La Silhouette sinon l’ombre). With a preface written by the editor Fiona Sze-Lorrain, this book is the first documentation that focuses exclusively on Gao Xingjian’s artistic expression in the film world.]

—–. “‘Cinema, Too, Is Literature’: Conversing with Gao Xingjian.” MCLC Resource Center (March 2008).

Tam, Kwok-kan, ed. Soul of Chaos: Critical Perspectives on Gao Xingjian. HK: Chinese University Press, 2001.

—–. “Language as Subjectivity in One Man’s Bible.” In Tam, ed., Soul of Chaos: Critical Perspectives on Gao Xingjian. HK: Chinese University Press, 2001, 293-310.

—–. “Introduction: Gao Xingjian, the Nobel Prize and the Politics of Recognition.” In Tam, ed. Soul of Chaos: Critical Perspectives on Gao Xingjian. HK: Chinese University Press, 2001, 1-20.

—–. “Drama of Paradox: Waiting as Form and Motif in The Bus-Stop and Waiting for Godot.” In Tam, Kwok-kan, ed. Soul of Chaos: Critical Perspectives on Gao Xingjian. HK: Chinese University Press, 2001, 43-66. Previously published as “Drama of Dilemma: Waiting as Form and Motif in Waiting for Godot and The Bus-stop.” In Yun-tong Luk, ed. Studies in Chinese-Western Comparative Drama. HK: The Chinese University Press, 1990, 23-45.

—–. “Gao Xingjian and the Asian Experimentation in Postmodernist Performance.” Tam, Kwok-kan, ed. Soul of Chaos: Critical Perspectives on Gao Xingjian. HK: Chinese University Press, 2001, 201-12.

Tay, William. “Avant-garde Theater in Post-Mao China: The Bus-Stop.” In Goldblatt, ed. Worlds Apart: Recent Chinese Writing and its Audiences. Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 111-19. Rpt. in Tam, Kwok-kan, ed. Soul of Chaos: Critical Perspectives on Gao Xingjian. HK: Chinese University Press, 2001, 67-76.

Veg, Sebastien. “On the Margins of Modernity: A Comparative Study of Gao Xingjian and Oe Kenzaburo.” China Perspectives 2 (2010): 34-46.

Weschler, Bert. “Review of Between Life and Death.” By Gao Xingjian. Asian American Theater Review. NY: Yangtse Repertory Theater of America, Feb. 1997.

Xu, Gang Gary. “My Writing, Your Pain, and Her Trauma: Pronouns and (Gendered) Subjectivity in Gao Xingjian’s Soul Mountain and One Man’s Bible.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 14, 2 (Fall 2002): 99-129.

Xu Guroong 许国荣, ed. Gao Xingjian xiju yanjiu 高行键戏剧研究 (Studies on Gao Xingjian’s plays). Beijing: Zhongguo xiju, 1989.

Yan, Haiping. “Gao Xingjian’s Drama.” World Literature Today (Winter 2001).

Yeung, Jessica. Ink Dances in Limbo: Gao Xingjian’s Writing As Cultural Translation. HK: Hong Kong UP, 2008.

[Abstract: In this pioneering study of the entire written works of Gao Xingjian, China’s first winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature, Jessica Yeung analyses each group of his writing and argues for a reading of Gao’s writing as a phenomenon of ‘cultural translation’: his adoption of Modernism in the 1980s is a translation of the European literary paradigm; and his attempt at postmodernist writing in the 1990s and 2000s is the effect of an exilic nihilism expressive of a diasporic subjectivity struggling to translate himself into his host culture. Thus Dr Yeung looks at Gao’s works from a double perspective: in terms of their relevance both to China and to the West. Avoiding the common polarized approaches to Gao’s works, her dual approach means that she neither extolls them as the most brilliant works of contemporary Chinese literature eligible for elevation to the metaphysical level, nor dismisses them as nothing more than elitist and misogynist mediocre writings; rather she sees this important body of work in a more nuanced way.This book is suitable for all readers who are interested in contemporary Chinese culture and literature. It is particularly valuable to students who are keen to engage with the issue of contemporary China-West cultural relationships.]

Yeung, Wai Yee. From China to Nowhere — The Writings of Gao Xingjian in the 1980s and Early 1990s. MPhil thesis. HK: The University of Hong Kong, 1996.

Yip, Terry Siu-Han and Kwok-kan Tam. “Gender and Self in Gao Xingjian’s Three Post-Exile Plays.” In Kwok-kan Tam, ed. Soul of Chaos: Critical Perspectives on Gao Xingjian. HK: Chinese University Press, 2001, 215-33.

Zhang, Yinde. “Gao Xingjian: Fiction and Forbidden Memory.” China Perspectives 2 (2010): 25-33.

Zhang, Yingjin. “Cultural Translation between the World and the Chinese: The Problematics in Positioning Nobel Laureate Gao Xingjian.” Concentric: Literary and Cultural Studies 31, 2 (July 2005): 127-44.

Zhao, Henry Y.H. Towards a Modern Zen Theatre: Gao Xingjian and Chinese Theatre Experimentalism. London: School of Oriental and African Studies, 2000.

Zhao Yiheng (Henry). “Jianli yizhong xiandai chanju” (Establish a modern Zen theater). Jinri xuanfeng 7.

Zou, Jiping. Gao Xingjian and Chinese Experimental Theatre. Ph.D. diss. Urbana: U of Illinois, 1994.

Ge Fei 格非

Choy, Howard Y. F. “Typography and Topography: The Textual Body in the Works of Su Tong and Ge Fei.” In Choy, Remapping the Past: Fictions of History in Deng’s China, 1979-1997. Leiden: Brill, 2008, 214-27.

—–. “Tibetan Plateau: Historical Alternatives by Tashi Dawa, Alai, and Ge Fei.” In Choy, Remapping the Past: Fictions of History in Deng’s China, 1979-1997. Leiden: Brill, 2008, 103-32.

Iovene, Paula. “Why Is There a Poem in this Story? Li Shangyin’s Poetry, Contemporary Chinese Literature, and the Futures of the Past.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 19, 2 (Fall 2007): 71-116.

—–. “Futures en Abyme: Poetry in Strange Loops.” In Iovene, Tales of Future Past: Anticipation and the Ends of Literature in Contemporary China. Stanford: Stanford UP, 2014, 107-34.

—–. “A Clean Place to Die: Fog, Toxicity, and Shame in End of Spring in Jiangnan.” In Iovene, Tales of Future Past: Anticipation and the Ends of Literature in Contemporary China. Stanford: Stanford UP, 2014, 135-62.

—–. “Ge Fei.” In Thomas Moran and Ye (Dianna) Xu, eds., Chinese Fiction Writers, 1950-2000. Dictionary of Literature Biography, vol. 370. Detroit: Thomson Gale, 2013, 81-87.

Jing, Wendong.”The Myriad Things Retain Their Mystery for Me.” Tr. Denis Mair. Chinese Literature Today 4, 1 (2014): 29-31.

Kong, Shuyu. “Ge Fei on the Margins.” B.C. Asian Review 10 (1996/97).

Yang, Xiaobin. “Ge Fei: Indeterminate History and Memory.” In Yang, The Chinese Postmodern: Trauma and Irony in Chinese Avant-garde Fiction. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2002, 168-87.

Wang, Jing. “The Mirage of Chinese ‘Postmodernism’: Ge Fei, Self-Positioning, and the Avant-garde Showcase.” positions: east asia cultures critique 1, 2 (1993): 349-88.

Zhang, Ning. “The Psychic Split in Chinese Contemporary Literature: Ge Fei and Zhang Ning in Diaologue.” Tr. Denis Mair. Chinese Literature Today 4, 1 (2014): 16-23.

Zhang, Xudong. “Fable of Self-Consciousness: Ge Fei and Some Motifs in Meta-Fiction.” In Zhang, Chinese Modernism in the Era of Reforms. Durham: Duke UP, 1997, 163-200.

Zhang, Yinde. “The Utopia of the Human: about Ge Fei’s Jiangnan Trilogy.” Asiatische Studien – Études Asiatiques 70, 3 (Sept. 2016): 797-815.

[Abstract: Researchers have recently shown a growing interest for studies of anti-utopian fictions in Chinese, highlighting their critical value in history, society, and ideology. However the persistence of the utopian spirit beyond these dystopian representations has often been neglected. The present paper aims to explore this underlying utopianism by focusing on Ge Fei’s Jiangnan Trilogy (2004–2011), as it forms a significant paradigm on the issue, through an appeal for displacement, pointing out the importance in our reflections of moving from topography into the human dimension. This paper seeks to examine how human utopia is featured both in a literary and contextualized way, by arguing that utopianism is humanism, inherent to the awareness of social and historical crises, as opposed to the myths of Nation, Progress or Prosperity.]

Gong Liu 公刘

Kung, Mu. “On Kung Liu’s Recent Works.” In Hualing Nieh, ed., Literature of the Hundred Flowers, Volume II: Poetry and Fiction. NY: Columbia UP, 1981, 226-36.

Gu Cheng 顾城

Brady, Anne-Marie. “Dead in Exile: The Life and Death of Gu Cheng and Xie Ye.” China Information 11, 4 (Spring 1997): 126-48.

Galik, Marian. “Gu Cheng’s Novel Ying’er and the Bible.” Asian and African Studies 5, 1 (1996).

—–. “Gu Cheng and Xie Ye: Contemporary Chinese Poets Who Died Too Early.” Asian and African Studies [Brataslava] 3, 2 (1994): 116-39.

Huang, Yibing. “The Ghost Enters the City: Gu Cheng’s Metamorphosis in the ‘New World.'” In Christopher Lupke ed., New Perspectives on Contemporary Chinese Poetry. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008, 123-143.

Kubin, Wolfgang. “Gu Cheng: Peking, Ich.” In Findeison and Gassmann, eds., Autumn Floods: Essay in Honour of Marian Galik. Bern: Peter Lang, 1997, 415-30.

Li, Xia. “‘Nameless Flowers’: The Role of Nature in Gu Cheng’s Poetry and in His Narrative Prose Ying’er.” In Findeison and Gassmann, eds., Autumn Floods: Essays in Honour of Marian Galik. Bern: Peter Lang, 1997, 431-46.

—–, ed. Essays, Interviews, Recollections and Unpublished Material of Gu Cheng, Twenthieth Century Chinese Poet: The Poetics of Death. Lewiston, NY: Mellen Press, 1999.

—–. “Gu Cheng’s Ying’er: A Journey to the West.” MCL 10, 1 (1998): 135-148.

—–. “Annihilation of the Self in Exile: Gu Cheng’s Ying’er (1993).” Interlitterraria (Tartu, Estonia) 3 (1998): 200-215.

—–. “The Death of Natural Man: Culture Versus Nature in Gu Cheng.” In Graham Squires ed., Language, Literature and Culture: A Selection of Papers Presented at Inter-Cultural Studies ’98. Newcastle: University of Newcastle, 1999: 66-79.

Liu, Shusen. “Gu Cheng and Walt Whitman: In Search of New Poetics.” In Ed Folson ed., Whitman East & West : new contexts for reading Walt Whitman. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2002, 208-20.

Nielsen, Inge. The Changing Phases of Gu Cheng’s Poetry, 1964-1993. Diss. Durham, England: University of Durham, 1997.

Patton, Simon. “Desire and Masculinity at the Margins in Gu Cheng’s Ying’er.” In Kam Louie and Morris Low, eds., Asian Masculinities: The Meaning and Practice of Manhood in China and Japan. NY, London: RoutledgeCurzon, 2003.

—–. “The Forces of Production: Symmetry and the Imagination in the Early Poetry of Gu Cheng.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 13, 2 (Fall 2001): 134-71.

—–. “Premonition in Poetry: Elements of Gu Cheng’s Menglong Aesthetic.” Journal of the Oriental Society of Australia 22-23 (1990-91): 133-45.

—–. “The Unbearable Heaviness of Being: Gender, Sexuality and Insanity in Gu Cheng and Xie Ye’s Ying’er.” Modern Chinese Literature 9 (1996): 399-415.

—–. “Notes Toward a Nomad Subjectivity: The Poetics of Gu Cheng (1956-1993).” Social Semiotics 9, 1 (1999): 49-66.

Trappl, Richard. “‘Modernism’ and Foreign Influences on Chinese Poetry: Exemplified by the Early Guo Moruo and Gu Cheng.” In Marian Galik, ed., Interliterary and Intraliterary Aspects of the May Fourth Movement 1919 in China. Bratislava: Veda, 1990, 83-92.

Gu Hongming 辜鴻銘

Arkush, David. “Ku Hung-ming (1857-1928).” Papers on China 19 (1965): 194-238.

Hao, Tianhu. “Ku Hung-ming, an Early Chinese Reader of Milton.” Milton Quarterly 39, 2 (May 2005): 93-100.

Lo, Hui-min. “Ku Hung-ming: Schooling” East Asian History 38 (Sept. 88): 45-64.

—–. “Ku Hung-ming: Homecoming.” East Asian History 6 (Dec. 1993): 163-82.

—–. “Ku Hung-ming: Homecoming, part 2.” East Asian History 9 (June 1995): 67-96.

Gu Hua 古华

Van Der Meer, Marc. “‘Hibiscus,’ ‘The Garden of the Literati,’ and Mao Zedong’s Biography: A Brief Introduction to the Life and Work of Writer Gu Hua.” China Information 7, 2 (1998): 20-29.

Gu Jiegang 顾颉刚

Lee, Haiyan. “Tears That Crumbled the Great Wall: The Archaeology of Feeling in the May Fourth Folklore Movement.” The Journal of Asian Studies 64, 1 (Feb. 2005): 35-65. [Deals chiefly with Gu Jiegang’s study of the Meng Jiang Nu legend and briefly with Guo Moruo’s translation of ancient poetry] [download from AAS website]

Schneider, Lawrence. Ku Chieh-kang and China’s New History: Nationalism and the Quest for Alternative Traditions. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1971.

Gu Junzheng 顾均正

Yang, Qiong. A Writer’s Dilemma: Gu Jenzheng and a Turning Point of Chinese Science Fiction. MA thesis. Columbus: Ohio State University, 2010.

Guo Moruo 郭沫若

Bujatti, Anna. “The Spirit of the May Fourth Movement in The Goddesses of Guo Moruo.” In Marian Galik, ed., Interliterary and Intraliterary Aspects of the May Fourth Movement 1919 in China. Bratislava: Veda, 1990, 101-110.

Chan, Wing-Ming. “Li Po and Tu Fu by Kuo Mo-jo–A Reexamination.” Chinese Literature: Essays, Articles, Reviews 4, 1 (Jan. 1982): 75-90. [available on PROJECT MUSE]

Chen, Xiaoming. From the May Fourth Movement to the Communist Revolution: Guo Moruo and the Chinese Path to Communism. Albany, NY: SUNY Press, 2007.

Doar, Bruce. “Images of Women in the Dramas of Guo Moruo: The Case of Empress Wu.” In C. Tung and C. Mackerras, eds., Drama in the People’s Republic of China. Albany: SUNY Press, 1987, 254-92.

Dolezelova-Velingerova, Milena. “Kuo Mo-jo’s Autobiographical Works.” In Jaroslav Prusek, ed., Studies in Modern Chinese Literature. Berlin: Akademie-Verlag, 1964, 45-75.

Galik, Marian. “Kuo Mo-jo’s The Goddesses: Creative Confrontation with Tagore, Whitman and Goethe.” In Galik, ed., Milestones in Sino-Western Literary Confrontation (1898-1979). Weisbaden: Otto Harrassowitz, 1986, 43-72.

—–. “Kuo Mo-jo and his Development from Aesthetico-impressionist to Proletarian Criticism.” In Galik, The Genesis of Modern Chinese Literary Criticism, 1917-1930. London: Curzon Press, 1980, 28-62.

Lee, Haiyan. “Tears That Crumbled the Great Wall: The Archaeology of Feeling in the May Fourth Folklore Movement.” The Journal of Asian Studies 64, 1 (Feb. 2005): 35-65. [Deals chiefly with Gu Jiegang’s study of the Meng Jiang Nu legend and briefly with Guo Moruo’s translation of ancient poetry] [download from AAS website]

Liu, Jianmei. “Guo Moruo’s Changing Attitude toward Zhuangzi.” The Journal of Study on Language and Culture of Korea and China 19 (2009): 273-296. Rpt. in Zhuangzi and Modern Chinese Literature. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016, 21-45.

Liu, Ruoqiang. “Whitman’s Soul in China: Guo Moruo’s Poetry in the New Culture Movement.” In Ed Folson ed., Whitman East & West: New Contexts for Reading Walt Whitman. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2002, 172-86.

Mi, Jiayan. Self-Fashioning and Reflexive Modernity in Modern Chinese Poetry. Lewiston, NY: Edwin Mellen, 2004.

[Abstract: This study explores diverse modes of self-fashioning in the discursive formation of Chinese modernity between 1919 and 1949 in modern Chinese poetry. By focusing on four representative poets of modern Chinese poetry before 1949—Guo Moruo, Li Jinfa, Dai Wangshu, and Mu Dan, the study offers fresh, insightful analysis of the dynamic trajectory of the historical complexity of fashioning a new modern self-subjectivity with relation to the nation-state. Theoretically informed by the varied perspectives of modernity, the self, the body, and memory, the author for the first time reveals how the corporeal body emerges as a site of agency, trauma, and libidinal investment for engaging with the configuration of a multi-layered self, gender, and nationhood in modern China. This work will make several significant contributions to enhancing readers’ understanding of the cultural and psychological complexity of modern China. This work will be of interest to teachers, students and scholars of modern Chinese literature and culture as well as comparative literature.]

Ou, Hong. “Pantheistic Ideas in Guo Moruo’s The Goddesses and Whitman’s Leaves of Grass.” In Ed Folson ed., Whitman East & West : new contexts for reading Walt Whitman. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2002, 187-96.

Prusek, Jaroslav. “Kuo Mo-jo.” In Prusek, Three Sketches of Chinese Literature. Prague: Oriental Institute in Academia, 1969, 99-140.

Roy, David T. Kuo Mojo: The Early Years. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1971.

Shih, Shu-mei. “Psychoanalysis and Cosmopolitanism: The Work of Guo Moruo.” In Shi, The Lure of the Modern: Writing Modernism in Semicolonial China, 1917-1937. Berkeley: UC Press, 2001, 96-109.

Trappl, Richard. “‘Modernism’ and Foreign Influences on Chinese Poetry: Exemplified by the Early Guo Moruo and Gu Cheng.” In Marian Galik, ed., Interliterary and Intraliterary Aspects of the May Fourth Movement 1919 in China. Bratislava: Veda, 1990, 83-92.

Tsang, Winnie. “Kuo Mojo’s The Goddesses.” Journal of Oriental Studies 12 (1977): 97-109.

Tsu, Jing. “Perversions of Masculinity: The Masochistic Male Subject in Yu Dafu, Guo Moruo, and Freud.” Positions 8, 2 (Fall 2000): 269-316.

Vesterová, Barbara. “Some Remarks on the Earliest Poetry of Guo Moruo (1904-12).” Frontiers of Literary Studies 6, 4 (2012): 539-52.

[Abstract: This is a study of the earliest poetry by the modern Chinese writer Guo Moruo (1892–1978), composed between 1904 and 1912. He became famous mostly due to his “early poetry” composed in the 1920s, such as Nüshen (The Goddesses), but he was also an author of autobiographies. His autobiography Shaonian shidai (Childhood) and the poems published in the volume Guo Moruo shaonian shigao (Guo Moruo’s childhood poetry), are analysed here in comparison with the traditional Tang poetry.]

Wagner, Rudolf. The Contemporary Chinese Historical Drama. Berkeley: UCP, 1990, 246-50. 282-89. [deals with “Cai Wenji” and “Wu Zetian”]

Wang, Pu. “Enlightenment as a ‘Romantic Science?’ Cultural Politics and Guo Moruo’s Rewritings of Ancient Chinese History.” In Nakajima Takahiro, ed, Rethinking Enlightenment in Global and Historical Contexts. UTCP Booklet 21/ICCT Series 1. Tokyo: University of Tokyo Philosophy Center, 2011, 45-68.

—–. “Ren, Geren and Renmin: The Prehistory of the New Man and Guo Moruo’s Conception of ‘the People.'” Frontiers of Literary Studies in China 6, 1 (2012): 78-94.

[Abstract: This paper aims to contribute to the ongoing debate about the “socialist New Man” in modern Chinese literature. Focusing on the ideas of humanity, individuality and the people, it attempts to show the prehistory of the “New Man,” i.e., the emergence of the concept-figure of “the people” out of the discourse of humanity. The making of a new historical subjectivity of “the people” was part and parcel of the singular historical experience of the Chinese Revolution and the precondition for its social experiments. Yet this issue receives insufficient critical attention. This paper gives an outline of this idea’s genealogy, by concentrating on Guo Moruo’s literary-intellectual trajectory. It will show how the enlightenment project and romantic historical imagination paved the way for the concept of the people, and how the new subjectivity of the people prepared for the ideal of the new man.]

Yip, Terry Siu-Han, and Kwok-Kan Tan. “European Influence on Modern Chinese Drama: Kuo Mo-jo’s Early Historical-Problem Plays.” Journal of Oriental Studies 24, 1 (1986): 54-65.

Zheng, Yi. “The Figuration of the Sublime: Guo Moruo’s Qu Yuan.” Modern Chinese Literature and Culture 16, 1 (Spring 2004): 153-98.

Zikpi, Monica E. M. “Revolution and Continuity in Guo Moruo’s Representations of Qu Yuan.” Chinese Literature: Essays, Articles, Reviews 36 (2014): 175-200.

Guo Shixing 过士行

Conceison, Claire. “The Occidental Other on the Chinese Stage: Cutlural Cross-Examination in Guo Shixing’s Bird Man.” Asian Theatre Journal 15, 1 (Spring 1998): 87-100.

Guo Xiaolu 郭小橹

Gilmou, Rachael“Living between languages: The Politics of Translation in Leila Aboulela’s Minaret and Xiaolu Guo’s A Concise Chinese-English Dictionary for Lovers.” The Journal of Commonwealth Literature 47, no. 2 (2012): 207-227.

Hwang, Eunju. “Love and Shame: Transcultural Communication and Its Failure in Xiaolu Guo’s ‘A Concise Chinese-English Dictionary for Lovers.’” Ariel 43, no. 4 (2013): 69-95.

Kong, Belinda. “Xiaolu Guo and the Contemporary Chinese Anglophone Novel.” In Carlos Rojas and Andrea Bachner, eds., The Oxford Handbook of Modern Chinese Literatures. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016, 474-97.